List of best-selling Latin albums in the United States

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A Latin album in the United States is defined by both the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and Billboard magazine as being a type of music release that features 51% or more of its content recorded in Spanish.[1][2] Sales of Latin albums in the US are compiled by Billboard which began in November 1972.[3] The first Latin albums chart was compiled on December 1972,[4] then known as the Hot Latin LP's, which surveyed sales of Latin LP's in selected regions in the United States including Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami, New York, and Texas.[5] In 1982, LP's from the US territory of Puerto Rico were included in the survey for Latin albums.[6] In June 1985, Billboard introduced the Top Latin Albums chart which surveyed all aforementioned markets and was divided into three genre categories— Latin Pop Albums, Tropical Albums, and Regional Mexican Albums.[7] The sales were provided by Latin music retailers and distributors.[8] On July 10, 1993, an overall Top Latin Albums was established and the methodology was changed to have sales data compiled by Nielsen SoundScan.[8] The first number one was Mi Tierra by Gloria Estefan. The album spent 25 weeks at atop in 1993 and 33 weeks in this position in 1994, becoming the best-selling Latin album of the latter year in the United States.[9][10]

Spanish singer Julio Iglesias was among the successful Latin acts of the 1980s with his albums Julio and In Concert having success in the Anglophone and Hispanophone markets in the United States.[11] Tex-Mex music performer Selena's albums Amor Prohibido and Dreaming of You reached number one on the chart; the latter album debuted at number one on the Billboard 200, making Selena the first Hispanic singer to debut at the top of this chart.[12] Dreaming of You was the best-selling Latin album of 1995 and 1996.[13][14] Barrio Fino by Puerto Rican singer Daddy Yankee was cited by Billboard as the main influence for bringing reggaetón into mainstream in the 2000s and was the best-selling Latin album of the decade.[15][16]

Sales certifications for US album sales are awarded by the RIAA.[1] The RIAA began awarding certifications in 1958.[17] Certifications are based on unit retail sales: sales of 500,000 were awarded gold, 1,000,000 for platinum and 2,000,000 or more for multi-platinum.[17] In 2000, the RIAA launched "Los Premios Oro y Platino" (The Gold and Platinum Awards in Spanish) to acknowledge the Latin market in the United States.[18] The initial threshold for the certifications were —sales of 100,000 for gold (Disco de oro), 200,000 for platinum (Disco de platino), and 400,000 or more for multi-platinum (Multi-platino).[18] In 2008, these requirements were lowered due to declining shipment figures for Latin albums.[19] The thresholds for a Latin album certification were — 50,000 for gold, 100,000 for platinum, and 200,000 or more for multi-platinum. All albums that received a Latin certification before 2008 were updated to match the current criteria at the time.[20] On December 20, 2013, the RIAA lowered the criteria for Spanish-speaking album once more to reflect on the Latin music in the country. As of December 30, 2013, the current thresholds for a Latin album certification are — 30,000 for gold, 60,000 for platinum, and 120,000 or more for multi-platinum.[21]

Mexican singer Luis Miguel became the first non-crossover Latin artist to achieve gold status for his album Romance, a collection of classic boleros.[22] The album as well at its follow-ups — Segundo Romance and Romances were later certified platinum. Me Estoy Enamorando and Vuelve by Alejandro Fernández and Ricky Martin were both certified platinum and were the best-selling Latin albums of 1998 and 1999 respectively.[23][24] Colombian singer Shakira's albums Pies Descalzos and Dónde Están los Ladrones? were both certified while her 2005 album, Fijación Oral Vol. 1 was certified 11× Platinum (Latin field). As of February 2010, the highest-certified Latin album is Dreaming of You by Selena, which has been awarded platinum certification 35 × in the Latin field.

Best-selling albums[edit]

Daddy Yankee's 2004 album Barrio Fino was cited as bringing reggaeton into mainstream. It was also the best-selling Latin album of the 2000s decade in the United States.
Shakira's albums Pies Descalzos and Dónde Están los Ladrones? were certified platinum in the United States. Her 2005 album, Fijación Oral Vol. 1 was certified 11× Platinum in the Latin field.
Mexican singer Luis Miguel's album, Romance was the first Spanish-language album by a non-crossover Latin artist to be certified gold in the United States. The album and it subsequent successors Segundo Romance and Romances were certified platinum.
Key
dagger Denotes Latin certification by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA)
Best-selling Latin albums in the US
Album Artist Record label[a] Released[a] Top Latin Albums
chart peak[b]
Number of times
certified platinum[a]
Units shipped[a]
Dreaming of You Selena EMI Latin July 18, 1995 1 35× dagger 3,500,000
Amor Prohibido Selena EMI Latin March 13, 1994 1 2,000,000
Canciones de Mi Padre Ronstadt, LindaLinda Ronstadt Elektra November 9, 1987 4 2,000,000
Julio Iglesias, JulioJulio Iglesias Columbia March 1, 1983 6 2,000,000
In Concert Iglesias, JulioJulio Iglesias Columbia September 11, 1984 34 2,000,000
Mi Tierra Estefan, GloriaGloria Estefan Epic June 14, 1993 1 16× dagger 1,600,000
Nouveau Flamenco Liebert, OttmarOttmar Liebert Higher Octave February 26, 1990 [c] 14× dagger 1,400,000
¿Dónde Jugarán los Niños? Maná WEA Latina November 13, 1992 4 12× dagger 1,200,000
Fijación Oral Vol. 1 Shakira Epic June 7, 2005 1 11× dagger 1,100,000
Barrio Fino Daddy Yankee VI Music July 13, 2004 1 1,000,000
The Best of the Gipsy Kings Gipsy Kings Nonesuch/Atlantic February 27, 1995 2 1,000,000
Buena Vista Social Club Buena Vista Social Club Nonesuch/Atlantic September 5, 1997 1 1,000,000
Como Te Recuerdo Temerarios, LosLos Temerarios Fonovisa February 8, 1998 2 1,000,000
Dónde Están los Ladrones? Shakira Sony Discos September 2, 1998 1 1,000,000
En La Madrugada Se Fue Temerarios, LosLos Temerarios Fonovisa February 28, 2000 1 1,000,000
Enrique Iglesias Iglesias, EnriqueEnrique Iglesias Fonovisa September 29, 1995 1 1,000,000
Gipsy Kings Gipsy Kings Elektra November 14, 1988 3 1,000,000
Jefe de Jefes Tigres del Norte, LosLos Tigres del Norte Fonovisa June 17, 1997 1 1,000,000
Me Estoy Enamorando Fernández, AlejandroAlejandro Fernández Sony Discos September 25, 1997 1 1,000,000
Necesito Decirte Conjunto Primavera Fonovisa July 27, 1998 13 1,000,000
Pies Descalzos Shakira Sony Discos February 13, 1996 5 1,000,000
Romance Miguel, LuisLuis Miguel WEA Latina November 19, 1991 3 1,000,000
Romances Miguel, LuisLuis Miguel WEA Latina August 27, 1997 1 1,000,000
Segundo Romance Miguel, LuisLuis Miguel WEA Latina August 30, 1994 1 1,000,000
Sentimientos Zaa, CharlieCharlie Zaa Sonolux November 19, 1996 1 1,000,000
Suavemente Crespo, ElvisElvis Crespo Epic April 7, 1998 1 1,000,000
Sueños Líquidos Maná WEA Latina October 17, 1997 1 1,000,000
Trozos de Mi Alma Solís, Marco AntonioMarco Antonio Solís Fonovisa January 26, 1999 1 1,000,000
Vivir Iglesias, EnriqueEnrique Iglesias Fonovisa January 27, 1997 1 1,000,000
Vuelve Martin, RickyRicky Martin Sony Discos February 28, 1998 1 1,000,000
  1. ^ a b c d The record labels, dates, and shipment values are those given by the RIAA.[25]
  2. ^ The charts are those given by Billboard magazine.[26]
  3. ^ Nouveau Flamenco did not rank on the Billboard Latin Albums chart, but peaked at number one hundred thirty-four on the Billboard 200 chart.[27]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

General (chart positions)
  • "Latin Albums database". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. Retrieved January 18, 2013.  For information about every week of this chart, follow this link; in the chart date section select a date and the top ten positions for the week selected will appear on screen, including the number-one album, which is shown in the table above.
  • "Gold & Platinum Searchable Database". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved January 18, 2013.  .
Specific
  1. ^ a b "About". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved August 12, 2015. 
  2. ^ Cobo, Leila (January 5, 2012). "Latin Sales Down Slightly In 2011, Digital Latin Sales Up". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved August 13, 2015. 
  3. ^ "The Latin Explosion Is Here!". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 84 (46). November 11, 1972. Retrieved January 18, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Hot Latin LP's in Los Angeles". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 84 (50): 10. December 9, 1972. Retrieved January 18, 2013. 
  5. ^ "Hot Latin LP's". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 85 (28): 21. July 14, 1973. Retrieved January 19, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Puerto Rico Top LP's". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 94 (34): 56. September 4, 1982. Retrieved January 19, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Debut for New Latin Charts". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 97 (26): 3. June 29, 1985. Retrieved January 19, 2013. 
  8. ^ a b "Billboard's Latin Charts Switch To SoundScan". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media: 4, 71. July 10, 1993. Retrieved January 19, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Latin Albums— July 10, 1993". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. July 10, 1993. Retrieved July 25, 2009. 
  10. ^ "1994 Top Billboard Latin 50 Albums". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. December 31, 1994. Archived from the original on January 19, 2013. 
  11. ^ Mayfield, Geoff (May 27, 2000). "Life On The Charts A Look At How Julio Has Faired Through The Years". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 112 (22): 90. Retrieved January 19, 2013. 
  12. ^ Burr, Ramiro (March 3, 2005). "Still In Love With Selena". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved July 28, 2009. 
  13. ^ "1995 Top Billboard Latin 50 Albums". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. December 31, 1995. Archived from the original on January 19, 2013. 
  14. ^ "1996 Top Billboard Latin 50 Albums". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. December 31, 1996. Archived from the original on January 19, 2013. 
  15. ^ Cobo, Leila (November 19, 2005). "Reggaetón Seeks New Daddy". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 117 (47): 10. Retrieved January 19, 2013. 
  16. ^ "Best of the 2000s—  Latin Albums". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Archived from the original on January 1, 2012. Retrieved January 19, 2013. 
  17. ^ a b "History of the Awards". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved January 20, 2013. 
  18. ^ a b Lannert, John (February 5, 2000). "RIAA Creates Latin Market Certifications". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 112 (6): 12, 93. Retrieved January 20, 2013. 
  19. ^ Cobo, Leila (July 26, 2008). "RIAA Lowers Latin's Gold, Platinum Requirements". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 120 (30): 16. Retrieved January 20, 2013. 
  20. ^ "Country Takes The Crop". Recording Industry Association of America. 2008. Retrieved January 20, 2013. 
  21. ^ "RIAA Updates Latin Gold & Platinum Program". RIAA. December 20, 2013. Retrieved March 10, 2014. 
  22. ^ Lannert, John (November 26, 1994). "Latin Notas". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 106 (48): 70. Retrieved January 20, 2013. 
  23. ^ "1998-The Year in Music". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 110 (52): YE-70. December 26, 1998. Retrieved February 4, 2013. 
  24. ^ "1999-The Year in Music". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 111 (52): YE-72. December 25, 1999. Retrieved February 4, 2013. 
  25. ^ "RIAA - Gold & Platinum Searchable Database". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved January 18, 2013. 
  26. ^ "Latin Albums". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved January 18, 2013. 
  27. ^ "Nouveau Flamenco — Ottmar Liebert". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved January 18, 2013.