List of compositions for keyboard and orchestra

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This is a list of musical compositions for keyboard instruments such as the piano or harpsichord and orchestra. See entries for concerto, piano concerto and harpsichord concerto for a description of related musical forms.

Compositions for keyboard and orchestra[edit]

A[edit]

  • Luigi Abbiate
    • Piano concerto
  • Johann Christian Ludwig Abeille
    • Grand Concerto in D major, op.6 (1763), for one piano four-hands and orchestra
  • Carl Friedrich Abel
    • Concerto for harpsichord (or pianoforte), two violins and a cello in F major, op.11 No.1 (first printed in 1771)
    • Concerto for harpsichord (or pianoforte), two violins and a cello in B flat major, op.11 No.2 (first printed in 1771)
    • Concerto for harpsichord (or pianoforte), two violins and a cello in E flat major, op.11 No.3 (first printed in 1771)
    • Concerto for harpsichord (or pianoforte), two violins and a cello in D major, op.11 No.4 (first printed in 1771)
    • Concerto for harpsichord (or pianoforte), two violins and a cello in G major, op.11 No.5 (first printed in 1771)
    • Concerto for harpsichord (or pianoforte), two violins and a cello in C major, op.11 No.6 (first printed in 1771)
  • Lev Abeliovich
    • Piano Concerto (1978–1980)
  • Anton García Abril
    • Piano concerto
  • Jean Absil
    • Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1, Op. 30 (1938)
    • Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 2, Op. 131 (1967)
    • Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 3, Op. 162 (1973)
  • John Adams
  • Richard Addinsell
  • Thomas Adès
    • Concerto conciso, op.18, for piano and orchestra
  • Isaac Albéniz
    • Concierto fantástico in A minor, op. 78 (1887)
  • Eugen d'Albert
  • Frangis Ali-Sade
    • Piano concerto (1972)
  • Charles-Valentin Alkan
    • Concerto da Camera No. 1 in A minor, op. 10 no. 1 (1828)
    • Concerto da Camera No. 2 in C-sharp minor, op. 10 no. 2 (1828)
    • Concerto da Camera No. 3 in C sharp minor (reconstructed H. Macdonald)
    • Piano Concerto Op. 39 (orch Klindworth)
  • Eyvind Alnæs
    • Piano concerto in D major, op. 27
  • Anton Arensky
  • Thomas Arne - 6 Favourite Concertos for harpsichord, piano, or organ (late 18th century)
  • Malcolm Arnold
    • Concerto for Phyllis and Cyril, op. 104, for two pianos (3 hands; one pianist plays with both hands, the other with only one hand)
  • Alexander Arutiunian
    • Piano Concertino (1951)
  • Daniel Asia
    • Concerto for Piano and Orchestra (1994)
  • Kurt Atterberg
    • Piano Concerto in B Flat Minor, Op. 37 (1927–35)
  • Lera Auerbach
    • Piano Concerto No. 1 - River of Loss, Dialogue with Time, Wind of Oblivion (Sikorski)

B[edit]

C[edit]

D[edit]

E[edit]

([2])

F[edit]

G[edit]

H[edit]

I[edit]

J[edit]

K[edit]

L[edit]

M[edit]

N[edit]

O[edit]

P[edit]

Q[edit]

R[edit]

S[edit]

T[edit]

U[edit]

V[edit]

W[edit]

X[edit]

Y[edit]

Z[edit]

  • Efrem Zimbalist
    • Piano Concerto in E flat (composed 1953 for William Kapell, destroyed in the air crash in which the pianist died, reconstructed by the composer)

Concertos for piano and other solo instrument(s)[edit]

Other concertante works for piano and orchestra[edit]

Works for orchestra or large ensemble with prominent solo piano part[edit]

Similar works[edit]

Concerti have been written where the piano is not the only solo instrument. A famous example is the Triple concerto (for piano, violin, cello and orchestra) by Beethoven.

There also exist a number of compositions for piano and orchestra which treat the piano as a solo instrument while not being piano concerti. Examples of such works include George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue, Rachmaninov's Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini and Liszt's Totentanz. The last two of these works are each in variation form, based on the 24th Caprice for solo violin by Niccolò Paganini and the ancient Gregorian Dies Irae chant respectively.

There are also works written for orchestra or large ensemble requiring a solo pianist, such as Olivier Messiaen's Des canyons aux étoiles... and Turangalîla-Symphonie, and Karol Szymanowski's 4th Symphony.

Composers also occasionally bring orchestral pianists into the limelight, as for example Igor Stravinsky does in episodes of his ballet Petrushka.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Hinson, Maurice (1993). Music for Piano and Orchestra: an Annotated Guide. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press. ISBN 0-253-20835-1.