List of communities in New Brunswick

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Communities in Canada's provinces and territories

This is a list of communities in New Brunswick, a province in Canada. For the purposes of this list, a community is defined as either an incorporated municipality, an Indian reserve, or an unincorporated community inside or outside a municipality.

Cities[edit]

New Brunswick has eight cities.

Cities of New Brunswick
Name Council type[1] Council size[1] Population
(2016)[2]
Population
(2011)[3]
Change
(%)[3]
Land
area
(km²)[3]
Population
density
(per km²)[3]
Bathurst at-large 7 11,897 12,275 −3.1 92.04 129.3
Campbellton[NB 1] at-large 6 6,883 7,385 −6.8 18.58 370.5
Dieppe ward 8 25,384 23,310 8.9 54.05 469.6
Edmundston ward 8 16,580 16,032 3.4 106.85 155.2
Fredericton[NB 2] ward 12 58,220 56,224 3.6 132.57 439.2
Miramichi at-large 8 17,537 17,811 −1.5 179.93 99.0
Moncton[NB 3] ward 10 71,889 69,074 4.1 141.92 506.5
Saint John[NB 4] ward 10 67,575 70,063 −3.6 315.96 213.9
Total cities 275,965 256,141 1,040.22 261.7

Indian reserves[edit]

New Brunswick has 28 Indian reserves.

Parishes[edit]

New Brunswick has 152 parishes, of which 150 are recognized as census subdivisions by Statistics Canada.[5]

Local service districts[edit]

Rural communities[edit]

New Brunswick has seven rural communities.

Towns and villages[edit]

New Brunswick has 27 towns and 66 villages.

Neighbourhoods[edit]

Local service districts[edit]

Other communities and settlements[edit]

This is a list of communities and settlements in New Brunswick.

A–B[edit]

A
B

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C–G[edit]

C
D
E
F
G

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H–L[edit]

H
I
J
K
L

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M–P[edit]

M
N
O
P

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Q–S[edit]

Q
R
S

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T–Z[edit]

T
U
V
W
Z

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See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

Cities
  1. ^ Campbellton is New Brunswick's smallest city by population and area.
  2. ^ Fredericton is New Brunswick's capital.
  3. ^ The Moncton census metropolitan area (CMA) includes the City of Dieppe.
  4. ^ Saint John is New Brunswick's second largest city by population and area. The Saint John CMA is formed around the City of Saint John.
Parishes
  1. ^ The local service district of the parish of Campobello was incorporated as a rural community on November 1, 2010; the parish itself still legally exists and appears in the Territorial Division Act.
  2. ^ The local service district of Parish of Ludlow was replaced on March 10, 1971, by the new local service district of Upper Miramichi, which also included part of the local service district of the parish of Stanley; Upper Miramichi was incorporated as a rural community on March 17, 2008. The parish itself still legally exists and appears in the Territorial Division Act.
  3. ^ The official name is Sainte-Marie in both languages.[9]
  4. ^ These totals are not inclusive of the local service districts of the parishes of Campobello and Ludlow, which are now incorporated as rural communities (Ludlow as part of Upper Miramichi). See rural community for the total 2011 Census statistics of all rural communities in New Brunswick.
  5. ^ St. Stephen was incorporated as a town in 1871, but amalgamated with Milltown in 1973 and renamed St. Stephen-Milltown but the name reverted to St. Stephen in 1975.[10]
  6. ^ Incorporated as St. Anthony but the name was changed to Saint-Antoine in 1969.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Saint John Telegraph-Journal: "municipal election 2016 results", p.A4-A5 10 May 2016
  2. ^ a b "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2016, 2011 and 2006 censuses (New Brunswick)". Statistics Canada. May 28, 2012. Retrieved February 10, 2017. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "2016StatCanNB" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page).
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2011 and 2006 censuses (New Brunswick)". Statistics Canada. May 28, 2012. Retrieved January 4, 2013.
  4. ^ "List of Reserves/Settlements/Villages (New Brunswick)". Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada. June 28, 2012. Retrieved January 13, 2013.[permanent dead link]
  5. ^ "Interim List of Changes to Municipal Boundaries, Status, and Names: From January 2, 2011 to January 1, 2012" (PDF). Statistics Canada. Retrieved April 2, 2013.
  6. ^ a b c "Corrections and updates: Population and dwelling count amendments, 2011 Census". Statistics Canada. February 14, 2013. Retrieved February 15, 2013.
  7. ^ "Census Profile". Statistics Canada. October 24, 2012. Retrieved January 30, 2013.
  8. ^ "Census Profile". Statistics Canada. October 24, 2012. Retrieved January 30, 2013.
  9. ^ "Territorial Division Act (R.S.N.B. 1973, c. T-3)". Government of New Brunswick website. Retrieved 25 August 2016.
  10. ^ a b c "Provincial Archives of New Brunswick". Government of New Brunswick. 2015. Retrieved March 6, 2015.