List of closed New York City Subway stations

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The City Hall station was the original southern terminal station of the first line

The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system that serves four of the five boroughs of New York City in the U.S. state of New York: the Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, and Queens. Its predecessors—the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT), the Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT), and the Independent Subway System (IND)—were consolidated in 1940. Since then, stations of the New York City Subway have been permanently closed, either entirely or in part.

The largest number of closed New York City Subway stations consist of stations on abandoned and demolished elevated lines once operated by the IRT and the BMT, both of which were privately held companies. After their takeover by the City of New York (the IND was already owned and operated by New York City), the three former systems were no longer in competition with each other. Thus, elevated lines that duplicated underground lines were the first to close. Other elevated lines that did not create a redundancy in the system, such as the Bronx portion of the IRT Third Avenue Line and a major portion of the BMT Myrtle Avenue Line were later demolished. Two stations in which sections of track still operate have been demolished. The Dean Street station was demolished as part of the rebuilding of the BMT Franklin Avenue Line, and the Cortlandt Street station of the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line was demolished after it sustained heavy damage caused by the September 11 attacks.

The remaining closed stations and portions of stations are intact and are abandoned. The exception is the Court Street station: it is the site of the New York Transit Museum, a museum that documents the history of public transportation in New York City. The closed outer platforms of the Hoyt–Schermerhorn Streets station are occasionally used for filming purposes. The criterion for closing stations, as explained by spokesman Charles Seaton, is not "because of low ridership. The only reason we have closed a station is because of its proximity to another station... The smaller stations are just as necessary as the larger ones."[1]

Permanently closed but existing stations[edit]

These stations are still intact but are not currently served by passenger trains. This list does not include closed platforms on a different level of an open station. For the one station that is currently closed on a temporary basis, see "Reopened and temporarily closed stations" below.

Station Division Line Borough Opened Closed Former
Services
Notes
18th Street A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan October 27, 1904[2] November 8, 1948 NYCS-bull-trans-6.svg Between 23rd Street and 14th Street – Union Square. Closed after platform lengthening of both adjacent stations and the opening of new entrances at 22nd Street and 15th Street deemed the 18th Street station to be within proximity.[3][4]
91st Street A (IRT) Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan October 27, 1904[2] February 2, 1959 NYCS-bull-trans-1.svg Between 96th Street and 86th Street. Closed after platform lengthening of the 96th Street platforms deemed the station to be within proximity.[5]
Anderson–Jerome Avenues A (IRT) Ninth Avenue elevated Bronx July 1, 1918 August 31, 1958 North of the 155th Street station, the elevated line crossed the Harlem River and went into a tunnel, much like the 125th Street subway station comes out of the tunnel onto a high viaduct. This was done in both places to keep the grade of the tracks relatively level. Closed with the discontinuation of the Polo Grounds Shuttle.
City Hall Loop A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan October 27, 1904[2] December 31, 1945 NYCS-bull-trans-6.svg South of Brooklyn Bridge – City Hall on a curved balloon loop. Closed due to low ridership, short platform length and the proximity of the busier Brooklyn Bridge – City Hall station.[6] Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Court Street B (IND) Fulton Street Line Brooklyn April 9, 1936[7] June 1, 1946[8] NYCS-bull-trans-S.svg West of Hoyt–Schermerhorn Streets. Closed due to low ridership and proximity to other Downtown Brooklyn stations. Site now houses the New York Transit Museum.[9][10]
Myrtle Avenue B (BMT) Fourth Avenue Line Brooklyn June 22, 1915[11] July 1, 1956July 1956[12] Between the Manhattan Bridge and DeKalb Avenue. Closed due to proximity to DeKalb Avenue and construction of a flying junction to ease a choke point in the area.[12] The southbound platform no longer exists; the northbound platform now houses the Masstransiscope zoetrope artwork by Bill Brand visible from Manhattan-bound trains coming from the local track at DeKalb Avenue.[13]
Sedgwick Avenue A (IRT) Ninth Avenue elevated Bronx July 1, 1918 August 31, 1958 North of the 155th Street station, the elevated line crossed the Harlem River and went into a tunnel similarly to how the 125th Street subway station comes out of the tunnel onto a high viaduct. This was done in both places to keep the grade of the tracks relatively level. Closed with the discontinuation of the Polo Grounds Shuttle.
South Ferry A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan July 10, 1905[2] February 13, 1977 NYCS-bull-trans-5.svg NYCS-bull-trans-S.svg Inner platform of station; south of Bowling Green on a curved balloon loop. Closed due to low ridership, specialized rolling stock requirement and proximity to Bowling Green.[14]
Worth Street A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan October 27, 1904[2] September 1, 1962 NYCS-bull-trans-6.svg Between Canal Street and Brooklyn Bridge – City Hall. Closed after platform lengthening of the Brooklyn Bridge – City Hall platforms deemed the station to be within proximity.[15]

Open stations with closed platforms[edit]

These stations are currently in operation, but contain abandoned platforms either adjacent to or on another level from the open platforms. The entries under the "Line" column refer to the line in question, even if the line is defunct. The entries under the "Opened" and "Closed" columns refer to the platform in question.

Station Division Line Borough Opened Closed Former
Services
Notes
009Ninth Avenue B (BMT) Culver Line Brooklyn March 16, 1919[11] May 10, 1975 NYCS-bull-trans-S.svg Lower platforms of the bi-level Ninth Avenue station.[16] Platforms abandoned after Culver Shuttle service was discontinued.[17] The line between Ninth Ave and Ditmas Avenue was demolished in 1985.
14th Street – Union Square A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan October 27, 1904[2] NYCS-bull-trans-6.svg Two side platforms (5-car length) originally used for local service closed due to lengthening of all trains to ten cars, and use of island platforms for cross-platform interchange with express services.
42nd Street – Port Authority Bus Terminal B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan September 10, 1932[7] 1981-03March 1981[9] NYCS-bull-trans-E.svg The lower level side platform on the southbound side was built with the upper level but not completed. It was completed in the 1950s and opened in September 1959 for Aqueduct Racetrack express service until that service's cessation in 1981.[9] It was also used for E service during the 1970s and as a crossunder during the station's history. It was partially demolished to make way for the 7 Subway Extension in the late-2000s.
59th Street – Columbus Circle B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan September 10, 1932[7] 1981 NYCS-bull-trans-A.svg NYCS-bull-trans-D.svg The center of three island platforms has been closed since 1981. Trains can't easily open their doors on both sides simultaneously. The edges of the platform were equipped with railings in the late-2000s, and re-opened as a transfer passageway to the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line platforms until 2010, when they were converted again into office space and storage rooms.
96th Street A (IRT) Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan October 27, 1904[2] May 2010 NYCS-bull-trans-1.svg Two side platforms (5-car length) originally used for local service closed due to lengthening of all trains to ten cars, and use of island platforms for cross-platform interchange with express services. They were used as part of the station's entrances until 2010.
Atlantic Avenue B (BMT) Fulton Street elevated Brooklyn 1916 April 26, 1956 BMT 13 Formerly a six track, three island platform station. Western-most island platform still in service for the BMT Canarsie Line. Center island platform still standing, but no tracks are installed. The center island platform was last used in 1956 for Fulton Street elevated service. Eastern-most tracks, platform and structure demolished in 2003–2004.
Bergen Street B (IND) Culver Line Brooklyn March 20, 1933[7] 1976 NYCS-bull-trans-F.svg When express service on the Culver line ended in 1976, the lower level of this station closed and fell into disrepair. There are no plans to refurbish or reopen this level.
Bleecker Street A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan 1957[18] March 26, 2012[19] NYCS-bull-trans-6.svg Uptown platform lengthened at northern end in 1950s. Uptown platform lengthened at southern end for construction of a transfer to Broadway – Lafayette Street in 2012; Original northern extension closed at the same time.
Bowery B (BMT) Nassau Street Line Manhattan August 4, 1913[11] Fall 2004 NYCS-bull-trans-J.svg NYCS-bull-trans-Z.svg Due to northbound service being rerouted to the former downtown express track, eastern island platform closed with all service on the western island platform.
Bowling Green A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan July 10, 1905[2] February 13, 1977 NYCS-bull-trans-S.svg Western island platform used for shuttle service to South Ferry. Platform closed when shuttle service was discontinued.[14]
Broadway B (BMT) Myrtle Avenue Line Brooklyn June 25, 1888 October 4, 1969 MJ Upper level. Island platform still standing, but no tracks are installed.
Brooklyn Bridge – City Hall A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan October 27, 1904[2] NYCS-bull-trans-6.svg Two side platforms (5-car length) originally used for local service closed due to lengthening of all trains to ten cars, and use of island platforms for cross-platform interchange with express services. Curved portions of island platforms at the south end with gap fillers closed.
Canal Street B (BMT) Nassau Street Line Manhattan August 4, 1913[11] Fall 2004 NYCS-bull-trans-J.svg NYCS-bull-trans-Z.svg Due to northbound service being rerouted to the former downtown express track, eastern island platform closed with all service on the western island platform.
Chambers Street B (BMT) Nassau Street Line Manhattan August 4, 1913[11] NYCS-bull-trans-J.svg NYCS-bull-trans-Z.svg Two side platforms and center island platform closed. Western and eastern island platforms still in service for downtown and uptown services respectively.
DeKalb Avenue B (BMT) Fourth Avenue Line Brooklyn June 22, 1915[11] 19601960[12] NYCS-bull-trans-B.svg NYCS-bull-trans-D.svg NYCS-bull-trans-N.svg NYCS-bull-trans-Q.svg NYCS-bull-trans-R.svg The island platforms were originally extended southward in 1927 on curves. Coincident with the reconstruction of switches, in 1960, the platforms were extended on a straight extension northward and the curved portions were closed.[12]
East 180th Street A (IRT) Dyre Avenue Line Bronx May 15, 1941[2] NYCS-bull-trans-S.svg Island platform east of the current East 180th Street platforms in operation. Platform abandoned after Dyre Avenue Line trains operated through service to the IRT White Plains Road Line.
Essex Street B (BMT) Nassau Street Line Manhattan September 16, 1908[20] 1948 Large open space south of station visible from platforms; Closed trolley terminal with multiple tracks and turning loops.
Gun Hill Road A (IRT) Third Avenue elevated Bronx October 4, 1920 April 28, 1973 8 (New York City Subway service) Upper level for the subway opened March 3, 1917 as part of the Dual Contracts. The lower level for the elevated was built at the same time but not opened until October 4, 1920. The lower level was an island platform with two tracks. The Third Avenue elevated closed on April 28, 1973. The lower level was demolished as part of a station rebuild in 2004–2006.
Hoyt–Schermerhorn Streets B (IND) Fulton Street Line Brooklyn April 9, 1936[7] June 1, 1946 NYCS-bull-trans-S.svg The two outer platforms were originally intended for Court Street service. When that station closed, so did these platforms.
1959-09September 1959[9] 1981-03March 1981[9] S The two outer platforms were reopened for Aqueduct Racetrack express service until that service's cessation.[9]
Mets – Willets Point A (IRT) Flushing Line Queens May 7, 1927[2] NYCS-bull-trans-7.svg The northern end of the very long southbound side platform is abandoned and gated off.
Pelham Bay Park A (IRT) Pelham Line Bronx December 20, 1920[2] NYCS-bull-trans-6.svg Two side platforms (5-car length) closed due to lengthening of all trains to ten cars.
Pelham Parkway A (IRT) Dyre Avenue line Bronx May 29, 1912 December 12, 1937 NYW&B Northbound island platform has no center express track installed.
Queensboro Plaza A (IRT) Second Avenue elevated Queens July 23, 1917[21] June 13, 1942[22] Platforms for IRT Flushing Line and BMT Astoria Line still used.
Rector Street B (BMT) BMT Broadway Line Manhattan January 5, 1918   NYCS-bull-trans-R.svg The south end of the northbound side platform is walled off. The rest of the station is still in use.
Van Cortlandt Park – 242nd Street A (IRT) Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line Bronx August 1, 1908[2] NYCS-bull-trans-1.svg Two side platforms (5-car length) closed due to lengthening of all trains to ten cars.
Wakefield – 241st Street A (IRT) White Plains Road Line Bronx December 13, 1920[2] NYCS-bull-trans-2.svg Two side platforms (5-car length) closed due to lengthening of all trains to ten cars.
Woodlawn A (IRT) Jerome Ave Line Bronx April 15, 1918[2] NYCS-bull-trans-4.svg Two side platforms (5-car length) closed due to lengthening of all trains to ten cars.

Unfinished stations[edit]

These stations saw some construction but were left unfinished. The entries under the "Station" column refer to the station in which the unfinished station was built around.

Station Division Proposed Line Borough Notes
Broadway B (IND) Worth Street Line Brooklyn Upper level with four island platforms and six tracks (similar to Hoyt–Schermerhorn Streets) partially built for the IND Second System.
City Hall B (BMT) Broadway Line Manhattan Lower level with two island platforms and three tracks. The platforms were intended to serve express trains, but express trains were instead rerouted over the Manhattan Bridge.
East Broadway B (IND) Worth Street Line Manhattan Upper level with two side platforms and two tracks. Space was set aside for the IND Second System, but never completed. Part of unfinished station is now the mezzanine.
Jackson Heights – Roosevelt Avenue B (IND) Winfield Spur and Queens Boulevard Line Queens Upper level with an island platform (for 8-car trains) and two trackways partially built for the IND Second System. The station is tiled and had blank signs, but no tracks or signals have been installed.
Nevins Street A (IRT) Provisional IRT service on Fulton Street or Fourth Avenue Brooklyn Lower level with on side platform and one track partially built for a provisional IRT expansion. The provisional lines the platform would have served are now the IND Fulton Street Line and the BMT Fourth Avenue Line.
Utica Avenue B (IND) Utica Avenue Line Brooklyn Upper level with two island platforms and four tracks partially built for the IND Second System.

Demolished stations[edit]

These stations have been demolished, with little or no infrastructure in existence. For lines that have been demolished, see defunct lines.

Station Division Line Borough Opened Closed Notes
180th Street – Bronx Park A (IRT) White Plains Road Line Bronx November 26, 1904[2] August 4, 1959 Former terminal station prior to the extension of the IRT White Plains Road Line. The next station south was West Farms Square – East Tremont Avenue.
221st Street A (IRT) Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan March 12, 1906[23] January 14, 1907[24] The temporary terminus of the IRT West Side Line until the opening of the new terminal station, Marble Hill – 225th Street.
Cortlandt Street A (IRT) Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan July 1, 1918[2] September 11, 2001[25] Severely damaged as a result of the September 11, 2001 attacks. It was demolished and will be rebuilt.[25] See also "Reopened and temporarily closed stations."
Dean Street B (BMT) Franklin Avenue Line Brooklyn August 15, 1896[26][27] September 10, 1995[28] Between Franklin Avenue and Park Place stations. Demolished as part of the reconstruction of the BMT Franklin Avenue Line; also closed due to low ridership and proximity to adjacent stations.[28] See also "Reopened and temporarily closed stations."
Park Avenue B (BMT) Jamaica Line Brooklyn June 25, 1888 sometime between 1912 and 1921 Between Myrtle Avenue and Flushing Avenue stations
World's Fair B (BMT) IND World's Fair Line Queens April 22, 1939 October 28, 1940 Served the 1939–1940 World's Fair, and was demolished after the fair's closure.

Reopened and temporarily closed stations[edit]

These are stations that were officially closed and then reopened after a period of time. This list does not include stations that were closed due to rehabilitation. One station that is currently closed due to technical reasons that prohibit a safe opening is included here.

In addition to the three Cortlandt Street stations below, a number of stations were closed in Lower Manhattan in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks. See Closings and cancellations following the September 11 attacks.

Station Division Line Borough Closed Reopened Notes
Cortlandt Street B (BMT) Broadway Line Manhattan September 11, 2001 September 15, 2002 Closed when station sustained significant damage due to the September 11, 2001 attacks.
Cortlandt Street B (BMT) Broadway Line Manhattan August 20, 2005 November 25, 2009 (northbound)[29]
September 6, 2011 (southbound)[30]
The station was closed a second time for the construction of the Dey Street Passageway and by request of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to facilitate the rebuilding of the World Trade Center site.
Cortlandt Street A (IRT) Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan September 11, 2001 still under construction Closed when station sustained severe damage due to it being right underneath Ground Zero of the September 11, 2001 attacks. Station has since been demolished and will be rebuilt when reconstruction of the new World Trade Center site is being performed.[25] See also "Demolished stations."
Dean Street B (BMT) Franklin Avenue Line Brooklyn 1899 October 28, 1901 Closed due to low ridership. The station was reopened following protests.[citation needed] See also "Demolished stations."
South Ferry (Outer Loop) A (IRT) Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan March 16, 2009 April 4, 2013 Closed due to the opening of the new South Ferry – Whitehall Street station. Reopened when the new station was damaged by Hurricane Sandy.
South Ferry (new) A (IRT) IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan October 28, 2012 still under construction Flooded by Hurricane Sandy in October 2012. Station is temporarily closed while being made rebuilt for service. The outer South Ferry loop serves as a temporary replacement.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Olshan, Jeremy (2006-08-21). "Lone Riders of the Rockaways: 256 a Day Use Sleepiest Subway Stop". New York Post. Archived from the original on January 11, 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-10. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Fischler, "The Subway," p. 239-240
  3. ^ Brennan, Joseph. "18 St". Abandoned Stations. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  4. ^ "IRT STATION TO BE CLOSED; East Side Subway Trains to End Stops at 18th Street". The New York Times. 1948-11-06. Retrieved 2010-03-11. 
  5. ^ Brennan, Joseph. "91 St". Abandoned Stations. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  6. ^ Brennan, Joseph. "City Hall (IRT)". Abandoned Stations. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  7. ^ a b c d e Fischler, "The Subway," p. 243-244
  8. ^ Fischler, "The Subway and the City," p. 503
  9. ^ a b c d e f Brennan, Joseph. "Court St, and Hoyt–Schermerhorns Sts platforms". Abandoned Stations. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  10. ^ Fischler, "The Subway and the City," pp. 501–510
  11. ^ a b c d e f Fischler, "The Subway," p. 241-242
  12. ^ a b c d Brennan, Joseph. "Myrtle Ave, and De Kalb Ave platforms". Abandoned Stations. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  13. ^ Williams, Keith. "The DeKalb Avenue station and the Manhattan Bridge". The Weekly Nabe. Retrieved 26 April 2012. 
  14. ^ a b Brennan, Joseph. "Bowling Green & South Ferry platforms". Abandoned Stations. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  15. ^ Brennan, Joseph. "Worth St". Abandoned Stations. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  16. ^ The upper level platform is served by the BMT West End Line.
  17. ^ Brennan, Joseph. "9 Ave lower level". Abandoned Stations. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  18. ^ Chan, Sewell (2005-05-07). "With Connection on No. 6 Line, a Manhattan Transfer Is Coming". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-04-27. 
  19. ^ "Bleecker Street Platform Shifts". MTA.info. March 26, 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-23. 
  20. ^ New York Times, Mayor Runs a Train Over New Bridge, September 17, 1908, page 16
  21. ^ Time Traveling on the Second Avenue El
  22. ^ Staff. "Second Avenue 'El' Coming to a Stop", The Christian Science Monitor, June 13, 1942. Accessed March 30, 2014.
  23. ^ A History of the New York City Subway System, Part 1 The Manhattan Els and the IRT. p. 30. 
  24. ^ "Farthest North In Town By The Interborough: Take a Trip to the New Station, 225th Street West". New York Times. January 14, 1907. Retrieved 16 August 2015. 
  25. ^ a b c Brennan, Joseph. "Cortlandt St". Abandoned Stations. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  26. ^ "New Route to Coney Island". Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, NY). August 14, 1896. p. 12. 
  27. ^ "First Trains to Brighton". Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, NY). August 14, 1896. p. 7. 
  28. ^ a b Pérez-Peña, Richard (1995-09-11). "A Subway Station Is Shuttered, the First in 33 Years". The New York Times. Retrieved 2009-06-01. 
  29. ^ "Cortlandt Street R/W Subway Station Reopens". New York City Transit Authority. Retrieved 2009-11-26. 
  30. ^ Fermino, Jennifer (August 3, 2011). "G. Zero station set to reopen". New York Post. Retrieved September 6, 2011. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Fischler, Stan (1997). The Subway: A Trip Through Time on New York's Rapid Transit. H & M Productions II Inc. ISBN 1-882608-19-4. 
  • Fischler, Stan (2004). The Subway and the City: Celebrating a Century. with John Henderson. Frank Merriwell Incorporated. ISBN 0-8373-9251-9. 
  • Dougherty, Peter (2007). Tracks of the New York City Subway v4.2.