List of best-selling Latin singles in the United States

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Latin music in the United States is defined by both the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and Billboard magazine as any release with 51% or more of its content recorded in Spanish.[1][2] Since 2010, Billboard has tracked the best-selling Latin Digital Songs chart on January 23, 2010 which shows the top downloaded Spanish-language song of the week.[3] On October 11, 2012, the methodology for the Hot Latin Songs chart were changed to include sales of digital downloads and streaming activity as well as excluding non predominately Spanish languages from appearing on the chart.[4] As a result, English-language versions of a track sung in Spanish are not factored to the digital sales of a Latin song.[5]

Sales certifications for US singles sales are awarded by the RIAA.[6] The RIAA began awarding certifications in 1958.[7] Certifications are based on unit retail sales: sales of 500,000 were awarded gold, 1,000,000 for platinum and 2,000,000 or more for multi-platinum.[7] Beginning on May 9, 2013, the RIAA updated the methodology for singles to include digital downloads and streaming (with 100 streams counting as one download).[8] Since February 1, 2016, 150 streams are equivalent to one download.[9]

In 2000, the RIAA launched Latin certifications to acknowledge that market in the United States.[10] The thresholds for a Latin certification were — 50,000 for gold, 100,000 for platinum, and 200,000 or more for multi-platinum.[11] "La Bomba" by Azul Azul was the only single to receive a Latin certification based on units sold to retails (it was certified platinum).[12] On December 20, 2013, the RIAA established the Latin Digital Singles Award for Spanish-language digital songs. The threshold for the Latin digital songs are 30,000 for gold, 60,000 platinum, and 120,000 or more for multi-platinum. The Latin Digital Singles Awards uses the same methodology as the Digital Singles Award.[13] The RIAA also awards the Latin diamond certification for singles that have been certified at least 10× multi-platinum for sales plus track-equivalent streams of 600,000 units. "Ay Vamos" and "6 AM" by J Balvin are the first Latin singles to receive the diamond (Latin) award.[14] As of January 2018, the highest-certified Latin single is "Despacito" by Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee, which has been awarded a diamond certification.

Best-selling singles[edit]

Records[edit]

Key
dagger Indicates Latin digital single certification
* Indicates digital single certification
^ Indicates standard single certification
Best-selling Latin singles in the U.S. (sales plus track-equivalent streams)[a][b]
Single Artist(s) Record label[c] Released Chart peaks[d] Multi-platinum
certification[e]
Certified
units
Ref.
US Latin
"Despacito" January 13, 2017 1 1 10× * 10,000,000 [18][19][20]
"Danza Kuduro" Machete August 15, 2010 82 1 5× * 5,000,000 [21][22][23]
"Bailando" Republic March 18, 2014 12 1 4× * 4,000,000 [24][25][26]
"Macarena" Los del Río RCA August 11, 1995 1 12 4× ^ 4,000,000 [27][28][29]
"Mi Gente" Universal Latin June 30, 2017 3 1 2× * 2,000,000 [30][31][32]
"La Tortura" Epic May 20, 2005 23 1 32× dagger 1,920,000 [33][34][35]
"Felices Los 4" Maluma Sony Latin April 21, 2017 48 2 29× dagger 1,740,000 [36][37][38]
"El Perdón" Sony Latin February 5, 2015 56 1 27× dagger 1,620,000 [39][40][41]
"Hasta El Amanecer" Nicky Jam Sony Latin January 15, 2016 73 1 22× dagger 1,320,000 [40][41]
"Adiós Amor" Christian Nodal Universal Latin January 13, 2017 [f] 4 21× dagger 1,260,000 [43][44]
"Mayores" Sony Latin July 14, 2017 74 3 21× dagger 1,260,000 [45][46][47]
"Propuesta Indecente" Romeo Santos Sony Latin July 30, 2013 79 1 20× dagger 1,200,000 [48][49][50]
"Promise" Sony Latin September 6, 2011 83 1 19× dagger 1,140,000 [49][50]
"La Bicicleta" Sony Latin May 27, 2016 95 2 17× dagger 1,020,000 [51][52][35]
"Chantaje" Sony Latin October 28, 2016 51 1 16× dagger 960,000 [34][35]
"Krippy Kush" Sony Latin July 31, 2017 75 5 16× dagger 960,000 [53][54][55]
"Vivir Mi Vida" Marc Anthony Sony Latin April 30, 2013 92 1 16× dagger 960,000 [56][57][58]
"Odio" Sony Latin January 28, 2014 45 1 13× dagger 780,000 [49][50]
"El Amante" Nicky Jam Sony Latin January 20, 2017 92 2 13× dagger 780,000 [40][41]
"Duele El Corazón" Sony Latin March 17, 2016 82 1 12× dagger 720,000 [24][25][26]
"La Gozadera" Sony Latin May 4, 2015 [g] 2 12× dagger 720,000 [60][61]
"Corazón" Sony Latin November 3, 2017 87 5 11× dagger 660,000 [37][38]
"Eres Mía" Romeo Santos Sony Latin February 25, 2014 2 11× dagger 660,000 [49][50]
"6 AM" Capitol Latin December 3, 2013 5 10× dagger 600,000 [31][32]
"Ay Vamos" J Balvin Capitol Latin September 16, 2014 [h] 1 10× dagger 600,000 [31][32]
"Ginza" J Balvin Capitol Latin July 17, 2015 84 1 10× dagger 600,000 [30][31][32]
"Báilame" Nacho Universal Latin April 14, 2017 [i] 5 10× dagger 600,000 [64][65]
"Ahora Me Llama" Universal Latin May 26, 2017 10 10× dagger 600,000 [66][67]
"Encantadora" Sony Latin October 2, 2015 3 10× dagger 600,000 [68][69]
"Te Boté (Remix)"
Flow La Movie Inc. April 13, 2018 36 1 10× dagger 600,000 [70][71][67]

English-language songs by Latin artists with Spanish versions[edit]

Since Billboard and the RIAA only provide overall sales of a song without separating Spanish-language versions of a track sung in English, some Spanish versions' sales are incalculable. Counting both versions, "Hips Don't Lie" by Shakira featuring Wyclef Jean sold 3,553,000 copies,[72][73] "She Wolf" by Shakira sold 1,812,000 as of March 2014,[74][73] "Waka Waka (This Time for Africa)" by Shakira featuring Freshlyground sold 1,763,000 as of March 2014,[75][73] and "Livin' La Vida Loca" by Ricky Martin sold 1,100,000 physical copies as of 1999[76][77] and 502,000 digital units as of 2011.[78]

Spanglish songs performed mainly in English[edit]

Since Billboard and Nielsen SoundScan are inconsistent with the definition of Latin music (Billboard states that the US Latin Digital Songs chart only ranks Spanish-language songs[79] but the English-language song "Conga" was ranked on the 2016 US Latin Digital Songs year-end chart),[80] some Spanglish songs primarily sung in English were excluded from the table above. Following that, "I Know You Want Me (Calle Ocho)" by Pitbull sold over two million digital units as of November 2009[81] and "Bailamos" by Enrique Iglesias sold 700,000 physical copies as of 1999.[77]

Best-selling single by year[edit]

This is a list of the best-selling Latin digital songs in the United States since 2010.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Spanish or Portuguese-language songs does not need to rank on the US Latin Digital Songs chart to be included on the table.
  2. ^ In order to be included on the table, singles must have at least a Diamond (Latin) certification. If not certified, units must surpass 600,000 sales plus track-equivalent streams.
  3. ^ The record labels, dates, and shipment/digital download values are those given by the RIAA.[15]
  4. ^ The charts are those given by Billboard magazine.[16][17]
  5. ^ Since May 2013, digital certifications are based on digital sales plus track-equivalent streams. From February 2016 onwards, 150 streams are counted as one download.[9]
  6. ^ "Adiós Amor" did not chart on the Billboard Hot 100, though did peak at number five on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart.[42]
  7. ^ "La Gozadera" did not chart on the Billboard Hot 100, though did peak at number 12 on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart.[59]
  8. ^ "Ay Vamos" did not chart on the Billboard Hot 100, though did peak at number 11 on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart.[62]
  9. ^ "Báilame" did not chart on the Billboard Hot 100, though did peak at number eight on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart.[63]

References[edit]

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  4. ^ "Billboard Shakes Up Genre Charts With New Methodology". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. October 11, 2012. Retrieved May 31, 2017.
  5. ^ Mendizabal, Amaya (May 29, 2014). "Becky G, Dr. Luke Land First Latin No. 1 With 'Can't Get Enough'". Billboard. Retrieved May 31, 2017.
  6. ^ "About RIAA". RIAA. Retrieved May 31, 2017.
  7. ^ a b "History of the Awards". Recording Industry Association of America. Archived from the original on January 3, 2016. Retrieved May 31, 2017.
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  9. ^ a b "RIAA Accepts Streams for Gold and Platinum Certifications". Billboard. February 1, 2016. Retrieved June 1, 2017.
  10. ^ Lannert, John (February 5, 2000). "RIAA Creates Latin Market Certifications". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 112 (6): 12, 93. Retrieved May 31, 2017.
  11. ^ "Country Takes The Crop". Recording Industry Association of America. 2008. Retrieved May 31, 2017.
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  33. ^ "Shakira Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved May 14, 2018.
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  36. ^ "Maluma Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved May 14, 2018.
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  39. ^ "Nicky Jam Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved May 14, 2018.
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  42. ^ "Christian Nodal Chart History: Bubbling Under Hot 100". Billboard. Retrieved June 5, 2018.
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  45. ^ "Becky G Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved May 14, 2018.
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  48. ^ "Romeo Santos Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved May 14, 2018.
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  50. ^ a b c d "American recording certifications – Romeo Santos". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved May 31, 2017.
  51. ^ "Carlos Vives Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved May 14, 2018.
  52. ^ "Carlos Vives Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved May 14, 2018.
  53. ^ "Farruko Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved May 14, 2018.
  54. ^ "Farruko Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved May 14, 2018.
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  56. ^ "Marc Anthony Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved May 14, 2018.
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  63. ^ "Nacho Chart History: Bubbling Under Hot 100". Billboard. Retrieved June 5, 2018.
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  68. ^ "Yandel Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved July 14, 2018.
  69. ^ "American recording certifications – Yandel - Encantadora". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved June 23, 2018.
  70. ^ "Bad Bunny Chart History (Billboard Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved July 14, 2018.
  71. ^ "Bad Bunny Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved July 17, 2018.
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  75. ^ "American recording certifications – Shakira – Waka Waka (This Time for Africa)". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved May 31, 2017.
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