List of discontinued photographic films

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All the still camera films on this page have either been discontinued, have been updated or the company making the film no longer exists. Often films will be updated and older versions discontinued without any change in the name.

Photographic films for still cameras that are currently available are in the List of photographic films. Films for movie making are included in the List of motion picture film stocks.

Contents

ADOX[edit]

Adox was a German camera and film brand active in the 1950s and 1960s. In the 1970s Dupont the new owners of the ADOX brand sold the recipes and machinery of the film (but not the brand name) to Fotokemika in Croatia who continued to produce the films according to the 1950s ADOX formulas under the Efke brand.

Black and white film[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
ADOX KB 14 / R14 1952- 1973 T 20 B&W Print Ortho-panchromatic classic 1950s single layer emulsion. KB = 'Kleinbild' (Small format 135), R = Rollfilm. Germany 135, 120, Sheet film Efke KB25 & R25
ADOX KB 17 / R17 1952- 1973 T 40 B&W Print Ortho-panchromatic classic 1950s emulsion. Germany 135, 120, Sheet film Efke KB50 & R50
ADOX KB 21 / R21 1952- 1973 T 100 B&W Print Ortho-panchromatic classic 1950s emulsion. Germany 135, 120, Sheet film Efke KB100 & R100

Colour reversal (slide) film[edit]

  • ADOX C15 (1958) Color reversal film
  • ADOX C17 (?) Color reversal film
  • ADOX C18 (18° DIN, 50 ASA).

ADOX (Fotoimpex)[edit]

The ADOX brand for photographic films was revived by Fotoimpex (Berlin, Germany) in 2003 initially rebranding the Efke films as ADOX CHS Art. After Fotokemikas closure, ADOX (Fotoimpex) subsequently revived the KB100 film as ADOX CHS II.

Colour negative film[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
ADOX Color Implosion To 2017 T 100 C-41 Print A "creative" C-41 colour film, designed to intentionally give unpredictable results with skewed colours.[1] tbc 135 Nothing

AGFA[edit]

Originally founded in Berlin, 1867, its name was changed to AGFA (Actien-Gesellschaft für Anilin-Fabrikation) in 1873. The Wolfen factory was established in 1910 and the original Leverkusen works around the same time. By 1925 under IG Farben, Wolfen was specialising in film production and Leverkusen photographic paper. After the war, Agfa was split into two companies: Agfa AG, Leverkusen in West Germany, and VEB Film und Chemiefaserwerk Agfa Wolfen in East Germany. Initially both companies produced films under the AGFA brand with the same names, such as Isopan F. To distinguish them, the film edge markings were L IF for Agfa Leverkusen, and W IF for Agfa Wolfen. After 1964 films from Wolfen were rebranded ORWO (ORiginal WOlfen). See separate listing. Trading of materials however continued between plants.

Agfa AG (Leverkusen), which saw major investment post war in 1952 as a wholly owned subsidiary of Bayer was subsequently merged with Gevaert based in Mortsel, Belgium in 1964 to form Agfa-Gevaert with Bayer subsequently acquiring full ownership of the merged company. Agfa-Gevaert film products continued to be sold under the AGFA 'rhombus' brand. The Mortsel plant specialised in commercial films including aerofilms and Leverkusen in consumer films. Following a public flotation in 1999 Agfa-Gevaert Group became independent from Bayer. The consumer film division, Agfa in Leverkusen, Germany was spun off into a new company AgfaPhoto in 2004 as a management buyout, a time of significant challenges to the traditional film market with the rapid rise of digital photography, resulting in bankruptcy in 7 months, and the closure of the Leverkusen plant in 2005. Production of aerial films continued at the Agfa-Gevaert, Mortsel plant some of which have been subsequently converted for retail sale by Maco Photo Products.

Black and white film[edit]

  • ISOPAN Ultra (discontinued)
  • ISOPAN Fine Grain (Discontinued)
  • AGFA Vario-XL (Discontinued) Chromogenic Black & White Film that can be developed in C-41 Colour Chemistry.
  • Agfaortho 25
Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
AGFA Isopan/ Isopan F / IF17 Pre 1943 - c1970 T 40 B&W Print Fine grain panchromatic film. Leverkusen version also referred to as ISOPAN IF 17, marginal markings L IF Germany 135 ?
AGFA Isopan FF /IFF ? - c1960s T 25 B&W Print Ultra fine grain panchromatic film. Leverkusen version also referred to as ISOPAN IFF, marginal markings L IFF Germany 135, 120, 127, 620 ?
AGFA Isopan Record ? - c1960s T 640 B&W Print Ultra high speed (for its time) panchromatic film. Germany 135, 120, 127, 620 ?
AGFA Isopan SS 1935 - c1960s T 100 B&W Print 'Super Speed' Introduced around 1935 as a replacement for Superpan and originally rated at 19 or 20 DIN, around 1937 this was increased to 21 DIN. For correct rendering a pale yellow filter was required in daylight and a pale green in half-watt illumination.[2] Ultra fine grain ortho-panchromatic film. Leverkusen version also referred to as ISOPAN ISS 21, marginal markings L ISS Germany 135, 120, 127, 620 ?
AGFA AgfaPan 25 to ca. 1989 T/P 25 B&W Print Professional general purpose traditional cubic grain panchromatic film, Sheet film P base. Germany 135, 120, Sheet film Agfa APX 25
AGFA AgfaPan 100 To ca. 1989 T/P 100 B&W Print Professional general purpose traditional cubic grain panchromatic film. Sheet film P base. Germany 135, 120, Sheet film Agfa APX 100
AGFA AgfaPan AP 400 To ca. 1989 T/P 400 B&W Print Professional general purpose traditional cubic grain panchromatic film. Sheet film P base. Germany 135, 120, Sheet film Agfa APX 400
AGFA AgfaPan APX 25 1989 - 2000 T 25 B&W Print Professional general purpose traditional cubic grain panchromatic film, with single layer emulsion and anti-halation layer[3] Discontinued due to low demand Germany 135, 120 Nothing
AGFA AgfaPan APX 100 1989 - 2005 T/P 100 B&W Print General purpose traditional cubic grain panchromatic film. Wide exposure latitude and tonal range.[3] Sheet film P base (6.5x9, 9x12, 10.2x12.7, 13x18 cm). Germany 135, 120, Sheet film Agfa Photo APX 100
AGFA AgfaPan APX 400 c 1990s - 2005 T 400 B&W Print General purpose traditional cubic grain panchromatic film. Wide exposure latitude and tonal range. Germany 135, 120 Agfa Photo APX 400

Black and white reversal (slide) films[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
AGFA Scala 200x c 1990s – 2005 T/P 200 Scala Slide General purpose B&W reversal film based on the same emulsion as the APX 100 film. Wide exposure and tonal range. Requires specialist Scala process. ADOX Scala is the nearest replacement. Sheet film P base (4x5"). Germany 135, 120, Sheet film ADOX Scala
  • Dia-Direct (Discontinued) Reversal film with speeds of ISO 12 & ISO 32.

Colour negative films[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
AGFA Agfacolor T 1949 – 1956 T 10-12 Agfa Print General purpose color film for Daylight/Tageslicht (T). Introduced 1951 to UK. Germany 135, 120, Karat, Sheet film, CN17
AGFA Agfacolor K 1949 – 1956 T 10-12 Agfa Print General purpose color film for Tungsten lighting (K) Introduced 1951 to UK. Germany Sheet film CN17
AGFA Agfacolor CN 17 1956 – 1971 T 40 Agfa Print Universal color film, unmasked and balanced for use in daylight and artificial light, corresponding to colour temperatures of about 2500°K to 6500°K Germany 135, 120, 620, 127 Sheet film CN17S
AGFA Agfacolor CN 17M 1963 – 64 T 40 Agfa Print Short lived general purpose masked color negative film Germany Sheet film CN17S
AGFA Agfacolor CN 17S 1966 – 1968 T 40 Agfa Print S= Special. General purpose double masked color negative film with extra fine grain. Germany 135, 120 CNS
AGFA Agfacolor Special CNS 1968 – 1975 T 80 Agfa Print General purpose color film (CNS=Color Negative Special). Intergral double mask as for 17S but higher speed. Germany 135, 126, 127, 120, 620, Sheet film CNS2
AGFA Agfacolor Pocket Special 1971 – ? T 80 Agfa Print Updated version of CNS with finer grain for smaller negatives of the new 110 format, higher resolution, and a 25% reduction in layer thickness Germany 110 ?
AGFA Agfacolor CNS2 1975 – c1981 T 80 Agfa Print Updated version of CNS as for 'pocket special' (which continued in production) Germany 135, 126, 127, 120, 620 Agfa color 100
AGFA Agfacolor 80S Professional 1975 – ? T 80 Agfa Print Professional version of CNS2 color film Germany 135, 120, Sheet film ?
AGFA Agfacolor CNS 400 1978/9 – c1984 T 400 C-41/ AP70 Print Higher speed version of CNS2 with fine grain. First Agfa AP70/C-41 film Germany 110, 135 XR400
AGFA Agfacolor N80L Professional c1982 – ? T 80 C-41/ AP70 Print Professional color film for artifical light/Long exposures >1/10 sec. Germany 120, Sheet film ?
AGFA Agfacolor N100S Professional c1982 – ? T 100 C-41/ AP70 Print Professional color film for Short exposures <1/10 sec. Germany 120, Sheet film ?
AGFA Agfacolor Pro 200 ? – ? T 200 C-41 Print Professional color film. Germany 135 ?
AGFA Agfacolor 100 1981- c1984 T 100 C-41 Print Consumer color film with C-41 process and ISO 100 replacing CNS2. Orange box. Germany 110, 126, 135 XR100
AGFA Agfacolor XR100 1984 – 1989 T 100 C-41 Print Consumer general purpose color film with new structured grain technology. Orange box (Later XR100i in white box) Germany 110, 126, 135, 120, Rapid XRG 100
AGFA Agfacolor XR200 1984– 1989 T 200 C-41 Print Consumer general purpose color film with new structured grain technology. First Agfa film to carry DX coding on 135 cartridges. First Agfa ISO 200 consumer color negative film. Germany 135, 120 XRG 200
AGFA Agfacolor XR400 1984 – 1989 T 400 C-41 Print Consumer general purpose color film with new structured grain technology Germany 110, 135, 120 XRG 400
AGFA Agfacolor XRG 100 1989 – ? T 100 C-41 Print Consumer general purpose fine grain color film with high sharpness and saturation with wide exposure latitude, accurate to 1/3 stop. XRC in USA. Germany 135, ? HDC+ 100
AGFA Agfacolor XRG 200 1989 – ? T 200 C-41 Print Consumer general purpose fine grain color film with high sharpness and saturation with wide exposure latitude, accurate to 1/3 stop. XRC in USA. Germany 135, ? HDC+ 200
AGFA Agfacolor XRG 400 1989 – ? T 400 C-41 Print Consumer general purpose fine grain color film with high sharpness and saturation with wide exposure latitude, accurate to 1/3 stop. XRC in USA. Germany 135, ? HDC+ 400
AGFA Agfacolor HDC+ 100 – 2001 T 100 C-41 Print Consumer general purpose fine grain color film Germany 135 Vista 100
AGFA Agfacolor HDC+ 200 – 2001 T 200 C-41 Print Consumer general purpose fine grain color film Germany 135 Vista 200
AGFA Agfacolor HDC+ 400 – 2001 T 400 C-41 Print Consumer general purpose fine grain color film Germany 135 Vista 400
AGFA Agfa Vista 100 2001 - 2005 T 100 C-41 Print Consumer general purpose fine grain color film with Eye vision technology from Professional Optima films. Germany 135 Agfaphoto Vista 100
AGFA Agfa Vista 200 2001 - 2005 T 200 C-41 Print Consumer general purpose fine grain color film with Eye vision technology from Professional Optima films Germany 110, 135 Agfaphoto Vista 200
AGFA Agfa Vista 400 2001 - 2005 T 400 C-41 Print Consumer general purpose fine grain color film with Eye vision technology from Professional Optima films Germany 135 Agfaphoto Vista 400
AGFA Agfa Vista 800 2001 - 2005 T 800 C-41 Print Consumer general purpose fine grain color film with Eye vision technology from Professional Optima films. Agfas first (and last) 800 speed color film. Germany 135 Nothing
AGFA AgfaColor XRS 100 1984 – c1996 T 100 C-41 Print Professional fine grain color film with high sharpness and saturation with wide exposure latitude, accurate to 1/6th stop. Revised in 1989 to share XRG technology and similar metallic box packaging. "Texas Point & Shoot Out". Popular Photography. USA: Hachette. May 1989.  Germany 135, 120, Sheet film Optima 100
AGFA AgfaColor XRS 200 1984 – c1996 T 200 C-41 Print Professional general purpose fine grain color film with high sharpness and saturation with wide exposure latitude, accurate to 1/th stop. Revised in 1989 to share XRG technology and similar metallic box packaging Germany 135, 120 Optima 200
AGFA AgfaColor XRS 400 1984 – c1996 T 400 C-41 Print Professional general purpose fine grain color film with high sharpness and saturation with wide exposure latitude, accurate to 1/6th stop. Revised in 1989 to share XRG technology and similar metallic box packaging Germany 135, 120 Optima 400
AGFA AgfaColor XRS 1000 1984 – c1996 T 1000 C-41 Print Professional general purpose fine grain color film. This was not updated in 1989 Germany 135, 120 Nothing
AGFA AgfaColor Optima 100 c1996 – 2005 T 100 C-41 Print Professional general purpose color negative films with EYE VISION technology Germany 135, 120 Nothing
AGFA AgfaColor Optima 200 c1996 – 2005 T 200 C-41 Print Professional range of general purpose color negative films with EYE VISION technology. A similar un-masked variant of the emulsion was made by Agfa-Gevaert for aerial photography and converted by Maco and sold as Rollei CN 200. Germany 135, 120 Nothing
AGFA AgfaColor Optima 400 c1996 – 2005 T 400 C-41 Print Professional general purpose color negative films with EYE VISION technology Germany 135, 120, 220 Nothing
AGFA AgfaColor Portrait 160 ? – 2005 T 160 C-41 Print Professional color negative film for portrait, wedding and fashion photography. Germany 135, 120, 220 Nothing
AGFA AgfaColor Ultra 50 ? – 2005 T 50 C-41 Print Professional high saturation color negative film for Landscapes and nature. Germany 135, 120 Nothing
AGFA AgfaColor Ultra 100 ? – 2005 T 100 C-41 Print Professional high saturation color negative film for Landscapes and nature. Germany 135, 120 Nothing

Colour reversal (slide) film[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
AGFA Color Neu 1936 – ? T 2- 25 Color Slide Color Neu, also known as Agfacolor 111, went on public sale in November 1936 in 135 format as an ISO 2-4 film and was the first subtractive 3 layer color film incorporating dye couplers in each of the layers which could be processed at the same time by a single color developer. This arrangement formed the basis for all subsequent color slide and negative films. [4][5]. In comparison Kodak Kodachrome which launched a year earlier required the processing of each color layer separately. Agfa Color Neu was initially made available on a trial basis from April 1936 with use in the August 1936, Berlin Olympics. Speed was later increased to ISO 25 by 1938. [6]. Germany 135 ?
AGFA Color/Chrome CT18 1958–1985 T 50 AP-41 Slide General purpose consumer color reversal film. Renamed Chrome in 1978. Warm pleasing colors, but not very stable in long term storage. Also sold under Perutz brand. A similar film was produced by ORWO in the former Agfa plant in East Germany as OrwoChrom UT18 until the 1990s. Germany ? ?
AGFA Chrome CT 100 1984-1992 T 100 E-6 Slide General purpose consumer color reversal film. Germany 135 CT100i
AGFA Chrome CT 200 1982-1992 T 200 E-6 Slide General purpose consumer color reversal film. First Agfa AP44/ E-6 process film Germany 135 ?
AGFA Chrome CT 100i 1992–1995 T 100 E-6 Slide Consumer general purpose color slide film. Launched at Photokina [7] Germany 135 CT 100x
AGFA Chrome CT 100x 1995- 1999 T 100 E-6 Slide Consumer general purpose color slide film. Launched at Photo Marking Association in 1995 with improvements in color intensity, accuracy, and edge definition along with enhanced pushability. [8] Germany 135 CT Precisa 100
AGFA CT Precisa 100 1999–2005 T 100 E-6 Slide Consumer general purpose color slide film The film boasted stronger colors and softer tones After 2005 replaced by Agfa Photo CT Precisa made by Ferrania and subsequently FujiFilm. Germany 135 Agfa Photo CT Precisa
AGFA CT Precisa 200 1999–2005 T 200 E-6 Slide Consumer general purpose color slide film. Germany 135 Nothing
AGFA Chrome 50S 1968–1984 T 50 AP-41 Slide Professional color reversal film. For short exposures <1sec. Last batches expired around 1987/88 Germany ? RS 50
AGFA Chrome 50L 1968–1983 T 50 AP-41 Slide Professional color reversal film. For long exposures over 1 sec. Last batches expired around 1987/88 Germany ? RS 50
AGFA Chrome 64 1974–1983 T 64 AP-41 Slide Consumer color reversal film for the North American market Germany ? ?
AGFA Chrome 50 RS 1984–1995 T 50 AP-44 /E-6 Slide Professional general purpose color slide film. Agfa process 44 compatible with Kodak E-6, replacing Agfa process 41 films. Improved emulsion from 1992 Germany ? RSX 50
AGFA Chrome 100 RS 1984–1995 T 100 AP-44 /E-6 Slide Professional general purpose color slide film. Improved emulsion from 1992 Germany 135, 120 RSX 100
AGFA Chrome 200 RS 1984–1995 T 200 AP-44 /E-6 Slide Professional general purpose color slide film. Improved emulsion from 1992 Germany 135, 120 RSX 200
AGFA Chrome 1000 RS 1984–1995 T 1000 AP-44 /E-6 Slide Professional very high speed color slide film Germany 135 Nothing
AGFA Chrome RSX 50 1995–1998 T 50 AP-44 /E-6 Slide Professional general purpose color slide film Germany 135, 120 RSX II 50
AGFA Chrome RSX 100 1995–1998 T 100 AP-44 /E-6 Slide Professional general purpose color slide film Germany 135, 120, Sheet film RSX II 100
AGFA Chrome RSX 200 1995–1998 T 200 AP-44 /E-6 Slide Professional general purpose color slide film Germany 135, 120 RSX II 200
AGFA Chrome RSX II 50 1999–2005 T 50 AP-44 /E-6 Slide Professional general purpose color slide film Germany 135, 120 Nothing
AGFA Chrome RSX II 100 1999–2005 T 100 AP-44 /E-6 Slide Professional general purpose color slide film. The "Pro" RSX II film "made with extremely narrow production tolerances to ensure maximum consistency as required by professionals" does not require refrigeration except in hot/humid conditions. Consumer equivalent CT Precisa[9] Germany 135, 120, Sheet film Nothing
AGFA Chrome RSX II 200 1999–2005 T 200 AP44 /E-6 Slide Professional general purpose color slide film, Slightly subdued perceived by many users as natural and producing flattering skin tones. After the demise of AgfaPhoto Agfa-Gevaert continued producing the emulsion for aerial photography on a polyester base as Aviphot Chrome 200 PE1. Maco converted this as Rollei CR 200. Also sold as Lomography X-Pro 200. Germany 135, 120 Rollei CR 200

AGFA PHOTO[edit]

The AGFA consumer film division in Leverkusen, Germany was spun off by Agfa-Gevaert into a new company AGFA PHOTO in 2004 as a management buyout, at a time of significant challenges to the traditional film market with the rapid rise of digital photography, resulting in bankruptcy in 7 months, and the closure of the Leverkusen plant in 2005. At buy out the firm was split into a holding company (licenses) and manufacturing company (leverkusen). Thus whilst the production company went bankrupt the holding company survived and retains a trademark license from Agfa-Gevaert for the use of the AgfaPhoto brand and 'red dot' logo on products having a photographic application [10]. Since 2005 these rights for consumer film products have been sub-licensed to Lupus Imaging & Media. [11] After 2005 the colour films were initially made by Ferrania whilst B&W films continued to be AGFA material converted by Ferrania from frozen master rolls of AGFA APX. Ferrania itself closed in 2009 and so Lupus procured replacement Agfa Photo branded films from Fujifilm (colour) and Harman/Ilford (black & white). The contract with Fujifilm ended in early 2018[12]

Black and white film[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
AGFA PHOTO APX 100 2005–2012 T 100 B&W Print General purpose traditional cubic grain panchromatic film with wide exposure and tonal range. Film was converted by Ferrania, Italy from AGFA Leverkusen APX master rolls that had been stored frozen until this material was exhausted. ADOX Silvermax is a near equivalent to the original AGFA APX 100. Germany 135, 120 New Agfa Photo APX 100 (ADOX Silvermax)
AGFA PHOTO APX 400 2005–2012 T 400 B&W Print General purpose traditional cubic grain panchromatic film with wide exposure and tonal range. Film was converted by Ferrania, Italy from AGFA Leverkusen APX master rolls that had been stored frozen until this material was exhausted. ADOX test-produced a slightly improved version of AGFA APX 400 as ADOX Pan 400 during 2010. Due to Fotokemika stopping general production in 2012 priority was given to ADOX CHS II instead.[13] Germany 135, 120 New Agfa Photo APX 400

Colour negative film[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
AGFA PHOTO Vista 200 2005– 2009 T 200 C-41 Print Consumer color film produced by Ferrania post Leverkusens closure, based on Solaris 200 Italy 135 Vista Plus 200
AGFA PHOTO Vista Plus 200 2009- 2018 T 200 C-41 Print General purpose budget colour film (Re-branded FujiColor C200). Sold in 24/36 exp. rolls and 3 packs. Production ended 2018.[14][15] Japan 135 Nothing
AGFA PHOTO Vista 400 2005– 2009 T 400 C-41 Print Consumer color film, produced by Ferrania post Leverkusens closure based on Solaris 400. Italy 135 Vista Plus 400
AGFA PHOTO Vista Plus 400 2009- 2018 T 400 C-41 Print General purpose budget colour film (assumed to be Fujicolor Superia 400). Sold in 24/36 exp. rolls and 3 packs. Production ended 2018.[16] Japan 135 Nothing

Colour reversal (slide) films[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
AGFA PHOTO CT Precisa 100 2005- 2009 T 100 E-6 Slide General purpose slide film produced by Ferrania, initially using Agfa chemicals. Identified by yellow boats on packaging compared to later Fuji version with colour beach huts on box. Italy 135-36 Nothing
AGFA PHOTO CT Precisa 100 2009- 2018 T 100 E-6 Slide General purpose slide film (Considered to be FujiChrome Provia 100F emulsion, not cold stored or Sensia). Production ended early 2018 and was largely sold out by mid 2018.[17][18] Japan 135-36 Nothing

Dan-Di film[edit]

manufactured in Belgium

Dan-Di Orthochromatic safety film[edit]

  • Type: Safety Film - Orthochromatic
  • Available formats: 116 N-16(known)
  • Speed: Rating of High Speed (?) on box EM-N°
  • Granularity:
  • Latitude:
  • Resolving Power:
  • History:
  • Primary Usage:

ERA[edit]

ERA's factory was originally founded in 1950 in Shantou, China. It was named Shantou ERA Limited Corporation (ERA) in 1999. Its main products were black and white film, resin coated papers and x-ray film. Kodak China acquired an 80% share of their assets in 1998 and reputedly invested in a color film line. Production of film emulsion seem to have ended, c. 2008.[19]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
ERA 100 1999- c2008 T 100 B&W Print Traditional B&W film with anti-halation layer China 135, Sheet film Nothing

Ferrania[edit]

Ferrania was an Italian filmmaker based in Ferrania (Liguria), Italy founded in 1923 as a maker of photographic film, papers, and photographic equipment, including cameras. The company was purchased in 1964 by the 3M corporation (USA) to become Ferrania 3M and made photographic film sold under the 'Scotch' brand. The films and data storage division was spun off from 3M in 1996 becoming Imation. In 1999, Ferrania was acquired by Schroder Ventures and subsequently sold on to Gruppo Messina (Ignazio Messina & Co. S.p.A) in 2000, as Ferrania Imaging Technology with film being sold again under the Ferrania brand. However photographic film manufacture ended in 2009. Whilst originally a producer of B&W cine/still films such as P30, as Ferrania 3M it became a significant producer of 'white label' consumer colour films for both retailers and traditional B&W film producers needing a colour film to repackage under their own brand. Examples include; Fortecolor film (also supplied by Konica), the Boots UK pharmacy chain color negative products from ca. 1973 until 2003 and AgfaPhoto color negative and slide films from 2005 until plant closure in 2009 (for Lupus Imaging). Ferrania Technology continues to produce chemicals for medical use and solar panels on part of the original factory complex whilst the film plant was demolished. In 2013 a new company was founded as FILM Ferrania to build a film manufacturing company using the former Ferrania Research laboratory building, its coating machine and other equipment salvaged from the original Ferrania production plant prior to its demolition.

Black and white film[edit]

  • P30 ISO 80. 135, 120, 127. Introduced in '60 in three version: Cinema, Leica and Portrait.
  • P33 135, 120, 127
  • P3 28 DIN. 135
  • P36 26 DIN/320 ASA. 120

Color negative film[edit]

  • Ferrania Solaris From early 2000 by Ferrania Imaging Technologies. It was also sold under different names of imported supermarket chains and under the name of several companies such as Polaroid, Samung and others
  • Ferrania Solaris FG 100 135 (2000–2003)
  • Ferrania Solaris FG 200 135, APS, 110, 12 (2000–2003)
  • Ferrania Solaris FG 400 135, APS (2000–2003)
  • Ferrania Solaris FG 800 135( 2000–2003)
  • Ferrania Solaris FG 100 Plus 135 (2003–2009)
  • Ferrania Solaris FG 200 Plus 135, APS (2003–2009) (also 110, 126 to 2007)
  • Ferrania Solaris FG 400 Plus 135 (2003–2009) FG 400i to c2005?
  • Ferrania Solaris FG 800 Plus 135 (2003–2009) FG 800i to c2005?

Color reversal film[edit]

  • Ferraniacolor 135, 120, photographic plate. Introduced in 1947 until the 70s. it was available in sizes 135, 120, photographic plate
  • Scotch Chrome ISO 100, 400, 1000. 135.
  • Imation Chrome ISO 100, 400. 135.
  • Ferrania Solaris Chrome 100 [135]. 2000–2005

Film Washi[edit]

Factory in Saint-Nazaire, France. Launched in 2013, producing a handcrafted film, handcoated on traditional Washi paper. Also converting other films industrially coated in larger factories and originally made for technical,motion pictures, industrial or aerial applications.

Colour film[edit]

  • "X" - 400 iso (35mm), C-41 without mask, can be processed in E-6. Discontinued

Forte[edit]

Forte (Forte Photochemical Industry VAC) was a Hungarian manufacture of photographic film and paper products originally established in 1922. They ceased to manufacture products in January 2007. Only B&W films were coated by Forte. Colour films were supplied by other manufacturers, and packaged into Forte branding.

Black and white film[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
Forte Fortepan 100 To 2007 T 100 B&W Print Traditional B&W film Hungary 120, 135 Nothing
Forte Fortepan 200 To 2007 T 200 B&W Print Traditional B&W film Hungary 120, 135, Sheet film Nothing
Forte Fortepan 400 To 2007 T 400 B&W Print Traditional B&W film Hungary 120, 135, Sheet film Nothing
Forte Portrait pan 100 To 2007 T 100 B&W Print B&W film for portraits Hungary 120 Nothing

Colour negative films[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
Forte Fortecolor Super FG plus To c2000 T 100 C-41 Print ISO 100 consumer color film - Ferrania Solaris FG Italy, Hungary 135 Nothing
Forte Fortecolor Super FR c1990- 2007 T 100 C-41 Print Consumer color film - Konica Color Super SR or Scotch Color Japan, Hungary 135 Nothing
Forte Fortecolor Super FR c1990- 2007 T 200 C-41 Print Consumer color film - Konica Color Super SR or Scotch Color Japan, Hungary 135 Nothing
Forte Fortecolor Super HR To 2007 T 200 C-41 Print Consumer color film - Konica Color Super SR200 Japan/Italy, Hungary 110 Nothing

Fotokemika[edit]

Factory in Samobor (near Zagreb), Croatia. Closed since 2012. Dupont the owners of the ADOX brand sold the recipes and 'dip and dunk' machinery of their film (but not the brand name) to Fotokemika in Croatia in the 1970s who continued to produce the films according to the 1950s ADOX formulas under the Efke brand. Products were also sold by Fotoimpex (Berlin, Germany) under the original brand name ADOX after they acquired the rights to this in 2003. Fotokemika also manufactured B&W papers. After Fotokemikas closure, ADOX (Fotoimpex) subsequently revived the KB100 film as ADOX CHS II.

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
Efke KB25 & R25 To 2012 T 25 B&W Print Ortho-panchromatic classic 1950s style single layer emulsion. 135(KB25), 120 (R25) and sheet size (4×5, 5×7 and 8×10. Croatia 135, 120, Sheet film Nothing
Efke KB50 & R50 To 2012 T 50 B&W Print Ortho-panchromatic classic 1950s style emulsion. 135(KB50), 120 (R50) and sheet size (4×5, 5×7 and 8×10 Croatia 135, 120, Sheet film. Nothing
Efke KB100 & R100 To 2012 T 100 B&W Print Ortho-panchromatic classic 1950s style emulsion. 135(KB100), 120 (R100), 127 (R100-127) and sheet size (4×5, 5×7 and 8×10. The same film was subsequently produced for ADOX by Inoviscoat, Germany as ADOX CHS II 100. Croatia 135, 127, 120, Sheet film ADOX CHS II
Efke IR820 To 2012 T 100 B&W Print Ortho-panchromatic classic 1950s style emulsion. 135(KB100), 120 (R100) and sheet size (4×5, 5×7 and 8×10 Croatia 135, 120, Sheet film Nothing

Fuda[edit]

Xiamen Fuda Photographic Materials or Fuda was a Chinese manufacturer of photographic material based in Shanghai China. In 1984, Kodak helped Fuda build their color film production line with color film being produced under license from Kodak.[20] Kodak china acquired their assets in 1998.[19]

Black and white film[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
FUDA Fudapan To? T 100 B&W Print Traditional B&W film China 120 Nothing

Colour negative film[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
FUDA Color 100 c1984-c1990 T 100 C-41 Print Consumer color film China 135 Nothing
FUDA Color GA 100 c1990- T 100 C-41 Print Consumer color film China 135 Nothing

Fujifilm[edit]

FUJIFILM is a Japanese manufacturer of photographic films, papers and cameras established in 1934. Fujifilm today (2018) continue to offer a much reduced traditional film product range. See Fujifilm photographic films & List of photographic films. Historically however they were one of the major producers of colour negative and slide films producing a wide range of own brand professional and consumer films in competition with Kodak and Agfa-Gevaert. (The other main colour film producers; Konica and 3M Ferrania specialising in 'white label' consumer product). The film range was divided into Black & white film Neopan, Color negative film Fujicolor and Colour slide film Fujichrome together with instant 'pack film'. They also undertook limited contract manufacture including for AGFA PHOTO colour negative/slide films from c2008 - 2018.[21][22]

Black and white film[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
FUJIFILM Neopan 100 SS To 2012 T 100 B&W Print General purpose classical cubic-crystal ortho-panchromatic film with wide exposure latitude. Asia and selected markets only (Parallel import elsewhere)[23] Japan 135 ACROS 100
FUJIFILM Neopan 400 Professional To 2014 T 400 B&W Print Professional general purpose monosize cubic-crystal grain panchromatic film. Called 'Presto' in Japan. Japan 135, 120 Nothing
FUJIFILM Neopan 1600 Professional To 2010 T 1600 B&W Print Professional high speed panchromatic film with E.I. 1600 for sports, journalism, stage shows and low light situations. Called 'Super Presto' in Japan. Same development time as Neopan 400. Japan 135 Nothing

Color negative film[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
FUJIFILM FujiColor Press 400 To ? T 400 C-41 Print Professional version of Superia 400 (cold stored) Japan 135 Nothing
FUJIFILM FujiColor Press 800 To c2008 T 800 C-41 Print Professional version of Superia 800 (cold stored). Last batch exp. 2009 Japan 135 Nothing
FUJIFILM FujiColor Press 1600 To ? T 800 C-41 Print Professional version of Superia 1600 (cold stored) Japan 135 Nothing
FUJIFILM FujiColor Superia Reala To 2012 T 100 C-41 Print A premium ISO 100-speed emulsion delivering exceptional color accuracy. The finest, smoothest grain and the best sharpness of all Superia films. First 4th layer technology film for improved colors (no greenish cast) under fluorescent lighting later extended to fujifilm Superia and Pro color negative films (CS). Last available in 120 format [24][25] Japan 135, 120, 220 Nothing
FUJIFILM FujiColor Superia 100 1998–2009? T 100 C-41 Print General purpose consumer color film using 4th layer technology (CN). Japan 135, 120 Fujicolor 100 (Japan only)
FUJIFILM FujiColor Superia 200 1998–2017 T 200 C-41 Print General purpose consumer color film using 4th layer technology (CA). Older tech Fujifilm C200 advised as alternative.[26] Japan 135 Nothing
FUJIFILM FujiColor Superia 400 To ca. 2003 T 400 C-41 Print General purpose consumer color film. Replaced by X-tra 400 with sigma fine grain technology from Pro films. Japan 135 Superia X-tra 400
FUJIFILM FujiColor True Definition 400 c2004 – ? T 400 C-41 Print General purpose consumer color film using 4th layer technology, USA market only. More natural colors than Superia 400 (CH-11) Japan 135 Superia X-tra 400
FUJIFILM FujiColor 400 To 2017 T 400 C-41 Print Japanese market only. General purpose color film sold in plain boxes in 100 roll 24 or 36 exp packs for business market. Also sold individually by retailers as a budget film. Discontinued 2017. (Edge markings same as Superia X-tra 400). Parallel import elsewhere Japan 135
FUJIFILM FujiColor Superia X-tra 800 2000–2016 T 800 C-41 Print General purpose consumer color film using 4th layer & sigma fine grain technology (CZ). Superia 800 branded stock discontinued 2016 outside Japan with final stock dated exp. 8/18. Japanese market version, Venus 800 remains on sale. Japan 135-36 Venus 800 (Japan)
FUJIFILM FujiColor Superia 1600/ Natura 1600 2003–2017 T 1600 C-41 Print General purpose high speed color film using 4th layer & sigma fine grain technology (CU). Superia 1600 discontinued 2016 outside Japan, with final stock dated exp. 8/18. Natura 1600 the Japanese market version continued on sale, parallel import elsewhere. Natura discontinued Oct 2017, stock lasted on sale to mid 2018.[27] Japan 135-36 Nothing
FUJIFILM FujiColor NPL 160 To 2004 T 160 C-41 Print Professional Tungsten balanced color film primarily for studio portraits and copying, suitable for 'L'ong exposures. Not carried forward into Pro line Japan 135, 120, 220 Nothing
FUJIFILM FujiColor NPC 160 To 2004 T 160 C-41 Print Daylight-type color negative film designed for professional use, higher 'C'ontrast than NPS' Japan 135, 120, 220 Pro 160C
FUJIFILM FujiColor NPS 160 To 2004 T/P 160 C-41 Print Daylight-type color negative film for 'S'hort exposures designed for professional use. 120, 220 (T base), 4x5", 8x10"(P base) Japan 120, 220, sheet film Pro 160S
FUJIFILM Fujicolor Pro 160C 2004–2010 T 160 C-41 Print Daylight-type colour negative film with 4th color layer & sigma fine grain technology designed for professional use, featuring a gradation design optimized for exposures requiring high-contrast results. Japan 135, 120, 220 Nothing
FUJIFILM Fujicolor Pro 160S 2004–2010 T/P 160 C-41 Print Daylight baanced natural color professional film with 4th color layer & sigma fine grain technology, featuring more highly optimized skin tone reproduction and neutral gray balance, especially important for wedding and portrait photography. Renamed Pro 160NS in 2010. 120, 220 (T base), 4x5", 8x10"(P base) Japan 135, 120, 220, Sheet film Pro 160 NS
FUJIFILM FujiColor NPH 400 2002–2004 T 400 C-41 Print Professionalfine-grained 400 speed film now features improved skin tones, much more accurate color reproduction, better shadow detail, and wider exposure latitude. It features Fuji's new peel and stick paper backing. Renamed in 2004 Pro 400H with no change to the emulsion. Japan 135, 120, 220 Pro 400H
FUJIFILM FujiColor NPZ 800 2002–2004 T 800 C-41 Print Professional fine-grained 800 speed film now features improved skin tones, much more accurate color reproduction, better shadow detail, and wider exposure latitude. It features Fuji's new peel and stick paper backing. Renamed in 2004 Pro 800Z with no change to the emulsion. Japan 135, 120, 220 Pro 800Z
FUJIFILM Fujicolor Pro 800Z 2004–2009 T 800 C-41 Print Fine grain high speed natural color professional film for Weddings, portraits, fashion with 4th color layer, Renamed from NPZ 800 to bring it into line with the new 160 line of films Japan 135, 120, 220 Nothing

Colour Reversal (Slide) Film[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
FUJIFILM FujiChrome Velvia RVP 1990–2003 T 50 E-6 Slide Velvia for Professionals (RVP). Professional-quality, medium-speed, daylight-type color reversal film with high sharpness, highly saturated colors, and fine grain for landscapes, marine and product photography. Sheet film 4x5, 8x10 Japan 135, 120, 220, Sheet film Velvia RVP50
FUJIFILM FujiChrome Velvia 100F 2003–2012 (-2017 JP) T/P 100 E-6 Slide Professional-quality, medium-speed, daylight-type color reversal film with ultrafine grain, designed to produce high-contrast images with the highest color saturation among 100F series films for landscape, nature, commercial, food, and interior applications (RVP100F). Sheet film 4x5, 8x10. All formats discontinued 2012 outside Japan,[28][29] Discontinued in Japan; 120 (2015) [30][31] and sheet film (c2017 - last packs dated 1.19) [32] Japan 135, 120, 220, Sheet film Nothing
FUJIFILM FujiChrome Astia 100 1997–2003 T/P 100 E-6 Slide Professional-quality, medium-speed, daylight-type color reversal film with ultrafine grain,subdued color reproduction and the softest tone reproduction among the 100 ISO films. Portrait/fashion orientated film with soft tones and lower contrast (RAP100). Sheet film 4x5, 8x10 Japan 135, 120, 220, Sheet film Astia 100F
FUJIFILM FujiChrome Astia 100F 2003–2012 T/P 100 E-6 Slide Professional-quality, medium-speed, daylight-type color reversal film with ultrafine grain,subdued color reproduction and the softest tone reproduction among the 100F films. Portrait/fashion orientated film with soft tones and lower contrast (RAP100F). Sheet film 4x5, 8x10 Japan 135, 120, 220, Sheet film Nothing
FUJIFILM FujiChrome Fortia/Fortia SP 2004–2007 T 50 E-6 Slide A Japan only ultra high saturation slide film released for the cherry blossom season, possibly a variant of Velvia 50. Initially released a limited run in 2004 as Fortia, following by Fortia SP (2005–07) Japan 135, 120 Nothing
FUJIFILM FujiChrome 100 Professional D 1978–1994 T 100 E-6 Slide Professional-quality, medium-speed, daylight-type color reversal film with ultrafine grain, designed to provide medium color saturation and contrast (RDP). Japan 135, 120 Provia 100
FUJIFILM FujiChrome Provia 100 1994-2000 T 100 E-6 Slide Professional-quality, medium-speed, daylight-type color reversal film with ultrafine grain, designed to provide medium color saturation and contrast (RDPII). Japan 135, 120 Provia 100F
FUJIFILM FujiChrome 400 Professional D 1980–1994 T 400 E-6 Slide Professional-quality, high-speed, daylight-type color reversal film with the finest grain in its class and highly saturated colors (RHP). Suited to such uses as sports photography, reportage, and stage show coverage. Emulsion changes were made in 1992. Japan 135, 120 Provia 400
FUJIFILM FujiChrome Provia 400 1994–2000 T 400 E-6 Slide Professional-quality, high-speed, daylight-type color reversal film with the finest grain in its class and highly saturated colors (RHPII). Suited to such uses as sports photography, reportage, and stage show coverage Japan 135, 120 Provia 400F
FUJIFILM FujiChrome Provia 400F 2000–2006 T 400 E-6 Slide Professional-quality, high-speed, daylight-type color reversal film with the finest grain in its class and highly saturated colors (RHPIII). Suited to such uses as sports photography, reportage, and stage show coverage Japan 135, 120 Provia 400X
FUJIFILM FujiChrome Provia 400X 2006–2013 T 400 E-6 Slide Professional-quality, daylight-type ISO 400 color reversal film, fine grain (Epitaxial Sigma Crystal technology) and sharpness, vivid color reproduction and regulated gray balance to match Provia 100F with improved colour image storage permanence (RXP) Japan 135, 120 Nothing
FUJIFILM FujiChrome 1600 Professional D -1994 T 1600 E-6 Slide Highly suited for low light photography, this film is appropriate to indoor and nighttime sports as well as nightfall illuminated and available light photography (RSP) Japan 135 Provia 1600
FUJIFILM FujiChrome Provia 1600 1994- T 1600 E-6 Slide Highly suited for low light photography, this film is appropriate to indoor and nighttime sports as well as nightfall illuminated and available light photography (RSPII) Japan 135 Nothing
FUJIFILM FujiChrome 64 Professional Type T 1979-1999 T/P 64 E-6 Slide Professional-quality, medium-speed, tungsten-type color reversal film with natural color reproduction for product photography, interiors and for reproducing illustrations and paintings (RTP). Emulsion changed in 1983 and name changed to FujiChrome Professional T. Emulsion changed again in 1987 Japan 135, 120, Sheet film FujiChrome 64T
FUJIFILM FujiChrome 64T 1999-2005 T/P 64 E-6 Slide Professional-quality, medium-speed, tungsten-type color reversal film with natural color reproduction for product photography, interiors and for reproducing illustrations and paintings (RTPII). Japan 135, 120, Sheet film FujiChrome T64
FUJIFILM FujiChrome T64 2005- ? T/P 64 E-6 Slide Professional-quality, medium-speed, tungsten-type color reversal film with natural color reproduction for product photography, interiors and for reproducing illustrations and paintings (RTPIII?). Sheet film 4x5, 8x10 [33] Japan 135, 120, Sheet film Nothing
FUJIFILM FujiChrome Sensia 100 1994-1997 T 100 E-6 Slide General purpose consumer, daylight-type color reversal film with faithful color reproduction and fine grain (RA) Japan 135 FujiChrome Sensia II 100
FUJIFILM FujiChrome Sensia II 100 1997-2003 T 100 E-6 Slide General purpose consumer, daylight-type color reversal film with faithful color reproduction and fine grain (RAII) Japan 135 FujiChrome Sensia III 100
FUJIFILM FujiChrome Sensia III 100 2003–2011 T 100 E-6 Slide General purpose consumer, daylight-type color reversal film with faithful color reproduction and fine grain (RAIII).[34] Japan 135 Nothing
FUJIFILM FujiChrome Sensia 200 1994–2010 T 200 E-6 Slide General purpose consumer, daylight-type color reversal film with faithful color reproduction and fine grain (RM). Japan 135 Nothing
FUJIFILM FujiChrome Sensia 400 1994–2010 T 400 E-6 Slide Multi-use, high-speed, daylight-type color reversal film providing fine grain and vibrant color reproduction in spite of its high speed for sports, portraiture, nighttime photography, astrophotography, portraiture, and snapshots (RH). Japan 135 Nothing
FUJIFILM FujiChrome MS 100/1000 ? T 100/ 1000 E-6 Slide Variable ISO Slide Film. Japan 135, 120 Nothing

Instant Film[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
FUJIFILM Instant Color Film FP-100C/FP-100C Silk 2003–2016 T 100 Instant Print Professional peel-apart type ISO 100 instant color film for daylight / electronic flash suited for identification, portraiture and other general imaging applications. 10-exposure packs. Gloss or Silk finish. Traditionally used with medium format camera instant backs for studio test shots but high volumes also used for visas and other identity documents. Discontinuation of pack film in 2016 made a large amount of camera equipment redundant. Photosize 85x108mm & 102x131mm.[35][36] Japan 3.25x4.25", 5x4" Nothing
FUJIFILM Instant Black & White Film FP-3000B Super Speedy 2003–2013 T 3000 Instant Print Professional peel-apart panchromatic material suited for identification, portraiture and other general imaging applications. 10 exposure packs. Photosize 85x108mm & 102x131mm [37][38] Japan 3.25×4.25", 4×5" Nothing

Gigabit[edit]

Gigabit Film (discontinued)[edit]

  • Type: Black and White
  • Speed: ISO 40, DIN 17°
  • Available formats: 35 mm
  • Granularity: Extremely Fine
  • Resolving power: Extremely High
  • History: said to be Agfa Copex micrography film, sold with special low-contrast developer to increase dynamic range
  • Primary usage: General black-and-white photography, with scanning in mind
  • General characteristics: PET base for better film flatness, strong contrast and low exposure tolerance, fine grain not much subject to grain aliasing in usual resolution scans

[39]

Ilford Photo[edit]

Ilford Photo is a UK manufacturer of photographic materials based in Mobberley, Cheshire known worldwide for its black and white films, papers and chemicals. Discontinued film versions include:

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
ILFORD Pan F To ? ? 50 B&W Print Fine grain Panchromatic UK ? Pan F Plus
ILFORD FP 1934–1939 ? 28 B&W Print General purpose panchromatic film. UK ? FP2
ILFORD FP2 1939–1942 ? 80 B&W Print General purpose panchromatic film. UK ? FP3
ILFORD FP3 1942–1968 ? 125 B&W Print General purpose panchromatic film. 125 ASA at lease since 1960. UK ? FP4
ILFORD FP4 1968–1990 ? 125 B&W Print General purpose panchromatic film. UK ? FP4 Plus
ILFORD HP 1935–1939 ? 160 B&W Print High speed traditional Panchromatic emulsion. UK ? HP2
ILFORD HP2 1939–1941 ? 200 B&W Print High speed traditional panchromatic film. This film was essentially the same as HP3. The difference in specified sensitivity reflects a safety factor that the manufacturer deemed necessary before general availability of exposure meters. UK ? HP3
ILFORD HP3 1941–1969 ? 400 B&W Print High speed traditional panchromatic film. Between 1965 and 1969 it appears that both HP3 and HP4 were available. The Ilford HP page contains conflicting information about the sensitivity. UK ? HP4
ILFORD HP4 1965–1976 ? 400 B&W Print High speed traditional panchromatic film. UK ? HP5
ILFORD HP5 1976–1989 ? 400 B&W Print High speed traditional panchromatic film. UK ? HP5 Plus
ILFORD HPS 1954–1998 ? 800 B&W Print Very high speed traditional panchromatic film. The Ilford HP page has conflicting information about the sensitivity UK ? Ilford Delta 3200
ILFORD Mark V ? ? ? B&W Print Origin uncertain, possibly motion picture stock UK ? Nothing

Kodak[edit]

Eastman Kodak was founded in 1888. During most of the 20th century, Kodak held a dominant position in photographic film. However Kodak struggled to manage the transition to digital photography and filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2012. Whilst Kodak films for still cameras continue to be manufactured by Eastman Kodak in Rochester, New York, US since its Chapter 11 bankruptcy they are now sold and marketed by Kodak Alaris, a separate company controlled by the Kodak UK Pension fund based in Hertfordshire, UK.[40]

See web page http://www.taphilo.com/Photo/kodakfilmnumxref.shtml for a list of Kodak film number to film type.

Black and white film[edit]

Discontinued Kodak black & white films
box of kodak verichrome film
Kodak Verichrome Pan 620 Fast Panchromatic Film (Expired: July 1957) 
Box of Kodak Super XX 120 Film
Kodak Super-XX Panchromatic High Speed 120 Film (Expired: December 1939) 
Kodak academy film cannister
Kodak Panatomic-X 35mm Film (Expired, July 1944) 
Bow of kodak panatomix X film
Kodak Academy 200 
Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
Kodak Verichrome Safety Film 1931–1956 T ? B&W Print Orthocromatic B&W film. WRATTEN & WAINWRIGHT VERICHROME was introduced around 1907/8 offering greater spectral sensitivity and speed compared to contemporary emulsions of the time. The company was bought by KODAK in 1912. In 1931 KODAK released the film on a safety base as a Roll film, with greater latitude and finer grain than the KODAK NC (Non-Curling) Film that had been the standard since 1903. Replaced by Kodak Verichrome Pan Panchromatic) film in 1956. USA 116, 120, 616, 620, Kodak Verichrome Pan
Kodak Panatomic X 1933–1987 T 32/40 B&W Print Very fine grain general purpose film Speed: 32 ASA (Kodak Publication No. R-20, 3rd Edition, 1967)[citation needed], 40 ASA/17° DIN (Kodak publication FF1062, 1965), 40 ASA (Kodak Publication No. F-13, 2nd Edition, 1965) [41] USA 135 TMAX 100
Kodak Super-XX 1940–1992 T 200 B&W Print Kodak's standard high-speed film from 1940 to 1954, when Tri-X was introduced in smaller formats. Discontinued before 1960 in roll-film formats, but sheet film was available until 1992. Originally 100, later 200 iso when safety factor was reduced. Relatively coarse grain. Very long, almost perfectly straight-line characteristic curve, great latitude made it ideal for variable developments, both longer and shorter, water-bath development, special compensating formulas. USA Sheet film Tri-X
Kodak Verichrome Pan 1956–1995? T 80/125 B&W Print General purpose medium-speed (EI 125) panchromatic film that features extremely fine grain with excellent gradation and wide exposure latitude. (Early 620: EI 80 Daylight, 60 Tungsten) . This film has characteristics similar to those of KODAK PLUS-X Pan Professional Film, but does not have retouching surfaces. Also 8" x 5 feet format for Cirkut cameras. Discontinued 1995? (127 format), 1970s (120 format) [42] USA 120, 127, 116, 126, 616, 110, 620, 828 Nothing
Kodak Plus X Pan 1954–2011 T 125 B&W Print Plus X Pan (PX) and PLUS-X Pan Professional (PXP) films were general purpose medium-speed panchromatic films for outdoor or studio photography with extremely fine grain and excellent sharpness. (Originally ASA 50 later ISO 125). PX in 135 format and (PXP) 120, 220 formats with a retouching surface on the emulsion side.[43][44] USA 135, 120, 220 Nothing
Kodak EKTAPAN to 2002 T 100 B&W Print Very Fine grain film for portraiture and close-up work with electronic flash, and for commercial, industrial, and scientific applications. Formats: 4"x5", 5"x7", 8"x10", and 11"x14" sheets, long rolls [45][46] USA Sheet film Nothing
Kodak Technical Pan c1984 – 2004 T/P 25 B&W Print An ultra-high definition high-contrast microfilm emulsion that was made panchromatic through the addition of sensitizing dyes. Special developer is needed to tame the extreme contrast for use in pictorial photography. Type 2415 in 135 and 4 x 5-inch sizes with 4-mil (P)base with light piping suppressing layer and 6415 Film in 120 size with a 3.6-mil (T) base.[47] USA 135, 120, 4x5" Nothing
Kodak Academy/ Panchromatic 200 to 2000 T 400 B&W Print Low cost wide latitude black and white film marketed in Europe, Asia and India. Coarse grained and low resolution film reminiscent of Super-XX. Very tolerant of processing variations allowing contrast adjustment by altering development times. "Kodak Panchromatic 200" in the Philippines from ca. 1995-2000. USA 135 Nothing
Kodak High Speed Infrared – 2007 P 80 B&W Print Infrared sensitive high-speed film with moderately high contrast, sensitive to light and radiant energy to 900 nanometres (nm). It is useful for haze penetration and for special effects in commercial, architectural, fine art, and landscape photography. EI 80 (daylight) 200 (tungsten)(HIE) [48] USA 135, 120, 220, sheet film Nothing
Kodak T400CN – 2004 T/P 400 C-41 Print General purpose C41 process chromogenic B&W film with wide exposure latitude.[49] USA 135, 120, 220, 4x5" BW400CN
Kodak BW400CN 2004–2014 T 400 C-41 Print General purpose C41 process chromogenic B&W film with wide exposure latitude. Competitor to Ilford XP2 Super.[50][51] USA 135, 120, 220 Nothing


Color negative film[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
Kodak Kodacolor 1942–1963 T 25/32 C-22 Print General purpose consumer colour film. Initially processing was included, but following anti-trust legislation in 1950s, independent processing using C-22 process became available. Type A (suffix), indicated balanced for 3400K photolamps. 135 format added from 1958. USA 135, 120, 620, 116, 616, 127, 122 Kodacolor X
Kodak Kodacolor X 1963–1975 T 64/80 C-22 Print General purpose consumer colour film. It was introduced along with the Kodak Instamatic cameras which use 126 film. Initially 64 ISO later increased to 80 ISO USA 135, 120, 620, 116, 616, 126, 127, 828 Kodacolor II
Kodak Kodacolor II 1972–1983 T 80/100 C-41 Print First general purpose consumer colour film, using new C-41 process. Introduced with launch of the new 110 film cartridge. Initially 80 ISO, increased to 100 ISO from 1975 USA 110, 135, 120, 620, 116, 616, 126, 127, 828 Kodacolor VR 100
Kodak Kodacolor 400 1977–1983 T 400 C-41 Print High speed general purpose consumer colour film, 120 from 1978. USA 110, 135, 120 Kodacolor VR 400
Kodak Kodacolor HR 1982–1983 T 200? C-41 Print General purpose consumer colour film for disc cameras. It was Kodak's first color negative film to use their T-Grain technology and improved cyan coupler. Quickly replaced with VR series for all film types. USA Disc Kodacolor VR 200
Kodak Kodacolor VR 1000 1983–1989 T 1000 C-41 Print Very high speed general purpose consumer colour film, possible due to new T-Grain technology introduced with HR Disc films. USA 135 Kodak Ektar 1000
Kodak Kodacolor VR 100 1982–1986 T 100 C-41 Print General purpose consumer colour film. Emulsion re-introduced in 1990 as 'Kodacolor 100' budget film in 135 format (not USA market) (CP) USA 135, 120, 110 Kodacolor VR-G 100
Kodak Kodacolor VR 200 1982–1986 T 200 C-41 Print General purpose consumer colour film. Emulsion re-introduced in 1990 as 'Kodacolor 200' budget film (not USA market), later improved version (VR-G?) ColorPlus (CL) USA 135, 120, 620, 127, 126, Disc Kodacolor VR-G 200
Kodak Kodacolor VR 400 1982–1988 T 400 C-41 Print General purpose consumer colour film. 110, 135 discontinued in 1986.(CM) USA 110, 135, 120 Kodacolor VR-G 400
Kodak Kodacolor VR-G 100 1987–1988 T 100 C-41 Print General purpose consumer colour film. First generation 'gold' film (CA) USA 135, 120 Kodacolor Gold 100
Kodak Kodacolor VR-G 200 1987–1988 T 200 C-41 Print General purpose consumer colour film. First generation 'gold' film (CB) USA 110, 135, 120, 126, 127 Kodacolor Gold 200
Kodak Kodacolor VR-G 400 1987–1988 T 400 C-41 Print General purpose consumer colour film. First generation 'gold' film (CC) USA 135, 120 Kodacolor Gold 400
Kodak Kodacolor Gold 100 1988–1997 T 100 C-41 Print General purpose consumer colour film. Only 120 format Gold film. (GA) USA 135, 120 Kodak Gold 100
Kodak Kodacolor Gold 200 1988–1997 T 200 C-41 Print General purpose consumer colour film (GB) USA 110, 135, 120, 126, 127, 620 Kodak Gold 200
Kodak Kodacolor Gold 400 1988–1997 T 400 C-41 Print General purpose consumer colour film (GC) USA 110, 135 Kodak Gold 400
Kodak Ektar 25 1989–1997 T 1000 C-41 Print Professional color film launched at Photokina in 1988 with ultra fine grain, intended to provide the enhanced color saturation and high acutance associated with color slide emulsions. 135 format discontinued in 1994 and renamed Royal Gold. USA 135, 120 Royal Gold 25
Kodak Ektar 125 1989–1991 T 125 C-41 Print Professional color film with ultra fine grain. The 125 ISO was a poor seller and replaced by a 100 ISO film USA 135, 120 Ektar 100 (1991)
Kodak Ektar 100 1991–1997 T 100 C-41 Print Professional color film with ultra fine grain. 135 format discontinued in 1994 and renamed Royal Gold. USA 135, 120 Royal Gold 100
Kodak Ektar 1000 1989–1997 T 1000 C-41 Print Professional color film with ultra fine grain. 135 format discontinued in 1994 USA 135, 120 Royal Gold 1000
Kodak Portra 160 NC 1998–2011 T/P 160 C-41 Print Professional color film, 'Natural Color' for subtle color and natural skin tones in controlled lighting situations USA 135, 120, 220, Sheet film Portra 160
Kodak Portra 160 VC 1998–2011 T/P 160 C-41 Print Professional color film, 'Vivid Color' for vibrant color and slightly higher contrast in controlled lighting situations USA 135, 120, 220, Sheet film Portra 160
Kodak Portra 400 NC 1998–2010 T/P 400 C-41 Print Professional color film, 'Natural Color' for subtle color and natural skin tones in low light or with flash USA 135, 120, 220, Sheet film Portra 400
Kodak Portra 400 VC 1998–2010 T 400 C-41 Print Professional color film, 'Vivid Color' for vibrant color and slightly higher contrast to add snap to flat/overcast light USA 135, 120, 220 Portra 400
  • Kodak Gold 100
  • Kodak Gold 400 (Replaced by Ultramax 400 in 2007)
  • Kodak Royal Gold 25 (replaced original ektar 25) 1996 on
  • Kodak Royal Gold 100 (replaced original ektar) end c2002
  • Kodak Royal Gold 200 (replaced original ektar) end c2004
  • Kodak Royal Gold 400 (replaced original ektar) 1996 - c2004
  • Kodak Royal Gold 1000 (replaced original ektar) 1998 -
  • Kodak High Definition 200 (US) 135-36 /Royal Supra 200 (not US)
  • Kodak High Definition 400 (US) 135-24 only/Royal Supra 400 (not US) 135-36
  • Kodak Professional Ultra Color 100 135, 120, 220 New 2004 for fashion, advertising, editorial, commercial, travel, and nature photography [52]
  • Kodak Professional Ultra Color 400 135, 120, 220 Rebranded Portra UC

Color reversal (slide) film[edit]

Discontinued Kodak reversal (slide) film
Kodak Elite Chrome 100 
Kodachrome 64 
Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
Kodak Kodachrome 1936- 1962 T 10-16 Kodak Slide First color film that used a subtractive color method to be successfully mass-marketed. Launched 1935 for motion picture film, 1936 for still cameras. Special development process required, with multiple dyeing steps as each color layer was processed separately, because there were no dye-couplers in film, unlike the contemporary Agfa Color Neu (where color couplers enabled all three layers processed together). This resulted in good color longevity as developed Kodachrome does not retain unused color couplers. However it required more complex processing. Available in daylight (ISO 10) and Type A (ISO 16). USA 135, 828 Kodachrome (1955)
Kodak Kodachrome Professional 1938- 1951 T 8-10 Kodak Slide Professional Daylight (ISO 8) and Type A film (ISO 10) for 34000 K photofloods USA Sheet film Nothing
Kodak Kodachrome 1955- 1962 T 12 K-11 Slide Daylight color slide film (ISO 12) USA 135, 828. Kodachrome II
Kodak Kodachrome Professional 1956- 1962 T 16 K-11 Slide Professional Type A film (ISO 16) USA 135 Kodachrome II
Kodak Kodachrome II 1961- 1974 T 25 K-12 Slide Daylight color slide film. USA 135, 828. Kodachrome 25
Kodak Kodachrome II Professional 1962- 1978 T 40 K-12 Slide Type A professional color slide film USA 135 Kodachrome 40
Kodak Kodachrome X 1962- 1974 T 64 K-12 Slide Daylight color slide film. Launched with 135 format, 126 was added in 1963 and 110 in 1972 USA 110, 126, 135 Kodachrome 64
Kodak Ektachrome E200 To 2011 T 200 E-6 Slide General purpose daylight-balanced color transparency film with moderate contrast and the "look" of a lower speed film. Push-processing capable to an E.I. of 800. 'T' Grain emulsion. Discontinued March 2011 [53] USA 135, 120, 220 Ektachrome E100G
Kodak Professional Elite Chrome 100 1989 - 2012 T 100 E-6 Slide General purpose daylight-balanced color transparency film with natural colours including skin tones, colors, and neutrals. Uses Kodak’s color amplifying and T-grain technology (EB). [54][55] USA 135 Nothing
Kodak Professional Elite Chrome Extra Color 100 1991 - 2012 T 100 E-6 Slide Daylight-balanced color transparency film featuring the highest color saturation available in a 100-speed consumer slide film, delivering extra bright colors particularly for nature and scenic photos (EBX)[56] USA 135 Nothing
Kodak Ektachrome 64T – 2012 T 64 E-6 Slide Tungsten balanced fine grain color transparency film, for commercial photography for catalogs, room interiors, furniture and architectural subjects. (EPY) [57] USA 135, 120, Sheet film Nothing
Kodak Ektachrome 100 Plus 2001–2009 T 100 E-6 Slide Daylight balanced fine grain color transparency film (EPP).[58] USA 135, 120, 220 Ektachrome E100G
Kodak Ektachrome E100G 2000–2012 T/P 100 E-6 Slide Daylight balanced fine grain color transparency film with moderately enhanced color saturation and a neutral color balance, for commercial advertising, fashion, editorial, architecture, nature/wildlife photography. Uses Kodak’s Color Amplifying and T-GRAIN Emulsion technology. Sheet film 4x5", 8x10" 'P' base.[58] USA 135, 120, 220, Sheet film Nothing
Kodak Ektachrome E100GX 2001–2009 T 100 E-6 Slide Daylight balanced fine grain color transparency film with moderately enhanced color saturation and a warm color balance (compared to neutral color for E100G), for commercial advertising, fashion, editorial, architecture, nature/wildlife photography. Uses Kodak’s Color Amplifying and T-grain technology.[58] USA 135, 120, 220 Ektachrome E100G
Kodak Ektachrome E100VS 2002–2012 T 100 E-6 Slide Daylight balanced fine grain color transparency film with vivid saturated colors (VS) while maintaining a neutral gray scale. Intended for commercial location and studio shooting of nature, food, jewelry, and subjects that call for brilliant, dramatic hues. Uses Kodak’s Color Amplifying and T-grain technology. (E100VS) Sheet film 4x5", 8x10" 'P' base[59]> USA 135, 120, 220, sheet film Nothing
Kodak Ektachrome Professional Infrared EIR Film – 2009 P 200 E-6 Slide Infrared sensitive false color reversal film for IR photographic applications e.g. artistic, industrial, scientific, and aerial or technical ground photography. The extent infrared reflectance affects the final color rendition. E.I 200 (daylight), 100 (tungsten). (EIR) [60][61] USA 135-36 Nothing

Kodachrome 25, 64, and 200 Professional[62][edit]

  • First practical color reversal film; essentially first commercially-important color film of any kind.
  • Kodachrome Type F (for flash; stopped being made in 1950s).
  • later Kodachrome 200 and Kodachrome Professional 64 and 200 were added.
  • Processing purchased with film until Justice Department sued around 1954, claiming this was a monopolistic practice. There were relatively few competitors however, with the complex developing machinery necessary.
  • Extremely fine grain, high saturation, sharpest color film ever made.
  • Originally available in larger roll film formats and sheet film (until late 1940s, beginning of 1950s). Kodak kept urging replacement with Ektachrome, which could be developed by user or by many independent laboratories.
  • Discontinued: 2009. Last processor in world closed down its Kodachrome line at end of 2010.
  • Suggested Replacement: Kodak Ektachrome E100d


Ektachrome Lumiere 100[edit]

  • Professional Film
  • Code LPP 6146
  • Launch Date: ?
  • Discontinued: ?
  • Suggested Replacement: ?
  • Type: Medium speed color reversal film providing neutral color balance with enhanced color saturation.
  • Speed: Temp/EI/Wratten filter no. (Source: Ektachrome Lumiere 100 Data Sht dtd 11-93)
  1. 5500K/100/none
  2. 3200K/25/80A
  3. 3400K/32/80B
  • Processing: E-6
  • Formats: 135, 120, cut film.
  • Kodak Pub No. E-137, "Kodak Ektachrome Lumiere 100 Professional Film"
  • Note: A number of photographers noted this film was too cool under some circumstances.

[63]


  • EKTACHROME 64 Professional Film
  • EKTACHROME 100 Professional Film
  • EKTACHROME 100 Plus Professional Film
  • EKTACHROME 160T Professional Film
  • EKTACHROME 320T Professional Film
  • EKTACHROME P1600 Professional Film
  • EKTACHROME 400X Professional Film
  • Ektachrome E100S
  • Ektachrome E100D

Konica[edit]

Established 1873 in Japan, Konishiroku (Konica) was a major producer of colour film, cameras and related products, including film development processors and printing technology. Originally Konica film and paper was sold under the brand name of "Sakura" meaning Cherry Blossom in English. Along with 3M Ferrania they were a significant producer of 'white label' consumer color films for both retailers and traditional B&W film producers needing a colour film to repackage under their own brand. Only in later years did they make significant efforts to market film under the Konica brand. In 2003, Konica merged with Minolta to form Konica Minolta. In 2006, the merged company closed down its photo imaging division, which produced color film, color paper, photo chemicals and digital minilab machines (at the time it was the 3rd largest film producer behind Kodak and Fujifilm, AgfaPhoto having collapsed a year earlier)[64]. The company produced the following films;

Black & white film[edit]

  • Sakura Panchro c1946 Format 120
  • Konica Infrared 750 nm Format 135, 120

Colour negative film[edit]

  • Sakuracolor N100 (C-22)1967-71
  • Sakuracolor N100 (C-22)1971-75
  • Sakuracolor II N100 1974-c84 Employing a DIR color coupler
  • Sakuracolor (C-41) c1975-80
  • Sakuracolor 400 c1976- 1984
  • SR (c1984 - 86) SR 100/ 200/400/1600 formats 135, Disc(also sold as Sakuracolor SR)
  • SR-V (1987)3200 Format 135 (also sold as Sakuracolor with same names) Monodispersed emulsion
  • SR-G (1989- c1994) 100, Format 135
  • SR-G 160 Professional (Format 120/220)
  • Super DD (1990) 100/200/400 Format 135
  • GX (1987)100, 3200 Format 135
  • Impresa 50 1991 (Format 120 only)
  • Super HR to c1991
  • Super SR (1991 - ca.1997)100, 200 Format 135, 110
  • Super XG (1993 - ca 1996) 100 Format 135
  • VX ca. 1994 - 1999 100, 200 Format 135
  • VX Super 100, Format 135
  • Centuria (1999). 100/200/400/800 Format 135
  • Centuria 100 format 120
  • Centuria Super
  • Pro 160, Professional Portrait film Format 135, 120, 220
  • Pro 400 Professional Portrait film Format 135, 120, 220 exp2007

Colour reversal (slide) film[edit]

  • Sakuracolor R-100 (E-4) to 1972
  • Sakurachrome R-100 (E-6) ca 1983 to c1986
  • Konica Chrome 100 c1986 -90


Lomography[edit]

Headquarters in Vienna, Austria. Lomography is a globally-active organization dedicated to analogue, experimental and creative photography. Lomography offers films under its own brand procured from various manufacturers.

Color Negative films[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
Lomography LomoChrome Turquoise XR 2017 -2017 tbc 100-400 C-41 Print Creative colour negative film with turquoise hues, limited run of 5000 rolls. [65] tbc 135, 120 Nothing

Lucky Film[edit]

Lucky Group Corporation in Baoding, Héběi province, China produced a range of colour, black and white, and chromogenic black and white consumer films. Colour film was produced initially conjunction with Kodak after signing a 20-year partnership which Kodak ended in 2007 after 4 years.[66] Production of all consumer films ceased in 2012.[67] Limited photographic film production was restarted in 2017.

Black and white film[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
Lucky SHD 100 To 2012 T 100 B&W Print General purpose, panchromatic film China 135, 120 New SHD 100
Lucky SHD 400 To 2012 T 400 B&W Print General purpose, panchromatic film China 135 Nothing
Lucky SHD 400 CN To 2012 T 100 B&W Print General purpose chromogenic film China 135 Nothing

Color negative film[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
Lucky GBR 100 2003–2012 T 100 B&W Print General purpose consumer colour film China 135 Nothing
Lucky GBR 200 2003–2012 T 200 B&W Print General purpose consumer colour film China 135 Nothing
Lucky GBR 400 2003–2012 T 400 B&W Print General purpose consumer colour film China 135 Nothing

Maco[edit]

Headquarters in Stapelfeld, Germany. Film sales through www.macodirect.de

ORT[edit]

  • Type: Black and White (orthochromatic)
  • Speed: ISO 25, DIN 15°
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120, Sheet Film
  • Granularity: Extremely Fine
  • Resolving power: Extremely High (>330lp/mm)
  • History: evolution of Agfa Ort25c, same emulsion as MACO EM micrography film, evolved later in ORTO25
  • Primary usage: Reprography, Micrography, specialty black-and-white photography
  • General characteristics:
  • Discontinued

[68]

Negra[edit]

Negra Industrial, S A. was a film manufacturer based in Barcelona, Spain established ca. 1928 producing black & white negative film, photographic paper and chemicals. Color film was rebranded stock from other producers mainly Konishiroku (Konica) and 3M (Ferrania). Film production appears to have ended in 1984.[69]

Black and white film[edit]

  • Negra Negrapan 21 (ISO 100) panchromatic film in 135, 120, 127, 110 and 126 sizes. last films expired 89.

Color negative film[edit]

  • Negracolor AR to 1984 Konica Color
  • Negracolor NC80 1970-73 3M Color Print
  • Negracolor NC100 1973-76 Sakuracolor (Konica)
  • Negracolor II 1976 -84 Sakuracolor II (Konica)
  • Negracolor 400 1976 -84 Sakuracolor 400 (Konica)

Color reversal (slide) film[edit]

  • Negracrome 50 1969 -74 3M Color Slide

Perutz[edit]

Perutz was a German film manufacturer. It was taken over by Agfa-Gevaert in 1964. Films included.

Polaroid[edit]

Type 55[edit]

  • Type: Black and white Pos/Neg instant film
  • Speed: 50/18° (pos), 35/16° (neg)
  • Available formats: 4×5 Sheet film
  • Granularity:
  • Latitude:
  • Resolving power:
  • History: Discontinued by Polaroid in 2008; production process licensed out
  • Primary usage: Test shots, fine art

ORWO[edit]

ORWO (ORiginal WOlfen) was the successor to Agfa in Wolfen, GDR. In the 1950s and early 1960s they produced films closely related to the Agfa products made in Leverkusen, West Germany. The marginal markings clarified the origin. For example, Isopan F from Leverkusen was marked L IF, while Isopan F from Wolfen was marked W IF.

Black and white film[edit]

Agfa Wolfen Isopan F[edit]

  • Type: black and white negative, panchromatic
  • Speed: 17° DIN, 40 ASA
  • Available formats: 35 mm
  • Granularity:
  • Resolving power:
  • History: Replaced in the 1960s by NP 18
  • Primary usage: General purpose film
  • Comments: Also referred to as ISOPAN IF 17, Agfa-Isopan-Feinkorn, marginal markings W IF. Speed sometimes quoted as 17° DIN, 32 ASA.

ORWO NP 18=[edit]

  • Type: black and white negative, panchromatic
  • Speed: 18° DIN, 50 ASA
  • Available formats: 35 mm
  • Granularity:
  • Resolving power:
  • History: Replacement for Wolfen Isopan F
  • Primary usage: General purpose film
  • Comments:

Agfa Wolfen Isopan FF[edit]

  • Type: black and white negative, panchromatic
  • Speed: Uncertain, 10° or 15° DIN
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120, 127, 620
  • Granularity:
  • History: Replaced by ORWO NP 10
  • Primary usage: Ultra fine grain film
  • Comments: Also referred to as ISOPAN IFF, marginal markings W IFF

ORWO NP 10[edit]

  • Type: black and white negative, panchromatic
  • Speed: 10° DIN, 8 ASA
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120
  • Granularity: ultra fine
  • History: Replacement for Agfa Wolfen Isopan FF.
  • Primary usage: Ultra fine grain film
  • Comments:

Agfa Wolfen Isopan SS[edit]

  • Type: black and white negative, panchromatic
  • Speed:
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120, 127, 620
  • Granularity: fine
  • Resolving power:
  • History: Marketed at least in the 1960s
  • Primary usage: Ultra fine grain film
  • Comments: Also referred to as ISOPAN ISS, marginal markings L ISS

ORWO NP 22[edit]

  • Type: black and white negative, panchromatic
  • Speed: 22° DIN, 125 ASA
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120, 127, 620
  • Granularity: fine
  • Resolving power:
  • History: Replacement for Agfa Wolfen Isopan SS
  • Primary usage: Ultra fine grain film
  • Comments:

Agfa Wolfen Isopan Rapid[edit]

  • Type: black and white negative, panchromatic
  • Speed:
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120, 620
  • Granularity:
  • Resolving power:
  • History: Replaced by ORWO NP27.
  • Primary usage: High speed film
  • Comments: Speed unclear, could be 27° DIN or 29° DIN

ORWO NP27[edit]

  • Type: black and white negative, panchromatic
  • Speed: 27° DIN, 400 ASA
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120, 620
  • Granularity:
  • Resolving power:
  • History: Replacement for Agfa Wolfen Isopan Rapid
  • Primary usage: Ultra high speed film
  • Comments:

ORWO NC 16[edit]

  • Type: colour negative
  • Speed: 16° DIN, 32 ASA
  • Available formats:
  • Granularity:
  • Resolving power:
  • History:
  • Primary usage:
  • Comments:

Color negative film[edit]

  • ORWO Color NC19, ISO64. Color Negative 120 expired c1993.

Rera[edit]

Rera is a small range of photographic films for 127 (4x4) format roll film cameras assembled in Japan by Kawauso-Shoten. Film is bought in and converted for 127 format and sold through main retailers. Discontinued films include:

Color reversal (slide) film[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
Rera Chrome 100 c2016 - 17 P 100 E-6 Slide General purpose color slide film. Possibly an Aviphot Chrome film. tbc 127 Nothing

Rollei[edit]

The Rollei brand for photographic film is licensed to Maco (Hans O. Mahn GmbH & Co. KG, Maco Photo Products) a German-based supplier of photographic films. They offer a range of Black and White and Colour films produced by Agfa-Gevaert and other suppliers. Discontinued films are listed below;

R3[edit]

  • Speed: ISO 200, DIN 24° (can be used from ISO25 to ISO6400)
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120, Sheet Film
  • Granularity: Fine
  • Resolving power: High
  • History: launched in 2004
  • Primary usage: General black-and-white photography
  • General characteristics: Fairly wide latitude, PET base for better film flatness, extended spectral sensitivity from IR to near-UV, to be stored in special black cartridges
  • Discontinued

[70]

ATO (Advanced Technical Ortho)[edit]

  • same emulsion as Maco Genius Film
  • clear base
  • suitable for reversal process

Rollei Ortho[edit]

  • orthochromatic film with a clear base
  • spectral sensitivity 380–610 nm
  • resolving power of 330 lines/mm (with a fine-grain developer)
  • especially suited for digital scanning
  • Replaced by Ortho Plus in 2017

Rollei Pan[edit]

  • ISO 25
  • clear base, well suited for B&W slides

Retro Tonal[edit]

  • same emulsion as Maco PO100C
  • an orthopanchromatic ("RectePan") film
  • clear base
  • suitable for reversal process

RSD[edit]

  • same emulsion as Agfa Copex Slide Direct
  • a pre-fogged orthochromatic film specially for negative or slide duplication
  • exposure index (EI) in daylight around 0.2 (thus it has a DIN value of -6 !) = about EI 6 + 5 f stops (not many cameras will handle this correctly)
  • after a massive exposure will produce a positive in traditional B&W process, i.e. is NOT run through a reversal process; see also solarisation
  • contrast adjustment using different developers, i.e. lower contrast: for ex. Rodinal/Adonal (1:25 about 10 mins., 1:50 about 20 mins.) or higher contrast: any paper developer 1+4 about 5 mins.

Color negative films[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
Rollei CN 200 2008 - 2017 P 200 C-41 Print Unmasked colour film of an older aesthetic well suited for scanning. (Agfa Aviphot Color X100). Originally called digibase CN 200 pro. Final stocks in 120 lasted until mid 2018. Belgium 135, 120 Nothing

Color reversal (slide) film[edit]

Make Name Dates Base ISO Process Type Details Origin Formats Replaced by
Rollei Vario Chrome 2017-2017 T? 200 E-6 Slide Limited edition film in 2017 converted from expired slide stock. Can be exposed between 200/24° to 400/27° ISO without adjusting development. Gives earthy grainy colors.[71] Belgium? 135 Nothing

ScanFilm[edit]

  • same emulsion as Agfa Aviphot Color X400 without a mask, very well suited for scanning

Svema[edit]

Svema (Russian: Свема, Светочувствительные Материалы) was the former name ("NPO "Svema") of the Shostka Chemical Plant, located in Shostka, Sumy Oblast, Ukraine. It was founded in 1931 in then Ukrainian SSR.

"Svema" used to be the major photographic film manufacturer in the USSR, but their film lost market share in former Soviet countries to imported products during the late 1990s. They made black-and-white photographic film, photographic paper, B&W/colour cine film and magnetic tapes until 2000. Colour film was made with equipment dismantled from the Agfa-Wolfen Factory after World War II. The plant's production of photographic products slowed through the 1990s and ceased film production entirely in c2000-03, the plant supplying district heating until 2006.[72] Films generally supplied without spool in a black paper wrapper and box

Black and white film[edit]

Type 1981
(old GOST speed scale)

  • Svema FN 32; 32 GOST, ISO 40/17°
  • Svema FN 64; 64 GOST, ISO 80/20°; 135, sheet films 6.5×9 cm - 30×40 cm, KB, 6×9", bulk last expired 1/94.
  • Svema FN 125; 125 GOST, ISO 160/23°; KB, bulk
  • Svema FN 250; 250 GOST, ISO 320/26°; KB, bulk
  • Svema Reporter 200 GOST, ISO 200/24° (actually cinematographic filmstock); KB, bulk

Type approximately 1986
(old GOST speed scale)

  • Svema Foto 32
  • Svema Foto 65 (80 ASA)
  • Svema Foto 130
  • Svema Foto 250

Type 1990
(new GOST speed scale, same as ASA)

  • Svema Foto 50; ISO 50/18°
  • Svema Foto 100; ISO 100/21°; KB, 6×9", bulk last expiry July 4
  • Svema Foto 200; ISO 200/24°; KB, bulk
  • Svema Foto 400; ISO 400/27°; KB, bulk

Colour negative film[edit]

  • SVEMA DS-2 45 18DIN 50ASA 6x6cm Negative Color film 120 format. 1970s era
  • Svema DS-4 Color Negative Film 45 GOST (ISO) / 18 DIN / 50 ASA, 1980s/90s 135, 120 format No spool.
  • Svema sNL-65 Color Negative Film, 65 GOST (ISO) / 20 DIN / 80 ASA, 135 format

Colour reversal (slide) film[edit]

  • Svema CO-32D Color reversal film, 120 format 1990s
  • Svema CO-50d Color reversal film, 50 GOST (ISO) / 18 DIN / 50 ASA, 120 format. 1990s last expired 1992

Tasma[edit]

TasmaТасма in Russian Cyrillic characters was a manufacturer of photographic films located in Kazan, Russia, it has been in operation since 1933 (starting as “Film Factory No. 8”. The name “Tasma” is derived from the Russian phrase «Татарские светочувствительные материалы» “TAtarskie Sveto MAterialiy.” - “TAtar Sensitized Materials;”it was adopted by the company in 1974. Prior to the fall of the Soviet Union, the company offered an array of color photographic products from the year 1950 as well, but these were discontinued following the fall of the Iron Curtain. After the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the company was reorganized as a free enterprise and privatized in 1992. Photographic film production ceased in the 1990s and today they specialise in industrial films including aerial photography films. Films generally supplied without spool in a black paper wrapper and box.

Black and white film[edit]

  • Tasma 100 Super
  • Tasma Foto 32
  • Tasma Foto 64
  • Tasma Foto 125
  • Tasma 65 GOST (ISO) / 20 DIN / 80 ASA 135 format
  • Tasma 130 GOST (ISO) / 23 DIN / 160 ASA 135 format
  • Tasma 250 GOST (ISO) 135 format

Colour reversal (slide) film[edit]

  • TASMA ЦО-25 (daylight)

Valca[edit]

Valca was a Spanish film manufacturer established in 1940 headquartered in Bilbao. The company name comes from the factory location in Sopeñano, Burgos; Valle de Mena (Mena Valley) through which flows the Rio Cadagua (Cadagua River) which provided cooling water for the factory.[73] The company produced black and white negative film, photographic paper and X ray films. Ilford acquired an equity interest in Valca in 1960, resulting in technical co-opertion and Valca acting as Ilford distributors in Spain. The agreement lasted until 1976 when Ilford sold its shares.[74][75] It was particularly successful in the X-ray film market and in 1991 it had a 17% share of its national market and 1% of the USA market, the latter accounting for 60% of production, with 65% of X-ray film exported in total. Whilst black & white film was produced in house, colour film was rebranded stock from other suppliers. The company underwent re-structuring in 1991 due to financial problems, reportedly due to poor management and the factory finally closed in 1993.[76][77]

Black and white film[edit]

  • Valca Sheet Film Autographica – Panchromatica Antihalo
  • Valca Sheet Film Retrato V Orthochromatic
  • Valca Sheet Film Retrato VV Panchromatic
  • Valca Sheet Film Retrato ES Panchromatic
  • Valca Diapositiva Dura
  • Valca F22 – ASA 125 (sheet film 9×12 cm, 35mm, 120, 620 & 126) Possibly based on FP4.
  • Valca H27 – ASA 400 Possibly based on Ilford HP3
  • Valca H29 – ASA 400 (sheet film, 35mm, 120) Possibly based on Ilford HP4.

Colour negative films[edit]

  • Valcolor, 1974-75 Sakuracolor N100
  • Valcolor II – 1975-1977 Sakuracolor II
  • Valcolor II – 1977-1980 (35mm, 126, 120, 110) 3M color print 100
  • Valcolor HR100 – to 1991 (35mm & 126) Konica color 100

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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