List of country blues musicians

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The following is a list of country blues musicians.

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E[edit]

  • Sleepy John Estes (January 25, 1899 – June 5, 1977). Guitarist, singer and songwriter.

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  • Lead Belly (January 20, 1888 [uncertain, possibly January 23, 1889] – December 6, 1949). Singer and multi-instrumentalist who played folk music and blues, notable for his strong vocals, virtuosity on the twelve-string guitar, and the folk standards he introduced. Considered to be highly influential.
  • Furry Lewis (March 6, 1893 – September 14, 1981). Guitarist, singer and songwriter.
  • Noah Lewis (September 3, 1890 or 1895, Henning, Tennessee – February 7, 1961). Jug band and country blues harmonica player, composer of "Minglewood Blues", which he recorded as a member of Cannon's Jug Stompers.
  • Charley Lincoln (March 11, 1900, Lithonia, Georgia – September 28, 1963). Acoustic country and Piedmont blues guitarist and singer. He was the brother of Barbecue Bob, with whom he performed from the 1920s until Bob's death in 1931. He made several recordings, some for Columbia Records.
  • Mance Lipscomb (April 9, 1895, Navasota, Texas - January 30, 1976). Guitarist and singer, he performed a repertory based on blues, ragtime, Tin Pan Alley and folk music. He recorded for Arhoolie Records and Reprise Records (early 1960s).
  • Robert Lockwood, Jr. (March 27, 1915 – November 21, 2006). Delta blues guitarist.
  • John Long (born 1950). American fingerstyle guitarist, harmonica player and songwriter. He performs in a pre-war acoustic blues style, although his material is contemporary and mainly composed by Long and his elder brother. He has released three albums to date.[6]

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  • Sonny Boy Nelson (December 23, 1908 – November 4, 1998). Multi-instrumentalist (banjo, guitar, harmonica, horn, mandolin and violin).
  • Robert Nighthawk[7] (November 30, 1909 – November 5, 1967). He played with Big Joe Willams and Sonny Boy Willamson.
  • Hammie Nixon (January 22, 1908, Brownsville, Tennessee – August 17, 1984). Born Hammie Nickerson, he began his music career with jug bands in the 1920s. He is best known as a country blues harmonica player. He also played the kazoo, guitar and jug. He played with the guitarist Sleepy John Estes for half a century, first recording with Estes in 1929 for Victor Records. He also recorded with Little Buddy Doyle, Lee Green, Clayton T. Driver, Charlie Pickett and Son Bonds.

P[edit]

  • Charley Patton (April 1891 [uncertain, possibly 1881, 1885, or 1887] – April 28, 1934). Delta blues guitarist and singer. Considered one of the originators of the delta blues style itself.
  • Peg Leg Sam (December 18, 1911 – October 27, 1977). Harmonica player and singer.
  • Robert Petway (October 18, 1907 - May 30, 1978). Delta blues guitarist and singer. Composed and performed seminal and hugely influential "Catfish Blues".
  • Reverend Peyton (April 12, 1981 - current). Guitarist and singer.
  • Dan Pickett (August 31, 1907 – August 16, 1967),[8] born as James Founty, was an American Piedmont blues and country blues singer, guitarist and songwriter.[9][10] He only recorded fourteen tracks for Gotham Records in 1949, several of which were issued in more recent times. AllMusic noted that "Pickett had a distinctive rhythmic style and unique phrasing that makes his records compelling decades after his release".[11]
  • Polka Dot Slim (December 9, 1926 – June 22, 1981). Singer and harmonica player.

Q[edit]

  • Henry Qualls (July 8, 1934 – December 7, 2003)[12] was an American Texas and country blues guitarist and singer. He found success late in his life after being "discovered" in 1993 by the Dallas Blues Society.[12][13] He released his only album in 1994 but toured globally playing at a number of festivals.

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  • Adia Victoria (born July 22, 1986). Singer, guitarist and songwriter

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Jason Ankeny. "Backwards Sam Firk | Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved 2016-05-22.
  2. ^ Eugene Chadbourne. "Ted Bogan | Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved 2016-11-08.
  3. ^ Jason Ankeny (1927-07-18). "William Harris | Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved 2017-01-07.
  4. ^ "William Harris | Big Road Blues". Sundayblues.org. Retrieved 2017-01-07.
  5. ^ Scott Yanow (1929-06-14). "Complete Recorded Works in Chronological Order 1927 - 1929 - William Harris | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Retrieved 2017-01-07.
  6. ^ Steve Leggett. "John Long | Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved 2017-04-28.
  7. ^ "Robert Nighthawk | Biography, Albums, Streaming Links". AllMusic. Retrieved 2017-04-28.
  8. ^ Eagle, Bob; LeBlanc, Eric S. (2013). Blues - A Regional Experience. Santa Barbara: Praeger Publishers. p. 89. ISBN 978-0313344237.
  9. ^ Jim O'Neal. "Dan Pickett | Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved 2016-10-13.
  10. ^ "Dan Pickett's illustrated discography". Wirz.de. Retrieved 2016-10-19.
  11. ^ Thom Owens. "1949 Country Blues - Dan Pickett | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Retrieved 2016-10-19.
  12. ^ a b "Henry Qualls | Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved 2017-01-10.
  13. ^ Thor Christensen. "Henry Qualls: East Texas country-blues singer found success late in life". The Dallas Morning News.
  14. ^ "Remembering Carl Rutherford > Appalachian Voices". Appvoices.org. April 1, 2006. Retrieved March 5, 2019.
  15. ^ "Carl Rutherford". Musicmaker.org. Retrieved March 5, 2019.
  16. ^ Shadwick, Keith (2001). "Henry Thomas". Encyclopedia of Jazz & Blues. Ann Arbor, Michigan: Quintet Publishing. p. 650. ISBN 1-86155-385-4.
  17. ^ Du Noyer, Paul (2003). The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music. Fulham, London: Flame Tree Publishing. p. 181. ISBN 1-904041-96-5.
  18. ^ "Jontavious Willis - The Third Day Of The Devil's Music". Feelingoverdose-com.webnode.es. Retrieved 23 July 2019.

Other sources[edit]