List of compositions by Jean Sibelius

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Sibelius at Ainola, 1907

The following is a complete list of the orchestral works of the Finnish composer Jean Sibelius, as well as an incomplete list of works for chamber ensemble, solo piano, and voice. Primarily known for his compositions for orchestra, the core of Sibelius's oeuvre is his set of seven symphonies, the Violin Concerto, and a number of tone poems, in particular En saga, the Lemminkäinen Suite (which includes The Swan of Tuonela), Finlandia, Pohjola's Daughter, The Oceanides, and Tapiola. In addition, works such as the Karelia Suite, Valse triste, Kullervo, Luonnotar, Pelléas et Mélisande, The Tempest, and the String Quartet in D minor, Voces intimae have found favor with the public.

Over the course of his lifetime, Sibelius produced several catalogues of his works; the first dates to 1896 and the last to 1952.[1] However, between inventories, Sibelius revised many of his early numbering decisions, omitted compositions from subsequent lists, and plugged holes with other pieces. As a result, Sibelius' opus numbers are uninformative in terms of compositional chronology and are thus ill-suited to the task of tracking his stylistic maturation over time; instead, opus numbers should be viewed as a record of Sibelius' ever-changing assessment of his output.[1][2] For works without opus numbers, the convention is to follow the supplemental JS numbering system of Fabian Dahlström (fi).[3]

In the inventory that follows, the dates provided indicate the year of composition (or, where appropriate, revision) rather than premiere or publication. Where possible, names in the original Swedish or Finnish are included, with English translations in parentheses. Finally, an asterisk ( * ) appears next to revised (primarily orchestral) compositions for which Finnish conductor Osmo Vänskä and the Lahti Symphony Orchestra have recorded—under the BIS label—surviving original or intermediate versions. These include, among others, the Fifth Symphony, the Violin Concerto, En saga, and the Lemminkäinen Suite.

Orchestral works[edit]

Symphonies[edit]

Sibelius, Finland's most important symphonist, composed 7 numbered symphonies, the last of which (in one movement) erodes the traditional subdivisions of sonata form; an eighth symphony likely was destroyed by the composer in the late 1930s. In addition, the choral work Kullervo and the tone poem cycle Lemminkäinen—both based upon Kalevala myths—are classified occasionally as unnumbered, programmatic symphonies.[4][5]

Abandoned:

  • Youth symphony (1891); early symphonic project among composer's juvenilia, two movements completed as the Overture in E major, JS 145, and the Scène de ballet, JS 163[6][7]
  • JS 190: Symphony No. 8 (1924-1930s); destroyed by composer, very few sketches survive

Also see:

  • Op. 7: Kullervo (1892); sometimes classified as a programmatic choral symphony
  • Op. 22: Lemminkäinen Suite (1895); sometimes classified as a programmatic symphony

Tone poems[edit]

Sibelius, along with Richard Strauss, was perhaps the most significant (and prolific) contributor to the symphonic poem repertoire since Franz Liszt.[8][9] His 16 examples in the form (with the Lemminkäinen cycle disaggregated) span the duration of his career and include two of his most famous and oft-performed works, The Swan of Tuonela and Finlandia. A number of the tone poems—such as Lemminkäinen, Pohjola's Daughter, Luonnotar, and Tapiola—take their inspiration from Finnish mythology.

  • Op. 9: En saga (A Saga or A Fairy Tale) (1892, r. 1902)*
  • Op. 16: Vårsång (Spring Song) (1894, r. 1895, 1902); originally called Improvisation for Orchestra*
  • Op. 15: Skogsrået (The Wood Nymph) (1894–95); also a melodrama
  • Op. 22: Lemminkäinen (also known as Four Legends from the Kalevala) (1895); sometimes classified as a symphony[10][11]
  1. Lemminkäinen ja saaren neidot (Lemminkäinen and the Maidens of the Island) (1895, r. 1897, 1939); occasionally mistranslated as Lemminkäinen and the Maidens of Saari*
  2. Tuonelan joutsen (The Swan of Tuonela) (1893–95, r. 1897, 1900); often performed as a stand-alone concert piece; originally No. 3[12]
  3. Lemminkäinen Tuonelassa (Lemminkäinen in Tuonela) (1895, r. 1897, 1939); originally No. 2[12]*
  4. Lemminkäinen palaa kotitienoille (Lemminkäinen's Return) (1895, r. 1897, 1900); occasionally translated as Lemminkäinen's Homecoming*
  • Op. 26: Finlandia (1899, r. 1900); arranged from Press Celebrations Music, JS 137*
  • Op. 49: Pohjolan tytär (Pohjola's Daughter) (1906)*
  • Op. 53a: Pan och Echo (Pan and Echo) (1906)
  • Op. 55: Öinen ratsastus ja auringonnousu (Nightride and Sunrise) (1909)
  • Op. 45/1: Dryadi (The Dryad) (1910)
  • Op. 64: Barden (The Bard) (1913, r. 1914); possibly began as No. 1 in the pre-Oceanides suite[13]
  • Op. 70: Luonnotar, for soprano and orchestra (1913); text from the Kalevala
  • Op. 73: Aallottaret (The Oceanides) (1913–14, r. 1914); originally a three-movement suite (No. 1 lost); tone poem also survives in earlier "Yale" version**
  • Op. 112: Tapiola (1926)

Also see:

  • Op. 7: Kullervo (1892); sometimes classified as a cycle of symphonic poems[14][15]

Concertante[edit]

  1. D major, Op. 69a (1912)
  2. G minor, Op. 69b (1913)
  • Op. 77: Two pieces, for cello (or violin) and orchestra
  1. Laetare anima mea (Cantique), Op. 77/1 (1914)
  2. Ab imo pectore (Devotion), Op. 77/2 (1915)
  • Op. 87 & Op. 89: Six humoresques, for violin and orchestra
  1. D minor, Op. 87/1 (1917, r. 1940)*
  2. D major, Op. 87/2 (1917)
  3. G minor, Op. 89a (1917)
  4. G minor, Op. 89b (1917)
  5. E-flat major, Op. 89c (1917)
  6. G minor, Op. 89d (1918)
  • Op. 117: Suite for Violin and Orchestra in D minor (1929)
  1. Country Scenery
  2. Evening in Spring
  3. In the Summer

Incidental music[edit]

Also see:

  • Op. 8: Ödlan (The Lizard), for chamber ensemble (1909)

Derived concert suites[edit]

  • Op. 27: Kuningas Kristian II (King Christian II) (1898); orchestral suite from the incidental music
  1. Nocturne
  2. Elegy
  3. Musette
  4. Serenade
  5. Ballade
  1. At the Castle Gate
  2. Mélisande
  3. At the Seashore
  4. By a Spring in the Park
  5. The Three Blind Sisters
  6. Pastorale
  7. Mélisande at the Spinning Wheel
  8. Entr'acte
  9. The Death of Mélisande
  • Op. 51: Belsazars gästabud (Belshazzar's Feast) (1907); orchestral suite from the incidental music
  1. Oriental Procession
  2. Solitude
  3. Nocturne
  4. Khadra's Dance
  • Op. 54: Svanevit (Swanwhite) (1908); orchestral suite from the incidental music
  1. The Peacock
  2. The Harp
  3. The Maidens with Roses
  4. Listen, the Robin Sings
  5. The Prince Alone
  6. Swanwhite and the Prince
  7. Song of Praise
  • Op. 109/1: Stormen (The Tempest) (1927); orchestral suite No. 1 from the incidental music
  1. Prelude
  2. The Oak Tree
  3. Humoresque
  4. Caliban's Song
  5. The Harvesters
  6. Canon
  7. Scène
  8. Intrada - Berceuse
  9. Entr'acte - Ariel's Song
  10. The Storm
  • Op. 109/2: Stormen (The Tempest) (1927); orchestral suite No. 2 from the incidental music
  1. Chorus of the Winds
  2. Intermezzo
  3. Dance of the Nymphs
  4. Prospero
  5. Song I
  6. Song II
  7. Miranda
  8. The Naiads
  9. Dance Episode

Solo voice and orchestra[edit]

  • JS 168: Serenad (Serenade), for baritone and orchestra (1894–95); text by Erik Johan Stagnelius
  • Op. 33: Koskenlaskijan morsiamet (The Rapids-Rider's Brides), for baritone (or mezzo-soprano) and orchestra (1897); text by A. Oksanen
  • Op. 17/1: Se'n har jag ej frågat mera (Since then I have Questioned No Further), for voice and orchestra (1903); text by Johan Ludvig Runeberg
  • Op. 38/2: På verandan vid havet (On a Balcony by the Sea), for voice and orchestra (1903); text by Viktor Rydberg
  • Op. 38/3: I natten (In the Night), for voice and orchestra (1903); text by Viktor Rydberg
  • Op. 38/1: Höstkväll (Autumn Evening), for voice and strings (or orchestra) (1904); text by Viktor Rydberg
  • Op. 3: Arioso, for voice and strings (1911); text by Johan Ludvig Runeberg
  • Op. 57/6: Hertig Magnus (Duke Magnus), for voice and orchestra (1912); text by Ernst Josephson
  • Op. 37/3: Soluppgång (Sunrise), for voice and orchestra (1913); text by Tor Hedberg
  • Op. 13/4: Våren flyktar hastigt (Spring is Flying), for voice and orchestra (1913); text by Johan Ludvig Runeberg
  • Op. 36/6: Demanten på marssnön (The Diamond on the March Snow), for voice and orchestra (1917); text by Josef Julius Wecksell
  • Op. 96b: Autrefois, for two sopranos and orchestra (1919, r. 1920); text by Hjalmar Procopé
  • Op. 7: Kullervon valitus (Kullervo's Lament), for voice and orchestra; from Kullervo (1957), with text from the Kalevala
  • Op. 60/1: Kom nu hit, död (from Twelfth Night), for voice and orchestra (1957) ; with text by William Shakespeare translated by C.A. Hagberg

Also see:

  • Op. 70: Luonnotar, tone poem for soprano and orchestra (1913)

Chorus and orchestra[edit]

  • Op. 7: Kullervo, for mezzo-soprano, baritone, male chorus, and orchestra (1892); text from the Kalevala; sometimes classified as a symphony[14][15]
  1. Introduction (Allegro moderato)
  2. Kullervo's ungdom (Kullervo's Youth) (Grave)
  3. Kullervo och hans syster (Kullervo and His Sister) (Allegro vivace)
  4. Kullervo tagar ut till strid (Kullervo Goes to War) (Alla marcia—Allegro molto—Vivace—Presto)
  5. Kullervos död (Kullervo's Death) (Andante)
  1. Terve nuori ruhtinas (Hail the Young Prince)
  2. Oikeuden varmasa turvassa (In the Sure Security of Justice)
  • Op. 31/1: Laulu Lemminkäiselle (A Song for Lemminkäinen), for male chorus and orchestra (1896); text by Yrjö Weijola
  • Op. 33: Koskenlaskijan morsiamet (The Rapids-Rider's Brides), for male chorus and orchestra (1897, transcribed 1943); text by A. Oksanen
  • Op. 28: Sandels, for male chorus and orchestra (1898, r. 1915); text by Johan Ludvig Runeberg
  • Op. 31/3: Athenarnes sång (Song of the Athenians) (1899), for boys'/men's voices, woodwinds, brass, percussion, and double bass; text by Viktor Rydberg
  • Op. 19: Impromptu, for female chorus and orchestra (1902, r. 1910); text by Viktor Rydberg*
  • Op. 32: Tulen Synty (The Origin of Fire) (1902, r. 1910); text from the Kalevala
  • Op. 31/2: Har du mod? (Have You Courage?), for male chorus and orchestra (1904, r. 1911, 1912, and 1914); text by J.J. Wecksell
  • Op. 48 : Vapautettu kuningatar (The Captive Queen), for mixed (or male) chorus and orchestra(1906); text by Paavo Cajander
  • Op. 91a: March of the Finnish Jåger Battalion, for male chorus and orchestra (1917); text by Heikki Nurmio
  • Op. 92: Oma maa (My Own Land or Our Native Land), for mixed chorus and orchestra (1918); text from the Kallio
  • Op. 91b: Scout March, for mixed chorus and orchestra (1918); text by Jalmari Finne
  • Op. 93: Jordens sång (Song of the Earth), for mixed chorus and orchestra (1919); text by Jarl Hemmer
  • Op. 95: Maan Virsi (Hymn of the Earth), for mixed chorus and orchestra (1920); text by Eino Leino
  • Op. 110: Väinön virsi (Väinö's Hymn or Väinämöinen's Song), for mixed chorus and orchestra (1926); text from the Kalevala

Lost:

Melodrama[edit]

  • Op. 15: Skogsrået (The Wood Nymph), for reciter, piano, horns, and strings (1894); text by Viktor Rydberg
  • Op. 30: Islossningen i Uleå älv (The Breaking of the Ice on the Oulu River), for reciter, male chorus, and orchestra (1899); text by Zachris Topelius
  • Op. 29: Snöfrid (The Beloved Beauty), for reciter, mixed chorus, and orchestra (1900); text by Viktor Rydberg
  • JS 88: Grevinnans konterfej (The Countess's Portrait), for reciter and strings (1906); text by Anna Maria Lenngren and Zachris Topelius
  • JS 77b: Ett ensamt skidspår (A Lonely Ski-Trail), for reciter and strings (1948); text by Bertel Gripenberg

Opera[edit]

Abandoned:

  • Veneen luominen (The Building of the Boat) (1893-1895); some material reworked into the Lemminkäinen Suite, Op. 22[16]

Other orchestral[edit]

  • JS 145: Overture in E major (1891); initially envisioned as No. 1 in a three or four movement symphony, along with Scène de ballet, JS 163[6][7]
  • JS 163: Scène de ballet (1891); initially envisioned as No. 2 in a three or four movement symphony, along with Overture in E major, JS 145[6][7]
  • JS 115: Karelia, Music for a Festival and Lottery in Aid of Education in the Province of Viipuri (1893); reconstructed by Kalevi Aho; also by Jouni Kaipainen
  1. Overture (appears as the Karelia Overture, Op. 10)
  2. Tableau 1 A Karelian Home - News of War
  3. Tableau 2 The Founding of Viipuri Castle
  4. Tableau 3 Narimont, the Duke of Lithuania, Levying Taxes in the Province of Käkisalmi
  5. Intermezzo I (appears as No. 1 in the Karelia Suite, Op. 11)
  6. Tableau 4 Ballade: Karl Knutsson In Viipuri Castle (appears as No. 2 in the Karelia Suite, Op. 11)
  7. Tableau 5 Pontus De la Gardie at the Gates of Käkisalmi
  8. Intermezzo II Alla marcia (appears as No. 3 in Karelia Suite, Op. 11)
  9. Tableau 6 The Siege of Viipuri
  10. Tableau 7 The Reunion of Old Finland, Karelia, with the Rest of Finland
  11. Tableau 8 Our Land, the Finnish National Anthem (arrangement by Jean Sibelius)
  1. Intermezzo
  2. Ballade
  3. Alla marcia
  • Op. 5: Impromptu in E minor, for strings (1893, r. 1894); arranged from Op. 5, No. 5 & 6
  • Op. 4: Presto, for strings (1894); arranged from Op. 4
  • JS 127: Menuetto (1894)
  • JS 104: Coronation March (1896); arranged from the Coronation Cantata of 1896
  • JS 137: Musiikkia Sanomalehdistoön päivien juhlanäytäntöön (Music for the Press Celebrations Days) (1899)
  1. Preludio
  2. Tableau 1 Väinämöinen Delights Nature with His Song (arranged in 1911 as All'overtura in Scenes historiques No. 1, Op. 25)
  3. Tableau 2 The Finns are Baptized
  4. Tableau 3 Duke Johan's Court (arranged in 1911 as Festivo in Scenes historiques No. 1, Op. 25)
  5. Tableau 4 The Finns in the Thirty Years' War (arranged in 1911 as Scena in Scenes historiques No. 1, Op. 25)
  6. Tableau 5 The Great Hostility
  7. Tableau 6 Finland Awakes (arranged in 1900 as Finlandia, Op. 26)
  • JS 152: Porilaisten marssi (March of the Pori Regiment) (1900); arrangement
  • JS 144: Overture in A minor (1902)
  • Op. 6: Cassazione (1904, r. 1905)*
  • Op. 42: Romance in C major, for strings (1904)
  • Op. 45/2: Dance Intermezzo (1904, r. 1907); originally called Musik zu einer Scène*
  • Op. 44/1: Valse triste (1904); scene arranged from Kuolema, JS 113*
  • Op. 44/2: Kurkikohtaus (Scene with Cranes) (1906); scene arranged from Kuolema, JS 113
  • JS 54: Cortège (1905)
  • Op. 59: In memoriam, funeral march (1909, r. 1910)*
  • Op. 25: Scènes historiques I (1911); arranged from Press Celebrations Music, JS 137
  1. All'overtura
  2. Scena
  3. Festivo
  • JS 113: Canzonetta, Op. 62/a (1911); additional scene to Kuolema; originally called Rondino der Liebenden[17]
  • Op. 62/b: Valse romantique (1911); additional scene to Kuolema, JS 113; originally called Vals-intermezzo[17]
  • JS 62: Die Sprache der Vögel (The Language of the Birds), wedding march (1911); to a play by Adolf Paul
  • Op. 14: Rakastava (The Lover), for strings and percussion (1911, r. 1912)
  1. The Lover
  2. The Path of His Beloved
  3. Good Evening!... Farewell!
  • Op. 66: Scènes historiques II (1912)
  1. La Chasse
  2. Love Song
  3. At the Draw-Bridge
  • JS 155: Academic March (1919)
  • Op. 96: Three Pieces for Orchestra (1920-1922)
  1. Valse lyrique
  2. Autrefois, for two clarinets (or sopranos) and orchestra
  3. Valse chevaleresque
  • Op. 98a: Suite mignonne, for two flutes and strings (1921)
  1. Petite scène
  2. Polka
  3. Epilogue
  • Op. 98b: Suite champêtre, for strings (1922)
  1. Pièce caractéristique
  2. Mélodie élégiaque
  3. Danse
  • Op. 100: Suite caractéristique, for harp and strings (1922)
  1. Vivo
  2. Lento
  3. Comodo
  • JS 34b: Andante festivo, for strings and timpani (1922, r. 1938)
  • JS 135a: Morceau romantique sur un motif de M. Jakob de Julin (1925)
  • Op. 113/6: Processional (1938); arrangement of Musique religieuse No. 6

Lost:

  • JS 80: Fäktmusik (Fencing Music) (1891)
  • JS 223: Zirkusmarsch (Circus March) (1891)

Chamber works[edit]

String quartet[edit]

  • JS 184: String Quartet [No. 1] in E-flat major (1885)
  • JS 183: String Quartet [No. 2] in A minor (1889)
  • Op. 4: String Quartet [No. 3] in B-flat major (1890)
  • Op. 56: String Quartet [No. 4], Voces intimae, in D minor (1909)
  • Op. 34a: Andante festivo, for string quartet (1922); later transcribed for string orchestra and timpani

Other juvenilia[edit]

  • JS 134: Molto moderato—Scherzo, for string quartet (1885)
  • JS 16: Alla marcia in E minor, for string quartet (1888)
  • JS 154: Presto in F major, for string quartet (1888)
  • JS 197: Theme and Variations in G minor, for string quartet (1888)
  • JS 20: Allegretto in D major, for string quartet (1888)
  • JS 39: Andantino in C major, for string quartet (1888)
  • JS 195: Theme and Variations in C-sharp minor, for string quartet (1888); completed by Kalevi Aho
  • JS 131: Moderato and Allegro appassionato in C-sharp minor, for string quartet (1888–89)
  • JS 37: Andante molto sostenuto in B minor, for string quartet (1888–89)
  • JS 28: Allegro in E minor, for string quartet (1888–89)
  • JS 17: Allegretto in A major, for string quartet (1888–89)
  • JS 149: Più lento in F major, for string quartet (1888–89)
  • JS 14: Adagio in F minor, for string quartet (1888–89)
  • JS 32: Andante—Allegro molto in D major, for string quartet (1888–89)
  • JS 59: Den lilla sjöjungfrun (The Little Mermaid), for reciter and string quartet (1888–89, incomplete fragment); text by Hans Christian Andersen
  • JS 85: Fugue for Martin Wegelius, for string quartet (1889)
  • JS 12: Adagio in D minor, for string quartet (1890)

Without JS or Opus number:

  • [Scherzo] in B minor, for string quartet (1885); completed by Kalevi Aho
  • [Four Themes], for string quartet, in: G minor; E-flat major; A minor; and, E minor (1887)
  • [33 Small Pieces], for string quartet (1888–89)
  • [Allegro] in G minor, for string quartet (1888–89)
  • Allegretto in B-flat major, for string quartet (1889)

Other[edit]

  • Vattendroppar (Raindrops), for violin and cello pizzicato, JS 216 (c. 1881)
  • Andante Cantabile in E-flat major for Piano and Harmonium, JS 30b (1887)
  • Piano Trio in D major (Korpo), JS 209 (1887)
  • Theme and Variations for Solo Cello (still unpublished) (1887)
  • Allegro for Brass Septet, JS 25 (1889)
  • Andante Cantabile in G major, JS 33 (1889)
  • Overture in F minor for Brass Septet, JS 146 (1889)
  • Sonata in F major for Violin and Piano, JS 178 (1889)
  • Piano Quintet in G minor, JS 159 (1890)
  • Adagio in D minor, JS 12 (1890)
  • Andantino and Minuet for Brass Septet, JS 45 (1890–1891)
  • Prelude for Brass Septet, JS 83 (1891)
  • La Pompeuse Marche d'Asis for Violin, Cello and Piano, JS 116 (1891)
  • Duo in C major for Violin and Viola (c. 1891–1892)
  • Rondo in D minor for Viola and Piano, JS 162 (1893)
  • Tiera for Brass Septet and Percussion, JS 200 (1899)
  • Malinconia for Cello and Piano, Op. 20 (1900)
  • Ödlan (The Lizard), for a string ensemble, Op. 8 (1909); incidental music for a play by Mikael Lybeck
  • Five pieces for violin and piano, Op. 81: Masurkka, Rondino, Valssi, Aubade, Menuetto (1915)
  • 4 Pieces for Violin (or Cello) and Piano, Op. 78 (Impromptu, Romance, Religioso, Rigaudon) (1915–1917)
  • 6 Pieces for Violin and Piano, Op. 79 (1915–1917)
  • Novelette for Violin and Piano, Op. 102 (1922)
  • 5 Danses Champêtres for Violin and Piano, Op. 106 (1925)
  • Four pieces for violin and piano, Op. 115: Nummella, Balladi, Humoreski, Kellot (1929)

Piano[edit]

  • Piano Suite (Florestan), JS 82 (1889)
  • Six Impromptus, Op. 5 (1893)
  • Sonata in F major, Op. 12 (1893)
  • 10 Pieces, Op. 24 (1894–1903)
  • 10 Bagatelles, Op. 34 (1914–16)
  • 10 Pensées lyriques, Op. 40 (1912–14)
  • Kyllikki, Op. 41, 3 Lyric Pieces on subjects from the Kalevala (1904)
  • 10 Pieces, Op. 58 (1909)
  • Three Sonatinas, Op. 67 (1912)
    • No. 1 in F-sharp minor
    • No. 2 in E major
    • No. 3 in B-flat minor
  • 2 Rondinos, Op. 68 (1912)
  • 4 Lyric Pieces, Op. 74 (1914)
  • 5 Pieces (The Trees), Op. 75 (1914)
  • 13 Pieces, Op. 76 (1914)
  • 5 Pieces (The Flowers), Op. 85 ((1916)
  • 6 Pieces, Op. 94 (1919)
  • 6 Bagatelles, Op. 97 (1920)
  • 8 Short Pieces, Op. 99 (1922)
  • 5 Romantic Compositions, Op. 101 (1923)
  • 5 Characteristic Impressions, Op. 103 (1924)
  • 5 Esquisses, Op. 114 (1929)

Organ[edit]

  • Preludium (1925)
  • Postludium (1925)
  • Intrada, Op. 111a (1925)
  • Surusoitto (Funeral Music), Op. 111b (1931)
  • Opening Hymn (from Masonic Ritual Music, Op. 113 (1926/1948))
  • Marche funèbre (Funeral March) from Masonic Ritual Music, Op. 113 (1926/1948))

Vocal/choral[edit]

  • Five Christmas Songs, Op. 1 (1895–1913)
  • Seven Songs, Op. 13 (1891–92)
  • Seven Songs, Op. 17, with lyrics by J. L. Runeberg, K.A. Tavaststjerna, Oscar Levertin, A.V. Forsman (Koskimies, Finnish surname), and Ilmari Calamnius (Kianto, Finnish surname) (1891–1904)
  • Two Songs, Op. 35 (1907)
  • Six Songs, Op. 36 (1899; dedicated to Ida Ekman)
  • Five Songs, Op. 37 (1898–1904)
  • Five Songs, Op. 38 (1904)
  • Six Songs, Op. 50 (1906)
  • Eight Songs, Op. 57 (1909)
  • Two Songs from Twelfth Night, Op. 60 (1909)
  • Eight Songs, Op. 61 (1910)
  • Six Songs, Op. 72 (1914–15)
  • Six Songs, Op. 86 (1916; ded. Ida Ekman)
  • Song Cycle, Op. 88 (1917; ded. Ida Ekman)
  • Six Songs, Op. 90 (1917; ded. Ida Ekman)
  • other songs without opus numbers

Band[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Barnett 2007, p. 347.
  2. ^ Tawaststjerna 1997, p. 41–47.
  3. ^ Dahlström 2003.
  4. ^ Tawaststjerna 1976, p. 107–108, 176–77.
  5. ^ Hurwitz 2007, p. 49, 59.
  6. ^ a b c Barnett 2007, p. 66–67.
  7. ^ a b c Tawaststjerna 1976, p. 88–93.
  8. ^ Hurwitz 2007, p. 134.
  9. ^ Layton 1965, p. 106.
  10. ^ Tawaststjerna 1976, p. 176–177.
  11. ^ Hurwitz 2007, p. 59.
  12. ^ a b Tawaststjerna 1976, p. 166.
  13. ^ Barnett 2007, p. 235.
  14. ^ a b Tawaststjerna 1976, p. 107–108, 177.
  15. ^ a b Hurwitz 2007, p. 49.
  16. ^ Tawaststjerna 1976, p. 158.
  17. ^ a b Tawaststjerna 1986, p. 165.

References[edit]

  • Barnett, Andrew (2007). Sibelius. New Haven: Yale University Press. 
  • Dahlström, Fabian (2003). Jean Sibelius: Thematisch-bibliographisches Verzeichnis seiner Werke. Wiesbaden: Breitkopf & Härtel. 
  • Goss, Glenda Dawn (1996). The Sibelius Companion. Westport: Greenwood Press. 
  • Hurwitz, David (2007). Jean Sibelius: Sibelius: The Orchestral Works. Pompton Plains: Amadeus Press. 
  • Layton, Robert (1965). Sibelius: The Masters Musicians Series. New York: Schirmer Books. 
  • Tawaststjerna, Erik (1976). Sibelius: Volume I (1865–1905). (Robert Layton, English translation). London: Faber & Faber. 
  • Tawaststjerna, Erik (1986). Sibelius: Volume II (1904–1914). (Robert Layton, English translation). London: Faber & Faber. 
  • Tawaststjerna, Erik (1997). Sibelius: Volume III (1914–1957). (Robert Layton, English translation). London: Faber & Faber. 

External links[edit]