List of conspiracy theories promoted by Donald Trump

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This article contains a list of conspiracy theories promoted by Donald Trump.[1][2][3]

Conspiracies[edit]

Commentaries[edit]

The flow of debunked or unproven conspiracy theories advanced by Trump have been commented on and made fun of by jounalists, cartoonists[21] and others.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Zeballos-Roig, Joseph; Haltiwanger, John; Kranz, Michal (October 9, 2019). "24 conspiracy theories Donald Trump has floated over the years". Business Insider. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Bump, Philip (November 26, 2019). "President Trump loves conspiracy theories. Has he ever been right?". The Washington Post. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  3. ^ a b c Shesgreen, Deirdre (December 16, 2019). "Donald Trump, Russia and Ukraine: Five conspiracy theories debunked". USA Today. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  4. ^ Dearden, Lizzie (November 29, 2017). "Donald Trump retweets Britain First deputy leader's Islamophobic posts". The Independent. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  5. ^ Matthews, Dylan (November 14, 2019). "#ClintonBodyCount and Jeffrey Epstein, explained". Vox. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  6. ^ a b Nicholas, Peter (November 29, 2019). "Why Trump Loves—And Depends on—Conspiracy Theories". The Atlantic. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  7. ^ Shuster, Simon; Bergengruen, Vera (October 3, 2019). "How Trump's Obsession With a Conspiracy Theory Led to the Impeachment Crisis". TIME. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  8. ^ Benen, Steve (May 11, 2020). "The political significance of Trump's odd new conspiracy theory". MSNBC. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  9. ^ "Trump, aides flirt with China lab coronavirus conspiracy theory". Al Jazeera. April 17, 2020. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  10. ^ Oh, Inae (February 28, 2020). "Trump and His Allies Are Pushing an Outrageous Coronavirus Conspiracy Theory". Mother Jones. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  11. ^ Levin, Bess (February 27, 2020). "Trump Supporters Have a Predictably Insane Coronavirus Conspiracy Theory". Vanity Fair. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  12. ^ Cillizza, Chris (February 14, 2020). "Donald Trump's 'Deep State' conspiracy theory just took a big hit". CNN Politics. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  13. ^ Beggin, Riley (August 11, 2019). "Trump retweets conspiracy claiming Bill Clinton killed Jeffrey Epstein". Vox. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  14. ^ Forgey, Quint (May 12, 2020). "Trump promotes conspiracy theory accusing TV show host of murder". Politico. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  15. ^ https://thehill.com/homenews/media/499366-trump-ramps-up-twitter-push-on-unfounded-scarborough-conspiracy-theory
  16. ^ Kunzelman, Michael (February 9, 2020). "'QAnon' conspiracy theory creeps into mainstream politics". AP News. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  17. ^ Calderone, Michael (January 8, 2017). "Trump Linked To Fox News' Bogus Seth Rich Story, Lawsuit Alleges". HuffPost. Retrieved May 16, 2020.
  18. ^ "'Obamagate': Fox News helping Trump turn conspiracy theory into 2020 version of Clinton's emails". May 19, 2020. Retrieved May 19, 2020.
  19. ^ "The absurd cynicism of 'Obamagate'". May 16, 2020. Retrieved May 19, 2020.
  20. ^ Corn, David (December 9, 2019). "Inspector General's Report Shows Trump's "Spygate" Conspiracy Theory Was the Real Hoax". Mother Jones. Retrieved May 16, 2020.
  21. ^ https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/05/24/trump-has-peculiar-way-distancing/