List of birds of Cyprus

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This is a list of the bird species recorded in Cyprus. The avifauna of Cyprus include a total of 409 species.


Table of contents

Ducks, geese and swans • Partridges, grouse, turkeys and Old World quail • Loons • Grebes • Flamingos • Shearwaters and petrels • Storm petrels • Boobies and gannets • Cormorants • Pelicans • Bitterns, herons and egrets • Ibises and spoonbills • Storks • Osprey • Eagles, kites and allies • Caracaras and falcons • Rails, gallinules and coots • Cranes • Bustards • Thick-knees • Lapwings and plovers • Oystercatchers • Stilts and avocets • Sandpipers and allies • Pratincoles • Gulls, terns, and skimmers • Skuas • Sandgrouse • Pigeons and doves • Cuckoos, roadrunners and anis • Barn owls • Typical owls • Nightjars • Swifts • Hoopoes • Kingfishers • Bee-eaters • Rollers • Woodpeckers, sapsuckers and flickers • Larks • Swallows • Wagtails and pipits • Kinglets • Waxwings • Hypocolius • Dippers • Wrens • Accentors • Old-world thrushes • Cisticolas • Cettid warblers • Locustellid warblers • Acrocephalid warblers • Phylloscopid warblers • Old-world warblers • Old-World flycatchers • Bearded reedling • Tits • Wallcreeper • Treecreepers • Penduline tits • Old-world orioles • Shrikes • Crows, jays and allies • Starlings • Old-world buntings • Finches • Old-world sparrows

References

Key: PM = passage migrant, RB = resident breeder, MB = migrant breeder, OB = occasional breeder, FB = former breeder, WV = winter visitor, AV = accidental vagrant, IN = introduced, EX = extirpated

Ducks, geese and swans[edit]

Greylag goose
Common shelduck
Common scoter

Order: Anseriformes   Family: Anatidae

Anatidae includes the ducks and most duck-like waterfowl, such as geese and swans. These birds are adapted to an aquatic existence with webbed feet, bills which are flattened to a greater or lesser extent, and feathers that are excellent at shedding water due to special oils.

Partridges, grouse, turkeys and Old World quail[edit]

Black francolin

Order: Galliformes   Family: Phasianidae

Phasianidae consists of the pheasants and their allies. These are terrestrial species, variable in size but generally plump with broad relatively short wings. Many species are gamebirds or have been domesticated as a food source for humans.

Loons[edit]

Order: Gaviiformes   Family: Gaviidae

Loons are aquatic birds the size of a large duck, to which they are unrelated. Their plumage is largely grey or black, and they have spear-shaped bills. Loons swim well and fly adequately, but, because their legs are placed towards the rear of the body, are almost helpless on land.

Grebes[edit]

Great crested grebe

Order: Podicipediformes   Family: Podicipedidae

Flamingos[edit]

Order: Phoenicopteriformes   Family: Phoenicopteridae

Flamingos (genus Phoenicopterus monotypic in family Phoenicopteridae) are gregarious wading birds, usually 3ÔÇô5 feet in height, found in both the Western and Eastern Hemispheres. Flamingos filter-feed on shellfish and algae. Their oddly shaped beaks are specially adapted to separate mud and silt from the food they consume and, uniquely, are used upside-down.

Shearwaters and petrels[edit]

Yelkouan shearwater

Order: Procellariiformes   Family: Procellariidae

The procellariids are the main group of medium-sized "true petrels", characterised by united nostrils with medium septum, and a long outer functional primary.

Storm petrels[edit]

Order: Procellariiformes   Family: Hydrobatidae

The storm petrels are the smallest seabirds, relatives of the petrels, feeding on planktonic crustaceans and small fish picked from the surface, typically while hovering. The flight is fluttering and sometimes bat-like.

Boobies and gannets[edit]

Order: Suliformes   Family: Sulidae

The sulids comprise the gannets and boobies. Both groups are medium-large coastal seabirds that plunge-dive for fish.

Dalmatian pelican

Cormorants[edit]

Order: Suliformes   Family: Phalacrocoracidae

Cormorants are medium-to-large aquatic birds, usually with mainly dark plumage and areas of coloured skin on the face. The bill is long, thin and sharply hooked. Their feet are four-toed and webbed, a distinguishing feature among the Pelecaniformes order

Purple heron

Pelicans[edit]

Order: Pelecaniformes   Family: Pelecanidae

Pelicans are very large water birds with a distinctive pouch under their beak. Like other birds in the order Pelecaniformes, they have four webbed toes.

Bitterns, herons and egrets[edit]

Order: Pelecaniformes   Family: Ardeidae

The family Ardeidae contains the herons, egrets and bitterns. Herons and egrets are medium to large wading birds with long necks and legs. Bitterns tend to be shorter necked and more secretive. Members of Ardeidae fly with their necks retracted, unlike other long-necked birds such as storks, ibises and spoonbills.

Ibises and spoonbills[edit]

Eurasian spoonbill

Order: Pelecaniformes   Family: Threskiornithidae

Members of this family have long, broad wings, are strong fliers and, rather surprisingly, given their size and weight, very capable soarers. The body tends to be elongated, the neck more so, with rather long legs. The bill is also long, decurved in the case of the ibises, straight and distinctively flattened in the spoonbills.

Storks[edit]

Black stork

Order: Ciconiiformes   Family: Ciconiidae

Storks are large, heavy, long-legged, long-necked wading birds with long stout bills and wide wingspans. They lack the powder down that other wading birds such as herons, spoonbills and ibises use to clean off fish slime. Storks lack a pharynx and are mute.

Osprey[edit]

Order: Accipitriformes   Family: Pandionidae

Pandionidae is a family of fish-eating birds of prey, possessing a very large, powerful hooked beak for tearing flesh from their prey, strong legs, powerful talons and keen eyesight. The family is monotypic.

  • Osprey, Pandion haliaetus PM

Eagles, kites and allies[edit]

Order: Accipitriformes   Family: Accipitridae

Accipitridae is a family of birds of prey, which includes eagles, hawks, kites, harriers and Old World vultures. These birds have very large powerful hooked beaks for tearing flesh from their prey, strong legs, powerful talons and keen eyesight.

White-tailed eagle
Eastern imperial eagle

Caracaras and falcons[edit]

Sooty falcon

Order: Falconiformes   Family: Falconidae

Falconidae is a family of diurnal birds of prey, notably the falcons and caracaras. They differ from hawks, eagles and kites in that they kill with their beaks instead of their talons.

Rails, gallinules and coots[edit]

Order: Gruiformes   Family: Rallidae

Little crake

Rallidae is a large family of small to medium-sized birds which includes the rails, crakes, coots and gallinules. The most typical family members occupy dense vegetation in damp environments near lakes, swamps or rivers. In general they are shy and secretive birds, making them difficult to observe. Most species have strong legs and long toes which are well adapted to soft uneven surfaces. They tend to have short, rounded wings and to be weak fliers.

Cranes[edit]

Order: Gruiformes   Family: Gruidae

Cranes are large, long-legged and long-necked birds. Unlike the similar-looking but unrelated herons, cranes fly with necks outstretched, not pulled back. Most have elaborate and noisy courting displays or "dances".

Houbara bustard

Bustards[edit]

Order: Otidiformes   Family: Otididae

Bustards are large terrestrial birds mainly associated with dry open country and steppes in the Old World. They are omnivorous and nest on the ground. They walk steadily on strong legs and big toes, pecking for food as they go. They have long broad wings with "fingered" wingtips, and striking patterns in flight. Many have interesting mating displays.

Thick-knees[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Burhinidae

The thick-knees are a group of largely tropical waders in the family Burhinidae. They are found worldwide within the tropical zone, with some species also breeding in temperate Europe and Australia. They are medium to large waders with strong black or yellow-black bills, large yellow eyes and cryptic plumage. Despite being classed as waders, most species have a preference for arid or semi-arid habitats.

Lapwings and plovers[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Charadriidae

Northern lapwing

The family Charadriidae includes the plovers, dotterels and lapwings. They are small to medium-sized birds with compact bodies, short, thick necks and long, usually pointed, wings. They are found in open country worldwide, mostly in habitats near water.

Oystercatchers[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Haematopodidae

The oystercatchers are large, obvious and noisy plover-like birds, with strong bills used for smashing or prising open molluscs.

Pied avocet

Stilts and avocets[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Recurvirostridae

Recurvirostridae is a family of large wading birds, which includes the avocets and stilts. The avocets have long legs and long up-curved bills. The stilts have extremely long legs and long, thin, straight bills.

Sandpipers and allies[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Scolopacidae

Scolopacidae is a large diverse family of small to medium-sized shorebirds including the sandpipers, curlews, godwits, shanks, tattlers, woodcocks, snipes, dowitchers and phalaropes. The majority of these species eat small invertebrates picked out of the mud or soil. Different lengths of legs and bills enable multiple species to feed in the same habitat, particularly on the coast, without direct competition for food.

Pratincoles[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Glareolidae

Pratincoles have short legs, very long pointed wings and long forked tails. Their most unusual feature for birds classed as waders is that they typically hunt their insect prey on the wing like swallows, although they can also feed on the ground. Their short bills are an adaptation to aerial feeding

Gulls, terns, and skimmers[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Laridae

Laridae is a family of medium to large seabirds and includes gulls, terns, kittiwakes and skimmers. Gulls are typically grey or white, often with black markings on the head or wings. They have stout, longish bills and webbed feet. Terns are a group of generally medium to large seabirds typically with grey or white plumage, often with black markings on the head. Most terns hunt fish by diving but some pick insects off the surface of fresh water. Terns are generally long-lived birds, with several species known to live in excess of 30 years.

Skuas[edit]

Order: Charadriiformes   Family: Stercorariidae

Skuas are in general medium to large birds, typically with grey or brown plumage, often with white markings on the wings. They have longish bills with hooked tips, and webbed feet with sharp claws. They look like large dark gulls, but have a fleshy cere above the upper mandible. They are strong, acrobatic fliers.

Sandgrouse[edit]

Order: Pteroclidiformes   Family: Pteroclididae

Sandgrouse have small, pigeon-like heads and necks and sturdy compact bodies. The adults are sexually dimorphic with the males being slightly larger and more brightly colored than the females. They have eleven strong primary feathers and long pointed wings giving them a fast direct flight. The muscles of the wings are powerful and the birds are capable of rapid take off and sustained flight. There is a dense layer of under down which helps insulate the bird from extremes of heat and cold. The feathers of the belly are specially adapted for absorbing water and retaining it, allowing adults, particularly males, to carry water to chicks that may be many miles away from watering holes.

Pigeons and doves[edit]

Order: Columbiformes   Family: Columbidae

Pigeons and doves are stout-bodied birds with short necks and short slender bills with a fleshy cere.

Cuckoos, roadrunners and anis[edit]

Order: Cuculiformes   Family: Cuculidae

The family Cuculidae includes cuckoos, roadrunners and anis. These birds are of variable size with slender bodies, long tails and strong legs.

Barn owls[edit]

Order: Strigiformes   Family: Tytonidae

Barn owls are medium to large owls with large heads and characteristic heart-shaped faces. They have long strong legs with powerful talons.

Typical owls[edit]

Order: Strigiformes   Family: Strigidae

Typical owls are small to large solitary nocturnal birds of prey. They have large forward-facing eyes and ears, a hawk-like beak and a conspicuous circle of feathers around each eye called a facial disk.

Nightjars[edit]

Order: Caprimulgiformes   Family: Caprimulgidae

Nightjars are medium-sized nocturnal birds that usually nest on the ground. They have long wings, short legs and very short bills. Most have small feet, of little use for walking, and long pointed wings. Their soft plumage is cryptically coloured to resemble bark or leaves.

Swifts[edit]

Order: Apodiformes   Family: Apodidae

The swifts are small birds which spend the majority of their lives flying. These birds have very short legs and never settle voluntarily on the ground, perching instead only on vertical surfaces. Many swifts have long swept-back wings which resemble a crescent or boomerang.

Hoopoes[edit]

Order: Upupiformes   Family: Upupidae

This black, white and pink bird is quite unmistakable, especially in its erratic flight, which is like that of a giant butterfly. It is the only member of its family. The song is a trisyllabic oop-oop-oop, which gives rise to its English and scientific names.

Kingfishers[edit]

Order: Coraciiformes   Family: Alcedinidae

Kingfishers are medium-sized birds with large heads, long, pointed bills, short legs and stubby tails.

Bee-eaters[edit]

Order: Coraciiformes   Family: Meropidae

Rollers[edit]

Order: Coraciiformes   Family: Coraciidae

Woodpeckers, sapsuckers and flickers[edit]

Order: Piciformes   Family: Picidae

Woodpeckers are small to medium-sized birds with chisel-like beaks, short legs, stiff tails and long tongues used for capturing insects. Some species have feet with two toes pointing forward and two backward, while several species have only three toes. Many woodpeckers have the habit of tapping noisily on tree trunks with their beaks.

Larks[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Alaudidae

Larks are small terrestrial birds with often extravagant songs and display flights. Most larks are fairly dull in appearance. Their food is insects and seeds.

Swallows[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Hirundinidae

Wagtails and pipits[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Motacillidae

Kinglets[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Regulidae

Waxwings[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Bombycillidae

Hypocolius[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Hypocoliidae

The grey hypocolius is a small Middle Eastern bird with the shape and soft plumage of a waxwing. They are mainly a uniform grey colour except the males have a black triangular mask around their eyes.

Dippers[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Cinclidae

Wrens[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Troglodytidae

Accentors[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Prunellidae

  • Dunnock, Prunella modularis WV PM

Thrushes and allies[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Turdidae

Cisticolas[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Cisticolidae

Cettid warblers[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Cettiidae

Locustellid warblers[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Locustellidae

Acrocephalid warblers[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Acrocephalidae

Phylloscopid warblers[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Phylloscopidae

Old-world warblers[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Sylviidae

Old-World flycatchers[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Muscicapidae

Bearded reedling[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Panuridae

Tits[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Paridae

  • Coal tit, Periparus ater AV (endemic subspecies P. a. cypriotes RB)
  • Great tit, Parus major aphrodite RB

Wallcreeper[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Tichodromidae

Treecreepers[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Certhiidae

Penduline tits[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Remizidae

Old-world orioles[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Oriolidae

Shrikes[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Laniidae

Crows, jays and allies[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Corvidae

Starlings[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Sturnidae

Old-world buntings[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Emberizidae

Finches[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Fringillidae

Old-world sparrows[edit]

Order: Passeriformes   Family: Passeridae

References[edit]