Glossary of baseball (0–9)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from List of baseball jargon (0-9))
Jump to navigation Jump to search


0[edit]

"Oh and ..." See count.

1[edit]

  • Official scorekeepers assign a number from 1 to 9 to each position on the field in order to record the outcome of each play in their own shorthand. The number 1 corresponds to the pitcher.
  • A shout of "One!" indicates the ball should be thrown to first base.
  • In the context of pitching, the number 1 is a common sign (and nickname) for the fastball.

1-2-3 inning[edit]

An inning in which a pitcher faces only three batters and none safely reaches a base. "Three up, three down."

1-2-3 double play[edit]

A double play in which the pitcher (1) fields a batted ball and throws home to the catcher (2), who retires a runner advancing from third. The catcher then throws to the first baseman (3) to force out the batter.

1-6-3 double play[edit]

The pitcher (1) fields a batted ball and throws to the shortstop (6) to force out a runner advancing to second. The shortstop then throws to the first baseman (3) to force out the batter.

2[edit]

  • The catcher, in scorekeeping shorthand.
  • A shout of "Two!" indicates the ball should be thrown to second base.
  • A "two-bagger" is a double.

2–2–2 (2 balls, 2 strikes, 2 outs)[edit]

See deuces wild.

3[edit]

  • The first baseman, in scorekeeping shorthand.
  • A shout of "Three!" indicates the ball should be thrown to third base.
  • A "three-bagger" is a triple.

3-2-3 double play[edit]

The first baseman (3) fields a batted ball and throws to the catcher (2), who retires a runner advancing from third and then throws back to the first baseman to force out the batter.

3-6 double play[edit]

The first baseman (3) fields a batted ball, steps on first (to force the batter out), and then throws to the shortstop (6), who tags out a runner.

3-6-1 double play[edit]

The first baseman (3) fields a batted ball and throws to the shortstop (6) to force out a runner at second. The shortstop then throws to the pitcher (1) (who is now covering first because the first baseman was busy fielding the ball) to force out the batter.

3-4-3 double play[edit]

Played and scored exactly the same as the 3-6-3 below, except it involves the second baseman (4) instead of the shortstop.

3-6-3 double play[edit]

The first baseman (3) fields a batted ball and throws to the shortstop (6) to force out a runner at second. The shortstop then throws back to the first baseman to force out the batter.

4[edit]

  • The second baseman, in scorekeeping shorthand.
  • A shout of "Four!" indicates the ball should be thrown to home plate.
  • A "four-bagger" is a home run.

4-6-3 double play[edit]

The second baseman (4) fields a batted ball and throws to the shortstop (6), who forces out a runner at second and then throws to the first baseman (3) to force out the batter.

45-foot line[edit]

  • The line between home plate and first base that begins 45 feet down the first base line and extends past first base. The rules state that if the batter-runner is in the path of a throw that originates near home plate and is outside the area created by the base line and the 45-foot line, he shall be called out if the umpire believes he interfered with the play. If he remains within the line, he cannot be called out for interference. This rule is designed to allow catchers and pitchers the ability to field bunts and throw the batter-runner out without having to worry about the batter-runner intentionally or unintentionally interfering with the throw.
  • This line is also used to decide whether a pickoff move is legal or a balk. If the pitcher steps with his lead foot towards the base he intends to throw to it is considered legal; the 45-foot line determines whether that step is towards the base or towards home plate. This only comes into play when the pickoff move is to the base the pitcher naturally faces, i.e. third for a right-hander or first for a lefty.

4 wide ones[edit]

Four consecutive pitches deliberately wide of the strike zone. Preacher Roe summarized this strategy to Stan Musial as "I throw him four wide ones and try to pick him off at first."[1]

5[edit]

The third baseman, in scorekeeping shorthand.

5 hole[edit]

  • Between a player's legs (the catcher's in particular). From the hockey term for how a puck is advanced past the goalie ("through the five hole").

5.5 hole[edit]

The space between the third baseman (5) and shortstop (6).

5-4-3 double play[edit]

The third baseman (5) fields a batted ball and throws to the second baseman (4) to force out a runner advancing from first. The second baseman then throws to the first baseman (3) to force out the batter.

5-tool player[edit]

A position player (non-pitcher) like Willie Mays,[2] Andre Dawson,[3] Duke Snider,[4][5] Vladimir Guerrero[6] or Ken Griffey, Jr.,[4][7] who excels at:
  1. hitting for average
  2. hitting for power
  3. base running
  4. throwing
  5. fielding[4]

6[edit]

The shortstop, in scorekeeping shorthand.

6-4-3 double play[edit]

The shortstop (6) fields a batted ball and throws to the second baseman (4), who forces out a runner advancing from first and then throws to the first baseman (3) to force out the batter.

7[edit]

The leftfielder, in scorekeeping shorthand.

7-2, 8-2, or 9-2 double play[edit]

A fly ball is caught by an outfielder, and a runner tries to tag up and score from third but is tagged out by the catcher.

8[edit]

The centerfielder, in scorekeeping shorthand.

9[edit]

The rightfielder, in scorekeeping shorthand.

9 to 0[edit]

The official score of a forfeited game in the Major leagues.

12 to 6[edit]

A kind of curveball, the motion of which evokes the hands of a clock.

30-30 club[edit]

Players who hit 30 home runs and steal 30 bases in a single season.

40-40 club[edit]

Players who hit 40 home runs and steal 40 bases in a single season.

55-footer[edit]

A pejorative term for a pitch that bounces short of the ​60 12 feet between the pitching rubber and the plate.

90 feet[edit]

When a runner advances one base, he "moves up 90 feet"—the distance between successive bases.


References[edit]

  1. ^ "Stan Musial Quotes". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved 2013-10-30.
  2. ^ "Willie Mays Baseball Stats and player history. | The Baseball Page". web.archive.org. June 22, 2011.
  3. ^ "Andre Dawson | The BASEBALL Page". Archived from the original on 2006-05-07.
  4. ^ a b c Bonavita, Mark (1999-03-31). "Baseball's five tools". The Sporting News. Times Mirror Interzines. Archived from the original on 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2007-11-03.
  5. ^ "Duke Snider | The BASEBALL Page". Archived from the original on 2006-05-07.
  6. ^ "Vladimir Guerrero". Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2018-08-11.
  7. ^ Kevin Acee (June 2001). "Majors' Five-Tool Players Who Are They? - skills of baseball players". Baseball Digest.