List of decommissioned ships of the South African Navy

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The following is a list of decommissioned ships of the South African Navy.


Mine laying and anti-mine vessels[edit]

Minesweeping whalers[edit]

Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
Hector Class HMSAS Soetvlei
Hector class HMSAS Brakvlei
Hector class HMSAS Hektor
HMSAS Swartberg
HMSAS Oostewal
HMSAS Steenberg
HMSAS Stellenberg
HMSAS Kommetje
HMSAS Florida
HMSAS Imhoff
HMSAS Grimwood
HMSAS Natalia T02 Returned to owner after war. Fate unknown. Built in 1925 and converted as minesweeper in 1941
HMSAS Larsen
HMSAS Robinson
HMSAS Goulding
HMSAS Whytock MV Charles Whytock T07 27 June 1940 9 September 1944 First sold to Wheelocks, Shanghai 28 June 1946. Sale was cancelled after collapse of company was re-sold to Knysna Cold Storage & Fisheries Corp in 1948. Registered as MV Knysna. Built by Nylands MV, Oslo, Norway in 1924. Requisitioned from Premier Whaling Co. Durban, South Africa. Scuttled off Port Elizabeth on 31 March 1952.[1]
HMSAS Langlaagte MV Southern Sun (1922)
MV Albert Hulett (1936)
T41 February 1941 21 January 1946 Sold to LHC Corp on 25 June 1946 Built by Smith's Dock & Co Ltd, Middlesbrough. Requisitioned from Union Whaling Co. Durban, South Africa on 8 September 1940.[2]
HMSAS Parktown MV Southern Sky (1929)
MV Sidney Smith (1936)
T39 February 1941 1942 Sunk in action with E Boats off Tobruk on 21 June 1942. Built by Smith's Dock & Co Ltd, Middlesbrough. Requisitioned from Union Whaling Co. Durban, South Africa on 8 September 1940.[2]
HMSAS Johannesburg Margarita Molins
Mossa Medes
MV Suderoy III
T56 20 August 1942 Laid up in March 1946. Handed over to the Royal Navy for disposal on 17 April 1946. Built by Porsgrund Mek Verksted, Tonsberg, Norway in 1925. Requisitioned from Suderoy Whaling Company on 3 July 1941.[3]
HMSAS Parktown MV Lobito
MV Suderoy
MV Suderoy I
T55 November 1941 Laid up on 21 September 1944. Handed over to the Royal Navy for disposal on 17 April 1946. Built by Jarlso Vaerft, Tonsberg, Norway in 1925. Requisitioned from Suderoy Whaling Company on 3 July 1941.[3]
HMSAS Springs MV Tas I
MV Uni I
T38 20 March 1941 20 July 1945 Sold by auction back to Union Whaling Company of Durban 7 May 1946 Built by Moss Værft & Dokk, Moss, Norway for the Fraternitas Whaling Company in 1930. Later bought by the Union Whaling Company of Durban, South Africa. Requisitioned in August 1940.[4]
HMSAS Nigel MV Tas II
MV Uni II
T40 10 March 1941 11 January 1945 Sold by auction to Palestine Fishing Company of Durban 7 May 1946 Built by Moss Værft & Dokk, Moss, Norway for the Fraternitas Whaling Company in 1930. Later bought by the Union whaling Company of Durban, South Africa. Requisitioned in August 1940.[4]
HMSAS Germiston MV Foik (1923)
MV Star VI
MV Tas IV
MV Uni IV (1937)
T47 22 September 1941 9 September 1944 Sold to private owner 7 May 1946 Built by Akers Shipyards, Oslo, Denmark in 1923. Requisitioned from Union Whaling Company, Durban, South Africa.[5]
HMSAS Krugersdorp MV Alex Lange (1923)
MV Star VII
MV Tas V
MV Uni V (1937).
T48 21 June 1941 22 August 1944 Sold to private owner 7 May 1946 Built by Akers Shipyards, Oslo, Denmark in 1923. Requisitioned from Union Whaling Company, Durban, South Africa.[5]
HMSAS Roodepoort
HMSAS Boksburg
HMSAS Bever
HMSAS Gribb
HMSAS Seksern
HMSAS Treern
HMSAS Randfontein
HMSAS Benoni

Minesweeping trawlers[edit]

Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
Mersey class HMSAS Immortelle MV Thomas Johns (1918) and HMS Eden (1920) 1 April 1922 31 March 1934 Returned to RN and reverted to HMS Eden.[6] Builder: Cochrane & Sons, Selby, Yorkshire, England, 1918.
Mersey class HMSAS Sonneblom John Edmund (1918) and HMS Foyle (1920) 1 April 1922 31 March 1934 Returned to RN and reverted to HMS Foyle.[6] Builder: Goole Shipbuilding and Repair Company, Goole, Hampshire, England, 1918.
Bluff class HMSAS Aristea 28 November 1939 27 December 1944 Builder: Hall Russell, Aberdeen, 1935. Requisitioned from Irvin & Johnson.
Bluff class HMSAS Babiana 18 September 1939 27 December 1944 Returned to owner. Builder: Hall Russell, Aberdeen, 1934. Requisitioned from Irvin & Johnson.[7]
Bluff class HMSAS Bluff 12 September 1939 27 December 1944 Returned to owner. Builder: Hall Russell, Aberdeen, 1934. Requisitioned from Irvin & Johnson.[7]
Bluff class HMSAS Crassula 17 October 1939 25 October 1944 Returned to owner and scrapped 1968. Builder: Hall Russell, Aberdeen, 1935. Requisitioned from Irvin & Johnson[7]
Disa class HMSAS Arum T10 4 November 1939 26 October 1944 Returned to owner Builder: Hall Russell, Aberdeen, 1926. Requisitioned from Irvin & Johnson.[8]
Disa class HMSAS Disa T15 5 September 1939 16 June 1940 Returned to owner Builder: Hall Russell, Aberdeen, 1924. Requisitioned from Irvin & Johnson.[8]
Disa Class HMSAS Nerine T11 4 November 1939 26 October 1944 Returned to owner. Builder: Hall Russell, Aberdeen, 1925. Requisitioned from Irvin & Johnson.[8]
Castle class HMSAS Algoa Bay
Castle class HMSAS David Haigh
Strath class HMSAS Richard Bennett
Gadfly Class HMSAS Africana T501 and later T01 10 September 1939 10 April 1947 Returned to Sea Fisheries Built by Hall Russell, Aberdeen Scotland (1930). Requisitioned from South African Department of Sea Fisheries.[9]

Minesweepers[edit]

Ton class minesweeper
Algerine class minesweeper
Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
Ton Class SAS Durban M1499 Museum ship in Durban
Ton Class SAS East London HMS Chilton M1215 Sold to Italian film company
Ton Class SAS Johannesburg HMS Castleton M1207
Ton Class SAS Kaapstad HMS Hazleton
HMS Blue Firefly
P1557
M1210
Ton Class SAS Kimberley HMS Stratton M1210
Ton Class SAS Mosselbaai HMS Oakington M1213
Ton Class SAS Port Elizabeth HMS Dumbleton M1212
Ton Class SAS Pretoria HMS Dunkerton
HMS Golden Firefly
P1556
M1144
Museum ship in Hout Bay
Ton Class SAS Walvisbaai HMS Packington M1214 Sold to The Walt Disney Company
Ton Class SAS Windhoek M1498
Algerine Class SAS Pietermaritzburg HMS Pelorus J-291) M291 Scuttled in Smitswinkel Bay
Algerine Class HMSAS Bloemfontein HMS Rosamund M439 Expended as target on 5 June 1967 in False Bay

Mine layers[edit]

Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
HMSAS Skilpad German trawler Polaris
HMS Spindrift in 1940
HMSAS Skilpad in 1951
5 July 1943 Sold for scrap Originally German trawler Polaris, captured by HMS Arrow off Norway on 26 April 1940. Broken up in Durban in 1957.[10]

Submarines[edit]

Agosta Class submarine. Ordered by the South African Navy but never delivered due to arms embargo.
Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
Daphne Class SAS Spear SAS Maria van Riebeeck S97 24 Jul 1970 '[11] 2003 Scrapped Originally named for the wife of Jan van Riebeeck (first Cape Colony commander) Maria van Riebeeck
Daphne Class SAS Umkhonto SAS Emily Hobhouse S98 26 Feb 1971 2008 Scrapped Named for Emily Hobhouse
Daphne class SAS Assegaai SAS Johanna van der Merwe S99 27 Aug 1971 Awaiting transfer to Naval Museum Named for Voortrekker heroine Johanna van der Merwe
Agosta Class SAS Adventurous Not delivered; sold to Pakistan as PNS Hurmat[12] Built by Dubigeon-Normandie Nantes, France. Launched 1 December 1978 and completed 18 February 1980. These vessels were ordered from France, but were embargoed (United Nations Security Council Resolution 418 in 1977) on 8 November 1977 with South African crews on board.
Agosta Class SAS Astrant Not delivered; sold to Pakistan as PNS Hashmat[12] Built by Dubigeon-Normandie Nantes, France. Launched 14 December 1977 and completed 17 February 1979. These vessels were ordered from France, but were embargoed (United Nations Security Council Resolution 418 in 1977) on 8 November 1977 with South African crews on board.

Anti-submarine[edit]

Anti-submarine whalers and trawlers[edit]

SAS Immortelle, circa 1935
Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
AS Whaler HMSAS Blaauwberg
AS Whaler HMSAS Cedarberg
AS Whaler HMSAS Sydostlandet
AS Whaler HMSAS Odberg
AS Whaler HMSAS Rondevlei
AS Whaler HMSAS Smalvlei
AS Whaler HMSAS Tordonn
AS Whaler HMSAS Pretoria
AS Whaler HMSAS Turffontein
AS Whaler HMSAS Vereeniging
AS Whaler HMSAS Standerton
Southern class HMSAS Southern Floe
Southern class HMSAS Southern Maid
Southern Class HMSAS Southern Barrier
Southern class HMSAS Southern Isles
Southern class HMSAS Southern Sea
Terje class HMSAS Brakpan
Terje class HMSAS Protea
Terje class HMSAS Sonneblom
Terje class HMSAS Immortelle
AS Trawler HMSAS Blomvlei
AS Trawler HMSAS Mooivlei

Frigates[edit]

HMS Swale, later to become HMSAS Swale
Loch Class frigate
Rothesay (President) Class frigate with a Whiskey type submarine
Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
River Class SAS Teviot HMS Teviot (K222) 10 June 1942 January 1946 Returned to Royal Navy in 1946. Built by Hall Russell, Aberdeen, Scotland. Sold on 29 March 1955 and broken up for scrap.[13]
River Class HMSAS Swale HMS Swale (K217) 1 August 1945 March 1946 Returned to Royal Navy in 1946. Built by Smith's Dock, Middlesbrough and launched in 1942. Sold on 26 February 1955 for scrap.[13]
Loch Class SAS Good Hope HMS Loch Boisdale (K432) F432 5 July 1944.[14] Scuttled in Smitswinkel Bay, 12 December 1978. Built by Blythe D.D. & Co
Loch Class SAS Natal HMS Loch Cree (K430) F430 and then A301 19 June 1944[15] Sunk as a target off the Cape, 19 September 1972. Used as a survey ship from 1957.
Loch Class SAS Transvaal HMS Loch Ard K602 F602 2 August 1944[15] Scuttled in Smitswinkel Bay 3, August 1978. Built by Harland & Wolf.
Type 15 Anti-Submarine SAS Vrystaat HMS Wrangler (R48) F157 1956 1963 Paid off into reserve. Sunk as submarine target 14 April 1976.[16]
President Class
[Notes 1][17]
SAS President Pretorius F145 18 March 1964 1985 Sold for scrap 1990.[17] Named for the first President of the South African Republic Marthinus Wessel Pretorius
President Class SAS President Kruger F150 1962 Sunk 1982 Sunk after a collision with SAS Tafelberg on 18 February 1982.[17] Named for South African Republic President Paul Kruger.
President Class SAS President Steyn F147 8 April 1963 1980 Used as a target and sunk by missile on 29 April 1991.[17] Named for last President of the Orange Free State Martinus Theunis Steyn

Destroyers[edit]

SAS Jan van Riebeeck pictured when still named HMS Wessex
HMSAS Simon van der Stel (Photo when still named HMS Whelp underway on the Tyne, 1944)
Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
W Class SAS Jan van Riebeeck HMS Wessex D278 1950 Continued in service until 1978 when she was put on the Disposal List. She was finally expended as a missile target on 25 March 1980. Wessex was transferred to the South African Navy on 29 March 1950 and renamed Jan van Riebeeck after the Dutch founder of Cape Town Jan van Riebeeck. She was modernised with a partial conversion into a frigate between 1964 and 1966.
W Class SAS Simon van der Stel HMS Whelp D237 1952 Placed in reserve from 1957,[18] but was modernised as a Type 15 frigate (in common with other destroyers of her generation) from 1962 to 1964, and re-commissioned in February 1964.[19]Simon van der Stel was scrapped in 1976 at Durban.[19] Sold to South Africa as the replacement for HMSAS Natal (formerly HMS Loch Cree) in 1952.[20] Renamed Simon van der Stel, after the 17th century colonist reputed to be the founder of the South African wine industry. Much of Simon van der Stel′s service was as a "grey ambassador", on good-will visits to Europe and Europe's African colonies, including a 147-day cruise to Europe in 1954. This role, however, declined as South Africa became increasingly isolated during the apartheid years.[21]

Corvettes[edit]

Ordered from France in 1976, but the sale was blocked in 1977 by United Nations Security Council Resolution 418 after official naming, but before they could be delivered or commissioned.

ARA Drummond, originally built as SAS Good Hope
Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
A69 Class SAS Good Hope F432 Vessel was ordered from France, commissioned and South African crew were aboard receiving training when the sale was blocked in 1977. Subsequently, sold to Argentina as ARA Drummond.
A69 Class SAS Transvaal F602 Vessel was ordered from France, named and crew trained in France. Delivery cancelled due to the arms embargo. Subsequently, sold to Argentina as ARA Guerrico.

Fast attack craft[edit]

Strike craft[edit]

Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
Warrior Class
[Notes 2]
SAS Jan Smuts P1561 8 July 1977[22] 2004 Scrapped 2004 Built by Israel Shipyards Ltd, Haifa, Israel. Originally named after PM of Union of South Africa Jan Smuts[23]
Warrior Class SAS Shaka SAS P.W. Botha P1562 2 December 1977[22] 2005 Sunk as target 2005[24] Built by Israel Shipyards Ltd, Haifa, Israel.[23] Originally named for former President of South Africa Pieter Willem Botha
Warrior Class SAS Adam Kok SAS Frederic Creswell P1563 6 April 1978 Awaiting disposal[25] Built by Israel Shipyards Ltd, Haifa, Israel.[23] Originally named for South African Labour Party minister Frederic Creswell and renamed for black South African leader Adam Kok III
Warrior Class SAS Sekhukhuni SAS Jim Fouché P1564 22 December 1978 2005 Sunk as target 2005[25] Built by Sandock Austral, Durban, South Africa.[23] Originally named after 2nd President of South Africa Jacobus Johannes Fouché
Warrior Class SAS René Sethren SAS Oswald Pirow P1566 4 March 1980 Awaiting disposal[25] Built by Sandock Austral, Durban, South Africa.[23] Originally named after National Party minister Oswald Pirow and renamed for decorated HMSAS officer René Sethren CGM
Warrior Class SAS Job Masego SAS Kobie Coetsee P1568 11 February 1983 2008 Sold for scrap[25] Built by Sandock Austral, Durban, South Africa.[23] Originally named after National Party politician Kobie Coetsee; renamed after Cpl Job Masego of the Native Military Corps

Defence vessels[edit]

Boom defence vessels[edit]

Boom defence vessels were used to maintain anti-submarine nets and anti-torpedo nets around ports, anchorages and individual ships.

HMS Barcross (1943), later renamed SAS Somerset.
Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
Bar class SAS Somerset HMS Barcross, retained the name HMSAS Barcross until 1951. Renamed SAS Somerset 1951 Transferred to S A Navy on 21 January 1943 31 March 1986 Used as a museum ship, Victoria & Alfred Waterfront as from 2 September 1988[26] Built by Blythe S.B. Co (1942).
Bar class SAS Fleur HMS Barbrake retained the name HMSAS Barbrake until 1951.
Renamed SAS Fleur 1951
Transferred to S A Navy on 15 February 1943 Sunk by naval gunfire near Simonstown on 8 October 1965[26] Built by William Simons & Co, Renfrew, Scotland (1942)

Seaward defence boats[edit]

Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
Ford Class SAS Gelderland HMS Brayford
HMSAS Gelderland
P3105 30 August 1954 1988 Stripped and expended as a demolition target off Duiker Point. 21 December 1988 Built by A&J Ingles Ltd, Glasgow. Laid down 1951 and launched 19 February 1952. Transferred to SA Navy 1954.[27]
Ford Class SAS Nautilus HMS Glassford
HMSAS Nautilus
P3120 23 August 1955 17 October 1985 Laid up in Simon's Town. Sold by public tender in 1989 and converted to yacht Nautilus in Cape Town. Built by Richard Dunston Ltd, Doncaster. Laid down 1952 and launched 28 March 1955. Transferred to SA Navy 1955.[27]
Ford Class SAS Rijger HMSAS Rijger P3125 6 October 1958 Paid off at Simon's Town. Converted into a re-usable missile target barge. Approved for disposal 1992 Built for South African Navy by Vosper Ltd, Portsmouth. Laid down 1956 and launched 6 February 1958.[27]
Ford Class SAS Haerlem HMSAS Haerlem P3126 2 June 1959 1987 Scuttled off Humewood Beach, Port Elizabeth as artificial reef on 30 November 1987. Built for South African Navy by Vosper Ltd, Portsmouth. Laid down 1957, launched 18 June 1958 and completed on 28 November 1958.[27]
Ford Class SAS Oosterland HMSAS Oosterland P3127 8 September 1959 Paid off at Durban. Converted into a re-usable missile target barge. Sold to private owner in Hout Bay in 1990. Built for South African Navy by Vosper Ltd, Portsmouth. Laid down 1958, launched 27 January 1959 and completed on 8 September 1959.[27]

Harbour defence motor launches[edit]

Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
HDML 1100-1300 Series[28] HDML 1197 HDML1197 24 July 1943 1966 Sold 1966 Built by Fred Nicolls, Durban. Attached to SAS Unitie and later SAS Saldanha. Renamed Windward II after sale.[29]
HDML 1100-1300 Series[30] HDML 1198 HDML1198 26 July 1943 1956 Sold Built by Fred Nicolls, Durban. Attached to Salisbury Island.[29]
HDML 1100-1300 Series[30] HDML 1199 HDML1199 20 July 1943 Sold 1955 Built by Fred Nicolls, Durban. Attached to SAS Inkonkoni until 1948. Used as a ferry on Salisbury Island from 1948 - 1950.[29]
HDML 1100-1300 Series[30] HDML 1200 HDML1200 4 August 1943 8 September 1969 Sold Built by Fred Nicolls, Durban. Attached to SAS Donkin. Renamed Venture. after sale to private owner.[29]
HDML 1100-1300 Series[30] HDML 1201 HDML1201 6 August 1943 1959 Sold Built by Fred Nicolls, Durban. Attached to Naval Dockyard, Simon's Town.[29]
HDML 1100-1300 Series[30] HDML 1202 HDML1202 3 September 1943 1962 Sold 1962 Built by Fred Nicolls, Durban. Attached to SAS Port Rex and later SAS Donkin. Damaged in collision in 1959.[29]
HDML 1100-1300 Series[30] HDML 1203 HDML1203 22 July 1943 1968 Sold 1968 Built by Herbie Spradbrow, Durban. Attached to SAS Port Rex and later transferred to SAS Inkonkoni.[29]
HDML 1100-1300 Series[30] HDML 1204 HDML1204 10 December 1943 1976 Sold 1976 Built by Herbie Spradbrow, Durban. Attached to SAS Robbeneiland. Used as ferry between Cape Town and Murry's Harbour on Robben Island. Transferred to Military Academy, Saldanha in 1971.[29]
HDML 1100-1300 Series[30] HDML 1330 HDML1330 23 June 1944 1953 Sold for scrap 1953 Built by Fred Nicolls, Durban.[29]
HDML 1100-1300 Series[30] HDML 1331 HDML1331 28 June 1944 1952 Sold 1953 Built by Fred Nicolls, Durban. Attached to Salisbury Island.[29]
HDML 1100-1300 Series[30] HDML 1332 HDML1332 28 June 1944 1958 Sold 1958 Built by Fred Nicolls, Durban. Attached to SAS Unitie.[29]

Depot/replenishment ships[edit]

Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
HMSAS Afrikander HMS Tickler (1879)
HMS YC229 (1902)
15 June 1923 Returned to Royal Navy Builder: Pembroke Dock, England, 1879. Renamed HMS Afrikander II in 1933. Broken up for scrap, Simons Town 1937.[31]
SAS Tafelberg Danish SS Annam A243 10 August 1967 Sold for scrap Built by Nakskovs Skibsvaerft, Denmark and completed on 23 October 1958.[32]
SAS Outeniqua Aleksandr Sledzyuk
Juvent
A302 8 June 1993 30 July 2004 Sold for conversion to floating accommodation vessel on the River Tyne, UK.[33] Built by Khersonski Sudnobudivny in Zavod-Kherson, Ukraine, launched 6 September 1991 as Alexander Sledzuk. After 12 months charter service renamed as Juvent. Purchased on behalf of the SA Navy on February 26, 1993 as replacement for SAS Tafelberg. In 1994 modifications to hangar, flight deck, replenishment at sea equipment and the fitting of light armament were done to permit conversion to combat support vessel. Sold to Mertech Marine (Pty) Ltd and renamed Paardeburg. Sold again in 2006 to C&M Gp. and became Ice Maiden I in 2007.[33]

Other vessels[edit]

Air-sea rescue launches[edit]

Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
Type 1 HSL R0 HMS Malmok R0 1940 1946 Sold after having her engines removed. Built by British Power Boat Company, Hythe, Southampton.[34]
PT boat R1 to R8 R1 to R8 1941 R1, 3, 5, 6, 7 and 8 sold 1946-8.
R2 sold in 1950s.
R4 sold in 1960s.
Built by Miami Shipbuilding Corporation, Florida, USA.[34]
PT boat R10 to R20 R10 to R20 1944 R10 broken up in 1946 after grounding.
R12, 14, 15, 16 and 17 sold in 1950s.
R11, 18, 19 and 20 sold in the 1960s.
Built by Miami Shipbuilding Corporation, Florida, USA.[34]
P1551 R31 P1551 1962 Built by Kogerwerft, Redsburg, West Germany.[34]
P1552 R30 P1552 1961 1988 Lost off Saldanah Bay on 7 October 1988 after striking a reef off Danger Point. Built by Kogerwerft, Redsburg, West Germany.[34]
PT boat P1553 R9 P1553 1944 1973 Sold to private owner. Renamed Circe, Hout Bay. Built by Miami Shipbuilding Corporation, Florida, USA.[34]
P1554 P1554 1973 1986 Sold to private owner. Built by Groves & Gutteridge, Cowes, UK.[34]
P1555 P1555 1973 Built by Groves & Gutteridge, Cowes, UK.[34]
P1558 P1558 1977 1986 Sunk as a gunnery target on 15 September 1988 during Exercise Magersfontein Built by Dorman Long Van der Bijl Corporation, Durban South Africa in 1976. Built for the Malawi Defence Force for use on Lake Malawi. With the revolution in Mozambique in 1977 the planned delivery route via northern Mozambique was no longer viable. The ship was subsequently handed over to the South African Navy.[35]

Hydrographic survey[edit]

Flower Class corvette. The SAS Protea was converted to a hydrographic survey vessel by the conversion of such a corvette.
Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
Hunt class HMSAS Protea Ventnor (1917)
SS Verwood (1918)
HMS Crozier (1919)
1 April 1922 30 April 1933 Returned to RN 30 April 1933 Builder: William Simons & Co, Renfrew, Scotland, 1919. Sold by tender to Protea Showboat (Pty) Ltd, Cape Town.[36]
Flower class corvette SAS Protea HMS Rockrose
HMSAS Protea
K51 4 October 1947 January 1957 Paid off to reserve. Sold by tender in 1962. Broken up, Table Bay, 1967.[37] Builder: C. Hill & Sons, Bristol, 1941. Converted to survey vessel in 1946.
A331 Department of Transport
RV RSA
A331 23 April 1978 17 March 1980 Transferred back to South African Department of Transport. Built by Fujinagata Shipbuilding and Engineering Co. Ltd, Osaka, Japan.[38]

Training ships[edit]

Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
Mersey Class SATS General Botha HMS Thames 1 April 1922 30 April 1933 Scuttled in False Bay in 1947 Named for the first PM of the Union of South Africa Louis Botha
SAS Navigator Built by Fred Nicols (Pty) Ltd, Durban, South Africa.

Salvage vessels[edit]

Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
SAS Gamtoos SS Gamtoos W122 10 October 1942 1946 Transferred to Department of Agriculture in 1946. Expended as a target on 10 June 1976. Builder: Scott & Sons, Glasgow, Scotland, 1936. Bought from Smiths Coasters, Durban in 1942.[39]
King Salvor class HMSAS Salvestor RFA Salvestor 31 August 1944 1946 Returned to Royal Navy Built by William Simons & Co, Renfrew, Scotland. Launched 28 August 1942. Operated by SANF personnel in the Mediterranean and Far East. Broken up for scrap at Briton Ferry in 1970.[40]
SAS Fleur P3148 Sold to Neill Scott-Williams in 2010 and deployed to Subtech Marine of Durban as a Support/Supply Vessel Built by Dorman & Long, Durban, South Africa (1969). Torpedo recovery and diving tender.

Cable layer vessels[edit]

Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
HMSAS Mead MV Kilmeade 27 August 1942 1947 Returned to owners in August 1947 Builder: Smith's Dock Co. Ltd, Glasgow, Middlesbrough, 1919. Requisitioned from Smiths Coasters, Durban in 1942.[41]

Examination vessels[edit]

Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
HMSAS Clara
HMSAS Stork
HMSAS William Messina

Tugs[edit]

Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Notes
Tug SAS De Noord 1963 2014 Replaced by new Damen Tug
Tug SAS De Neys 1969 2015 Replaced by new Damen Tug
Tug SAS De Mist 1978 2016 Replaced by new Damen Tug

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Commonly known as Rothesay class frigates
  2. ^ Previously Minister Class

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Du Toit 1992, pp. 76–77.
  2. ^ a b Du Toit 1992, p. 81.
  3. ^ a b Du Toit 1992, p. 117.
  4. ^ a b Du Toit 1992, p. 83.
  5. ^ a b Du Toit 1992, p. 87.
  6. ^ a b Du Toit 1992, p. 9.
  7. ^ a b c d Du Toit 1992, p. 38.
  8. ^ a b c Du Toit 1992, p. 40.
  9. ^ Du Toit 1992, p. 35.
  10. ^ Du Toit 1992, p. 146.
  11. ^ Bennett 2008, p. 233.
  12. ^ a b Du Toit 1992, p. 289.
  13. ^ a b Du Toit 1992, p. 157.
  14. ^ Janes 2000, p. 95.
  15. ^ a b Janes 2000, p. ?.
  16. ^ Du Toit 1992, p. 205.
  17. ^ a b c d Lenton 1967, p. ?.
  18. ^ Wessels, Andre (2004). "Snelstomers : torpedojaers in Suid-Afrikaanse Vlootdiens, 1950-1975 (abstract)". Electronic Publishing. Archived from the original on 16 June 2013. Retrieved 22 February 2010. 
  19. ^ a b Mason, Whelp
  20. ^ Mason, Lt. Cdr. Geoffrey B. (2005). "HMS LOCH CREE/HMSAS NATAL - Loch-class Frigates". SERVICE HISTORIES of ROYAL NAVY WARSHIPS in WORLD WAR 2. Retrieved 18 February 2010. 
  21. ^ "Unlikely Ambassadors". South African Navy. 9 February 2010. Retrieved 11 February 2010. 
  22. ^ a b Wessels, Andre. "The South African Navy during the years of conflict in Southern Africa 1966-1989" (PDF). Retrieved August 14, 2014. 
  23. ^ a b c d e f Du Toit 1992, p. 309.
  24. ^ Bennett 2008, p. 95.
  25. ^ a b c d Bennett 2008, p. ?.
  26. ^ a b Du Toit 1992, p. 144.
  27. ^ a b c d e Du Toit 1992, pp. 208-210.
  28. ^ Janes 1989, pp. 95-96.
  29. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Du Toit 1992, p. 152.
  30. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Janes 1989, p. ?.
  31. ^ Du Toit 1992, p. 18.
  32. ^ Du Toit 1992, p. 244.
  33. ^ a b Polarpost.ru. ""Александр Следзюк", судно-снабженец/вертолетоносец". 
  34. ^ a b c d e f g h Du Toit 1992, p. 255.
  35. ^ Du Toit 1992, p. 279.
  36. ^ Du Toit 1992, p. 16.
  37. ^ Du Toit 1992, p. 192.
  38. ^ Du Toit 1992, p. 293.
  39. ^ Du Toit 1992, p. 136.
  40. ^ Du Toit 1992, p. 154.
  41. ^ Du Toit 1992, p. 138.

References[edit]

External links[edit]