List of countries in the Eurovision Young Musicians

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Participation since 1982:
  Entered at least once
  Never entered, although eligible to do so
  Competed as a part of another country (Yugoslavia), but never as a sovereignty

Eurovision Young Musicians is a biennial classical music competition for European musicians that are aged between 12 and 21. The contest was created by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) in 1982. Only members of the EBU may take part in the contest. Six countries took part in the inaugural contest.

Participants[edit]

The Eurovision Young Musicians, inspired by the success of the BBC Young Musician of the Year, is a biennial competition organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) for European musicians that are 18 years old or younger. The first edition of the Eurovision Young Musicians took place in Manchester, United Kingdom on 11 May 1982 and 6 countries took part.[1] Germany's Markus Pawlik won the contest, with France and Switzerland placing second and third respectively.[2]

Listed are all the countries that have ever taken part in the competition, alongside the year in which they made their debut:

Table key
  Withdrawn – Countries who have participated in the past but have withdrawn.
  Former – Former countries that have been dissolved.
Country[3] Debut year Latest entry Entries Finals[a] Latest final[a] Wins Broadcaster(s)[4]
 Albania
2018
2018
1
0
N/A
0
RTSH
 Armenia
2012
2012
1
1
2012
0
AMPTV
 Austria
1982
2016
18
14
2016
5
ORF
 Belarus
2010
2012
2
2
2012
0
BTRC
 Belgium
1986
2018
10
2
1992
0
VRT (Dutch)
RTBF (French)
 Bosnia and Herzegovina
2012
2012
1
0
N/A
0
BHRT
 Bulgaria
2006
2006
1
0
N/A
0
BNT
 Croatia
1994
2018
11
4
2016
0
HRT
 Cyprus
1988
2010
10
0
N/A
0
CyBC
 Czech Republic
2002
2018
7
5
2018
0
ČT
 Denmark[b]
1986
2002
6
2
1994
0
DR
 Estonia
1994
2018
7
3
2004
0
ERR
 Finland[b]
1984
2008
12
8
2008
0
Yle
 France
1982
2000
8
6
2000
1
TF1 (1982)
France Télévisions (1984–2000)
 Georgia
2012
2012
1
0
N/A
0
GPB
 Germany
1982
2018
17
12
2018
2
ZDF (1982–2004)
WDR (ARD) (2008–)
 Greece
1990
2018
11
3
2014
1
ERT
 Hungary
1992
2018
6
5
2018
0
MTVA
 Ireland
1986
2000
7
0
N/A
0
RTÉ
 Israel
1986
2018
2
0
N/A
0
IBA (1986)
KAN (2018)
 Italy
1986
2002
4
1
2002
0
RAI
 Latvia
1994
2002
5
3
1998
0
LTV
 Lithuania
1994
1994
1
0
N/A
0
LRT
 Macedonia
1994
1994
1
0
N/A
0
MKRTV
 Malta
2014
2018
3
2
2016
0
PBS
 Moldova
2014
2014
1
1
2014
0
TRM
 Netherlands
1984
2014
12
5
2014
2
NOS (1984–1990, 2000–2004)
NPS (2006–2010)
NTS (2012–2014)
 Norway[b]
1982
2018
18
13
2018
1
NRK
 Poland
1992
2018
13
9
2016
3
TVP
 Portugal
1990
2014
4
1
2014
0
RTP
 Romania
2002
2010
5
1
2006
0
TVR
 Russia
1994
2018
8
6
2018
1
VGTRK
 San Marino
2016
2018
2
1
2016
0
SMRTV
 Serbia
2008
2008
1
0
N/A
0
RTS
 Serbia and Montenegro
2006
2006
1
0
N/A
0
UJRT
 Slovakia
1998
1998
1
1
1998
0
STV
 Slovenia
1994
2018
13
7
2018
1
RTV SLO
 Spain
1988
2018
8
1
1992
0
TVE
 Sweden[b]
1986
2018
13
5
2016
1
SVT
  Switzerland
1982
2006
12
7
2006
0
SRG SSR
 Ukraine
2008
2012
2
0
N/A
0
NTU
 United Kingdom
1982
2018
16
10
2008
1
BBC
 Yugoslavia[c]
1986
1992
4
1
1986
0
JRT

Other EBU members[edit]

The following list of countries are eligible to participate in Eurovision Young Musicians, but have yet to make their début at the contest.[3]

Participating countries in the decades[edit]

The table lists the participating countries in each decade since the first Eurovision Young Musicians was held in 1982.

Table key[edit]

     Winner – The country won the Eurovision Young Musicians that year.
     Second place – The country was ranked second that year.
     Third place – The country was ranked third that year.
     Non-qualified – The country did not qualify to the final (1986–2012, 2018–present).
     Undecided – The country has confirmed participation for the next Eurovision Young Musicians, however, the competition has not yet taken place.
     Debutant – The country made its debut during the decade.
     Did not participate – The country did not participate in the Eurovision Young Musicians that year.
     Withdrawn – The country was going to participate that year, but later withdrew.
A cross (X) means that the country participated in the contest that year.

1980s[edit]

1990s[edit]

2000s[edit]

2010s[edit]

2020s[edit]

Other countries who have broadcast the Eurovision Young Musicians[edit]

Country Broadcaster(s) Year(s)
 Australia Unknown 2004[6]
 Canada
 Iceland Ríkisútvarpið (RÚV) 2002,[7] 2008–2012[8][9][10]
 Turkey Turkish Radio and Television Corporation (TRT) 2000[11]

List of winners[edit]

By contest[edit]

Year Date Host City Countries Winner Performer Instrument Piece Runner-up
1982 11 May United Kingdom Manchester 6  Germany Markus Pawlik Piano Piano Concerto No.1 by Felix Mendelssohn  France
1984 22 May Switzerland Geneva 7  Netherlands Isabelle van Keulen [nl] Violin Violin concert no. 5 op. 37 by Henri Vieuxtemps  Finland
1986 27 May Denmark Copenhagen 15  France Sandrine Lazarides Piano Piano Concerto E flat by Franz Liszt   Switzerland
1988 31 May Netherlands Amsterdam 16  Austria Julian Rachlin Violin Concerto for violin and orchestra in d, op.22 by Henryk Wieniawski  Norway
1990 29 May Austria Vienna 18  Netherlands Niek van Oosterum [nl] Piano Concert for Piano and Orchestra a-minor op. 16, 1 Mov. by Edvard Grieg  Germany
1992 9 June Belgium Brussels 13  Poland Bartłomiej Nizioł Violin Concerto for violin and orchestra in d major op. 77 by Johannes Brahms  Spain
1994 14 June Poland Warsaw 24  United Kingdom Natalie Clein Cello Cello Concerto in E minor, op. 85, part I by Edward Elgar  Latvia
1996 12 June Portugal Lisbon 17  Germany Julia Fischer Violin  Austria
1998 4 June Austria Vienna 13  Austria Lidia Baich [de] Violin Violin Concerto no. 5, 1st Mov. by Henri Vieuxtemps  Croatia
2000 15 June Norway Bergen 18  Poland Stanisław Drzewiecki Piano Piano Concerto in E minor, op. 11, 3rd movement by Frederic Chopin  Finland
2002 19 June Germany Berlin 20  Austria Dalibor Karvay Violin Carmen Fantasy by Franz Waxman  United Kingdom
2004 27 May Switzerland Lucerne 17  Austria Alexandra Soumm Violin Violin Concerto No.1 (1st Movement) by Niccolò Paganini  Germany
2006 12 May Austria Vienna 18  Sweden Andreas Brantelid Cello Concerto for Violoncello and Orchestra, 1st movement by Joseph Haydn  Norway
2008 9 May Austria Vienna 16  Greece Dionysis Grammenos [el] Clarinet Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra, 4th movement by Jean Françaix  Finland
2010 14 May Austria Vienna 15  Slovenia Eva Nina Kozmus Flute Concerto for flute, III. mov. Allegro scherzando by Jacques Ibert  Norway
2012 11 May Austria Vienna 14  Norway Eivind Holtsmark Ringstad [no] Viola Viola concerto, 2 & 3 mov. by Béla Bartók  Austria
2014 31 May Germany Cologne 14  Austria Ziyu He Violin 2. Violinkonzert by Béla Bartók  Slovenia
2016 3 September Germany Cologne[12] 11  Poland Łukasz Dyczko [pl] Saxophone Rhapsody pour Saxophone alto by André Waignein  Czech Republic
2018 23 August United Kingdom Edinburgh 18  Russia Ivan Bessonov Piano 3rd mvt from Piano Concerto No. 1 by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky  Slovenia

By country[edit]

Map showing each country's number of Young Musicians gold medal wins up to and including 2018.

The table below shows the top-three placings from each contest, along with the years that a country won the contest.

Country 1st, gold medalist(s) 2nd, silver medalist(s) 3rd, bronze medalist(s) Total Years won
 Austria 5 2 1 8
 Poland 3 0 0 3
 Germany 2 1 0 3
 Netherlands 2 0 0 2
 Norway 1 3 1 5
 Slovenia 1 2 1 4
 United Kingdom 1 1 2 4
 France 1 1 0 2
 Russia 1 0 4 5
 Sweden 1 0 1 2
 Greece 1 0 0 1
 Finland 0 3 1 4 N/A
  Switzerland 0 1 1 2 N/A
 Croatia 0 1 0 1 N/A
 Czech Republic 0 1 0 1 N/A
 Latvia 0 1 0 1 N/A
 Spain 0 1 0 1 N/A
 Armenia 0 0 1 1 N/A
 Belgium 0 0 1 1 N/A
 Estonia 0 0 1 1 N/A
 Hungary 0 0 1 1 N/A
 Italy 0 0 1 1 N/A

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Correct as of the 2018 contest.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h The four Scandinavian countries (Denmark, Norway, Finland and Sweden) originally sent a joint participant to the contest. In 1982, the musician represented the Norwegian colors and the Finnish colors in 1984.[5] The nations were represented individually, following the introduction of a preliminary round, at the 1986 contest.
  3. ^ The Federal Republic of Yugoslavia competed as "Yugoslavia" in 1992.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "History. How it all started". British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). Archived from the original on 7 April 2008. Retrieved 6 March 2008.
  2. ^ "Eurovision Young Musicians 1982 (Participants)". youngmusicians.tv. European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 5 October 2014.
  3. ^ a b "List of EBU Active Members". ebu.ch. European Broadcasting Union. 6 June 2014. Retrieved 27 October 2014.
  4. ^ "Eurovision Young Musicians". www.ebu.ch. 15 May 2018.
  5. ^ "Eurovision Young Musicians 1986". Issuu. Retrieved 18 August 2018.
  6. ^ "EBU.CH :: 2004_05_28_EYM". EBU. 8 April 2005. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  7. ^ "Austria wins the 2002 Eurovision Competition for Young Musicians". European Broadcasting Union. 4 February 2005. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  8. ^ "Eurovision Young Musicians - Final Press Release". youngmusicians.tv. EBU. 12 May 2008. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  9. ^ "Eurovision Young Musicians - 2010 Eurovision Young Musician: Eva-Nina Kozmus, Slovenia". youngmusicians.tv. European Broadcasting Union. 23 May 2010. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  10. ^ "Norwegian viola prodigy wins Eurovision Young Musicians 2012". youngmusicians.tv. EBU. 11 May 2012. Retrieved 10 June 2018.
  11. ^ "Norway to host 10th Eurovision Grand Prix for Young Musicians". European Broadcasting Union. 14 February 2005. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  12. ^ "WDR and Cologne chosen to host 2016 competition". Youngmusicians.tv. 9 December 2014. Retrieved 9 December 2014.