Page semi-protected

List of city nicknames in the United States

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Reno, Nevada proudly displays its nickname as "The Biggest Little City in the World" on a large sign above a downtown street.

This partial list of city nicknames in the United States compiles the aliases, sobriquets and slogans that cities are known by (or have been known by historically), officially and unofficially, to municipal governments, local people, outsiders or their tourism boards or chambers of commerce.

City nicknames can help establish a civic identity, help outsiders recognize a community, attract people to a community because of its nickname, promote civic pride, and build community unity.[1] Nicknames and slogans that successfully create a new community "ideology or myth"[2] are also believed to have economic value.[1] This value is difficult to measure,[1] but there are anecdotal reports of cities that have achieved substantial economic benefits by "branding" themselves by adopting new slogans.[2]

In 2005 the consultancy Tagline Guru conducted a small survey of professionals in the fields of branding, marketing, and advertising aimed at identifying the "best" U.S. city slogans and nicknames. Participants were asked to evaluate about 800 nicknames and 400 slogans, considering several criteria in their assessments. The assigned criteria were: whether the nickname or slogan expresses the "brand character, affinity, style, and personality" of the city, whether it "tells a story in a clever, fun, and memorable way," uniqueness and originality, and whether it "inspires you to visit there, live there, or learn more."[3]

The top-ranked nickname in the survey was New York City's "The Big Apple," followed by "Sin City" (Las Vegas), "The Big Easy" (New Orleans), "Motor City" (Detroit), and "The Windy City" (Chicago). In addition to the number-two nickname, Las Vegas had the top-rated slogan: "What Happens Here, Stays Here." The second- through fifth-place slogans were "So Very Virginia" (Charlottesville, Virginia), "Always Turned On" (Atlantic City, New Jersey), "Cleveland Rocks!" (Cleveland, Ohio), and "The Sweetest Place on Earth" (Hershey, Pennsylvania).[3]

Some unofficial nicknames are positive, while others are derisive. The unofficial nicknames listed here have been in use for a long time or have gained wide currency.

Alabama

Alaska

Homer's welcome sign proclaims its nickname.

Arizona


Arkansas


California


A

B

People's Park in Berkeley was a center of 1960s counterculture activity remembered in the sobriquet "The People's Republic of Berkeley."

C

Castroville's nickname celebrates its status as a producer of artichokes.

D

Dinuba, Fallbrook, and Selma have nicknames that celebrate the production of raisins.

F

G

Garlic ice cream is given away at the annual Garlic Festival in Gilroy, nicknamed Garlic Capital of the World.

H

I

L

M

N

O

P

Close-up view of one of the flower-bedecked floats in the annual Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, which calls itself the City of Roses.

R

S

Solvang's architecture reflects the Danish heritage celebrated by its nickname, Danish capital of America.

T

V

W

Y


Colorado


A

B

C

D

E

F

G

L

M

N

O

P

S

T

V

W

Connecticut


Delaware


Florida


Georgia


Hawaii

Hilo
America’s Wettest City[466]
Orchid Capital[466]
Honolulu
The Big Pineapple
Pacific Diamond [467]


Idaho


Illinois


Indiana

The nickname "Athens of the Prairie" was bestowed on Columbus, Indiana, due to the large assemblage of contemporary architecture and public sculpture in the city, including Henry Moore's "Large Arch."

Iowa


Kansas


Kentucky

Nicknames for Lexington and Louisville celebrate the Bluegrass Region's horse farms and the state's most famous horse race, the Kentucky Derby, held at Churchill Downs in Louisville.

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Nicknames for Eau Claire and Traverse City are a reminder that cherries are an important crop in Michigan.

Minnesota

Mississippi


Missouri


Montana

  • Billings
    • The Magic City[923]
    • Montana's Trailhead[924]
    • Montana's City[925]
    • Star of the Big Sky Country[926]
    • B-Town. A recently-trending, popular unofficial nickname for Billings is "B-Town". Although the names of three of Montana's largest cities, Billings, Bozeman, & Butte all start with "B", Billings is the city associated, especially on social media, with the nickname "B-town". Another example of Billings' interesting monopoly of the letter "B" in its monikers can be found in reference to MSU-B, née Eastern Montana University, the largest college or university in Billings, which merged, as part of the 1994 reorganization of Montana's state university system, with Montana State University, founded over 100 years prior in Bozeman, Montana. "Eastern" as her alumni nicknamed their alma mater, was then renamed and now known under her current name of Montana State University Billings, or MSUB, retaining mascot Yellowjackets while the original MSU in Bozeman retains original mascot (Golden)Bobcats, or "Cats", as popularly known. (see Cat-Griz/Griz-Cat game, Brawl of the Wild.)
  • Bozeman – Bozangeles[927], The Bozone[928]
  • Butte
  • Cut Bank – Coldest Spot in the Nation[391]
  • Glendive – Good People Surrounded by Badlands[932]
  • Great Falls – The Electric City[933]
  • Helena – Queen City of the Rockies[934]
  • Kalispell – Hub of the Valley[935]
  • Libby – City of Eagles[936][937]
  • Missoula – The Garden City[938]


Nebraska


Nevada

New Hampshire


New Jersey

Nicknames of several New Jersey communities celebrate their status as Jersey Shore resorts.

Sleazeside[1,015]


New Mexico


New York

Chazy calls itself the world capital of the McIntosh apple.
Cooperstown, site of the Baseball Hall of Fame where this plaque honoring Ty Cobb is displayed, lays claim to the title "Birthplace of Baseball."
Lockport's nickname of "Lock City" refers to the several Erie canal locks located in the city.

A

B

C

D

Duluth – The Air-Conditioned City

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

The city of Niagara Falls, New York, gets both its name and its nickname of "Cataract City" from the famous set of waterfalls known as Niagara Falls.

/politics/special/clinton/frenzy/jacksPost|author=Larry J. Sabato's Feeding Frenzy | date=July 21, 1998 | accessdate=December 29, 2011}}</ref>

O

P

R

S

This 1907 postcard of Canfield Park and Saratoga Springs' nickname "the Spa City" both recall the era when the city's mineral springs and hotels made it a fashionable resort.

T

U

W

Y


North Carolina


North Dakota


Ohio

Alliance, which is officially nicknamed the Carnation City, helped make the scarlet carnation the state flower of Ohio.
The sculpture Flyover in downtown Dayton, the "Birthplace of Aviation," tracks the path of the Wright Brothers' first powered aircraft flight.

A

B

C

D

F

G

H

I

K

L

M

N

O

P

R

S

T

  • Toledo
    • Frog Town[1,222]
    • Glass Capital of the World[1,222]
    • The Glass City[1,223]
    • The Solar Valley[citation needed]
    • The Mud
    • The TOL
    • The 419
    • T-Town
    • Holedo (some refer due to the prostition issues in the city)
    • The Great Black Swamp
    • Port
  • Troy
    • Berry-land

U

V

W

X

Y

Z


Oklahoma


Oregon


Pennsylvania

A sign proclaiming Scranton as "The Electric City" overlooks Courthouse Square. The city got its moniker for being the site of the nation's first electric-powered streetcars.


Rhode Island


South Carolina


South Dakota


Tennessee

Texas


A-C

D-F

G-L

M-Q

R-T

U-Z

Utah

Vermont


Virginia


Washington

Blaine's nickname celebrates the Peace Arch on the U.S. border with Canada.

West Virginia

Wisconsin

The nicknames of several Wisconsin communities celebrate the state's cheese-making industry. Cheese curds, shown here covered with batter and deep-fried, traditionally have been available only at cheese factories.

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

R

S

T

V

W


Wyoming

District of Columbia

Nicknames of Washington, D.C.

Puerto Rico

See also

General:

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co cp cq cr cs ct cu cv cw cx cy cz da db dc dd de df dg dh di dj dk dl dm dn do dp dq dr ds dt du dv dw dx dy dz ea eb ec ed ee ef eg eh ei ej ek el em en eo ep eq er es et eu ev ew ex ey ez fa fb fc fd fe ff fg fh fi fj fk fl fm fn fo fp fq fr fs ft fu fv fw fx fy fz ga gb gc gd ge gf gg gh gi gj gk gl gm gn go gp gq gr gs gt gu gv gw gx gy gz ha hb hc hd he hf hg hh hi hj hk hl hm hn ho hp hq hr hs Muench, David (December 1993). "Wisconsin Community Slogans: Their Use and Local Impacts" (PDF). University of Wisconsin Extension. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 9, 2013. Retrieved April 10, 2007.
  2. ^ a b c Alfredo Andia, Branding the Generic City :), MU.DOT magazine, September 10, 2007
  3. ^ a b TaglineGuru Releases List of Top U.S. City Mottos and Monikers, press release, September 20, 2005, TaglineGuru.com website, archived on June 23, 2008
  4. ^ Alabaster, Alabama, accessed March 28, 2007.
  5. ^ a b c Greetings From America's Secret Capitals, Time (magazine), July 13, 1998.
  6. ^ a b Claims to Fame - Products, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  7. ^ Maney, Kevin. "Claims to fame", USA Today, May 20, 2005. Accessed June 3, 2009.
  8. ^ The Model City of the New South: Anniston, Alabama, 1872-1900, accessed March 28, 2007.
  9. ^ "Loveliest Village" Inspiration Award Archived 2007-09-30 at the Wayback Machine, accessed March 27, 2007.
  10. ^ a b Faber, Harold (1993-09-12). "The World Capital of Whatever". The New York Times. Retrieved 2018-11-15.
  11. ^ Bessemer Area Chamber of Commerce, accessed March 28, 2007.
  12. ^ https://twitter.com/cityofbhamal
  13. ^ http://originalbham.com
  14. ^ Birmingham: The Magic City, accessed March 28, 2007.
  15. ^ Birmingham: Introduction, accessed March 28, 2007.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co cp cq cr cs ct cu cv cw cx cy cz da db dc dd de U.S. City Monikers, Tagline Guru website, accessed January 5, 2008
  17. ^ Steel City Jazz Festival, accessed December 9, 2015
  18. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-06-21. Retrieved 2011-05-12.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link), accessed May 12, 2011.
  19. ^ a b Claims to Fame - Fish, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  20. ^ City of Daphne, Alabama website Archived 2010-10-05 at the Wayback Machine, accessed October 5, 2010. The "Jubilee" nickname refers to a phenomenon in Mobile Bay in "blue crabs, shrimp, and fish swimming from the depths of the bay [are brought] into the shallow waters of the shoreline."
  21. ^ Alabama Jubilee Hot-Air Balloon Classic, accessed March 28, 2007. Archived February 3, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  22. ^ Railroad keyed Decatur's growth Archived 2007-09-30 at Archive.today, The Decatur Daily, February 27, 2007.
  23. ^ Decatur History, accessed March 28, 2007. Archived February 3, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  24. ^ Decatur - The River City Review, accessed March 28, 2007.
  25. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-02-20. Retrieved 2010-04-14.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link), accessed April 14, 2010.
  26. ^ Rural Southwest Alabama: "Demopolis, Alabama is where the 'City of the People' and two rivers meet." Accessed December 9, 2015
  27. ^ [1]
  28. ^ City of Dothan, accessed March 28, 2007.
  29. ^ Claims to Fame - Agriculture, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  30. ^ Douglas, Alabama profile, accessed March 28, 2007.
  31. ^ [2], accessed September 3, 2017.
  32. ^ http://www.cityofgadsden.com/index.aspx?NID=292
  33. ^ Greenville, Alabama city profile, Epodunk, accessed March 28, 2007.
  34. ^ Claims to Fame - Plants, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  35. ^ CONGRATULATING THE CITY OF HALEYVILLE, ALABAMA AS THE HOME OF 911, accessed March 28, 2007.[dead link]
  36. ^ City of Hartselle, accessed March 28, 2007.
  37. ^ The Alabama Gang Archived 2008-04-16 at the Wayback Machine, Alabama Live, accessed March 29, 2007. "The Alabama Gang was especially forceful during the formative years of NASCAR as brothers Bobby and Donnie Allison and Red Farmer set up shop in Hueytown, Ala., putting that town on the sports map."
  38. ^ "National Affairs: Rocket City, U.S.A." Time. February 17, 1958. Retrieved March 16, 2010.
  39. ^ Huntsville: Rocket City, About.com, accessed March 29, 2007.
  40. ^ A Brief History of Huntsville, Marshall Space Flight Center, accessed March 29, 2007. "During these years Huntsville was famed as the "Watercress Capital of the World," and Madison County was Alabama's leader in cotton production."
  41. ^ Jacksonville, Alabama profile, accessed March 29, 2007.
  42. ^ Talladega County: Quality of Life Archived 2007-09-29 at the Wayback Machine, accessed March 29, 2007. "The City adopted the nickname "Motorsports City" due to its proximity next to the Talladega Superspeedway. "
  43. ^ Madison, Alabama city profile, accessed March 29, 2007.
  44. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-04-30. Retrieved 2010-04-14.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link), accessed April 14, 2010.
  45. ^ Public Television Features Mobile's Azalea Trail, University of Alabama Center for Public Television & Radio press release. Accessed May 17, 2007. "MOBILE--This town is known as The Azalea City, and the evergreen azaleas for which it is famous are an indispensable part of the city’s character."
  46. ^ Sheboygan Press, The Sheboygan Press May 20, 1932. "Q. What city is called The City of Six Flags? A. Mobile, Alabama. It has been under French, Spanish, British, American, Alabama, and Confederate Flags."
  47. ^ The Mother of All Mardi Gras, accessed March 29, 2007.
  48. ^ "Encyclopedia of Alabama: Steamboats in Alabama", Encyclopedia of Alabama, September 2008. Accessed March 22, 2011. "The state's most important towns developed along...navigable rivers, and Mobile, the largest metropolis, became known as the Port City."
  49. ^ [3], accessed April 10, 2010.
  50. ^ "Today, we are more than just the Capital of Alabama--we are the Capital of the South!" Archived 2008-04-16 at the Wayback Machine, accessed September 16, 2007.
  51. ^ Newfield, Jack. "Marching to Montgomery: The Cradle Did Rock", The Village Voice, April 1, 1965. Accessed May 17, 2007. "It was the Ecumenical Council, a hootenanny, a happening, and a revolution all rolled into one. And it happened in Montgomery, 'Cradle of the Confederacy.'"
  52. ^ Lunch in the Gump food blog
  53. ^ "Muscle Shoals Music - Shoals Chamber of Commerce" Archived 2011-03-25 at the Wayback Machine, shoalschamber.com, accessed 2011-02-22. "By the close of the 1980s, the music business no longer regarded Muscle Shoals as "The Hit Recording Capital of the World."
  54. ^ Ozark Area Chamber of Commerce Archived 2016-03-04 at the Wayback Machine
  55. ^ a b Visiting or Staying?, Prattville, Alabama. Accessed May 17, 2007. "Long before Prattville became "The Preferred Community," it was known as "The Fountain City" because of its numerous artesian wells."
  56. ^ a b City of Selma official website
  57. ^ "Freedom March Begins at Selma; Troops on Guard" (PDF). New York Times. March 22, 1965. Selma, which calls itself queen of the Alabama Black Belt -- the swath of rich, dark soil and heavy Negro population across south-central Alabama.
  58. ^ Slocomb Tomato Festival at WTVY.com Archived 2008-04-16 at the Wayback Machine, accessed August 9, 2007
  59. ^ South Baldwin Chamber of Commerce, accessed March 29, 2007. "Just north of Foley lies Summerdale, which offers a picturesque view of rural farm life and lives up to its slogan, 'The Sunshine City.'"
  60. ^ Claims to Fame - Rocks, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  61. ^ Frequently Asked Questions, DCH Health System website, accessed May 29, 2011. "In the late 1800s, the city fathers of Tuscaloosa planted oak trees along downtown streets. Just as the City of Birmingham was known as the Magic City because of its amazing growth, the City of Tuscaloosa became known as the Oak City, or, in recognition of the ancient British tribe that worshipped oaks, the Druid City."
  62. ^ Welcome to Tuskegee University, accessed March 29, 2007.
  63. ^ [4]
  64. ^ Vestavia Hills, Alabama Archived 2009-04-26 at the Wayback Machine, RelocateAmerica website
  65. ^ About Wetumpka, accessed March 29, 2007. "Abundant in lore and legend, Wetumpka (an Indian term meaning rumbling waters) is rich in aboriginal history. "
  66. ^ Motto ought to be boffo, Irvine World News, February 22, 2004
  67. ^ a b Air Crossroads of the World, Ground Support, April 2006."Increased tourism has halted those perceptions and Anchorage is now known as the "City of Lights and Flowers", a bustling city with a formidable backdrop of glaciers and mountains."
  68. ^ Make me feel brand new[permanent dead link], Anchorage Press, May 17, 2006.
  69. ^ Horn, Yvonne (2005-06-08). "'Winter camp' keeps Anchorage's fuchsias fresh for summer season". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 2009-03-06.
  70. ^ http://www.alaskapublic.org/2013/04/29/alaska-cultural-connections-los-anchorage/
  71. ^ http://www.ragecityrollergirls.org/
  72. ^ http://pjfatbo.bandcamp.com/track/rage-city-rockers
  73. ^ Cordova, Alaska profile, accessed March 29, 2007.
  74. ^ a b Claims to Fame - Food, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  75. ^ Shakespeare Marathon Archived 2007-03-14 at the Wayback Machine, KTTC, March 10, 2007. "Fairbanks, Alaska is a city known for its quirkiness, things like playing baseball at midnight and turning solid blocks of ice into works of art. But the "Golden Heart City" has another passion, one that may surprise you."
  76. ^ Rebecca George, The Golden Heart City celebrates its golden past Archived 2011-09-04 at the Wayback Machine, Fairbanks Daily News Miner, August 6, 2009.
  77. ^ Claims to Fame - Birds, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  78. ^ Homer, Alaska, accessed March 29, 2007. "Homer, Alaska, is considered the halibut capital of the world -- or so locals claim."
  79. ^ Kenai, Alaska website, accessed March 29, 2007.
  80. ^ "A Fleet of Ferry Ships to Offer Motorists a 'Marine' Highway to Skagway, Alaska; Enthusiasm Shown Summer Side Trip", The New York Times, March 8, 1963. "The Ferry Ships put in along The route at Ketchikan, 'The king salmon capital of The world'..."
  81. ^ Claims to Fame - Fish, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  82. ^ Knik - Fairview Alaska Archived 2011-10-02 at the Wayback Machine, accessed March 29, 2007. "Knik is a check-point for the Iditarod Sled Dog Race, and is called the 'Dog Mushing Center of the World.'"
  83. ^ A Prairie Home Companion at Sea: Alaska 2006, accessed March 29, 2007.
  84. ^ Sitka Convention & Visitors Bureau, accessed March 29, 2007.
  85. ^ Tagline Guru City Branding Survey, Tagline Guru website, accessed August 18, 2009
  86. ^ Apache Junction Ride Choice Archived 2007-11-03 at the Wayback Machine, accessed March 30, 2007. "© 2004 City of Apache Junction, Arizona Home of the Superstition Mountains "
  87. ^ Arizona Government Web Sites, accessed March 30, 2007. "City of Apache Junction, Arizona. Gateway to legends, lakes, leisure and lost treasures."
  88. ^ Claims to Fame - Rocks, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  89. ^ a b c d Flagstaff Arizona Archived 2011-10-02 at the Wayback Machine, accessed March 29, 2007. "Flagstaff is sometimes called "The City in the Pines" because the town sits in the middle of a Ponderosa Pine stand in the Coconino National Forest. The town is also called "The City of Seven Wonders" because of its proximity to the Grand Canyon, Oak Creek Canyon, Walnut Canyon, Wupatki National Monument, Sunset Crater National Monument and the San Francisco Peaks."
  90. ^ Song A' Th' Week Archived 2007-09-28 at the Wayback Machine, The Legend-News, January 21, 2002. "By golly, it's clean clear to Flag Town, c'mon. => On the highway between Rubber Duck's location and Flagstaff, Arizona ("Flagtown"), there are no reports of police activity."
  91. ^ Kingman Area Chamber of Commerce, accessed March 29, 2007. "Kingman, Arizona: The Heart of Route 66 and gateway to the Hoover Dam, Lake Mead and the Grand Canyon!"
  92. ^ Jahna Berry, Downtown Phoenix donning a new label to lure locals, tourists, The Arizona Republic, March 2, 2009
  93. ^ Soper, Taylor (February 11, 2015). "Silicon Desert: How Phoenix is quickly — and quietly — becoming a hub for innovation". GeekWire. Retrieved June 30, 2015.
  94. ^ Brown, Eliot (March 3, 2015). "Silicon Desert? Developer Bets on Scottsdale as a Tech Hub". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved June 30, 2015.
  95. ^ a b c d e Tagline Guru City Branding Survey, Tagline Guru website, accessed August 18, 2009
  96. ^ Quick Facts about Prescott, Prescott, Arizona. Accessed May 17, 2007. "Called the “mile-high city” at an elevation of 5,400 feet"
  97. ^ Scottsdale Arizona profile, accessed March 30, 2007. "The first mayor was Malcolm White. He also coined the city slogan, 'The West's Most Western Town.'"
  98. ^ Red Rock Country
  99. ^ Claims to Fame - Birds, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  100. ^ The City of Tombstone's Official Web Site, accessed March 29, 2007. "The Town too Tough to Die," Tombstone was perhaps the most renowned of Arizona's old mining camps.
  101. ^ Claims to Fame - Braggadocio, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  102. ^ A Look at the "Old Pueblo"--Tucson, accessed March 30, 2007. Archived October 16, 2006, at the Wayback Machine
  103. ^ a b My opinion Debbie Kornmiller : TV listings' headaches fixed today, Arizona Daily Star, March 18, 2007. "The Sunshine Factory" won a Tucson nickname contest in the 1980s as a replacement for the "Old Pueblo."
  104. ^ "AOIA.org – Arizona Optics Industry Association". Retrieved October 8, 2012.
  105. ^ History, Wickenburg Chamber of Commerce website, accessed November 20, 2011: "The construction of the Phoenix to California highway (Highway 60) brought even more tourists, making Wickenburg the Dude Ranch Capital of the World."
  106. ^ a b c d e Claims to Fame - Agriculture, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  107. ^ a b McKinney, Wanda (April 2005). "Our Favorite Town Slogans". Southern Living. Archived from the original on 2007-11-07.
  108. ^ Claims to Fame - Birds, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  109. ^ The Ghost Bird, National Geographic, December 2006, "The billboards are still up along Interstate 40, inviting drivers to stop at Brinkley, the Home of the Ivory-billed Woodpecker."
  110. ^ Official Site of the City of Conway, Arkansas, accessed April 1, 2007.
  111. ^ Dumas (Desha County), Encyclopedia of Arkansas. The nickname originated with the popular song "I'm a Ding Dong Daddy from Dumas."
  112. ^ a b Kenneth Bridges, El Dorado (Union County), The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture
  113. ^ a b FYV vs. FAY, Fayetteville Free Weekly (blog based in Fayetteville, Arkansas), September 6, 2007[unreliable source?]
  114. ^ Faber, Harold (1993-09-12). "The World Capital of Whatever". The New York Times. Retrieved 2018-11-15.
  115. ^ Hot Springs, Arkansas, accessed April 11, 2007. "You'll find the perfect combination of relaxing activities and kick-out-all-the-stops attractions in the Spa City."
  116. ^ Claims to Fame - Animals, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  117. ^ a b Jonesboro, accessed April 8, 2007.
  118. ^ Little Rock City Beautiful Scrapbooks Archived 2009-01-13 at the Wayback Machine, accessed April 11, 2007. "The City Beautiful Commission came up with the idea of an official rose, in keeping with Little Rock's traditional nickname, "City of Roses." The Joe T. Robinson rose was chosen."
  119. ^ A Brief History of Little Rock, accessed April 11, 2007. "Today, in downtown Little Rock, the old and new mix well together. Stately antebellum structures and ornate Victorian buildings neighbor gleaming new glass-facade skyscrapers stretching up into the river city's skyline with scenic, natural surroundings providing the backdrop."
  120. ^ The City of Lowell, Arkansas, accessed April 11, 2007. Motto is on upper right of page.
  121. ^ Claims to Fame - Products, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  122. ^ Claims to Fame - Rocks, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  123. ^ Ozark Folk Center, accessed April 11, 2007. "Visit downtown Mountain View, Arkansas, the 'Folk Music Capital of the World.'"
  124. ^ Claims to Fame - Arts, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  125. ^ "North Little Rock (Pulaski County)". The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History & Culture. According to oral tradition, people from Little Rock dumped their unwanted dogs in North Little Rock, but the name probably predates this practice and was a disparagement of the north side's blue-collar base. In the mid-1900s, Little Rock students often taunted North Little Rock students with chants of "Dogtown" at sporting and other events.
  126. ^ "Dogtown: Through a Glass Darkly".
  127. ^ Out There: The world's duck-hunting capital - Stuttgart, Ark., lies at the heart of the greatest mallard-hunting area, ESPN, accessed April 11, 2007. "The rice fields encroach to the very edge of the city, and erected at the side of one is a small wooden sign that says you've reached the city limits. This is it: Stuttgart — The Rice and Duck Capital of the World."
  128. ^ Tagline Guru City Branding Survey, Tagline Guru website, accessed August 18, 2009
  129. ^ Alameda, here we come - California island town Archived 2008-02-17 at the Wayback Machine, Sunset (magazine), August 2001. "Much of what makes Alameda, an island with a picturesque perch off Oakland's flank in San Francisco Bay, so unusual is the way it balances connection with isolation. It lies within easy reach of major urban hubs – the bay, the San Francisco skyline, and the East Bay hills are all in view. Even so, the "Island City" seems a world apart."
  130. ^ Antioch - A Total Community, accessed April 5, 2007. "The waters in the Antioch area are some of the prime striped bass and sturgeon fishing waters. As the "Gateway to the Delta", Antioch will continue as a refuge for boaters."
  131. ^ "About Arcadia". City of Arcadia. Archived from the original on August 29, 2013. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  132. ^ Welcome to the Auburn Endurance Capital Web Site!, accessed April 5, 2007. "2003, the Auburn City Council passed an official measure proclaiming Auburn as the Endurance Capital of the World. Auburn is home to some of the most challenging and historic endurance events on the planet."
  133. ^ Relocating to Bakersfield, Green Country. Accessed June 2, 2007. "Bakersfield has become known as "California's Country Music Capital" with the emergence of musicians like Merle Haggard and Buck Owens."
  134. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa Snibbe, Kurt (February 5, 2018). "Test your knowledge of nicknames for states and California cities". The Orange County Register. Retrieved 5 March 2018 – via Napa Valley Register.
  135. ^ Foldvary, Fred E. "The People's Republic of Berkeley" Archived 2007-09-30 at the Wayback Machine, The Progress Report. Accessed May 17, 2007.
  136. ^ Cockrell, Cathy. "The ‘Athens of the West’ - Latest Chronicle of UC edition highlights history of campus arts and culture", UCBerkeley News, October 20, 2004.
  137. ^ Yosemite Wrangler Wins Mule Days World Championships Archived 2008-02-17 at the Wayback Machine, Business Wire, June 30, 2000
  138. ^ Hemphill, W. G. (1964-06-04). "This & That -- Friendliest City In The West". Palo Verde Valley Times.
  139. ^ ABout Buena Park Archived 2007-12-27 at the Wayback Machine, Buena Park, California. Accessed May 17, 2007. "Known as the "Center of the Southland," Buena Park is a City with a distinct heritage undergoing an exciting revitalization in business, residential, and commercial projects."
  140. ^ "Burbank, Ca. – Media Capital of the World". Travel America. April 20, 2007.
  141. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v Claims to Fame - Agriculture, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  142. ^ Visit Carlsbad website, accessed December 9, 2015.
  143. ^ a b Motto ought to be boffo, Irvine World News, February 22, 2004.
  144. ^ "San Fernando's Open Secret: Porn Biz Has Migrated To What Some Call 'San Pornando Valley'", CBS News, November 25, 2002. Accessed June 2, 2007.
  145. ^ a b " City of Roses City of Trees - Chico, California" Archived 2008-01-12 at the Wayback Machine, CaliforniaBeautiful.com, March 17, 2007. Accessed May 17, 2007.
  146. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Faber, Harold (1993-09-12). "The World Capital of Whatever". The New York Times. Retrieved 2018-11-15.
  147. ^ Welcome to the Official Website for the City of Chino: About the City Archived 2007-12-27 at the Wayback Machine, Chino, California. Accessed May 17, 2007. "The City's motto, "Where Everything Grows" originally referred to this agricultural beginning."
  148. ^ A Brief History of Clovis Archived 2008-02-15 at the Wayback Machine, City of Clovis. Accessed June 2, 2007. "Located in the northeast quadrant of the Fresno-Clovis Metropolitan Area, Clovis is situated in the midst of the agriculturally rich San Joaquin Valley. Since its incorporation in 1912, Clovis has been the 'Gateway to the Sierra.'"
  149. ^ a b Your City: Coachella, The Desert Sun. Accessed June 2, 2007. "The "City of Eternal Sunshine – Gateway to the Salton Sea" is largely a young, rural and family oriented area of the desert."
  150. ^ a b Colma, California
  151. ^ History Archived 2007-09-29 at the Wayback Machine, City of Compton. Accessed June 2, 2007. "The City of Compton is known as the "Hub City" because of its unique position in almost the exact geographical canter of Los Angeles County."
  152. ^ Welcome to Corona - The Circle City Archived 2008-01-12 at the Wayback Machine, City of Corona. Accessed June 2, 2007.
  153. ^ CrownCity.com area businesses website
  154. ^ a b "Central Marin Police Authority Consolidation Summary": "Over the past three years the Twin Cities Police Authority and the San Anselmo Police Department have been collaboratively working together toward Police Consolidation through the sharing of services." Accessdate December 9, 2015
  155. ^ John L. Mitchell, Four Classics to Hit the Boards: 'Heart of Screenland' to Stage Theater in Park, Los Angeles Times, July 9, 1987. "Culver City may be known as the 'Heart of Screenland,' but live theater will take center stage there..."
  156. ^ Gateway to the Peninsula: History of Daly City, California Archived 2007-10-12 at the Wayback Machine. Accessed June 2, 2007.
  157. ^ " The melting pot boils over.", The Economist, October 13, 1990. Accessed June 2, 2007. "Daly City outside San Francisco, once a mostly white, blue-collar town, is now called "Little Manila" because of its large Filipino population."
  158. ^ US News & World Report Archived 2013-07-12 at the Wayback Machine
  159. ^ OpenWorld.gov
  160. ^ Fitch, Mike. "Growing Pains: Thirty Years in the History of Davis" Archived 2012-07-22 at the Wayback Machine Chapter Ten: The Political Culture of Davis, Davis, California. "Another of the city's critics was a railroad executive who couldn't hide his annoyance when officials asked his company in the early 1990s to contribute up to $1,000 for a planning project the city was undertaking next to the railroad tracks. "This letter is tantamount to railroad robbery. However, since we are forced to live with the People's Republic of Davis, we will accede to your demands in the interest of the commune welfare," the executive wrote in response, enclosing a check for $500."
  161. ^ Del Mar Thoroughbred Club
  162. ^ Raibert, Andrea. "Garden Grove: City of 'youth and ambition' is culturally diverse, celebrating 50 years of hometown pride" Archived 2008-02-13 at the Wayback Machine, Orange County Register, November 8, 2006. Accessed June 2, 2007.
  163. ^ Mendoza, Raymond (July 10, 2014). "Fountain Valley, a nice place to live". Orange County Register. Retrieved 24 August 2017.
  164. ^ Barry Popik, Big Strawberry, February 16, 2006
  165. ^ Glendale: The Jewel City (PDF), Glendale, California. Accessed June 2, 2007.
  166. ^ City of Glendora website
  167. ^ http://www.cagenweb.com/cpl/sbgoleta.htm
  168. ^ City of Hawthorne website, accessed September 22, 2016
  169. ^ City of Hayward website, accessed November 20, 2011
  170. ^ City of Hercules website. Accessed October 29, 2008.
  171. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2008-03-09. Retrieved 2008-03-04.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  172. ^ The 12 Zins of Lodi Archived 2008-03-13 at the Wayback Machine, accessed March 13, 2010.
  173. ^ a b c Claims to Fame - Plants, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  174. ^ a b Chad Greene, From 'Iowa By The Sea' To 'International City': A Look At Long Beach's Changing Demographics With Former Advanced Planning Officer, Long Beach Business Journal, January 17, 2006
  175. ^ Take Two (June 21, 2013). "'Angel Town': The City of LA's long lost official song". Southern California Public Radio. Retrieved 5 February 2016.
  176. ^ Queen City, Time (magazine), January 30, 1928, accessed April 13, 1928.
  177. ^ Due to earthquakes; a nickname shared with San Francisco, for similar reasons.
  178. ^ Grant, Rachel. "Different stars in Tinseltown", Financial Times, March 9, 2007, accessed April 12, 2007. "With shows such as Red Eye and an important LA artist retrospective last year at the Centre Pompidou in Paris, Tinseltown is finally gaining international artistic recognition."
  179. ^ "Membership Directory and Community Guide" (PDF). Madera District Chamber of Commerce. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-10-04.
  180. ^ Marysville's Golden History, accessed April 12, 2007. "Those that survive are a constant reminder of Marysville's golden history and proof that Marysville is still the ‘Gateway to the Gold Fields’."
  181. ^ Merced Conference & Visitor's Bureau, accessed April 12, 2007. "As the "Gateway to Yosemite," Merced offers the traveler an abundance of recreational facilities and a short drive or ride into Yosemite National Park."
  182. ^ City of Milpitas | About Milpitas Archived 2009-03-06 at the Wayback Machine, accessed March 16, 2009.
  183. ^ Welcome to Modesto - the city of "Water, Wealth, Contentment, Health." Archived 2007-12-27 at the Wayback Machine, accessed April 12, 2007.
  184. ^ Monterey, California, accessed April 12, 2007. "Many California "firsts" occurred in Monterey. These include California's first theater, brick house, publicly funded school, public building, public library, and printing press. Because of this, some have dubbed Monterey 'the cradle of history.'"
  185. ^ Claims to Fame - Animals, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  186. ^ Norwalk Citizen Forum Was 'Worth Every Nickel,' Mayor Says, Los Angeles Times, March 23, 1989
  187. ^ About Oakdale, accessed April 12, 2007. "The Saddle Club started putting on rodeos in the spring, and the city became known as the "Cowboy Capital of the World"."
  188. ^ Oakland: Geography and Climate, City-Data website. "Oakland has earned the nickname "bright side of the Bay" because of its sunny skies and moderate year-round climate."
  189. ^ Hell's Angels: A Strange and Terrible Saga: A Strange and Terrible Saga, by Hunter S Thompson (1966; Random House Publishing; ISBN 0-345-41008-4).[5] "...some were in jail, others had quit and many of the best specimens had gone north to Oakland--or "God's Country," as some of them called it--where Sonny Barger called the shots..." (page 42)
  190. ^ Oakland: Story of a City, by Beth Bagwell (1982; Presidio Press; ISBN 0-89141-146-1).[6] "From about 1860 until the turn of the century, Oakland claimed the title of "the Athens of the Pacific" because of its schools." (page 99)
  191. ^ Oakland (Postcard History), by Annalee Allen (2005; Arcadia Publishing; ISBN 978-0-7385-3014-7).[7] "A Chevrolet plant opened, attracting various automotive parts manufacturers to establish themselves as well, thus earning Oakland the nickname 'Detroit of the West.'" (page 58)
  192. ^ McClymonds Students Study to Rejuvenate Park Archived 2008-02-13 at the Wayback Machine, by Cecily Burt, from Oakland Tribune, Tuesday, May 4, 2004; archived on City of Oakland website (accessed January 6, 2007). "They talked about Oakland's nickname, 'Oak Town,' and the lack of remaining leafy specimens that made the city famous."
  193. ^ For Keyshia Cole, it's good to be back in the Bay Area Archived 2008-02-20 at the Wayback Machine, by Jim Harrington, Oakland Tribune, April 25, 2007, retrieved October 16, 2007
  194. ^ John Serrao, Is the Strawberry the Future of American Agriculture?, Nutrition Wonderland website, accessed January 8, 2010
  195. ^ [8], accessed July 21, 2015
  196. ^ [9], accessed July 21, 2015
  197. ^ Claims to Fame - Weather, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  198. ^ Pasadena Facts, City of Pasadena website
  199. ^ City of El Paso Robles Planning Commission Agenda, Jan. 28, 2014, accessed December 9, 2015
  200. ^ a b Claims to Fame - Favorites, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  201. ^ Local History: Redwood City, CA Archived 2008-01-20 at the Wayback Machine
  202. ^ Judge weighs lawyer's lawsuit: Plan to redevelop downtown challenged, by Will Oremus, Redwood City Daily News. Quote page 7, paragraph #3, '... for a city that has been saddled with the moniker "Deadwood City" in the past.'
  203. ^ Levy, Joan (July 3, 2006). "What happened to the Fourth of July Rodeo?". San Mateo Daily Journal. Archived from the original on 2009-07-22. Retrieved 2007-10-21.
  204. ^ City of Richmond FY 2008-2009 Budget (appears on title page), accessed June 20, 2010
  205. ^ [10]
  206. ^ Riverside dubbed "City of Arts & Innovation" Archived 2010-05-19 at the Wayback Machine, City of Riverside, press release, June 25, 2009
  207. ^ City of Riverside; Urban Forestry Policy Manual, Riverside Public Works Department, November, 2007, page 5. Retrieved 2010-06-20.
  208. ^ http://farmtoforkcapital.com
  209. ^ a b Barry Popik, Big Tomato, April 02, 2005
  210. ^ Sacramento Camellia City
  211. ^ Sacramento River City Archived 2008-01-11 at the Wayback Machine website
  212. ^ Sacramento Earns High Marks as 'Green' Leader Archived 2007-10-25 at the Wayback Machine, article from Sacramento Business Journal, July 2, 2007. "The River City joined Minneapolis and Tallahassee, Fla., as ... runners-up."
  213. ^ Used in names of Sactown Magazine and Sactown.com portal website
  214. ^ City Profile Archived 2011-09-27 at the Wayback Machine, City of San Carlos website, accessed June 4, 2011
  215. ^ Leo, Peter. "'America's finest city' takes a fall", Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, December 6, 2005, accessed April 12, 2007. "Which brings us to less-humble San Diego. It had the nerve to tout itself as "America's Finest City."... This would seem to present an opportunity for Tampa, which bills itself as "America's Next Greatest City."
  216. ^ Fikes, Bradley. "Science & Technology: Silicon Beach". North County Times. Retrieved 2007-08-17.
  217. ^ "CommNexus 'Silicon Beach' Map". Retrieved 2007-08-17.
  218. ^ Caen, Herb (1949). Baghdad-by-the-Bay. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday. ISBN 978-0-89174-047-6. LC F869.S3 C12.
  219. ^ "San Francisco, "the Paris of the West": SFist". 2014-06-22. Archived from the original on 2014-06-22. Retrieved 2018-01-30.
  220. ^ San Francisco Public Library (2005-03-29). "PPIE: The City That Knows How". Amusing America. San Francisco Public Library, Online Exhibitions. Retrieved 2008-06-14.
  221. ^ James Sullivan (October 14, 2003). "Frisco, that once-verboten term for the city by the bay, is making a comeback among the young and hip. Herb Caen is spinning at warp speed". San Francisco Chronicle. Archived from the original on February 3, 2004. Retrieved 2007-12-24.
  222. ^ Many tourists refer to San Francisco as "Frisco", a name popularized through songs like (Sittin' on) the Dock of the Bay and Sweet Little Sixteen. However, locals discourage this use and prefer the nickname The City by the Bay. Samuel D. Cohen writes that many credit "Friscophobia" to newspaper columnist Herb Caen, whose first book, published in 1953, was "Don't Call it Frisco." Caen was considered by many to be the recognized authority on what was, and what was not, beneath the city's dignity, and to him, Frisco was intolerable. Cohen, Sam (1997-09-11). "Locals Know best: only tourists call it 'Frisco'". Golden Gater Online. San Francisco State University. Retrieved 2008-07-13.
  223. ^ "Proclamations and History". www.emperornorton.org. Retrieved 2018-01-30.
  224. ^ "The Exposition City San Francisco. 1912. - David Rumsey Historical Map Collection". www.davidrumsey.com. Retrieved 2018-01-30.
  225. ^ "Map of San Francisco Showing Principal Streets and Places of Interest - David Rumsey Historical Map Collection". www.davidrumsey.com. Retrieved 2018-01-30.
  226. ^ Farewell to Frisco, say hello to San Fran
  227. ^ Jackson, Chris (2018-01-27). "Nicknames for San Jose". kfox.com. Retrieved 2018-11-19.
  228. ^ https://calisphere.org/item/ark:/13030/kt896nc9zv/. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  229. ^ "Does San Jose Deserve the Nickname 'Man Jose'?". KQED News. 2016-12-29. Retrieved 2017-09-28.
  230. ^ San Luis Obispo Chamber of Commerce, accessed July 11, 2007. "Experience the SLO Life".
  231. ^ http://www.ci.san-pablo.ca.us/
  232. ^ [11], accessed 19 Oct 2015.
  233. ^ New York Times article on Santa Barbara
  234. ^ Catalina Island Chamber of Commerce & Visitors Bureau
  235. ^ The Real Surf City? It's Santa Cruz, says Magazine by Steve Marble, The LA Times, June 16, 2009
  236. ^ a b Santa Monica Tries to Curb Charity to Homeless by Kit R. Roane, The New York Times, September 16, 1996
  237. ^ "Santa Monica Finds Its Generosity Has Limits After Vagrant Attack". The New York Times. August 20, 1990. Retrieved December 9, 2015.
  238. ^ Claims to Fame - Ethnic Groups, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  239. ^ Claims to Fame - Business, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  240. ^ City of Sunnyvale website Archived 2008-09-21 at the Wayback Machine, accessed September 5, 2008
  241. ^ http://articles.latimes.com/2010/sep/23/business/la-fi-0920-awesometown-20100920
  242. ^ Miller, Joanna M. (November 30, 1992). "Red Harvest : This Year's Poinsettia Crop Is the Best in Recent Years, Local Growers Say". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 23 May 2016. In 1926, at the urging of the Chamber of Commerce, the city changed its nickname from the Palm City to the Poinsettia City, a title to which the city clings today.
  243. ^ Visalia Chamber of Commerce
  244. ^ a b Willits Chamber of Commerce
  245. ^ Claims to Fame - Energy, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  246. ^ "Welcome to Yorba Linda, CA - "Land of Gracious Living" (text on city welcome sign), photograph on Waymarking.com website, accessed January 8, 2010
  247. ^ City of Alamosa website, accessed 2012-03-05
  248. ^ Fun Facts, City and Community of Arvada website, accessed 2012-03-05
  249. ^ Canary Initiative, City of Aspen official website, accessed December 9, 2015
  250. ^ "Town sign", Town of Ault website (photo), archived from the original on 2013-04-16, retrieved 2012-03-05
  251. ^ City Hall Archived 2012-12-20 at Archive.today, City of Aurora website, accessed 2012-03-05. "Long known as the Gateway to the Rockies, this All-America City on the eastern edge of the Denver-Aurora Metropolitan Area boasts spectacular views of the Front Range..."
  252. ^ Garden Spot of Colorado Archived 2008-02-23 at the Wayback Machine accessed 2007-05-29
  253. ^ The City of Mills accessed 2007-05-29
  254. ^ a b Cart, Julie (September 7, 2002). "Boulder: soiled and seething". Baltimore Sun.
  255. ^ The People's Republic of Boulder Archived 2003-01-11 at Archive.today accessed 2007-05-29
  256. ^ Historic Timeline, City of Breckinridge website, accessed 2009-08-18
  257. ^ The Climate Capital of Colorado accessed 2007-05-29
  258. ^ The Ultimate Rocky Mountain Hideout accessed 2007-05-27
  259. ^ The Southern Gateway to the Grand Mesa accessed 2007-05-27
  260. ^ Central City, Colorado - The richest square mile on Earth accessed 2008-03-21 Archived March 7, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  261. ^ a b History of Colorado Springs Colorado, Pikes-peak.com, archived from the original on 2012-05-05, retrieved 2012-04-15
  262. ^ Pre-Disaster Mitigation Plan Colorado Springs (PDF), City of Colorado Springs, 31 January 2004 (Revised March, 2005), p. 12, retrieved 2012-03-05, Colorado Springs became especially popular with the British and acquired the nickname Little London. Check date values in: |date= (help)
  263. ^ Marshall Sprague, Newport in the Rockies, Ohio University Press, 1961. accessed 2008-03-21
  264. ^ The Chamber Orchestra of the Springs accessed 2008-03-21
  265. ^ It’s day all day in the day time, And there is no night in Creede. Archived 2008-03-30 at the Wayback Machine accessed 2007-05-29
  266. ^ Colorado’s Last Great Ski Town accessed 2007-05-27
  267. ^ The Wildflower Capital of Colorado accessed 2007-05-29
  268. ^ Home of the World's First Rodeo Archived 2007-12-23 at the Wayback Machine accessed 2007-05-29
  269. ^ Claims to Fame - Geography, Epodunk, accessed 2007-04-16
  270. ^ Queen City, Time (magazine), 1928-01-30, accessed 2007-04-13.
  271. ^ Kane, Joseph Nathan; Alexander Edition, Gerard L. (1979). Nicknames and sobriquets of U.S. cities, States, and counties (3rd ed.). Scarecrow Press. p. 31. ISBN 9780810812550.
  272. ^ Kiszla, Mark (2001-01-28). "Take money and run with new stadium". The Denver Post. Retrieved 2008-03-21.
  273. ^ Gentry, Garland (July 1908). "Denver's Famous Street Lighting". Public Service. V (1): 4.
  274. ^ "Denver Lives Up To 'Cow Town' Nickname With Stock Show Parade". CBS4 Denver. CBS. Retrieved 15 January 2017.
  275. ^ a b Claims to Fame - Agriculture, Epodunk, accessed 2007-04-16
  276. ^ Durango Rocks! accessed 2007-05-29
  277. ^ The Garden of Eaton: Beef, Beets, and Beans accessed 2007-05-29
  278. ^ The City of Choice accessed 2007-05-29.
  279. ^ The Real South Park accessed 2007-05-07
  280. ^ Welcome to Fort Collins Archived 2006-10-22 at Archive.today accessed 2008-03-21
  281. ^ a b Visiting Fort Collins[permanent dead link] accessed 2008-03-21
  282. ^ FoCo Cafe, among others
  283. ^ City of Fort Morgan accessed 2016-08-31
  284. ^ City of Lights accessed 2016-08-31
  285. ^ Mike the Headless Chicken accessed 2007-05-29
  286. ^ Grand Junction Visitor & Convention Bureau accessed 2008-03-21
  287. ^ "Grand Junction, CO". Forbes.com. Retrieved March 29, 2014. Grand Junction is located along the Colorado River, where it receives the Gunnison River from the south, giving the city its nickname River City.”
  288. ^ History of Greeley, Colorado, for Kids, website accessed May 1, 2011
  289. ^ History, Town of Garden City, Colorado, website, accessed May 1, 2011. "Do you know how Garden City got its name? In the 1930's, Greeley's nickname was 'the Garden City of the West'."
  290. ^ City of Golden official website, accessed December 9, 2015
  291. ^ Carl Abbott (2008), How cities won the West: four centuries of urban change in western North America, UNM Press, ISBN 0-8263-3312-5, ISBN 978-0-8263-3312-4. Page 103.
  292. ^ Limon - The Hub City of the Plains Archived 2008-02-07 at the Wayback Machine accessed 2008-03-21
  293. ^ "Longmont Hits Puberty", The Prairie Dog Blog, accessed December 9, 2015
  294. ^ "Visiting". Loveland Chamber of Commerce & Visitor's Center. Retrieved 17 April 2012.
  295. ^ "Send Your Valentine's Through the Sweetheart City". Loveland Chamber of Commerce & Visitor's Center. Retrieved 17 April 2012.
  296. ^ "About". Town of Lyons, Colorado. Archived from the original on 19 February 2013. Retrieved 22 February 2013.
  297. ^ The History of Manitou Springs, The Manitou Springs Chamber of Commerce, Visitors Bureau & Office of Economic Development, retrieved 2012-04-15
  298. ^ The Frozen Dead Guy accessed 2008-03-04.
  299. ^ NedFest, the Nederlands Music and Arts Festival, accessed December 9, 2015
  300. ^ City of Ouray accessed 2008-03-21
  301. ^ a b c About Pueblo Archived 2009-11-25 at the Wayback Machine accessed 2008-03-21
  302. ^ Town of Severance accessed 2008-03-21
  303. ^ Steamboat Ski Resort accessed 2008-03-21. "Ski Town USA" is identified as a registered trademark.
  304. ^ Best of The Boat 2014 Winners, ExploreSteamboat.com, accessed December 9, 2015
  305. ^ Sterling, Colorado - A Colorado Treasure accessed 2008-03-21
  306. ^ Old Red Barn accessed 2008-03-28
  307. ^ To Hell You Ride Archived 2008-11-20 at the Wayback Machine accessed 2008-03-21
  308. ^ City of Victor official website, accessed December 9, 2015
  309. ^ Carnation Festival, History Archived 2013-08-20 at the Wayback Machine Clippings from 1970 refer to Wheat Ridge's then well-known status as Carnation Capital of the World
  310. ^ Berlin Chamber of Commerce website, accessed June 27, 2009
  311. ^ Bethlehem, CT official website
  312. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Bill Ryan, What's in a Name? Old Industrial Fame, The New York Times, January 21, 1996
  313. ^ Claims to Fame – Plants, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  314. ^ Perrefort, Dirk. "Lawmakers honor Hat City, 4 veteran politicians"[permanent dead link], The News-Times, April 1, 2008. Accessed April 10, 2008. "Lawmakers tipped their hats to Danbury on Wednesday during the first Danbury Day at the Capitol. Legislators from throughout the state wore hats of every shape, size and color to honor the Hat City's history."
  315. ^ ConnQuest – Derby, Connecticut, Connecticut Directory, accessed July 17, 2008
  316. ^ Groton, Connecticut – Submarine Capital of the World, Roadside America, accessed July 4, 2011
  317. ^ Friedrich, Ed (July 10, 2008). "Bases battle over title of "submarine capital of the world."". ScrippsNews. Archived from the original on April 7, 2012.
  318. ^ Hamden, Connecticut – Town Official Website
  319. ^ City of Hartford, Connecticut official website
  320. ^ a b c Claims to Fame – Business, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  321. ^ Madison: Connecticut's Front Porch, Madison Website
  322. ^ City to celebrate 100th anniversary of arboretum, Middletown Press, April 21, 2009. Quotes the chairman of the Urban Forestry Commission as saying ""Middletown was known as the Forest City before this even happened. It's been that way for a long, long time."
  323. ^ Glasper learns the hard lessons of football. ESPN.com, June 7, 2007. Retrieved 2008-02-14.
  324. ^ Faber, Harold (1993-09-12). "The World Capital of Whatever". The New York Times. Retrieved 2018-11-15.
  325. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am Barry Popik, Smoky City, barrypopik.com website, March 27, 2005
  326. ^ Norwich: The Rose City, Town Greens website, accessed February 19, 2008
  327. ^ Sharma Howard, Norwich's 350th: Roses of all ages share pride in city, Norwich Bulletin, July 3, 2009: Lists several theories of the names origin: (1) "the hills seen from Norwich harbor resemble unfurling rose petals", (2) "the loveliness of Norwich when the magnificent mansions of prosperous mill owners graced the streets," (3) "a speech delivered by 19th-century evangelist Henry Ward Beecher."
  328. ^ The City of Stamford, CT – About Stamford Archived 2012-07-22 at Archive.today. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
  329. ^ Waterbury: The Brass City, Town Greens website, accessed February 19, 2008
  330. ^ West Haven: Connecticut's Friendliest City, City of West Haven Website, accessed June 11, 2008
  331. ^ George Carlin. "Asshole, Jackoff, Scumbag." A Place For My Stuff!. Atlantic, 1981.
  332. ^ Greetings from the Honorable James L. Ford III, Lewes, Delaware. Accessed April 10, 2008. "Founded in 1631 by Dutch seamen, Lewes is known as the 'First Town in the First State.'"
  333. ^ Rehoboth Beach Delaware, Sussex County Online. Accessed April 10, 2008. "Long known as the 'Nation's Summer Capital' because of the number of Washingtonians who visit during the summer, Rehoboth Beach is Delaware's largest coastal town."
  334. ^ Claims to Fame - Business, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  335. ^ "City of Apopka – History". City of Apopka. Archived from the original on 2011-12-24. Retrieved 2011-12-30.
  336. ^ "City of Aventura, FL : Home". City of Aventura. Retrieved 2013-02-23.
  337. ^ "Home Page, City of Bartow". City of Bartow. Retrieved 2011-11-05.
  338. ^ "City of Bartow, Brochure 1920's". University of Florida. Retrieved 2011-11-05.
  339. ^ "Tour de Tow". The News Chief. Retrieved 2011-11-05.
  340. ^ Adelson, Eric. "The Chase". ESPN The Magazine. ESPN. Retrieved 23 May 2011.
  341. ^ Dicky Galore and Joseph Covino, Jr., Sexcapades by the Decades: The Twenties (2007), p. 70.
  342. ^ Escape from Cape Coma
  343. ^ City of Clewiston website, accessed October 5, 2010
  344. ^ a b c Claims to Fame - Animals, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  345. ^ City of Coral Gables website, accessed September 13, 2011
  346. ^ City of Coral Springs History Archived 2007-06-20 at the Wayback Machine
  347. ^ City of Crestview website, accessed June 15, 2017
  348. ^ 14th Annual DeLand Fall Festival of the Arts, DeLand Fall Festival. Accessed June 13, 2007. "Conveniently located between Orlando and Daytona Beach, DeLand is known as the "Athens of Florida" because of its cultural and educational history and people."
  349. ^ City of Deltona, FL. City of Deltona Government. Retrieved 2012-03-21.
  350. ^ City of Destin website, accessed June 15, 2017.
  351. ^ 2006 Outgoing Mayor's Message Archived 2008-05-17 at the Wayback Machine, Eustis, Florida. Accessed June 13, 2007. "As we bring on the challenges of 2007, may Eustis remain the City of Bright Tomorrows, the best City in Lake County."
  352. ^ Wanda McKinney, Our Favorite Town Slogans,[dead link] Southern Living, April 2005
  353. ^ About Fort Lauderdale Archived 2008-04-12 at the Wayback Machine, City of Fort Lauderdale. Accessed June 13, 2007. "The ideal place to live, to visit and to relocate a business. Listed below are pages to help you learn more about the City of Fort Lauderdale, Florida — Venice of America."
  354. ^ The City of Palms Archived 2008-01-25 at the Wayback Machine, Greater Fort Myers Chamber of Commerce. Accessed June 13, 2007. "These magnificent Royal Palms, some towering at 75 feet, give the City of Palms its nickname."
  355. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-05-06. Retrieved 2009-08-04.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  356. ^ a b c Claims to Fame - Fish, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  357. ^ Visitor and Relocation Information Archived 2008-01-12 at the Wayback Machine, Fort Walton Beach Chamber of Commerce website (accessed January 23, 2008)
  358. ^ John Howells, Where to Retire: America's Best and Most Affordable Places (2006), p. 31.
  359. ^ https://thetab.com/us/florida/2016/02/04/rainesville-best-wet-looks-campus-202
  360. ^ Barbie Baldwin, Underground gourmet: restaurants, recipes & reflections (1983), p. 181.
  361. ^ City of Haines City, The Heart if Florida, Haines City, Florida. Accessed June 13, 2007. "Haines City is conveniently located in Central Florida and is referred to as the Heart of Florida due to its location."
  362. ^ History of the City of Hialeah Archived 2007-12-31 at the Wayback Machine, Hialeah, Florida. Accessed June 13, 2007. "Hialeah -- The City of Progress"
  363. ^ Wentworth, Harold and Stuart Berg Flexner. (1967) Dictionary of American Slang. Maruzen Asian Edition. Thomas Y. Crowell Company. P. 286
  364. ^ Jacksonville. Where Florida Begins Archived 2008-08-28 at the Wayback Machine "Visitor Website to Jacksonville".
  365. ^ History of the "Bold New City " nickname Archived 2008-07-13 at the Wayback Machine RelocateAmerica.com
  366. ^ "In Key West, climate, culture entice second-home buyers". ABC News. Retrieved 15 September 2011.
  367. ^ "City of Key West, Florida". Key West Government. Archived from the original on 17 September 2011. Retrieved 15 September 2011.
  368. ^ "Dime City Cycles". Dime City Cycles 57000 Facebook Likes, world-renowned cafe racer site. Retrieved 12 June 2014.
  369. ^ Nannie Kate, Marinas Near Melbourne, Florida, USA Today Travel Tips, accessed November 21, 2011
  370. ^ About the City of Miami
  371. ^ "This Little Known Beach In Florida Will Be Your New Favorite Summer Destination". OnlyInYourState. Retrieved 2018-07-01.
  372. ^ a b Delaney, Anne (2017-06-07). "Navarre residents will protest new signs at Navarre Beach entrance". Pensacola News Journal. Retrieved 2018-07-01.
  373. ^ "Navarre Beach - Florida's Most Relaxing Place - Family Style Schooling". Family Style Schooling. 2018-06-06. Retrieved 2018-07-01.
  374. ^ a b "Home - Navarre Beach | Florida's Panhandle". Navarre Beach | Florida's Panhandle. Retrieved 2018-07-01.
  375. ^ "Florida's Playground Explodes with Family Activities". www.navarrechamber.com. Retrieved 2018-07-01.
  376. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-12-22. Retrieved 2011-03-14.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  377. ^ Tom LaMarra, Kentucky and Florida in 'Horse Capital' Battle, The Blood-Horse (March 28, 2002).
  378. ^ "The Horse Capital of the World". Ocala / Marion County Chamber & Economic Partnership. Retrieved March 5, 2013.
  379. ^ New Resident Information Archived 2007-10-24 at the Wayback Machine, accessed April 12, 2007. "Welcome to the City of Ocoee! We are glad you have chosen to move to The Center of Good Living."
  380. ^ a b Faber, Harold (1993-09-12). "The World Capital of Whatever". The New York Times. Retrieved 2018-11-15.
  381. ^ Information on things to do in the Orlando area Archived 2000-08-30 at the Wayback Machine, accessed April 12, 2007. Slogan is in City seal.
  382. ^ Fitzpatrick, Kelly (April 13, 2011). "Pub crawl: Gator Get Down in O-Town this Saturday". Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved August 21, 2011.
  383. ^ Mayor's Welcome Archived 2008-06-12 at the Wayback Machine, Ormond Beach website, accessed July 4, 2008
  384. ^ Lawlor, Julia. "HAVENS |Panama City Beach, Fla.; A Vacation Town Tries to Take Off Its Blue Collar", The New York Times, January 5, 2007, accessed April 12, 2007. "LIKE a supermodel showing off her good side, Panama City Beach is not shy about flaunting its most valuable asset. The World's Most Beautiful Beaches, boasts the sign at the end of Hathaway Bridge, which leads into the city."
  385. ^ CITY OF FIVE FLAGS Archived 2007-09-28 at the Wayback Machine, accessed April 12, 2007. "Known as the "City of Five Flags," Pensacola has been under the rule of the Spanish, the British, the French, the Confederacy and the United States since the first conquistadors landed in America in 1559."
  386. ^ a b c d e Claims to Fame - Agriculture, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  387. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-01-25. Retrieved 2011-06-05.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  388. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-03-17. Retrieved 2011-06-05.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  389. ^ [12][permanent dead link]
  390. ^ St Petersburg, accessed April 12, 2007.
  391. ^ a b c Claims to Fame - Weather, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  392. ^ The City of St. Petersburg, Official Website of the City of St. Petersburg - stpete.org, accessed January 27, 2011.
  393. ^ Jenny Deam, Clearwater Times (St. Petersburg Times)"St. Pete Beach begins to address name change", accessed January 27, 2011
  394. ^ Wright, I.M. The Stereotypical American: The Disconnected Society. Lulu. p. 12. ISBN 9781105404665. Retrieved 11 May 2015.
  395. ^ "DowntownSebring.Com". Retrieved July 26, 2014. Sebring was given this nickname because in the center of the city is a circular park and all roads lead in and out from this circle like the spokes of a wagon wheel
  396. ^ Laura Bergheim, An American Festival of World Capitals: From Garlic Queens to Cherry Parades (1997). John Wiley & Sons: p. 39.
  397. ^ Douglas Waitley, Best Backroads of Florida: Coasts, Glades, and Groves (2001). Pineapple Press: p. 35.
  398. ^ Alicia Deer, 'Tallanasty' no more: What Tallahassee's beautification means Archived 2015-05-18 at the Wayback Machine, FSUView (Nov. 20, 2013).
  399. ^ Nicholas Gonzalez, Busting the myth of Tallanasty Archived 2015-05-18 at the Wayback Machine, FSU News (Jan. 9, 2012).
  400. ^ Barry Popik, The Big Guava, April 3, 2005, discussion of nicknames' history
  401. ^ Barry Popik, Cigar City, August 15, 2006, discussion of nickname's history
  402. ^ Ybor City: Cigar Capital of the World, National Park Service, accessed April 12, 2007.
  403. ^ Porter, Arthur. "Looking back on fond years in Tampa Bay as the green, green grass of home beckons", Tampa Bay Business Journal, January 26, 2007, accessed April 12, 2007. "I will have been in Tampa for four years in May, and I remember my first day -- one of the typical Tampa days in May.... "Welcome to the lightning capital of the world," my new colleagues declared."
  404. ^ a b c Claims to Fame - Products, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  405. ^ [13]
  406. ^ Cynthia Thuma, Palm Beach in Vintage Postcards (2001), p 32.
  407. ^ Claims to Fame - Animals, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  408. ^ AlbanyGeorgia.biz, accessed December 9, 2015
  409. ^ Alpharetta Convention and Visitors Bureau page, Georgia Tourist Guide website, accessed January 8, 2012.
  410. ^ a b c d e f Claims to Fame - Agriculture, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  411. ^ Viewbook, University of Georgia
  412. ^ "Only in the A". Onllyinthea.com. Retrieved 15 October 2017.
  413. ^ "Ad Planner has been discontinued - Ad Planner Help". Google.com. Retrieved 15 October 2017.
  414. ^ "Aboutn". Straightfromthea.com. 19 August 2007. Retrieved 15 October 2017.
  415. ^ "Because we're the only city easily identified by just one letter", Creative Loafing, November 23, 2011
  416. ^ ""the a-town" atlanta - Google Search". Google.com. Retrieved 15 October 2017.
  417. ^ "Love it or loathe it, the city's nickname is accurate for the summer". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. June 16, 2008. p. C1.
  418. ^ See article Black mecca for extensive references
  419. ^ EndPlay (22 July 2011). "Atlanta May No Longer Be 'The City In A Forest'". Wsbtv.com. Retrieved 15 October 2017.
  420. ^ Karen K. Snyder (2007), Frommer's Atlanta, page 3
  421. ^ a b "The Democrats Atlanta: A City of Changing Slogans", Time magazine, July 25, 1988
  422. ^ ""Could 'Empire City of the South' play host to 2024 summer games", 11 Alive News". 11alive.com. Retrieved 15 October 2017.
  423. ^ McManus, John (11 January 2016). "Taylor Morrison, Acadia Deal: What it Means". Builder. Retrieved 25 May 2016.
  424. ^ "Florida city America's sex capital?". NBC-2.com. 18 July 2012. Retrieved 25 May 2016.
  425. ^ "How Atlanta became the Hollywood of the South". The Washington Times. 29 August 2015. Retrieved 25 May 2016.
  426. ^ King, Michael (3 July 2018). "Atlanta named 'Running City USA' because of AJC Peachtree Road Race". WXIA-TV. Retrieved 24 November 2018.
  427. ^ "Our Quiz Column", Sunny South, p.5
  428. ^ Rebecca Burns (2009), Rage in the Gate City: The Story of the 1906 Atlanta Race Riot, University of Georgia Press, ISBN 0-8203-3307-7.
  429. ^ Sources documented on Barry Popik's Big Apple blog:
    • 5 October 1872, Appletons' Journal of Literature, Science and Art, pg. 376: "Marvellous tales are told of this antique period in the history of the present 'New York of the South,' concerning acres upon acres of land, near the heart of the city, selling for fifty cents per acre, but which now are worth a snug little fortune. Such was Atlanta less than three decades ago."
    • 17 June 1879, Daily Constitution (Atlanta, GA), pg. 4: "...the future New York of the south,France of Britain- as it was predicted at the opening of the Port Royal railroad in 1873."
    • The Mother Of Continental Parliaments
    • 6 July 1881, The New York Times, pg. 4: "The New-Orleans Democrat says that that city is the New-York of the South, and yet has no public library."
    • 29 January 1884, Atlanta Constitution, pg. 4: "The New York of the South. From the New York Tribune: THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION draws a sad picture of its environment. "Within one hundred yards of the officer," is its plaintive mean, "wagons are literally up to the hub in mud. Part of Ellis street, in a quarter mile of the depot, is literally impassable." Assuming that our contemporary's account of these wagons and this streets is literally correct, it looks as if Atlanta was likely to be known as the New York of the south."
    • 12 November 1891, Atlanta Constitution, pg. 4: "Atlanta is a grand city. It is the New York of the south, and henceforth it can get the finest attractions produced, for its patronage is sufficient to make the very best and most expensive show a financial success."
    • 21 October 1892, Atlanta Constitution, pg. 5: "Work will cease altogether and the New York of the south will pay honor to the brave navigator, who in spite of the hardships he had to endure, pointed out a new land to the ignorant people of the time."
    • 19 January 1895, Atlanta Constitution, pg. 4: "Cedartown Standard: Atlanta aspires to be the New York of the south - in fact, she is, and so it is perfectly natural that she should follow New York in having the big police scandal and investigation that is now on hand
  430. ^ Underwriters, National Association of Life (15 October 1893). "Proceedings of the Annual Convention". Retrieved 15 October 2017 – via Google Books.
  431. ^ Jr, William J. Cooper; Terrill, Thomas E. (16 January 2009). "The American South: A History". Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. Retrieved 15 October 2017 – via Google Books.
  432. ^ Still, Bayrd (15 October 1974). "Urban America: a history with documents". Little, Brown. Retrieved 15 October 2017 – via Google Books.
  433. ^ History Archived 2011-12-27 at the Wayback Machine, on City of Atlanta website
  434. ^ Ron French, Atlanta: Black-white gap shrinks, The Detroit News, January 28, 2002
  435. ^ "Whatever Happened to Georgia's Downtown Hotels?", Georgia History Today
  436. ^ International, Rotary (1 June 1916). "The Rotarian". Rotary International. Retrieved 15 October 2017 – via Google Books.
  437. ^ Augusta, Georgia
  438. ^ a b Claims to Fame - Food, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  439. ^ a b c Faber, Harold (1993-09-12). "The World Capital of Whatever". The New York Times. Retrieved 2018-11-15.
  440. ^ Weinraub, Anita Zaleski (1 December 2006). Georgia Quilts: Piecing Together a History. Wormsloe Foundation. p. 129. ISBN 978-0820328508.
  441. ^ Serafin, Faith (4 September 2012). Haunted Columbus, Georgia: Phantoms of the Fountain City. The History Press. ISBN 978-1609495527.
  442. ^ a b c Claims to Fame - Products, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  443. ^ "Visit Darien". Darien-McIntosh Chamber of Commerce. Archived from the original on December 24, 2011. Retrieved December 26, 2011.
  444. ^ "Squaring off over shutdown". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved February 2, 2014.
  445. ^ "Welcome to Dublin, GA". www.cityofdublin.org. Retrieved 8 April 2018.
  446. ^ a b Claims to Fame - Rocks, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  447. ^ a b c d Claims to Fame - Plants, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  448. ^ Julia Traylor Dyar, Remembering LaGrange: Musings from America's Greatest Little City, Arcadia Publishing. Accessed December 9, 2015
  449. ^ [14] The New York Times, June 8, 1895.
  450. ^ MaconGa.org, MaconGa.org Archived 2011-07-27 at the Wayback Machine, listed under Special Events, accessed June 10, 2010
  451. ^ [15]
  452. ^ Wanda McKinney, Our Favorite Town Slogans, Archived 2007-11-07 at the Wayback Machine Southern Living, April 2005
  453. ^ Old Capitol City Classic 5K and Fun Run, accessed December 9, 2015
  454. ^ [16]
  455. ^ http://www.americasmosthauntedcity.com/
  456. ^ a b Claims to Fame - Favorites, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  457. ^ City of Sylvester website, accessed January 8, 2012. Nickname appears in the banner on the top of the page.
  458. ^ [17] Rogers, William W. "Thomasville." New Georgia Encyclopedia. 24 September 2014. Web. 13 March 2015.
  459. ^ a b Susan D. Morris and New Georgia Encyclopedia staff. "Thomson". New Georgia Encyclopedia.
  460. ^ [18] City website.
  461. ^ [19] City website. On city seal.
  462. ^ "Video". CNN. October 31, 1988.
  463. ^ Warner-Robins.org, in title graphic, accessed June 10, 2010
  464. ^ National Grits Festival website (accessed January 24, 2008). "On Feb. 12, 2002, Rep. Johnny Floyd of Cordele, Rep. Ray Holland of Ashburn led the Georgia House of Representatives to approve a resolution that made Warwick 'The Grits Capital of Georgia.' On March 19, 2003, Governor Sonny Perdue recognized Warwick as The Grits Capital of the World."
  465. ^ Rob Pavey, Even if White House got name wrong, world is now watching Burke County., Augusta Chronicle staff blog, February 18, 2010
  466. ^ a b "Big Island of Hawaii Travel Guide". To‑Hawaii.com Travel Guide. Honolulu: Eleakai Publishing. Archived from the original on 2016-01-08.
  467. ^ Linde, Nancy (2012). "Solutions". 399 Games, Puzzles & Trivia Challenges Specially Designed to Keep Your Brain Young. New York: Workman Publishing Company. pp. 290, 391. ISBN 978-0-7611-6825-6. LCCN 2012-21099. OCLC 794032599. OL 16672390W. The Big Pineapple (Honolulu).
  468. ^ Boise Today, Welcome to Boise online magazine, accessed June 20, 2010
  469. ^ a b Thornton Waite, Growth of the "Gate City", Pacific Rail News, October 1991, page 37. Retrieved from trainlife.com on March 11, 2012.
  470. ^ Ian Fennell (July 26, 2007), "Some advice for hiring Poky's next top cop", Idaho State Journal (blog), pocatelloshops.com, archived from the original on November 21, 2007
  471. ^ a b c d e Claims to Fame - Rocks, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  472. ^ "History of Algonquin". Village of Algonquin, IL. 9 February 2009. Archived from the original on 3 August 2014. Retrieved 14 January 2012.
  473. ^ "Aurora History – A Rapidly Growing City". About Our City. City of Aurora, IL. Archived from the original on 29 July 2012. Retrieved 14 January 2012. Later, when the City was the first in the United States to use electric lights for publicly lighting the entire City, it achieved the nickname of 'City of Lights'.
  474. ^ Schielke, Jeffery. "Our Town". Batavia History. City of Batavia. Archived from the original on 17 October 2010. Retrieved 14 January 2012.
  475. ^ Edwards, Jim; Edwards, Wynette (2000). "City of Energy Entrepreneurs". Batavia: From the Collection of the Batavia Historical Society. Chicago, IL: Arcadia. pp. 21–32. ISBN 978-0-7385-0795-8.
  476. ^ a b "Community slogans about agriculture". ePodunk. Retrieved 14 January 2012.
  477. ^ Pantagraph.com | Sesqui! Archived 2012-09-12 at Archive.today
  478. ^ BloomingtonNormal.com, accessed December 9, 2015
  479. ^ Pantagraph.com | Twin City Guide Archived 2009-02-25 at the Wayback Machine
  480. ^ Daily Eastern News Archived 2012-12-16 at the Wayback Machine. Charleston is popularly referred to as Chuckvegas by Eastern Illinois University students.
  481. ^ City of Chester website. Chester was the home town of E. C. Segar, the creator of Popeye, and some characters in his cartoons were based on people of Chester.
  482. ^ "The city had been built, inexplicably, in the middle of a mud flat, which necessitated raising portions of the downtown area on stilts above the sloshy earth, giving Chicago the first of many nicknames: Mud City.", Paddy whacked: The Untold Story of the Irish American Gangster, Thomas J. English, HarperCollins (c) 2005, ISBN 0-06-059002-5, pp73-74, https://www.harpercollins.com/9780060590031/paddy-whacked
  483. ^ Berman, John and Meewalla, Shani. When A Tattoo Goes Wrong, A Trend Develops. ABC News, April 7, 2007. Retrieved 2008-02-14.
  484. ^ Chicago Park District website Archived 2006-03-20 at Archive.today
  485. ^ a b c "Chicago Nicknames". Chicago Public Library. Archived from the original on 11 February 2008. Retrieved 8 August 2013.
  486. ^ 030909-MotorcoachMap
  487. ^ a b c Faber, Harold (1993-09-12). "The World Capital of Whatever". The New York Times. Retrieved 2018-11-15.
  488. ^ City of Crystal Lake. Accessed August 18, 2007.
  489. ^ City of Crystal Lake. Accessed August 18, 2007.
  490. ^ "Central Park skateboarders back to getting the boot – Mayor chases out those bored with their Fairview Park facility." Mike Frazier, Decatur Herald & Review, Saturday, November 11, 2006, p.A1
  491. ^ "ADM lunch puts soy in spotlight – The company spreads the word about food's health benefits." Paul Brinkmann, Decatur Herald & Review, Saturday, November 20, 1999 p.A1
  492. ^ City of Elgin Sustainability Action Plan, Version 2.1 (August 2011), City of Elgin website, accessed October 28, 2011
  493. ^ Elgin Fire Department 2006 Annual Report[permanent dead link], City of Elgin website, accessed October 28, 2011
  494. ^ "A Brief History of Evanston". Evanston Public Library. Retrieved 2009-01-08.
  495. ^ "City of Freeport, Illinois". City of Freeport, Illinois. Retrieved 29 April 2012.
  496. ^ Claims to Fame - Birds, ePodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  497. ^ "History of DuPage County : Lombard". www.dupagehistory.org. Retrieved 2016-12-29.
  498. ^ Village of Huntley. Accessed August 18, 2007.
  499. ^ Joliet JackHammers website Archived 2009-02-21 at the Wayback Machine (accessed June 7, 2008)
  500. ^ a b c d Illinois Farmers' Institute (1919), Annual Report and Proceedings of the Twenty-fourth Annual Meeting Held in Joliet, Illinois, February 19, 20, and 21, 1919. "Joliet is known as 'stone city,' 'prison city,' 'steel city,' and city of 'snap and progress.'
  501. ^ a b Joliet, Illinois, Encyclopedia of Chicago
  502. ^ Tony Graf, Joliet’s oldest school building is a limestone classic Archived 2011-10-12 at the Wayback Machine, The Herald-News (published by Chicago Sun-Times), October 9, 2011
  503. ^ Joliet Central High School History, Joliet Township High School District 204 website, accessed October 28, 2011. Before 1935, the school's sports teams were known as "The Prison City Boys."
  504. ^ Joliet out to escape past ties to prison: City says its image is no longer behind bars, Chicago Tribune, August 13, 2006. "For the first time in nearly 150 years, calling Joliet a prison town would be just plain wrong, city officials contend."
  505. ^ Claims to Fame - Animals, ePodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  506. ^ Lombard Info Archived 2010-05-27 at the Wayback Machine, National University of Health Sciences, accessed April 21, 2007. "Held each year during the first three weeks in May, regardless of the vagaries of the growing season, Lilac Time is Lombard’s celebration of a 70-year-old horticultural tradition that has led to the town’s designation as “The Lilac Village,”"
  507. ^ Lizzie Magie, A wikipedia article... I have no regrets. Eli-magi 4eva
  508. ^ Sloganville Awards, Tagline Guru website, accessed October 28, 2011
  509. ^ Louis Miglio, "A Geography Alumnus Fondly Remembers," Glacial Deposits, Volume 29, 2000-2001, Illinois State University, pages 5-7
  510. ^ Claims to Fame - Food, ePodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  511. ^ Southern Illinois
  512. ^ City of Monmouth, IL – Fast Facts
  513. ^ Morton Pumpkin Festival Information, Morton Chamber of Commerce, accessed April 21, 2007. "Morton is the "Pumpkin Capital of the World". Home of Nestle/Libby's pumpkin packing plant, 80% of the world's canned pumpkin is processed here."
  514. ^ White Squirrel Wars, Roadside America, accessed April 21, 2007. "Olney, IL; Marionville, Missouri; Kenton, Tennessee; Brevard, North Carolina; Exeter, Ontario. Not one, but five towns use albino squirrels as their claims to fame, and none is particularly happy about the others."
  515. ^ Maine South High School
  516. ^ City of Pana Illinois
  517. ^ Claims to Fame - Plants, ePodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  518. ^ Another Gem City Landing? Archived 2007-09-27 at the Wayback Machine, WGEM, April 10, 2007, accessed April 21, 2007. "QUINCY – It was an event that attracted thousands of people from around the world to the Gem City and then it moved to a different location -- Rantoul."
  519. ^ Willhite, Lindsey (4 August 2008). "Rugged 'Rantucky' tough starting spot for Illini". Daily Herald. Retrieved 14 January 2012.
  520. ^ About Rockford Archived 2009-03-01 at the Wayback Machine, City of Rockford, Illinois website (accessed June 7, 2008)
  521. ^ The State Journal-Register: Seeking the origin of the term 'Springpatch'
  522. ^ St. Charles, Illinois Traffic Counts[permanent dead link], City of St. Charles website, accessed December 6, 2010. "We're the Pride of the Fox, Come see why!"
  523. ^ Thomson Chamber of Commerce website (accessed June 8, 2008)
  524. ^ [20], City of Warrenville website
  525. ^ The History of Wilmington, IL Archived 2008-12-27 at the Wayback Machine, City of Wilmington website
  526. ^ a b c d e f g Jacob Platt Dunn (1912), Indiana Geographical Nomenclature, Indiana Magazine of History, Volume 8, page 81.
  527. ^ "The Backstage Blog - Visit Bloomington, Indiana Blog". www.visitbloomington.com. Retrieved 14 April 2018.
  528. ^ http://store.cstv.com/store_contents.cfm?store_id=406&dept_id=16417&product_id=177083
  529. ^ Bluffton, accessed July 18, 2013.
  530. ^ Chesterton, Indiana, accessed July 18, 2013.
  531. ^ Turtle Days, City of Churubusco, accessed April 21, 2007. "Oscar, however, does live on in memories, and is commemorated each year with a four-day Turtle Days celebration. Thus, Churubusco is world-renowned as TURTLE TOWN, USA."
  532. ^ Rich Davis, Words to live by; Pride extends from 'Best Town on Earth' to 'Hub of Universe', Evansville Courier & Press, January 27, 2008.
  533. ^ Columbus, Indiana: "The Athens of the Prairie", accessed April 21, 2007.
  534. ^ [21], accessed November 3, 2013.
  535. ^ a b Jacob Platt Dunn (1912), Indiana Geographical Nomenclature, Indiana Magazine of History, Volume 8, page 79. "Evansville is the 'Crescent City' from its location on the outer side of a curve on the Ohio River; the 'Pocket City' from its location in and as the metropolis of that part of the State popularly designated at 'The Pocket.'"
  536. ^ Catherine Traylor Gregory, Evansville, Indiana Business Magazine, Sunday, June 1, 1997. Nickname refers to city's location on "a horseshoe-shaped section of the Ohio River."
  537. ^ a b Rich Davis, Words to live by; Pride extends from 'Best Town on Earth' to 'Hub of Universe', Evansville Courier & Press, January 27, 2008. "Evansville has long been 'Stoplight City' to truckers thanks to the dozen or so red lights on U.S. 41. ...And while it's true you'll find 'River City' atop Downtown Evansville's Main Street arches from the 1980s, it could just as easily proclaim Pocket City or Heavensville."
  538. ^ Salter Rodriguez, Rosa (2007-06-22). "'City of Churches' hard to prove: Census stats can't back up old moniker". The Journal Gazette.
  539. ^ Lohrmann, Shannon. "Flood brought out our best". The News-Sentinel.[full citation needed]
  540. ^ Olson, Eric (2012-02-29). "30th anniversary of the Great Flood of 1982: Where were you?". Indiana's NewsCenter. Archived from the original on 2014-06-28. Retrieved 2013-07-19.
  541. ^ Crothers, Julie (2013-06-18). "Righting a toppled icon". The Journal Gazette. Retrieved 2013-07-18.
  542. ^ "Phelps Dodge Magnet Wire to consolidate operations to Fort Wayne". Inside Indiana Business. 2004-02-16. Archived from the original on 2014-06-28. Retrieved 2013-07-18.
  543. ^ Allen County - Fort Wayne Historical Society Archived 2007-09-28 at the Wayback Machine, accessed April 21, 2007. "Where does the term "Summit City" come from? When the Wabash and Erie canal was constructed, the highest point (summit) on the canal was at Fort Wayne."
  544. ^ a b THE MAGIC CITY OF STEEL, accessed April 21, 2007. "Local boosters referred to the Town of Gary as the 'Magic City' and the 'City of the Century.'"
  545. ^ Gary's steel town blues, BBC News, January 27, 2002, accessed April 21, 2007. "It is for this reason Gary, with its huge US Steel Gary Works plant – along with other, smaller steel firms – still refers to itself as 'Steel City'."
  546. ^ "Timing not right for study of nickname". Goshen News. 2010-10-13. Retrieved 2013-07-18.
  547. ^ Hornaday, Joe (2008-10-04). "Help the party come to life". Greensburg Daily News. Retrieved 2013-07-18.
  548. ^ Amateur Sports Capital of the World Archived 2008-05-16 at the Wayback Machine, accessed April 21, 2007. "Indianapolis is certainly deserving of its designation as “Amateur Sports Capital of the World.”"
  549. ^ Hot Spot: April 20-22, WISH-TV, April 20, 2007, accessed April 21, 2007. "INDIANAPOLIS – Looking for something fun to do with your family this weekend? There is plenty to do around the Circle City indoors and outside."
  550. ^ About Indy: Who We Are, Indianapolis Convention & Visitors Association, accessed April 21, 2007
  551. ^ a b India-no-place No More,Time Magazine, June 11, 1984, accessed July 27, 2012"
  552. ^ "IndyStar". Indianapolis Star. 2009-06-19. Retrieved 2009-06-19.
  553. ^ Colts' arrival transformed Indy into major sports city, USA Today, January 28, 2007, accessed April 21, 2007. "INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A convoy of moving vans brought more than the Colts to Indianapolis. The westward migration that cold, snowy night almost a quarter-century ago also awakened Naptown to a new era of professional football and transformed the city into a major league sports town."
  554. ^ City of Indianapolis Economic Development Portal: Transportation, accessed April 21, 2007. "The abundance of rail lines caused Indianapolis to become known as the 'Railroad City'."
  555. ^ About Jeffersonville, accessed July 18, 2013.
  556. ^ Information for Businesses, accessed April 2, 2007.
  557. ^ a b LaPorte, Indiana, accessed July 18, 2013.
  558. ^ a b c d e f Jacob Platt Dunn (1912), Indiana Geographical Nomenclature, Indiana Magazine of History, Volume 8, page 80.
  559. ^ History of Grant County & Marion, Indiana, accessed April 2, 2007. "Marion fielded professional baseball and roller polo teams, had its opera houses, supported rival street car companies and came within two weeks of operating the first electric interurban line in Indiana. Marion, "Queen City of the Gas Belt," was as exciting as a Roman candle lit at both ends."
  560. ^ a b A History of Excellence, City of Mishawaka website, accessed June 19, 2009
  561. ^ Huppke, Rex (April 27, 2003). "Day of prayer turning into day of discord". Chicago Tribune. Chicago. Retrieved November 7, 2016.
  562. ^ Roysdon, Keith; Walker, Douglas (2016). Wicked Muncie. The History Press. ISBN 978-1-43965-665-5.
  563. ^ Lasley, Norma (2012). "Muncie". Delaware County. Arcadia Publishing. p. 57. ISBN 978-0-7385-9430-9.
  564. ^ City of Peru, accessed April 2, 2007. "Being the "Circus Capital of the World", we celebrate our heritage each July with our own world class youth circus and parade."
  565. ^ City of Richmond: Rose View Transit, accessed December 9, 2015
  566. ^ "Covered Bridge Capital of the World, Rockville". Indiana Office of Tourism Development. Retrieved 2013-07-18.
  567. ^ "Roselawn, Indiana". Roadside America. Retrieved 2009-06-19.
  568. ^ Buttle; Tuttle (2008). "Naked City (Indiana) Airport". PlaceNames. Retrieved 2009-06-19.
  569. ^ Our Town – Speedway’s Vision Defined!, accessed April 2, 2007. "Speedway, Indiana is the true Racing Capital of the World."
  570. ^ Terre Haute: Queen City of the Wabash, accessed April 2, 2007.
  571. ^ Crossroads of America: In the days before the interstate system, Terre Haute was at the center of travel. Archived 2007-09-28 at the Wayback Machine, accessed April 2, 2007. "Terre Haute's claim as "Crossroads of America" dates back to the roaring '20s, when the city boasted newly paved U.S. 40 and newly designated U.S. 41."
  572. ^ History of Terre Haute, Vigo Co., IN - 1880, accessed April 2, 2007. "Certainly no more beautiful location could have been chosen for the "Prairie City.""
  573. ^ Vigo County Historical Society: History of Terre Haute[permanent dead link], accessed April 2, 2007. "The city's dream of becoming the Pittsburgh of the West was not realized because of inferior ore and the development of Lake County's steel industry."
  574. ^ City of Valparaiso ~ Vale of Paradise, accessed April 2, 2007.
  575. ^ Valparaiso, Indiana, accessed July 18, 2013.
  576. ^ Town of Van Buren, Indiana, website, accessed 10 May 2011.
  577. ^ Vision, Knox County (Indiana) Chamber of Commerce website, accessed 20 November 2011
  578. ^ a b Warsaw: a growing "orthopedics capital of the world.", Indiana Business Magazine, January 1, 2006. "Five industries employing more than 5,500 have earned Warsaw, long dubbed "Lake City" because of its three lakes, a new moniker. Today, Warsaw is also known as the 'Orthopedic Capital of the World.'"
  579. ^ Mike Conklin, Iowa town's claim to fame: the `World's Largest Cheeto', Chicago Tribune, August 26, 2005
  580. ^ City of Cedar Rapids, Iowa
  581. ^ Council Bluffs Area Chamber of Commerce, accessed December 9, 2015
  582. ^ Neal R. Peirce (1973), The Great Plains States of America: People, Politics, and Power in the Nine Great Plains States, W. W. Norton & Company, ISBN 0-393-05349-0, page 106
  583. ^ a b c Claims to Fame - Favorites, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  584. ^ Claims to Fame - Ethnic Groups, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  585. ^ Claims to Fame - Rocks, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  586. ^ FM to remain Pen City, Fort Madison Daily Democrat, accessed November 14, 2011.
  587. ^ Mayor's Letter, Grinnell, IA Village Profile website (accessed June 2, 2008)
  588. ^ Claims to Fame - Food, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  589. ^ Faber, Harold (1993-09-12). "The World Capital of Whatever". The New York Times. Retrieved 2018-11-15.
  590. ^ Rebecca Sunshine Our Hometown: Downtown Sioux City, KTIV NewsChannel 4, July 20, 2008: "Sioux City for a long time was called Little Chicago because of its reputation during the prohibition years in particular for being quite the purveyor of alcoholic beverages."
  591. ^ a b Sloganville, USA Awards For Best City Mottos & Monikers, Tagline Guru website, accessed March 15, 2010
  592. ^ Tagline Guru City Branding Survey, Tagline Guru website, accessed August 18, 2009
  593. ^ Baxter Springs Museum Retrieved 2008-02-21.
  594. ^ a b c d e Claims to Fame - Agriculture, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  595. ^ a b c d Claims to Fame - Birds, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  596. ^ a b Claims to Fame - Braggadocio, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  597. ^ Ford County Historical Society - Dodge City Archived 2009-09-26 at the Wayback Machine
  598. ^ a b Claims to Fame - Animals, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  599. ^ a b Claims to Fame - Business, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  600. ^ a b Claims to Fame - Ethnic Groups, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  601. ^ Kansas City Chamber of Commerce
  602. ^ http://got.net/~landauer/lists/CityOf.html (cf., "Kansas City, Kansas: Heart of America")
  603. ^ a b c Claims to Fame - Favorites, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  604. ^ City of Lansing, Kansas - Community Profile
  605. ^ Lawrence-Journal World: River City Chronicles Archived 2009-01-08 at the Wayback Machine
  606. ^ Little Sweden: A Local Legacy Archived 2009-10-14 at the Wayback Machine America's Story website, The Library of Congress (accessed January 25, 2008)
  607. ^ Manhattan Convention & Visitors Bureau
  608. ^ a b "About Marion". City of Marion, Kansas. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  609. ^ Claims to Fame - Clothing, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  610. ^ Claims to Fame - Food, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  611. ^ Faber, Harold (1993-09-12). "The World Capital of Whatever". The New York Times. Retrieved 2018-11-15.
  612. ^ Claims to Fame - Activities, Epodunk, accessed April 10, 2008.
  613. ^ Top City Athletics, one of several businesses using the name
  614. ^ "Travel Translator: Your guide to the local language in Wichita". VisitWichita.com.
  615. ^ Claims to Fame – Products Epodunk. Retrieved on 2010-10-16
  616. ^ City of Benham Archived 2012-07-24 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved on 2010-10-19
  617. ^ a b Claims to Fame – Art Epodunk. Retrieved on 2010-10-16
  618. ^ We Go Places-Bowling Green, Kentucky Retrieved on 2010-2-9
  619. ^ explorekentucky.com Retrieved on 2010-2-9
  620. ^ Burnside, Kentucky tourism Retrieved on 2010-10-15
  621. ^ Cave City, Kentucky Official website. Retrieved on 2010-10-15
  622. ^ City of Covington, Kentucky Retrieved on 2010-2-9
  623. ^ Solganville, USA Awards For Best City Mottos and Monikers Retrieved on 2010-10-16
  624. ^ City of Danville, Ky – City of Firsts Archived 2008-03-29 at the Wayback Machine
  625. ^ Finley, Marty (October 19, 2010). "E'town Moves Trick or Treat to Sunday". The News-Enterprise. Retrieved 2010-10-19.
  626. ^ Elkhorn City, Kentucky Official website. Retrieved on 2010-10-15
  627. ^ History of Fort Thomas Archived 2010-09-23 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved on 2010-10-19
  628. ^ City of Grayson, Kentucky Retrieved on 2010-10-16
  629. ^ Hazard/Perry County Tourism Retrieved on 2010-10-19
  630. ^ Hopkinsville/Christian County Visitors Bureau Retrieved on 2010-2-9
  631. ^ Hyden, Kentucky Welcome Sign Retrieved on 2010-12-19
  632. ^ Lexington, Kentucky:Athens of the West National Park Service. Retrieved on 2010-10-15
  633. ^ Claims to Fame – Animals Epodunk. Retrieved on 2010-10-16
  634. ^ Visit Lexington, Kentucky, accessed April 7, 2007. "Visiting a horse farm while you're in the Horse Capital of the World is a uniquely Bluegrass kind of experience you'll long remember."
  635. ^ a b c d Jonathan Meador, Art: Behold the mega church Archived 2011-01-28 at the Wayback Machine, LEO Weekly, January 20, 2010. "Louisville has its fair share of nicknames — River City, Falls City, Derby City, Aliville ... the list goes on. But there's one nickname that you might not be aware of: Due to the numerous and varied houses of worship within the city limits, Louisville was once known as the 'City of Beautiful Churches'."
  636. ^ Louisville Historic Tours, Historic Old Louisville Visitors Center website, accessed June 27, 2010
  637. ^ Smoky City Retrieved on 2010-10-16
  638. ^ Horse Racing in Kentucky, Part II, accessed April 7, 2007. "By then Louisville businesses had severed their northern ties since the only market for Louisville-made tools and food staples was in the war-ravaged South, making "former Confederate officers and soldiers precious commodities when the city's Board of Trade began promoting Louisville as the 'Gateway to the South.'"
  639. ^ Parking Authority of River City. Retrieved 2008-02-14.
  640. ^ "GameDay in the Ville". 2008-02-09. Retrieved 2009-01-31.
  641. ^ Rich Davis, Words to live by; Pride extends from 'Best Town on Earth' to 'Hub of Universe', Evansville Courier & Press, January 27, 2008. "Until a few decades ago, Madisonville, Ky., had 'Best Town on Earth' signs spanning some of its thoroughfares. 'It goes back to 1903 when the local paper, then known as the Madisonville Daily Hustler, ran a contest to come up with a slogan,' says mayoral assistant Leslie Curneal."
  642. ^ Griffith, Wendy (May 2, 2004). "Town's Radical Change a "Hope For America"". Christian Broadcast Network News. Retrieved 2010-10-19.
  643. ^ Art Council Formed in Middlesboro Archived 2011-07-14 at the Wayback Machine Middlesboro Daily News. Retrieved on 2010-10-15
  644. ^ Middlesboro, Kentucky Welcome Sign Retrieved on 2010-05-29
  645. ^ Stephen Woodward (2009). "BBC comes to the 'Crater'". Middlesboro Daily News.
  646. ^ Cumberland Manor Bed and Breakfast Archived 2010-12-19 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved on 2010-10-15
  647. ^ Matheny, Ann D. (2003). The Magic City: Footnotes to the History of Middlesborough, Kentucky, and the Yellow Creek Valley. Middlesboro, Kentucky: Bell County Historical Society. ISBN 0-9677765-2-X. Retrieved on 2010-10-15
  648. ^ First Southern National Bank - Wayne County Archived 2011-06-05 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved on 2010-05-29
  649. ^ The Capital of Whatever The New York Times by Harold Faber, September 12, 1993. Retrieved on 2010-10-16
  650. ^ Paducah takes center stage in Quilt City USA Archived 2012-09-05 at Archive.today, Kentucky Educational Television, February 23, 2004.
  651. ^ Official site of the City of Paintsville Retrieved on 2010-2-9
  652. ^ City of Paris, Kentucky Retrieved on 2010-11-25
  653. ^ official site of The City of Pikeville, Kentucky, accessed April 7, 2007. For the origin of this motto, see Pikeville Cut-Through.
  654. ^ Prestonsburg Convention and Visitors Bureau Retrieved on 2010-10-16
  655. ^ City of Shelbyville, Kentucky Retrieved on 2010-10-19
  656. ^ City of Simpsonville Retrieved on 2010-10-19
  657. ^ City of Williamsburg, Kentucky Archived 2010-11-09 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved on 2010-10-15
  658. ^ Byron Harmon (2008), God gave me some bad advice, page 173. Agate Publishing. ISBN 1-932841-34-2
  659. ^ a b c d Faber, Harold (1993-09-12). "The World Capital of Whatever". The New York Times. Retrieved 2018-11-15.
  660. ^ Claims to Fame - Fish, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  661. ^ Breaux Bridge, Louisiana, Chamber of Commerce website, accessed July 3, 2008
  662. ^ Welcome to Dubach, Louisiana
  663. ^ a b Claims to Fame - Food, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  664. ^ Claims to Fame - Birds, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  665. ^ Claims to Fame - Products, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  666. ^ Lafayette History, accessed September 27, 2007. "Lafayette, the heart of Acadiana and the unofficial capital of Cajun Country."
  667. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q New Orleans Nicknames, New Orleans Metropolitan Convention and Visitors Bureau website accessed December 25, 2008
  668. ^ Tagline Guru City Branding Survey, Tagline Guru website, accessed August 18, 2009
  669. ^ New Orleans—"The City That Care Forgot" and Other Nicknames - A Preliminary Investigation Archived 2008-07-06 at the Wayback Machine
  670. ^ New Orleans profile, accessed April 7, 2007. "Because it was built on a great turn of the river, it is known as the Crescent City."
  671. ^ Barry Popik, New York of the South, March 27, 2005
  672. ^ Claims to Fame - Agriculture, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  673. ^ McKinney, Wanda (April 2005). "Our Favorite Town Slogans". Southern Living. Archived from the original on 2007-11-07.
  674. ^ Claims to Fame - Animals, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  675. ^ John Ortved (April 11, 2013). "Ratchet: The Rap Insult That Became a Compliment". New York Magazine. Retrieved December 9, 2013. Ratchet can be traced back to the neighborhood of Cedar Grove in Shreveport, Louisiana.
  676. ^ St. Martinville Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved 2008-02-14.
  677. ^ Welcome to the Queen City, accessed April 7, 2007. "Although Bangor's history is of little national historical significance, a day in the Queen City of the East will provide the curious with opportunities to imagine the past."
  678. ^ Bath School Department, accessed April 7, 2007. "Known as, "The City of Ships", Bath lies on the shore of the Kennebec River and has been a major shipbuilding center for centuries."
  679. ^ Claims to Fame - Agriculture, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  680. ^ Claims to Fame - Clothing, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  681. ^ Farmington, Maine. Maine Resource Guide, accessed January 22, 2013.
  682. ^ Freeport, Maine. Maine Resource Guide, accessed January 22, 2013.
  683. ^ Sally W. Rand. "Freeport's Role In Maine's Statehood". Freeport Historical Society. There has been concern for many years about the tradition that papers were signed in 1820 in Freeport making it the “Birthplace of Maine.” No verification for this claim has been found, ... but this unsubstantiated story has lingered on. Without sources, this legend does not stand up to scrutiny. ...The legend exaggerating Freeport’s true role in Maine statehood was further perpetuated by the sale of collectible china. Souvenir china was imported from Germany for sale in local dry goods store in the late 19th century.
  684. ^ Celebrations, Welcome to Lincoln, Maine Website, accessed January 22, 2013
  685. ^ Barrows, Gridley (July 1, 1974). "Historic Lewiston". The Lewiston Historical Commission. Retrieved April 21, 2018.
  686. ^ Millinocket Historical Society website, accessed June 26, 2009
  687. ^ City of Presque Isle Online Archived 2011-10-01 at the Wayback Machine, accessed April 7, 2007.
  688. ^ Claims to Fame - Food, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  689. ^ a b Faber, Harold (1993-09-12). "The World Capital of Whatever". The New York Times. Retrieved 2018-11-15.
  690. ^ a b Stephen Plocher (2007), A Short History of Waterville, Maine, City of Waterville website, accessed June 21, 2009
  691. ^ [22], Irvine World News, February 22, 2004
  692. ^ Arin Shortz, Know All About Naptown, Charms of the Chesapeake website, accessed April 18, 2012.
  693. ^ Van Smith and Fred Siegel, Can Mayor O’Malley Save Ailing Baltimore?, City Journal, Winter 2001
  694. ^ Popik, Barry."Charm City (summary)". The Big Apple. Nicknames of Other Places. March 25, 2005. URL retrieved on May 5, 2007.
  695. ^ "Baltimore; The City of Firsts". City of Baltimore, Maryland. Archived from the original on October 11, 2007. Retrieved September 30, 2007.
  696. ^ "Baltimore City Heritage Area". Maryland Historical Trust. Retrieved September 30, 2007.[dead link]
  697. ^ "WHAT MAKES BALTIMORE THE CITY THAT READS?". Baltimore Urbanite. Archived from the original on August 29, 2007. Retrieved December 20, 2007.
  698. ^ a b Faber, Harold (1993-09-12). "The World Capital of Whatever". The New York Times. Retrieved 2018-11-15.
  699. ^ O'Mara, Richard. "Backstory: Baltimore - 'Home of 1,000 Slogans'". The Christian Science Monitor. January 5, 2006. URL retrieved on January 27, 2007.
  700. ^ Entry from July 18, 2008: Harm City, Barry Popik's blog, accessed August 10, 2009
  701. ^ Connery, William. "Maryland’s Mob Town Supplied Links Through Rail and Fort". May 2002. URL retrieved on January 27, 2007.
  702. ^ Smith, Van. "Mob Rules" Archived January 12, 2009, at the Wayback Machine. Baltimore City Paper. October 6, 2004. URL retrieved on January 27, 2007.
  703. ^ "Best Monument". 2005 Baltimore Living Winners. Baltimore City Paper. September 21, 2005. Archived from the original on October 12, 2007. Retrieved September 19, 2007.
  704. ^ The Next America Revisited Archived September 30, 2011, at the Wayback Machine, Levinson D. (2003) The Next America Revisited. Journal of Planning Education and Research. Summer 2003, Volume 22, Number 4, pp. 329-345.
  705. ^ Patrick H. Stakem (2008). Railroading Around Cumberland. Arcadia Publishing. ISBN 978-0-7385-5365-8. Retrieved November 10, 2012. Located at the confluence of Wills Creek and the Potomac River, Cumberland, Maryland, is known as the Queen City of the Alleghenies.
  706. ^ "Key City Food & Farm Market | The City of Frederick, MD - Official Website". www.cityoffrederick.com. Retrieved 2019-02-15.
  707. ^ a b Hagerstown, Maryland, mdoe.org Maryland Online Encyclopedia. Retrieved September 15, 2008.
  708. ^ Claims to Fame - Plants, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  709. ^ Amit R. Paley, Takoma Park Council Backs Same-Sex Unions, Washington Post, July 15, 2004, page B01.
  710. ^ Numerous local businesses, including Carriagetown Marketplace Shopping Center Archived 2016-02-05 at the Wayback Machine
  711. ^ a b c Claims to Fame - Products, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  712. ^ Technology Plan 2007-2011, Attleboro Public Schools Archived 2012-03-31 at the Wayback Machine, Attleboro Public Schools website, accessed September 17, 2011
  713. ^ Attleboro Massachusetts- The Jewelry Capital of the World, Guyot Brothers Company, Inc. website, accessed September 17, 2011
  714. ^ Boston: "The Athens of America" - Britannica Student Encyclopaedia
  715. ^ Why do they call Boston "Beantown"?, Ask Yahoo? website, September 5, 2001
  716. ^ Why do they call Boston "Beantown"?, Boston-Online website
  717. ^ a b c Norman Dalager, "What's in a nickname?", Boston.com website, accessed June 18, 2008
  718. ^ The Hub of the Universe, from Oliver Wendell Holmes' reference to the Massachusetts State House as the "hub of the solar system"
  719. ^ Queen City, Time (magazine), January 30, 1928, accessed April 13, 1928.
  720. ^ http://www.brockton.ma.us/
  721. ^ Cambridge Officials Put a Stop to Boy Scout Drive to Aid Troops in Iraq, Fox News, accessed April 4, 2008.
  722. ^ "City of Chicopee" Archived 2012-03-07 at the Wayback Machine, Boys & Girls Clubs of Chicopee. Accessed December 9, 2015
  723. ^ Trausch, Susan (1990), "There is Life Beyond Boston--Really," The Boston Globe, June 6, 1990, p. 17: "[Springfield] has Chicopee, "Kielbasa Capital of the World," right next door."
  724. ^ O'Brien, George (2001), "Stretching the Imagination in Chicopee," BusinessWest, October 1, 2001: p. 14: "The city once known merely as the kielbasa capital of the universe now has much more on its plate."
  725. ^ Reynolds, Mark. "Mayor's plans for city include schools for gifted pupils", The Providence Journal, February 2, 2005. Accessed June 28, 2009. "Meanwhile, the graduation rate for students in Fall River -- the self-proclaimed 'Scholarship City' -- is 97 percent."
  726. ^ Mike Richard (1993). Glory to Gardner: 100 years of football in the Chair City.
  727. ^ Bruce Gellerman, Erik Sherman (2008). Massachusetts Curiosities: Quirky Characters, Roadside Oddities & Other Offbeat Stuff. Globe Pequot. ISBN 0762746807.: "By 1837 they were turning out so many chairs that residents immodestly dubbed the place "Chair City of the World."
  728. ^ Constance Riley (2008). Chair City of the World. Xlibris. ISBN 978-1436358453.[self-published source]
  729. ^ Used in numerous local business and organization names, e.g. Chair City Supply Company, Chair City Oil, Chair City Family Medicine, Chair City Pale Ale Archived 2012-01-10 at the Wayback Machine, Chair City Pipers, etc.
  730. ^ City of Gardner official website, accessed October 28, 2008.
  731. ^ Faber, Harold (1993-09-12). "The World Capital of Whatever". The New York Times. Retrieved 2018-11-15.
  732. ^ Holyoke Community Charter School (HCCS) Opens in the Birthplace of Volleyball, SABIS Educational System, archived from the original on November 28, 2010