List of coal fired power stations in Australia

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Liddell Power Station was commissioned between 1971 and 1973

These fossil fuel power stations burn coal to power steam turbines that generate some or all of the electricity they produce. Australia's fleet of coal fired power stations are aging and due for replacement. In early 2017, 75% of coal fired power station in the country were operating beyond their original design life.[1] The Turnbull government is developing an investment framework for energy in Australia, leading to a debate on renewable energy.[2]

The declining cost of renewable energy sources such as solar power, wind power and battery storage means it is unlikely a new coal fired power station will ever be built in Australia.[3] The Liddell Power Station is expected to be decommissioned and replaced by battery storage in 2022.[4]

New South Wales[edit]

Power station Max. Capacity (MW) Turbines Coal Type Conveyance Mine type Cooling Water Status
Bayswater 2,640 4 bituminous conveyors, rail open cut fresh Active
Eraring 2,880 4 bituminous rail, truck underground salt Active
Liddell 2,000 4 bituminous conveyors, rail open cut fresh Active
Mt Piper 1,400* 2 bituminous road, conveyor underground fresh Active
Vales Point 1,320 2 bituminous conveyors underground salt Active

Total (MW): 10,240

  • In 2007 Delta Electricity re-rated the 2 units at Mt Piper at 700MW capacity. Further upgrades to capacity will occur in 2008/9
  • Liddell scheduled for closure in 2022.[5]
  • Vales Point B scheduled for closure in 2028.[5]
  • Eraring scheduled for closure in 2034.[5]
  • Bayswater scheduled for closure in 2035.[5]
  • Mount Piper scheduled for closure in 2043.[5]

Queensland[edit]

Power station Max. Capacity (MW) Turbines Coal Type Conveyance Mine type Cooling Water Status Refs
Callide A & B 730 6 bituminous conveyor open cut fresh Active [6]
Callide C 900 2 bituminous conveyor open cut fresh Active [6]
Collinsville 190 5 bituminous road open cut fresh Active [7][8]
Gladstone 1,680 6 bituminous rail open cut seawater Active [6]
Kogan Creek 750 1 bituminous conveyor open cut dry cooled Active [6]
Millmerran 852 2 bituminous conveyor open cut dry cooled Active [6]
Stanwell 1,445 4 bituminous rail open cut fresh Active [6]
Tarong 1,400 4 bituminous conveyor open cut fresh Active [6][9]
Tarong North 443 1 bituminous conveyor open cut fresh Active [6]

Total (MW): 8,390

  • Gladstone scheduled for closure in 2032.[5]
  • Tarong scheduled for closure in 2036.[5]
  • Callide B scheduled for closure in 2039.[5]
  • Stanwell scheduled for closure in 2046.[5]

Victoria[edit]

Power station Max. capacity (MW) Turbines Coal type Conveyance Mine type Cooling water Status
Loy Yang A 2200 4 lignite conveyors open cut fresh cooling tower Active
Loy Yang B 1050 2 lignite conveyors open cut fresh cooling tower Active
Yallourn Power Station 1480 4 lignite conveyors open cut fresh cooling tower Active

Total (MW): 4,730

  • Yallourn scheduled for closure in 2032.[5]
  • Loy Yang B scheduled for closure in 2046.[5]
  • Loy Yang A scheduled for closure in 2048.[5]

Western Australia[edit]

Power station Max. Capacity (MW) Turbines Coal Type Conveyance Mine type Cooling Water Status
Collie 340 1 bituminous conveyor open cut fresh Active
Kwinana Power Station 660 4 bituminous rail, conveyor, road open cut seawater Active
Muja 854 4 bituminous conveyor open cut fresh Active (units A&B Mothballed)
Worsley Alumina 107 4 bituminous rail open cut fresh Active
Bluewaters 416 2 bituminous conveyor open cut fresh Active

Total (MW): 2,377

  • Kwinana A (240 MW) was shut down in 2010, and Kwinana C (400 MW) remains operational.[10]
  • Muja A and B comprise of units 1-4. They are scheduled for closure in 2022.[11]
  • Muja C and D comprise of units 5-8. Units 5 and 6 are scheduled for closure in 2030, and units 7 and 8 are scheduled for closure in 2040.[11]
  • Collie is scheduled for closure in 2040.[11]

Other States[edit]

Tasmania has no functioning coal fired power stations, instead using primarily hydroelectricity, with natural gas used as a backup.

The Northern Territory relies predominantly on natural gas, as well as various renewable energy sources. Likewise, it has no functioning coal fired power stations.

South Australia previously had a number of coal power stations. The last to be closed were the Northern and Playford B power stations.[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Daryl Passmore (26 March 2017). "Australia's coal-fired power stations too old and among worst in the OECD". The Courier Mail. News Corp. Retrieved 28 September 2017. 
  2. ^ Katharine Murphy and Amy Remeikis (21 September 2017). "Turnbull rejects efforts to 'dumb down' energy debate into renewables v coal". The Guardian. Guardian News and Media. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  3. ^ "No new coal-fired power plants will be built in Australia, says CS Energy". 7:30 Report. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 28 September 2017. 
  4. ^ Giles Parkinson (27 September 2017). "AGL plans its own "big battery" and renewables to replace Liddell". RenewEconomy. Retrieved 28 September 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Transmission Annual Planning Report" (PDF). Retrieved 22 September 2018. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h "Coal-Fired Plants in Australia - QLD & SA". Gallery. Power Plants Around The World. 3 January 2014. Archived from the original on 19 July 2009. Retrieved 27 April 2014. 
  7. ^ "Collinsville Coal Power Plant". Global Energy Observatory. Retrieved 24 May 2014. 
  8. ^ "TRANSFIELD SERVICES TAKES FULL OWNERSHIP OF COLLINSVILLE POWER STATION". News. Transfield Services. 22 August 2002. Retrieved 24 May 2014. 
  9. ^ "Tarong Coal Power Plant". Global Energy Observatory. Retrieved 27 April 2014. 
  10. ^ "Kwinana Power Station - SourceWatch". www.sourcewatch.org. Retrieved 2018-09-22. 
  11. ^ a b c "Electricity Generation and Retail Corporation trading as Synergy" (PDF). p. 15. Retrieved 22 September 2018. 
  12. ^ "South Australia's Last Coal-Fired Power Station Demolished". The Urban Developer. 27 April 2018. Retrieved 29 April 2018.