Nobel laureates per capita

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

This article includes lists of sovereign countries, territories, autonomous regions, organisations, continents, and ethnoreligious group/religions or lack thereof by Nobel laureates per capita. That is, lists of said entities ranked by their Nobel Prize winners in relation to their current population. The article does not account for a country's population at the time each prize was awarded. Nobel Prizes have been awarded over more than 100 years, during which time national populations have varied very significantly. Because the population of an entity is significantly higher than its Nobel laureates, the figures have been multiplied by 10 million. Thus, the number on the rightmost column should be read as the number of Nobel laureates of an entity for every 10 million of its population.

The figures include all 896 Nobel Prizes awarded to individuals up to and including 9 October 2017.

All prizes[edit]

All five prizes (Chemistry, Literature, Peace, Physics, and Physiology or Medicine) and the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences are considered.
This list includes sovereign countries and autonomous regions, which are given a line (—) instead of a number and are marked in italics. Laureates from autonomous regions are also counted with their affiliated country.

Rank Entity Nobel laureates (2017)[1] Population
(2017)[note 1]
Laureates/
10 million
 Faroe Islands 1 49,361[2] 202.589
1  Saint Lucia 2 178,844 111.830
2  Luxembourg 2 583,455 34.279
3  Sweden 30 9,910,701 30.270
4  Iceland 1 335,025 29.849
5   Switzerland 26 8,476,005 29.728
6  Norway 13 5,305,383 24.503
7  Austria 21 8,735,453 24.040
8  Denmark 13 5,733,551 22.516
9  United Kingdom 128 66,181,585 19.945
10  East Timor 2 1,296,311 15.428
11  Ireland 7 4,761,657 14.701
12  Israel 12 8,321,570 14.420
13  Hungary 13 9,721,559 13.373
14  Germany 107 82,114,224 13.031
15  France 68 64,979,548 11.741
16  Netherlands 20 17,035,938 11.740
17  United States 368 324,459,463 11.342
18  Finland 5 5,523,231 9.053
19  Belgium 10 11,429,336 8.850
20  Cyprus 1 1,179,551 8.478
21  Trinidad and Tobago 1 1,369,125 7.304
22  New Zealand 3 4,705,818 6.375
23  Canada 23 36,624,199 6.280
24  Bosnia and Herzegovina 2 3,507,017 5.703
25  Latvia 1 1,949,670 5.129
26  Australia 12 24,450,561 4.908
27  Slovenia 1 2,079,976 4.808
28  Macedonia 1 2,083,160 4.800
29  Czech Republic 5 10,618,303 4.709
30  Liberia 2 4,731,906 4.227
31  Poland 14 37,948,020 3.968
32  Lithuania 1 2,890,297 3.460
33  Italy 20 59,359,900 3.369
 Tibet 1 3,195,085[3] 3.130
34  Croatia 1 4,189,353 2.387
35  Belarus 2 9,468,338 2.112
36  Japan 26 127,484,450 2.039
37  Costa Rica 1 4,905,769 2.038
38  Romania 4 19,679,306 2.033
39  Palestine 1 4,920,724 2.032
40  Portugal 2 10,329,506 1.936
41  Greece 2 11,159,773 1.792
42  South Africa 10 56,717,156 1.763
43  Spain 8 46,354,321 1.726
44  Russia 23 143,989,754 1.597
45  Bulgaria 1 7,084,571 1.412
 Hong Kong 1 7,387,914[4] 1.354
46  Guatemala 2 16,913,503 1.182
47  Argentina 5 44,271,041 1.129
48  Chile 2 18,054,726 1.108
49  Azerbaijan 1 9,827,589 1.018
50  Algeria 2 41,318,142 0.484
51  Ukraine 2 44,222,947 0.452
52  Taiwan 1 23,626,456 0.423
53  Egypt 4 97,553,151 0.410
54  Colombia 2 49,065,615 0.408
55  Yemen 1 28,250,420 0.354
56  Ghana 1 28,833,629 0.347
57  Peru 1 32,165,485 0.319
58  Venezuela 1 31,977,065 0.313
59  Morocco 1 34,377,511 0.291
60  Turkey 2 78,665,830 0.254
61  Mexico 3 129,163,276 0.232
62  Kenya 1 49,699,862 0.201
63  Korea, South 1 50,982,212 0.196
64  Myanmar 1 53,370,609 0.187
65  Iran 1 81,162,788 0.123
66  Vietnam 1 93,447,601 0.107
67  Pakistan 2 197,015,955 0.102
68  India 10 1,339,180,127 0.071
69  China 9 1,409,517,397 0.064
70  Bangladesh 1 160,995,642 0.062
71  Nigeria 1 190,886,311 0.052
72  Brazil 1 209,288,278 0.048
  1. ^ Countries in the world by population (2017) This source includes all sovereign entities in the list. Other entities have different sources listed next to their population figure; the population of Tibet as of 2017 is unknown and has a source with a 2015 estimate instead.

Scientific prizes[edit]

Only the awards for Chemistry, Physics, Physiology or Medicine, and the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences are considered.
This list includes sovereign countries and autonomous regions, which are given a line (—) instead of a number and are marked in italics. Laureates from autonomous regions are also counted with their affiliated country.

Rank Entity Nobel laureates (2017)[1] Population
(2017)[note 1]
Laureates/
10 million
 Faroe Islands 1 49,361[2] 202.589
1  Saint Lucia 1 178,844 55.915
2  Luxembourg 2 583,455 34.279
3   Switzerland 21 8,476,005 24.776
4  Austria 18 8,735,453 20.606
5  Sweden 17 9,910,701 17.153
6  Denmark 9 5,773,551 15.588
7  Norway 8 5,305,383 15.079
8  United Kingdom 103 66,181,585 15.005
9  Netherlands 19 17,035,938 11.153
10  Germany 91 82,114,524 11.082
11  United States 335 324,459,463 10.325
12  Israel 8 8,321,570 9.614
13  Cyprus 1 1,179,551 8.478
14  Hungary 12 9,721,559 12.345
15  New Zealand 3 4,705,818 6.375
16  France 40 64,979,548 5.794
17  Canada 20 36,624,199 5.461
18  Finland 3 5,523,231 5.432
19  Belgium 6 11,429,336 5.250
20  Latvia 1 1,949,670 5.129
21  Slovenia 1 2,079,976 4.808
22  Australia 11 24,450,561 4.499
23  Ireland 2 4,671,567 4.281
24  Lithuania 1 2,890,297 3.460
25  Bosnia and Herzegovina 1 3,507,017 2.851
26  Czech Republic 3 10,618,303 2.825
27  Croatia 1 4,189,353 2.358
28  Italy 13 59,359,900 2.190
29  Japan 22 127,484,450 1.758
 Hong Kong 1 7,387,914[4] 1.354
30  Poland 5 38,170,112 1.310
31  Russia 16 143,989,754 1.111
32  Belarus 1 9,464,338 1.057
33  Azerbaijan 1 9,827,589 1.018
34  Romania 2 19,679,306 1.016
35  Portugal 1 10,329,506 0.968
36  South Africa 4 56,717,156 0.705
37  Argentina 3 44,271,041 0.681
38  Spain 2 46,354,321 0.431
39  Taiwan 1 23,626,456 0.423
40  Venezuela 1 31,977,065 0.313
41  Morocco 1 34,377,511 0.291
42  Algeria 1 41,318,142 0.242
43  Ukraine 1 44,222,947 0.226
44  Turkey 1 78,665,830 0.127
45  Egypt 1 97,553,151 0.103
46  Mexico 1 129,163,276 0.077
47  Brazil 1 0.048
48  India 6 0.045
49  Pakistan 1

212,742,631 | 0.044

50  China 5 1,409,517,397 0.035
  1. ^ Countries in the world by population (2017) This source includes all sovereign entities in the list. Other entities have different sources listed next to their population figure.

Inclusion criteria[edit]

The list of Nobel laureates by country was compiled by BBC News using the following criteria:[5]

  • Prizes are allocated to the country/countries stated on the winner's biography on the website of the Nobel Prize committee (www.nobelprize.org).
  • Where the website mentions multiple countries in relation to a prize winner (country of birth; country of citizenship; country of residence at time of award) each of those countries is credited as having won the prize.
  • Where a prize has multiple winners, the country (or countries) of each winner are credited.
  • Prizes which were declined by the winner are included.
  • Prizes won by organisations are not allocated to countries.
  • Winners from Belarus and Ukraine are not credited to Russia. Winners born in what was then Poland but is now Ukraine are credited to Poland.

Note: The BBC News figures included all Nobel Prizes awarded up to and including 8 October 2010. Nobel prizes announced after that date were added generally following the same criteria outlined above (see Updates section below for details).

Corrections[edit]

This is a list of corrections made to the original figures provided by BBC News:

  • No award was attributed to Luxembourg, but, according to the Nobel Prize website, Gabriel Lippmann (Physics, 1908) was born in that country.[6]
  • No award was attributed to Azerbaijan, but, according to the Nobel Prize website, Lev Landau (Physics, 1962) was born in the area that is now held by that country (then part of the Russian Empire).[7] The justification for this correction is that BBC News did credit Latvia for Wilhelm Ostwald's 1909 Chemistry Prize, even though his birthplace—Latvia's capital Riga—was by the time he was born (1853) also part of the Russian Empire.
  • Australia was credited with only one Nobel laureate in Physics, but up to and including 8 October 2010 there were two Physics laureates associated with that country: William Lawrence Bragg (1915) and Aleksandr Prokhorov (1964), both of whom were born there according to the Nobel Prize website.[8][9]

Updates[edit]

This section details how Nobel Prizes announced after 8 October 2010 were added.

  • 2010 update:
    • Economic Sciences: 2 to the United States and 1 each to Cyprus, Denmark and the United Kingdom.
  • 2011 update:
    • Chemistry: 1 to Israel.
    • Literature: 1 to Sweden.
    • Peace: 2 to Liberia and 1 to Yemen.
    • Physics: 3 to the United States and 1 to Australia.
    • Physiology or Medicine: 2 to the United States and 1 each to Canada, France and Luxembourg.
    • Economic Sciences: 2 to the United States.
  • 2012 update:
    • Physiology or Medicine: 1 each to Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States.
    • Physics: 1 each to France, Morocco and the United States.
    • Chemistry: 2 to the United States.
    • Literature: 1 to China.
    • Peace: Not applicable.
    • Economic Sciences: 2 to the United States.
  • 2013 update:
    • Physiology or Medicine: 2 to the United States and 1 to Germany.
    • Physics: 1 each to Belgium and the United Kingdom.
    • Chemistry: 3 to the United States, 2 to Israel, and 1 each to Austria, South Africa and the United Kingdom.
    • Literature: 1 to Canada.
    • Peace: Not applicable.
    • Economic Sciences: 3 to the United States.
  • 2014 update:
    • Physiology or Medicine: 2 to Norway and 1 each to the United Kingdom and the United States.
    • Physics: 3 to Japan and 1 to the United States.
    • Chemistry: 2 to the United States and 1 each to Germany and Romania.
    • Literature: 1 to France.
    • Peace: 1 each to India, Pakistan and the United Kingdom.
    • Economic Sciences: 1 to France.
  • 2015 update:
    • Physiology or Medicine: 1 each to China, Ireland, Japan and the United States.
    • Physics: 1 each to Canada and Japan.
    • Chemistry: 2 to the United States and 1 each to Sweden, Turkey and the United Kingdom.
    • Literature: 1 each to Belarus and Ukraine.
    • Peace: Not applicable.
    • Economic Sciences: 1 each to the United Kingdom and the United States.
  • 2016 update:
    • Physiology or Medicine: 1 to Japan.
    • Physics: 3 each to the United Kingdom and the United States.
    • Chemistry: 1 each to France, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States.
    • Peace: 1 to Colombia.
    • Economic Sciences: 2 to the United States and 1 each to Finland and the United Kingdom.
    • Literature: 1 to the United States.
  • 2017 update:
    • Physiology or Medicine: 3 to the United States.
    • Physics: 3 to the United States and 1 to Germany.
    • Chemistry: 1 each to Germany, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States.
    • Literature: 1 each to Japan and the United Kingdom.
    • Peace: Not applicable.
    • Economic Sciences: 1 to the United States.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Nobel Prize Winners By Country". 
  2. ^ a b "Faeroe Islands Population (2018) - Worldometers". www.worldometers.info. 
  3. ^ A population estimate for 2015 was calculated using the average annual population growth in the Tibet Autonomous Region between the 2000 and 2010 censuses. 2000 census population: 2,616,329 (Source: National Bureau of Statistics of China). 2010 census population: 3,002,166 (Source: Xinhua News Agency). Formula used: 3002166+(2015-2010)*(3002166-2616329)/(2010-2000)=3195084.5.
  4. ^ a b "Hong Kong Population (2018) - Worldometers". www.worldometers.info. 
  5. ^ "Which country has the best brains?". BBC News. 2010-10-10. Retrieved 2010-10-10. 
  6. ^ "Gabriel Lippmann – Biography". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2011-10-11. 
  7. ^ "Lev Landau – Biography". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2012-06-19. 
  8. ^ "Lawrence Bragg – Biography". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2012-08-16. 
  9. ^ "Aleksandr M. Prokhorov – Biography". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2012-08-16. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Emeka Nwabunnia, Bishop Emeka Ebisi (2007), The Nobel prize (1901-2000): handbook of landmark records, University Press of America, ISBN 978-0-7618-3573-8 

External links[edit]