List of domestic works by Alfred Waterhouse

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Alfred Waterhouse (1830–1905) was a prolific English architect who worked in the second half of the 19th century. His buildings were largely in Victorian Gothic Revival style. Waterhouse's biographer, Colin Cunningham, states that between about 1865 and about 1885 he was "the most widely employed British architect".[1] He worked in many fields, designing commercial, public, educational, domestic, and ecclesiastical buildings.[1]

Waterhouse was born in Liverpool of Quaker parents. After being articled to P. B. Alley in Manchester, he took a ten-month tour of the Continent, then established his own practice in Manchester. Many of his early commissions came from Quakers and other nonconformist patrons. He came to national recognition when he won success in a competition for the design of Manchester assize courts. His next major public commissions in Manchester were for Strangeways Gaol and Manchester Town Hall. In 1865 he opened an office in London, which was followed by his first major commission in London, the Natural History Museum. Meanwhile he was also designing country houses. Here his major work was the rebuilding of Eaton Hall in Cheshire for the 1st Duke of Westminster, which was "the most expensive country house of the [19th] century".[1] He also designed educational buildings including schools and works for the universities of Cambridge, Oxford, Manchester, and Liverpool. In the commercial field, he designed banks, and offices for insurance and assurance companies, especially the Prudential Assurance Company, for whom he built 27 buildings.[1]

Waterhouse's success came from "a thoroughly professional approach rather than on brilliance or innovation as a stylist".[1] He paid particular attention to detail and, although he designed many major buildings, he still accepted smaller commissions.[1] Although most of his work was in the Gothic Revival style, he also employed other styles, including Romanesque and French Renaissance.[2] He used many building materials, but is noted for his use of red brick and terracotta. The use of these materials for many university buildings in the north of England is a major factor in their being termed "red brick universities".[1][3] In addition to his design work as an architect, Waterhouse was an assessor for about 60 architectural competitions. He was awarded the Royal Gold Medal of the Royal Institute of British Architects in 1878 for his design for Manchester Town Hall, and was president of that institution from 1888 to 1891. He was gained international diplomas, and in 1895 was awarded an honorary LL.D by Manchester University. Waterhouse was also a painter, exhibiting 80 watercolours at the Royal Academy. He suffered a stroke in 1901, and died in his home at Yattendon, Berkshire, in 1905. His practice was continued by his son Paul, followed by his grandson, Michael, and his great-grandson. His estate at death amounted to over £215,000 (equivalent to £20,820,000 as of 2015).[1][4]

Throughout his career, Waterhouse designed houses ranging in size from the largest in the country to small cottages. They included country houses, rectories and vicarages, and associated structures such as lodges, stables, gatehouses, and accommodation for estate workers. This list includes the major structures in this category, most of which are listed buildings.

Key[edit]

Grade
(England and Wales)
Criteria[5]
Grade I Buildings of exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important.
Grade II* Particularly important buildings of more than special interest.
Grade II Buildings of national importance and special interest.
Category
(Scotland)
Criteria[6]
Category A Buildings of national or international importance, either architectural or historic, or fine little-altered examples of some particular period, style or building type.
Category B Buildings of regional or more than local importance, or major examples of some particular period, style or building type which may have been altered.
Category C(S) Buildings of local importance, lesser examples of any period, style, or building type, as originally constructed or moderately altered; and simple traditional buildings which group well with others in categories A and B.
"—" denotes a work that is not graded.

Buildings[edit]

Name Location Photograph Date Notes Grade
Rothay Holme Ambleside, Cumbria
1854 Waterhouse's first new build; a country house for Elizabeth Head. Extended in 1890.[7][8]
Cemetery lodge and gates Ince-in-Makerfield, Wigan, Greater Manchester
53°31′58″N 2°37′01″W / 53.5329°N 2.6169°W / 53.5329; -2.6169 (Lodge and gates, Ince Cemetery)
Former Lodge at Ince Cemetery, Warrington Road, Lower Ince - geograph.org.uk - 78780.jpg 1855–57 Two-storey stone lodge with a slate roof. The gates are in cast iron and are "elaborate".[7][9][10] II
Hinderton Hall Neston, Cheshire
53°17′54″N 3°02′37″W / 53.2982°N 3.0437°W / 53.2982; -3.0437 (Hinderton Hall, Neston)
1856 A country house built for Christopher Bushell, a Liverpool wine merchant in sandstone with a green slate roof. It has two storeys and a tower.[7][11][12] II
Main Lodge, Hinderton Hall Neston, Cheshire
53°17′57″N 3°02′49″W / 53.2992°N 3.04682°W / 53.2992; -3.04682 (Main Lodge, Hinderton Hall, Neston)
Hinderton Hall Lodge - geograph.org.uk - 196714.jpg 1856 c. 1856 Built in sandstone with a green slate roof in a cruciform plan.[11][13] II
Back Lodge, Hinderton Hall Neston, Cheshire
53°17′55″N 3°02′27″W / 53.2987°N 3.0409°W / 53.2987; -3.0409 (Back Lodge, Hinderton Hall, Neston)
1856 c. 1856 Built in sandstone with a green slate roof in an L-shaped plan.[14] II
Quarry Lodge, Hinderton Hall Neston, Cheshire
53°17′45″N 3°02′18″W / 53.2958°N 3.0382°W / 53.2958; -3.0382 (Quarry Lodge, Hinderton Hall, Neston)
1856 c. 1856 Built in sandstone with a green slate roof in an L-shaped plan.[15] II
Fawe Park Keswick, Cumbria
54°35′39″N 3°09′22″W / 54.5943°N 3.1560°W / 54.5943; -3.1560 (Fawe Park, Keswick)
1856–58 A country house for James Bell overlooking Derwentwater. Its sitting room is on the top floor to take advantage of the view.[1][7][16]
Elleray Bank Windermere, Cumbria
1856–61 An Italianate house for G. G. Cunningham.[7][17]
Vicarage Blackmoor, Selborne, Hampshire
51°05′38″N 0°53′12″W / 51.0940°N 0.8867°W / 51.0940; -0.8867 (Vicarage, Selborne)
1860 c. 1860 Built in stone with a tiled roof and brick chimneystack. It has two storeys and attics.[18] II
Mission Hall Cottage Wareside, Hertfordshire
51°48′37″N 0°00′22″E / 51.8104°N 0.0062°E / 51.8104; 0.0062 (Mission Hall Cottage, Wareside)
1860s Cottages and estate office as part of the Easneye Estate. T-shaped in brick with two storeys.[19] II
Reading room and teacher's house Allonby, Cumbria
54°46′29″N 3°25′48″W / 54.7748°N 3.4300°W / 54.7748; -3.4300 (Reading room, Allonby)
1861 Built for the Quaker Joseph Pease.[7][20]
New Heys Allerton, Liverpool, Merseyside
53°22′12″N 2°53′24″W / 53.3701°N 2.8900°W / 53.3701; -2.8900 (New Heys, Liverpool)
1861–65 A suburban mansion for the lawyer W. G. Bateson. It is built in polychromatic brick with slate roofs, and was later divided into apartments.[7][21][22] II
Rockliffe Hall Hurworth-on-Tees,
County Durham
54°28′42″N 1°32′41″W / 54.4784°N 1.5446°W / 54.4784; -1.5446 (Rockliffe Hall, Hurworth-on-Tees)
1863–65 Built as a country house for Alfred Backhouse, in the 20th century it was used as a hospital, and later as a hotel. It is a red brick building with slate roofs.[23][24] II
Bankhead Broxton, Cheshire
53°05′10″N 2°45′58″W / 53.0862°N 2.7661°W / 53.0862; -2.7661 (Bankhead, Broxton)
1864 Used as a dower house for the Bolesworth Estate. It has an irregular plan, and is constructed in brick with sandstone dressings and a tiled roof.[7][25][26] II
Stable and coach house, Bankhead Broxton, Cheshire
53°05′11″N 2°45′57″W / 53.0865°N 2.7658°W / 53.0865; -2.7658 (Stable and coach house, Bankhead, Broxton)
1864 Built for the Bolesworth Estate. A single-storey L-shaped building in red brick with tiled roofs.[27] II
Thelwall Heys Grappenhall and Thelwall, Cheshire
53°22′35″N 2°32′00″W / 53.3763°N 2.5332°W / 53.3763; -2.5332 (Thelwall Heys, Cheshire)
1864 A country house in red-brown brick with yellow and blue brick banding, sandstone dressings, and a slate roof.[28] II
Goldney House Clifton, Bristol
51°27′10″N 2°36′52″W / 51.4529°N 2.6144°W / 51.4529; -2.6144 (Goldney House, Bristol)
Goldney1.jpg 1864–65 A house dating from about 1720, re-cased, altered and extended. Later used as student accommodation.[7][29][30] II
Benwell Dene Newcastle upon Tyne
54°58′21″N 1°40′11″W / 54.9726°N 1.6696°W / 54.9726; -1.6696 (Royal Victoria School for the Blind, Newcastle upon Tyne)
1865 This originated as the home of Dr Thomas Hodgkin, who later gave the house to the Royal Victoria School for the Blind. It is constructed in sandstone and has a slate roof. The building is in two storeys with attics.[31] II
Lodge, Benwell Dene Newcastle upon Tyne
54°58′22″N 1°40′09″W / 54.9729°N 1.6691°W / 54.9729; -1.6691 (Royal Victoria School for the Blind, Newcastle upon Tyne)
1865 A sandstone house with a slate roof in one storey.[32] II
Hutton Hall Guisborough,
North Yorkshire
54°31′21″N 1°04′32″W / 54.5224°N 1.0755°W / 54.5224; -1.0755 (Hutton Hall, Guisborough)
Hutton Hall - geograph.org.uk - 790392.jpg 1866 A large country house for J. W. Pease. It is a brick building with slate roofs. The frontage is of seven bays, and the building in High Victorian style. Associated with the house are a kitchen courtyard, a conservatory, and a gatehouse.[1][7][33] II
Gate lodge to Easneye Stanstead Abbots, Hertfordshire
51°47′44″N 0°00′14″E / 51.7955°N 0.0040°E / 51.7955; 0.0040 (Lodge to Easneye, Stanstead Abbots)
1866 The lodge contains two houses.[34][35] II
Easneye Stanstead Abbots, Hertfordshire
51°48′09″N 0°00′04″E / 51.8026°N 0.0010°E / 51.8026; 0.0010 (Easneye, Stanstead Abbots)
Easneye - geograph.org.uk - 143411.jpg 1867–68 Built as a country house for Thomas Fowell Buxton, it is constructed in red brick with black brick diapering, and has tiled roofs. Its plan is asymmetrical in three blocks. It has been used later as a college.[34][36] II*
Stables to Easneye Stanstead Abbots, Hertfordshire
51°48′11″N 0°00′03″E / 51.8030°N 0.0007°E / 51.8030; 0.0007 (Stables, Easneye, Stanstead Abbots)
1868 An L-shaped building in red brick with a tiled roof.[37] II
Allerton Priory Liverpool, Merseyside
53°22′11″N 2°52′58″W / 53.3697°N 2.8828°W / 53.3697; -2.8828 (Allerton Priory, Liverpool)
1867–70 A mansion built for the colliery owner John Grant Morris. It is a large asymmetrical house in two storeys with an attic, constructed in red brick with bands in blue brick and stone, stone dressings, and a tiled roof. It was later used as a school, and then converted into apartments.[38][39] II*
Lodge to
Allerton Priory
Liverpool, Merseyside
53°22′06″N 2°53′16″W / 53.3684°N 2.8879°W / 53.3684; -2.8879 (Allerton Priory Lodge, Liverpool)
1867–70 A two-storey house in brick with a timber-framed gable.[38][40] II
Chowley Lodge Chowley, Cheshire
53°06′02″N 2°46′36″W / 53.1005°N 2.7766°W / 53.1005; -2.7766 (Bankhead, Chowley)
Chowley - Chowley Lodge.jpg 1868 It is constructed in sandstone with a slate roof. It consists of a castellated entrance with wrought iron gates in an archway, and is attached to a cottage.[25][41] II
Foxhill House Earley, Berkshire
51°26′43″N 0°56′31″W / 51.4453°N 0.9419°W / 51.4453; -0.9419 (Foxhill House, Earley)
Foxhill from the west.jpg 1868 A house built by Waterhouse for himself, in brick with much diapering. It is in two storeys with an attic, and has since been used as a students' hall of residence.[42] II*
Stables and coach house,
Foxhill House
Earley, Berkshire
51°26′44″N 0°56′30″W / 51.4455°N 0.9416°W / 51.4455; -0.9416 (Stabels and coach house, Foxhill House, Earley)
Foxhill service wing.jpg 1868 Built by Waterhouse for himself, in red brick with blue brick diapering. It is in two storeys with an L-shaped plan. Since used as a students' accommodation.[43] II
Farmhouse and dairy Stanstead Abbots, Hertfordshire
51°48′21″N 0°00′20″E / 51.8059°N 0.0055°E / 51.8059; 0.0055 (Farmhouse and dairy, Stanstead Abbots)
1868 c. 1868 A T-plan two-storey house in brick with tiled roofs.[44] II
Mossley House Mossley Hill, Liverpool, Merseyside
53°22′49″N 2°55′31″W / 53.3803°N 2.9254°W / 53.3803; -2.9254 (Mossley House, Liverpool)
1868–69 Built as a mansion for Lloyd Rayner, later incorporated into Mossley Hill Hospital. It is a large, square house constructed in polychromatic brick, and in Gothic style.[45][46] II
Old Vicarage Bakewell, Derbyshire
53°12′43″N 1°40′48″W / 53.2119°N 1.6799°W / 53.2119; -1.6799 (Old Vicarage, Bakewell)
1869 A house in limestone with sandstone dressings and a tiled roof. It has two storeys and an attic. Later used as a residential home.[47] II
Blackmoor House Selborne, Hampshire
51°05′24″N 0°53′16″W / 51.0899°N 0.8878°W / 51.0899; -0.8878 (Blackmoor House, Selborne)
1869 A country house with extensions added in 1882, for Roundell Palmer, 1st Earl of Selborne. The house has since been divided into flats.[1][7][48] II*
South Lodge, Blackmoor House Selborne, Hampshire
51°05′09″N 0°52′50″W / 51.0859°N 0.8806°W / 51.0859; -0.8806 (South Lodge, Blackmoor House, Selborne)
1869 Lodge for Blackmoor House.[49] II
Coldhayes Steep, Hampshire
51°02′12″N 0°55′21″W / 51.0368°N 0.9224°W / 51.0368; -0.9224 (Coldhayes, Steep)
1869 A country house in limestone with Bath stone dressings and a tiled roof.[50] II*
Stables, Coldhayes Steep, Hampshire
51°02′14″N 0°55′20″W / 51.0373°N 0.9223°W / 51.0373; -0.9223 (Stables, Coldhayes, Steep)
1869 A range of buildings round a courtyard with an arched entrance at the corner. Built in limestone with Bath stone and tiled roofs.[51] II
Coachhouse and stables, Blackmoor House Selborne, Hampshire
51°05′09″N 0°52′50″W / 51.0859°N 0.8806°W / 51.0859; -0.8806 (South Lodge, Blackmoor House, Selborne)
1869 c. 1869 Buildings around three sides of a courtyard, later converted for residential use. II
Merlewood Langham Road, Bowdon, Greater Manchester
1869–71 A house in yellow brick with brownish bands.[52]
49 Grosvenor Street Westminster, Greater London
51°30′41″N 0°08′56″W / 51.5113°N 0.1488°W / 51.5113; -0.1488 (49 Grosvenor Street, Westminster)
1870 A terraced house built in 1725, heightened and altered by Waterhouse. It is in red brick with a slate roof, and has four storeys, a basement, and dormers in a mansard roof.[53] II
Eaton Hall Cheshire
53°08′25″N 2°52′39″W / 53.1403°N 2.8775°W / 53.1403; -2.8775 (Eaton Hall, Cheshire)
Eaton Hall c 1880 - Waterhouse's version. Photo by Francis Bedford (died 1894).JPG 1870–82 A major country house for the 1st Duke of Westminster replacing an earlier hall. It was the most expensive British house to be built in the 19th century, costing £600,000. Demolished in 1963.[1][54][55]
Walls and gates with overthrow, Eaton Hall Cheshire
53°08′32″N 2°52′33″W / 53.1423°N 2.8757°W / 53.1423; -2.8757 (Walls and gates, Eaton Hall, Cheshire)
1870 c. 1870 A gateway to the walled garden, 12 feet (3.7 m) high, gate piers, and a pair of gates with an overthrow.[56] II*
Coach House Court, Eaton Hall Cheshire
53°08′29″N 2°52′39″W / 53.1413°N 2.8776°W / 53.1413; -2.8776 (Coach House Court, Eaton Hall, Cheshire)
1870s A courtyard for the 1st Duke of Westminster containing a coach house, stables, and a riding school.[57][58] II
Lodge, Eaton Hall Cheshire
53°08′31″N 2°52′42″W / 53.1419°N 2.8783°W / 53.1419; -2.8783 (Lodge, Eaton Hall, Cheshire)
1870s A lodge in early French Renaissance style for the 1st Duke of Westminster plus gates, piers and screens.[59] II
Heythrop Park Heythrop, Oxfordshire
51°56′07″N 1°28′19″W / 51.9352°N 1.4720°W / 51.9352; -1.4720 (Heythrop Park)
Heythrop Park 01.jpg 1871 This originated as a country house in about 1705, designed by Thomas Archer for Charles Talbot, 1st Duke of Shrewsbury. It was badly damaged by fire in 1831, then restored and partly rebuilt by Waterhouse for Albert Brassey. It is in Baroque style, constructed in limestone with slate roofs. It has since been converted for use as a hotel. The wings of the house and garden features are listed separately at Grade II.[60][61][62] II*
Christchurch Vicarage Reading, Berkshire
51°26′38″N 0°57′43″W / 51.4438°N 0.9619°W / 51.4438; -0.9619 (Christchurch Vicarage, Reading)
1871 A brick house in two and three storeys with a tiled roof.[63] II
18 Lincoln's Inn Fields Camden, Greater London
51°31′02″N 0°07′01″W / 51.5171°N 0.1169°W / 51.5171; -0.1169 (18 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London)
1871–72 Built as two houses, later converted into one. In Portland stone with a slate roof. It has four storeys and three gabled dormers.[64] II
Lodge to the north of Newsham Park Hospital Liverpool, Merseyside
53°25′21″N 2°56′09″W / 53.4224°N 2.9357°W / 53.4224; -2.9357 (Lodge, Newsham Park Hospital, Liverpool)
1871–74 A two-storey house in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof.[65] II
Lingholm Portinscale near Keswick, Cumbria
54°35′24″N 3°09′21″W / 54.5899°N 3.1559°W / 54.5899; -3.1559 (Lingholm, Keswick)
Lingholm - geograph.org.uk - 349521.jpg 1871–75 A country house for the brewer Lt-Col G. F. Greenall at a cost of £15,700. Subsequently extended.[66]
Stables at Culver House Longdown, Devon
50°42′02″N 3°38′02″W / 50.7005°N 3.6339°W / 50.7005; -3.6339 (Culver House Stables, Longdown)
1872 Stables for a country house.[67] II
Abinger Manor Abinger, Surrey
51°12′07″N 0°24′25″W / 51.2019°N 0.4070°W / 51.2019; -0.4070 (Abinger Manor)
1872–73 Originally built in 1688 for John Evelyn, the house was rebuilt by Waterhouse, reusing some of its former materials. It is an L-shaped brick house set on a moated site.[68] II
Coodham House Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland
55°33′40″N 4°32′43″W / 55.5612°N 4.5452°W / 55.5612; -4.5452 (Coodham House, Ayrshire)
1872–79 A country house built in 1826–31 to which Waterhouse made improvements and additions for William Houldsworth, including a music room, a conservatory, and a private chapel.[69][70] A
Pierrement Darlington,
County Durham
54°31′54″N 1°34′12″W / 54.5317°N 1.5700°W / 54.5317; -1.5700 (Pierrement Hall, Darlington)
1873 An addition to the home of Henry Pease, since subdivided into separate units.[71] II
Former Postillion's House,
Eaton Hall
Cheshire
53°08′28″N 2°52′38″W / 53.1410°N 2.8773°W / 53.1410; -2.8773 (Postillion's House, Eaton Hall, Cheshire)
1873 This was part of the northern wall of Waterhouse's Eaton Hall, the remainder of which has been demolished. It is in the style of a 16th-century château, constructed in stone with a mansard roof surmounted by iron cresting, and containing dormers.[57][72] II*
Town Thorns Easenhall, Warwickshire
52°24′40″N 1°20′25″W / 52.4112°N 1.3404°W / 52.4112; -1.3404 (East Lodge, Easenhall)
1873 A country house for Washington Jackson, built in brick with stone dressings. It originally had an east wing and a tower, since demolished. It is in Italianate style. and has three storeys. On the north front is a porte-cochère. The building has since been used as offices.[1][73] II
East Lodge to Town Thorns Easenhall, Warwickshire
52°24′41″N 1°19′51″W / 52.4114°N 1.3308°W / 52.4114; -1.3308 (East Lodge, Easenhall)
1873 The east lodge to a country house, built in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has a cruciform plan, and is in Italianate style.[74] II
Gateway at East Entrance to Town Thorns Easenhall, Warwickshire
52°24′41″N 1°19′50″W / 52.4113°N 1.3305°W / 52.4113; -1.3305 (East Gateway, Easenhall)
1873 Gateway to a country house, built with stone gatepiers and wrought iron gates.[75] II
South Lodge to Town Thorns Easenhall, Warwickshire
52°24′36″N 1°20′36″W / 52.4099°N 1.3433°W / 52.4099; -1.3433 (South Lodge, Easenhall)
1873 The south lodge to a country house, built in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has a cruciform plan, and is in Italianate style.[76] II
Southwest Lodge to Town Thorns Easenhall, Warwickshire
52°24′38″N 1°20′55″W / 52.4106°N 1.3486°W / 52.4106; -1.3486 (Southwest Lodge, Easenhall)
1873 The south lodge to a country house, built in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. It is in Italianate style.[77] II
Stable Court,
Eaton Hall
Cheshire
53°08′28″N 2°52′39″W / 53.1412°N 2.8776°W / 53.1412; -2.8776 (Stable Court, Eaton Hall, Cheshire)
1873 c. 1873 A building with four ranges enclosing a courtyard; in red brick and half-timbering with tiled roofs, incorporating stables.[57][78] II*
Crookhey Hall Cockerham, Lancashire
53°57′14″N 2°48′31″W / 53.9540°N 2.8087°W / 53.9540; -2.8087 (Crookhey Hall, Cockerham)
1874 A country house constructed in sandstone with slate roofs. It is asymmetrical, with a tower and a porte-cochère. Subsequently converted for use as a school.[79][80][81] II
Rectory to St Elisabeth's Church Reddish, Stockport, Greater Manchester
53°26′19″N 2°09′49″W / 53.4385°N 2.1635°W / 53.4385; -2.1635 (Rectory, Reddish)
1874 Part of a development for the mill-owner William Houldsworth, including a school, the rectory, and St Elisabeth's Church. It is a brick building with stone dressings in Gothic style, and has sash windows.[82][83] II*
Firwood Rusholme, Manchester
53°27′22″N 2°13′20″W / 53.4562°N 2.2223°W / 53.4562; -2.2223 (Firwood, Manchester)
1874–75 A villa for T. R. Heatherington in 2½ storeys with a tower. Later used as part of the Xavier College.[84] II
Misarden Park Miserden, Gloucestershire
51°46′45″N 2°05′13″W / 51.7791°N 2.0869°W / 51.7791; -2.0869 (Misarden Park)
1874–78 Waterhouse made alterations to a large country house dating from about 1620 for Edward Aldam Leatham.[85] II*
The Brand Woodhouse, Leicestershire
52°43′00″N 1°12′40″W / 52.7166°N 1.2112°W / 52.7166; -1.2112 (The Brand, Woodhouse)
1875 A house for Arthur Ellis, with later additions.[86] II
Culver House Longdown, Devon
50°41′59″N 3°37′59″W / 50.6998°N 3.6330°W / 50.6998; -3.6330 (Culver House, Longdown)
1875 A country house built in 1836, extended by Waterhouse.[87] II*
38 Sheffield Terrace Kensington and Chelsea, Greater London
51°30′20″N 0°11′46″W / 51.5056°N 0.1962°W / 51.5056; -0.1962 (38 Sheffield Terrace, Kensington)
1876 The only surviving town house by Waterhouse. Built in brick with two storeys and a basement.[88] II
Silwood Park Blacknest, Hampshire
51°24′31″N 0°38′28″W / 51.4087°N 0.6410°W / 51.4087; -0.6410 (Silwood Park, Blacknest)
1876–78 This was built as a country house with stables, it is a brick building with stone dressings and tiled roofs. As of 2012 it is one of the academic campuses of Imperial College, London.[89][90] II
Silwood Park Garden House Blacknest, Hampshire
51°24′54″N 0°39′17″W / 51.4151°N 0.6547°W / 51.4151; -0.6547 (Silwood Park, Blacknest)
1876–78 A red brick house with a tiled roof, altered in the 20th century.[91] II
East lodge
Silwood Park
Blacknest, Hampshire
51°24′32″N 0°38′17″W / 51.4090°N 0.6380°W / 51.4090; -0.6380 (East Lodge, Silwood Park, Blacknest)
1876–78 A red brick house with a tiled roof, altered in the 20th century.[92] II
North lodge
Silwood Park
Blacknest, Hampshire
51°24′59″N 0°38′59″W / 51.4165°N 0.6497°W / 51.4165; -0.6497 (East Lodge, Silwood Park, Blacknest)
1876–78 A red brick house with a tiled roof, altered in the 20th century.[93] II
South Lodge
Silwood Park
Blacknest, Hampshire
51°24′23″N 0°38′32″W / 51.4063°N 0.6423°W / 51.4063; -0.6423 (South Lodge, Silwood Park, Blacknest)
1876–78 A building with an irregular plan, in one and two storeys, constructed in red brick with bands in darker bricks.[94] II
Virginia Water Lodge
Silwood Park
Blacknest, Hampshire
51°24′49″N 0°38′23″W / 51.4137°N 0.6398°W / 51.4137; -0.6398 (Virginia Water Lodge, Silwood Park, Blacknest)
1876–78 A red brick house with a tiled roof, altered in the 20th century.[95] II
Clayesmore School Iwerne Minster, Dorset
50°55′53″N 2°11′46″W / 50.9315°N 2.1962°W / 50.9315; -2.1962 (Clayesmore School)
1878 Built as a country house for Lord Wolverton in stone with tiled roofs. It has two storeys with a frontage of nine bays. Later used as a school.[1][96] II
Swanmore Park House Swanmore, Hampshire
50°57′24″N 1°10′15″W / 50.9567°N 1.1708°W / 50.9567; -1.1708 (Swanmore Park House)
1878–82 A country house for Charles Myers. Constructed in red brick with painted concrete dressings and tiled roofs. Since converted into flats.[97] II
Culver Lodge Longdown, Devon
50°42′10″N 3°37′47″W / 50.7029°N 3.6297°W / 50.7029; -3.6297 (Culver Lodge, Longdown)
1879 Lodge to a country house.[98] II
Dryderdale South Bedburn,
County Durham
54°41′34″N 1°51′47″W / 54.6927°N 1.8631°W / 54.6927; -1.8631 (Dryderdale, County Durham)
1879 A country house for Alfred Backhouse in French Renaissance style.[99] II
Dryderdale Lodge South Bedburn,
County Durham
54°41′28″N 1°51′24″W / 54.6910°N 1.8566°W / 54.6910; -1.8566 (Dryderdale Lodge, County Durham)
1879 c. 1879 A lodge to Dryderdale in sandstone with a T-plan.[100] II
Belmont School Abinger, Surrey
51°11′21″N 0°24′21″W / 51.1891°N 0.4059°W / 51.1891; -0.4059 (Belmont School, Abinger)
1879–80 This was built as a country house by G. Redmayne to plans drawn up by Waterhouse for Price Waterhouse, and it was later extended. It is constructed in Bargate stone, with brick dressings. The building has since been used as a school.[101][102] II
East Thorpe Reading, Berkshire
51°26′56″N 0°57′36″W / 51.4490°N 0.9599°W / 51.4490; -0.9599 (St Andrew's Hall, Reading)
Museum of English Rural Life 2.jpg 1880 Built as a house for Alfred Palmer in brick with a tiled roof. Later used as a residential students' home, then as part of the Museum of English Rural Life.[103][104] II
Estate Office,
Eaton Hall
Cheshire
53°08′55″N 2°52′32″W / 53.1486°N 2.8756°W / 53.1486; -2.8756 (Estate Office, Eaton Hall, Cheshire)
1880 Built as a laundry, this is a two-storey brick building with stone dressings and timber-framed gables.[105][106] II
Grotto, Eaton Hall Cheshire
53°08′28″N 2°52′39″W / 53.1410°N 2.8775°W / 53.1410; -2.8775 (Grotto, Eaton Hall, Cheshire)
1880 c. 1880 In simulated stone for the 1st Duke of Westminster.[57][107] II
Golden Gates,
Eaton Hall
Cheshire
53°08′25″N 2°52′45″W / 53.1404°N 2.8791°W / 53.1404; -2.8791 (Golden Gates, Eaton Hall, Cheshire)
Golden Gates at Eaton Hall Cheshire.JPG 1880 c. 1880 The central gates were made in the early 18th century. Waterhouse added the side gates and screens.[108][109] I
Loggia, Eaton Hall Cheshire
53°08′19″N 2°52′32″W / 53.1385°N 2.8756°W / 53.1385; -2.8756 (Loggia, Eaton Hall, Cheshire)
1880 c. 1880 Situated at the south end of the Broad Walk, this is an Italianate structure with three arches between Ionic columns. The central arch contains a Roman altar.[110][111] II
Stable court Iwerne Minster, Dorset
50°55′49″N 2°11′39″W / 50.9303°N 2.1943°W / 50.9303; -2.1943 (Stable Court, Clayesmore)
1880 c. 1880 Built for the country house of Lord Wolverton. It is constructed in brick with some timber framing. The entrance has a clock tower and a tourelle. Later used as laboratories and dormitories for Clayesmore School.[112] II
Garden Lodge,
Eaton Hall
Cheshire
53°08′39″N 2°52′30″W / 53.1443°N 2.8751°W / 53.1443; -2.8751 (Garden Lodge, Eaton Hall, Cheshire)
1881 A sandstone lodge for the 1st Duke of Westminster in two storeys with a massive central chimney.[113] II
North Lodge,
Eaton Hall
Cheshire
53°08′39″N 2°52′35″W / 53.1441°N 2.8765°W / 53.1441; -2.8765 (North Lodge, Eaton Hall, Cheshire)
1881 A stone lodge for the 1st Duke of Westminster with a four-storey circular tower.[105][114] II
Gate and posts
North Lodge,
Eaton Hall
Cheshire
53°08′39″N 2°52′36″W / 53.1441°N 2.8767°W / 53.1441; -2.8767 (North Lodge, Eaton Hall, Cheshire)
1881 c. 1881 A wrought iron simple gate 10 feet (3.0 m) high between complex sandstone gateposts.[115] II
Parrot House,
Eaton Hall
Cheshire
53°08′30″N 2°52′29″W / 53.1418°N 2.8746°W / 53.1418; -2.8746 (Parrot House, Eaton Hall, Cheshire)
1881–83 This is at the north end of the Broad Walk. It is in yellow terracotta in the form of a circularIonic temple surmounted by a shallow dome.[108][116] II
Gates, railings and walls, Eaton Hall Cheshire
53°08′39″N 2°52′29″W / 53.1443°N 2.8748°W / 53.1443; -2.8748 (Gates, Eaton Hall, Cheshire)
1881–83 The gates, piers, railings and walls are adjacent to Garden Lodge.[117] II
Lodges, walls and garden building,
St Paul's School
Hammersmith,
Greater London
51°29′37″N 0°12′55″W / 51.4935°N 0.2153°W / 51.4935; -0.2153 (Lodges, St Paul's School, Hammersmith)
1881–85 This consists of the master's lodge, the porter's lodge, walls and a circular building in the garden.[118] II
St Bartholomew's Vicarage Reading, Berkshire
51°27′15″N 0°56′33″W / 51.4541°N 0.9424°W / 51.4541; -0.9424 (St Bartholomew's Vicarage, Reading)
1883 Built as a vicarage to St Bartholomew's Church, in red brick with decorative features.[119] II
Lodge to Turner Memorial Home Liverpool, Merseyside
53°22′51″N 2°57′27″W / 53.3807°N 2.9574°W / 53.3807; -2.9574 (Lodge, Turner Memorial Home, Liverpool)
1884 An L-shaped lodge in stone with a tiled roof, in Gothic style located at the entrance of the drive to the home.[120][121] II
Buckhold House Bradfield, Berkshire
51°27′54″N 1°08′02″W / 51.4650°N 1.1340°W / 51.4650; -1.1340 (Buckhold House, Bradfield)
1884–85 A country house in red brick with diapering and tile hanging, and tiled roofs. Later used as a school.[122][123] II
Arnsbrae Cambus, Clackmannanshire, Scotland
56°07′31″N 3°49′16″W / 56.1252°N 3.8212°W / 56.1252; -3.8212 (Arnsbrae House, Clackmannanshire)
1885 A new country house, expanded in 1896. In stone with a slate roof; two storeys plus attic; irregular plan.[124][125] B
Lodge, Arnsbrae Cambus, Clackmannanshire, Scotland
56°07′25″N 3°49′23″W / 56.1237°N 3.8230°W / 56.1237; -3.8230 (Arnsbrae House Lodge, Clackmannanshire)
1885 A single storey lodge with a slate roof and timber-framed gables.[126][127] C(S)
Stables, Arnsbrae Cambus, Clackmannanshire, Scotland
56°07′32″N 3°49′16″W / 56.1255°N 3.8210°W / 56.1255; -3.8210 (Arnsbrae House Lodge, Clackmannanshire)
1885 A stone building in a single storey with a slate roof and dormers.[128][129] C(S)
Bottom House Lodge Bradfield, Berkshire
51°27′49″N 1°08′38″W / 51.4635°N 1.1440°W / 51.4635; -1.1440 (Bottom House Lodge, Bradfield)
1885 A two-storey brick house with a cruciform plan.[130] II
Gardener's Cottage Bradfield, Berkshire
51°27′57″N 1°07′38″W / 51.4657°N 1.1271°W / 51.4657; -1.1271 (Gardener's Cottage, Bradfield)
1885 A two-storey brick estate lodge with a cruciform plan.[131] II
Lodge, Heron's Farm Bradfield, Berkshire
51°28′14″N 1°07′40″W / 51.4705°N 1.1278°W / 51.4705; -1.1278 (Lodge, Heron's Farm, Bradfield)
1885 A two-storey brick house with a cruciform plan.[132] II
22 Binney Street Westminster,
Greater London
51°30′50″N 0°09′02″W / 51.5138°N 0.1506°W / 51.5138; -0.1506 (22 Binney Street, Westminster, London)
1889–91 Part of a terrace, built originally as a minister's house, this is a brick building with terracotta dressings; It has a mixture of Romanesque and Gothic styles.[133] II
Springfield Maidstone, Kent
51°17′04″N 0°30′58″E / 51.2844°N 0.5160°E / 51.2844; 0.5160 (Springfield, Maidstone)
1891 A large irregular house built for the Balston family, owners of Springfield Mill. It is constructed in red brick with yellow brick dressings, and has a tiled roof.[134] II
School house Yattendon, Berkshire
51°28′00″N 1°12′03″W / 51.4667°N 1.2007°W / 51.4667; -1.2007 (Yattendon Schoolhouse)
1891–92 The school house is constructed in red brick with stone dressings and a tiled roof.[135] II
The Homestead Yattendon, Berkshire
51°27′59″N 1°11′59″W / 51.4664°N 1.1997°W / 51.4664; -1.1997 (The Homestead, Yattendon)
Late 19th century A red brick house in 1½ storeys with a T-plan, later divided into two cottages.[136] II
Homestead Cottage Yattendon, Berkshire
51°27′59″N 1°11′57″W / 51.4664°N 1.1993°W / 51.4664; -1.1993 (Homestead Cottage, Yattendon)
Late 19th century A red brick house with some timber framing.[137] II
Jasmine Cottage Yattendon, Berkshire
51°27′59″N 1°11′58″W / 51.4664°N 1.1995°W / 51.4664; -1.1995 (Jasmine Cottage, Yattendon)
Late 19th century A red brick house in a single storey.[138] II

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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