List of equipment in Royal Thai Navy

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Emblem of the Royal Thai Fleet
Naval ensign of Thailand
Naval jack of Thailand

This article is the list of equipment in Royal Thai Navy, including an active and historic equipments. The equipments of the Royal Thai Navy were produced in broadly country around the world such as Canada, China, Germany, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Singapore, South Korea, Spain, United States, United Kingdom, etc.

Ships[edit]

Submarine[edit]

Class Origin Ship Hull No.
/Commissioned
Displacement Notes
Submarine (1 under construction)
Type S26T Class  China 2,600 tonnes As of 4 September 2018, one boat is under construction and another two boats are planned. The first is scheduled to be delivered in 2023.[1][2][3][4]

Aircraft carrier[edit]

Class Origin Ship Hull No.
/Commissioned
Displacement Notes
Aircraft carrier (1 in service)
Chakri Naruebet  Spain HTMS Chakri Naruebet CVH-911/1997 11,486 tonnes Armament:

Aircraft carried:

Amphibious warfare ship[edit]

Class Origin Ship Hull No.
/Commissioned
Displacement Notes
Amphibious warfare ship (3 in service + 1 under construction)
Type 071E  China 22,000 tonnes Delivery in 2022.
Endurance-class  Singapore HTMS Angthong LPD-791/2012 7,600 tonnes Armament:
Sichang-class  Thailand
 France
HTMS Sichang
HTMS Surin
LST-721/1987
LST-722/1988
4,520 tonnes Thai designation and built locally based on Normed PS 700 class.[5]

Armament:

Frigate[edit]

Class Origin Ship Hull No.
/Commissioned
Displacement Notes
Frigate (7 in service)
Bhumibol Adulyadej-class  Thailand
 South Korea
HTMS Bhumibol Adulyadej FFG-471/2019 3,700 tonnes Thai designation, built in South Korea.[5][6][7]

Multi-role stealth frigate.
Armament:

Naresuan-class  Thailand
 China
HTMS Naresuan
HTMS Taksin
FFG-421/1995
FFG-422/1995
2,985 tonnes Thai designation, built in China.[5]

Guided missile frigate.
Armament:

Chao Phraya-class  Thailand
 China
HTMS Chao Phraya
HTMS Bangpakong
HTMS Kraburi
HTMS Saiburi
FFG-455/1995
FFG-456/1995
FFG-457/1995
FFG-458/1995
1,924 tonnes Thai designation, built in China.[5]

Guided missile frigate.
Armament:

Corvette[edit]

Class Origin Ship Hull No.
/Commissioned
Displacement Notes
Corvette (7 in service)
Ratanakosin-class  United States HTMS Ratanakosin
HTMS Sukhothai
FS-441/1986
FS-442/1987
960 tonnes Guided missile corvette.

Armament:

Khamronsin-class  Thailand
 United Kingdom
HTMS Kamronsin
HTMS Thayanchon
HTMS Longlom
FS-531/1992
FS-532/1992
FS-533/1992
630 tonnes Anti-submarine warfare corvette.[5]

Armament:

Tapi-class  Thailand
 United States
HTMS Tapi
HTMS Khirirat
FF-431/1971
FF-432/1974
1,191 tonnes 'MAP' aid; Thai designation Tapi.[5]

Anti-submarine warfare corvette.
Armament:

Offshore patrol vessel[edit]

Class Origin Ship Hull No.
/Commissioned
Displacement Notes
Offshore patrol vessel (8 in service)
Krabi-class  Thailand
 United Kingdom
HTMS Krabi
HTMS Prachuap Khiri Khan[8]
OPV-551/2013
OPV-552/2019
1,969 tonnes Armament:[9]
Pattani-class  Thailand
 China
HTMS Pattani
HTMS Naratiwat
OPV-511/2005
OPV-512/2005
1,460 tonnes Thai design built in China.

Armament:

M58-class  Thailand HTMS Laemsing PC-561/2016 520 tonnes Armament:[10][11]
Hua Hin-class  Thailand HTMS Huahin
HTMS Klang
HTMS Sriracha
PC-541/2001
PC-542/2001
PC-543/2001
590 tonnes Armament:

Fast attack craft[edit]

Class Origin Ship Hull No.
/ Commissioned
Displacement Notes
Fast attack craft (41 in service + 4 under construction)
Chonburi-class  Italy HTMS Chonburi
HTMS Songkla
HTMS Phuket
FAC-331/1983
FAC-332/1983
FAC-333/1983
450 tonnes

Armament:

Sattahip-class  Thailand
 United States
HTMS Sattahip
HTMS Klongyai
HTMS Takbai
HTMS Kangtang
HTMS Thepa
HTMS Theai Mueang
PC-521/1983
PC-522/1984
PC-523/1985
PC-524/1985
PC-525/1985
PC-526/1986
300 tonnes locally built based on PSMM Mk.5

Armament:

Tor 991-class  Thailand Tor.991
Tor.992
Tor.993
T.991/2007
T.992/2007
T.993/2007
185 tonnes Armament:
Tor 994-class  Thailand Tor.994
Tor.995
Tor.996
T.994/2011
T.995/2011
T.996/2011
223 tonnes Armament:
Tor 997-class  Thailand Tor.997
Tor.998
T.997/20xx
T.998/20xx
223 tonnes Armament:
M36-class  Thailand Tor.111
Tor.112
Tor.113
Tor.114
Tor.115
T.111/2014
T.112/2014
T.113/2014
T.114/2020
T.115/2020
150 tonnes Armament:
M21-class  Thailand Tor.228
Tor.229
Tor.230
Tor.232
Tor.233
Tor.234
Tor.235
Tor.236
Tor.237
Tor.261
Tor.262
Tor.263
Tor.264
Tor.265
Tor.266
Tor.267
Tor.268
Tor.269
Tor.270
Tor.271
Tor.272
Tor.273
Tor.274
T.228/2013
T.229/2013
T.230/2013
T.232/2016
T.233/2016
T.234/2016
T.235/2016
T.236/2016
T.237/2016
T.261/2017
T.262/2017
T.263/2017
T.264/2017
T.265/2018
T.266/2018
T.267/2018
T.268/2018
T.269/2018
T.270/2018
T.271/2018
T.272/2018
T.273/2018
T.274/2018
45 tonnes Armament:[12]

Training ship[edit]

Class Origin Ship Hull No.
/Commissioned
Displacement Notes
Training ship/Salute ship (2 in service)
Makut Rajakumarn-
class
 United Kingdom HTMS Makut Rajakumarn FF-433/1973 1,900 tonnes Armament:
Cannon-class DE  United States HTMS Pin Klao DE-1/1959 1,620 tonnes Armament:

Landing craft utility[edit]

Class Origin Ship Hull No.
/Commissioned
Displacement Notes
Landing craft utility (9 in service)
M55-class  Thailand HTMS Mattaphon
HTMS Ravi
LCU-784/2010
LCU-785/2010
550 tonnes Armament:
Mannok-class  Thailand HTMS Mannok
HTMS Mannai
HTMS Manklang
LCU-781/2001
LCU-782/2001
LCU-783/2001
550 tonnes Armament:
Thongkaeo-class  Thailand HTMS Thongkaeo
HTMS Thonglang
HTMS Wangnok
HTMS Wangnai
LCU-771/1982
LCU-772/1983
LCU-773/1983
LCU-774/1983
396 tonnes Armament:

Replenishment ship[edit]

Class Origin Ship Hull No.
/Commissioned
Displacement Notes
Replenishment ship (9 in service)
Similan-class  China HTMS Similan AOR-871/1996 22,000 tonnes
Matra-class  Thailand HTMS Matra YO-836/2014 500 tonnes
Proet-class  Thailand HTMS Proet
HTMS Samed
YO-834/1969
YO-835/1970
410 tonnes
Jula-class(ll)  Singapore HTMS Jula YO-831/1980 1,661 tonnes
Chuang-class  Thailand HTMS Chuang
HTMS Chik
YO-841/1966
YO-842/1974
360 tonnes
YOG-5-class  United States HTMS Samui YO-832/1947 1,235 tonnes
Prong-class  Thailand HTMS Prong YO-833/1941 412 tonnes

Minesweeper[edit]

Class Origin Ship Hull No.
/Commissioned
Displacement Notes
Minesweeper ship (5 in service)
Thalang-class  Thailand
 Germany
HTMS Thalang MCS-621/1980 1,095 tonnes Designed for production in Thailand.[5]
Lat Ya-class  Thailand
 Italy
HTMS Lat Ya
HTMS Tha Din Daeng
MCS-633/1999
MCS-634/2000
697 tonnes Thai designation based on Gaeta class.[5]
Bang Rachan-class  Thailand
 Germany
HTMS Bangrajun
HTMS Nong Sarai
MCS-631/1987
MCS-632/1987
444 tonnes Thai designation based on M48 class.[5]

Research and survey vessel[edit]

Class Origin Ship Hull No.
/Commissioned
Displacement Notes
Research and survey vessel (3 in service)
Paruehasabordee-class  Thailand HTMS Paruehasabordee AGOR-813/2008 1,636 tonnes
Chan-class  Germany HTMS Chan AGOR-811/1961 996 tonnes
Sok-class  Thailand HTMS Sok AGOR-812/1982 1,526 tonnes

Tugboat[edit]

Class Origin Ship Hull No.
/Commissioned
Displacement Notes
Tugboat (8 in service)
Panyee-class  Thailand HTMS Panyee
HTMS Lipe[13]
YTM-857/2017
YTM-858/2019
800 tonnes
Rin-class  Singapore HTMS Rin
HTMS Rung
YTM-853/1981
YTM-854/1981
421 tonnes
Samsan-class  Thailand HTMS Samsan
HTMS Rad
YTM-855/1994
YTM-856/1994
385 tonnes
Klungbadan-class  Canada HTMS Klungbadan
HTMS Maarawichai
YTL-851/1954
YTL-852/1954
63 tonnes

Riverine patrol boat[edit]

Class Origin Hull No. Type In service Notes
Riverine patrol boat (189 in service)
R.21 class  United States R.21 – R.26 Riverine patrol boat 6
R.31 class  Thailand R.31 – R.3129
/ R.3133 – R.3135
Riverine patrol boat 132
R.3130 class  Thailand R.3130 – R.3132 Riverine patrol boat 3
R.41 class  United States R.41-R.43 Riverine patrol boat 3
R.51 class  United States R.51-R.56 Riverine patrol boat 6
MkII class PBR  United States R.11 – R.145 Riverine patrol boat 39

Aircraft[edit]

Model Origin Type Number Notes
Fixed Wing
Dornier Do 228  Germany MPA 7[14]
F-27  Netherlands MPA 2[14]
P-3  United States MPA 1[14]
ERJ-135  Brazil Transport 2[14]
F-27  Netherlands Transport 2[14]
Helicopter
H-145  France Utility 5[14]
Bell 212/Bell 214  United States Utility 8[14]
S-76  United States Utility 5[14]
S-70B/MH-60S  United States ASW, Multi-Mission 8[14] 6 S-70 and 2 MH-60S
Super Lynx  United Kingdom ASuW 2[14]

Armaments[edit]

OTO Melara 76 mm
Phalanx CIWS
Mk 54 torpedo
Mistral missile
Harpoon missile
Model Origin Type Notes
Naval gun
OTO Melara  Italy 76 mm; naval gun Main Naval gun of RTN fleet
Type 79  China 100 mm; naval gun For Chao Phraya class
Mk 45  United States 127 mm; naval gun Mk-45 Mod 4 of HTMS Naresuan class
Auto cannon naval gun
Rheinmetall Rh 202  Germany 20 mm; auto cannon gun
Oerlikon   Switzerland 20 mm; auto cannon gun
DLS GI-2  South Africa 20 mm; auto cannon gun
Breda-Mauser  Italy 30 mm; auto cannon gun
DS30M  United Kingdom 30 mm; auto cannon gun
AK-306  Russia 30 mm; auto cannon gun
Type 76  China 37 mm; auto cannon gun
Bofors  Sweden 40 mm; auto cannon gun
Close-in weapon system
Phalanx  United States Close-in weapon system Bhumibol Adulyadej-class frigate[15]
Anti-submarine
Yu-8  China Antisubmarine torpedo Yu-8 533mm for S26T submarine
Mark 54  United States Antisubmarine torpedo Bhumibol Adulyadej-class frigate[15]
RUM-139 VL-ASROC  United States Anti-submarine missile Bhumibol Adulyadej-class frigate[15]
Heavy machine gun
M2HB  United States Heavy machine gun Main Heavy machine gun in RTN fleet
Surface to air missile
Selenia Aspide  Italy Surface to Air Missile 24 ordered in 1984 for use on Ratanakosin Class corvettes
RIM-162 ESSM  United States Surface-to-Air Missile Nine on order (Plan 64), Bhumibol Adulyadej-class frigate[15] and frigate Naresuan
Mistral  France Surface-to-air missile For SADRAL launchers on aircraft carrier Chakri Naruebet
SM-2  United States Surface-to-air missile Bhumibol Adulyadej-class frigate[15]
Anti-ship missile
Harpoon  United States Anti-ship missile Main Anti-ship missile of RTN fleet
C-708UNA  China Anti-ship missile For S26T submarines
C-802A  China Anti-ship missile For modernized Chao Phraya
Naval mine
Mk.6  United States Naval mine Mk6 mod 5
Mk.18  United States Naval mine
Mi 9  Thailand Stealth naval mine locally built by RTN Mine Squadron[citation needed]
Mi 11  Thailand Stealth naval mine locally built by RTN Mine Squadron[citation needed]

Navy Infantry weapons[edit]

US Navy 100201-M-4593D-038 The Royal Thai Naval Air Wing participates in the Cobra Gold 2010 opening ceremony.jpg

Related article: List of equipment in Royal Thai Marine Corps
Related article: List of equipment in RECON battalion
Related article: List of equipment in Royal Thai Navy SEALs team

Model Origin Type Caliber Notes
Pistol
M1911  Thailand
 USA
Semi-automatic pistol .45 ACP Thai M1911A1 pistols produced under license; locally known as the Type 86 pistol (ปพ.86).[16]
Assault rifles
M16A1/A2/A4  Thailand
 USA
Assault rifle 5.56×45mm NATO [16]
CQ-A  China Assault rifle 5.56×45mm NATO Type CQ is an unlicensed Chinese variant of the M16 rifle which is manufactured by Norinco.[17][16]
Grenade launcher
M203  United States Grenade launcher 40 mm [16]

Historical equipment[edit]

Ships[edit]

Class Country of Origin Ship Service Note
Light cruiser
Naresuan class(I)  Italy HTMS Naresuan (I)
HTMS Taksin (I)
Cancelled
Cancelled
The Etna was one of the first anti-aircraft cruisers built in Italy. Originally ordered by Siam (now Thailand), it was laid down in 1939. Taksin, equipped with six 15.2 cm guns. In 1942 the ship was seized by Italy to use as an anti-aircraft cruiser and as flagship. The ship was under construction in Trieste when it was captured by German troops after the surrender of Italy on 10 September 1943. To prevent its use by the Germans, the ship was sunk by the retreating Italians. About 60% complete, the Germans never intended to continue its construction. After the war, it was found scuttled in Trieste harbor, refloated, and scrapped.
Coastal defence ship
Thonburi class  Japan HTMS Thonburi
HTMS Sri Ayudhya
1938-1941
1938-1951
HTMS Thonburi run aground in the Battle of Ko Chang. Later she was raised and attempts were made to repair the extensive damage and continued to serve the navy as a training vessel until being stricken in 1959. Part of her bridge and forward gun turret are preserved as a memorial at the Royal Thai Naval Academy.
HTMS Sri Ayudhya sunk in Manhattan Rebellion.
Ratanakosin class(l)  United Kingdom HTMS Ratanakosin (l)
HTMS Sukhothai (l)
1929-1969
1929-1972
Submarine
Matchanu class  Japan HTMS Matchanu
HTMS Wirun
HTMS Sinsamut
HTMS Phlai-Chumphon
1937-1951
1937-1951
1938-1951
1938-1951
All sold to the Siam Cement company for scrap. Part of the superstructure of the Matchanu is preserved at the Naval Museum in Samut Prakan Province, Thailand.
Destroyer
R-class  United Kingdom HTMS Phra Ruang 1920-1957 Former HMS Radiant.
Frigate
Tacoma class  United States HTMS Prasae (II)
HTMS Tachin (II)
1951-2000
1951-2000
Both used in Korean War
Knox-class  United States HTMS Phutthaloetla Naphalai
HTMS Phutthayotfa Chulalok
1997-2015 Ex-USS Ouellet (1970–1993).
Ex-USSTruett
Sloop-of-war
Maeklong class  Japan HTMS Maeklong
HTMS Tachin (I)
1937-1995
1937-1951
Aberdare Class  United Kingdom HTMS Chao Phraya (I) 1922-1971 Former HMS Havant
Corvette
Flower class  United Kingdom HTMS Bangpakong
HTMS Prasae (I)
1947-1985
1947-1951
Used in Korean War.
Grounded in the Korean War.
Torpedo boat
Chonbori class(I)  Italy HTMS Chonbori (I)
HTMS Trat (I)
HTMS Songkhla (I)
HTMS Phuket (I)
HTMS Pattani (I)
HTMS Surat Thani(I)
HTMS Chanthaburi (I)
HTMS Rayong (I)
HTMS Chumphon (I)
1938-1941
1937-1975
1938-1941
1937-1975
1937-1978
1938-1978
1938-1976
1938-1976
1938-1975
HTMS Chonbori (I) and HTMS Songkhla (I) sunk in Battle of Ko Chang
HTMS Chumphon (I) on display as a memorial near Prince of Chumphon Shrine at Sairee Beach, Chumphon Province, Thailand, since 1980.
Kyongyai class(I)  Japan HTMS Kyongyai (I)
HTMS Kantan (I)
HTMS Takbai (I)
1937-1976
1937-1976
1937-1973
ASW patrol craft
PC-461 class  United States HTMS Sarasin (II)
HTMS Thayanchon (II)
HTMS Khamronsin (I)
HTMS Phali
HTMS Sukiep
HTMS Tongpliu
HTMS Liulom
HTMS Longlom (I)
1947-1992
1947-1982
1947-1953
1947-1992
1948-1991
1952-1993
1951-1994
1952-1984
Former USS PC-495.
Former USS PC-575.
Former USS PC-609.
Former USS PC-1185.
Former USS PC-1218.
Former USS PC-616.
Former USS PC-1253.
Former USS PC-570.
Patrol craft
BMB-230 Class  Italy HTMS Ratcharit
HTMS Vitiyakom
HTMS U-domdej
1979 - 2016
FPB-45 Class  Germany HTMS Prabbrorapak
HTMS Hanhak Sudtru
HTMS Soo Pirin
1976 - 2018 Similar to Singapore Navy's Seawolf-class missile gunboats (a design based on Germany's Lürssen TNC45 FAC[18])
Sarasin class(I)  Thailand HTMS Sarasin (I)
HTMS Thiew Uthock
HTMS Travane Vari
1937-1945
1937-1960
1937-1951
HTMS Sarasin (I) sunk by British aircraft
HTMS Travane Vari sunk in Manhattan Rebellion.
Amphibious warfare ships, landing ships, landing craft
LST-542 class  United States HTMS Angthong (II)
HTMS Chang (II)
HTMS Phangan (II)
HTMS Lanta
HTMS Prathong
1947-2006
1962-2006
1972-2008
1973-2009
1975-2009
Former USS LST-924.
Former USS Lincoln County (LST-898).
Former USS Stark County (LST-1134). Used in the Vietnam War.
Former USS Stone County LST-1141.
Former USS Dodge County (LST-722).
LSM-1 class  United States HTMS Kut
HTMS Phai
HTMS Kram
1946-2003
1947-2004
1962-2002
Former USS LSM-338.
Former USS LSM-333.
Former USS LSM-469.
LCT mark 6 class  United States HTMS Mattaphon (I)
HTMS Ravi (I)
HTMS Adang
HTMS Phetra
HTMS Khorum
HTMS Talibong
1946-2008
1946-2008
1946-2008
1948-2008
1947-2008
1947-2008
Former USS LCU-8.
Former USS LCU-9.
Former USS LCU-10.
Former USS LCU-11.
Former USS LCU-12.
Former USS LCU-13.
LCI-351 class  United States HTMS Prab
HTMS Sattakut
1950-2007
1950-2007
Former USS LCI-670.
Former USS LCI-739.
LCS(L)(3)-1 class  United States HTMS Nakha 1966-2007 Former USS LCS(L)(3)-102, / JMSDF Himawari.
Minesweepers
Bangrajun class(l)  Italy HTMS Bangrajun (I)
HTMS Nong Sarai (I)
1938-1980
1938-1980
YMS-1 class  United States HTMS Ladya (I)
HTMS Bangkeo (I)
HTMS Tha Din Daeng (I)
1947-1964
1947-1964
1947-1964
Former USS YMS-334.
Former USS YMS-138.
Former USS YMS-353.
MSC-294 class  United States HTMS Ladya (II)
HTMS Tha Din Daeng (II)
1963-1995
1965-1992
Former USS MSC-297.
Former USS MSC-301.
Algerine Class  United Kingdom HTMS Phosamton (I) 1947-2012 Former HMS Minstrel
Transport support ships
Angthong class(l)  Japan HTMS Angthong (I) 1918-1951 Former HTMS Pratenung Mahachakri (II)
Chang class(l) ? HTMS Chang (I) 1902-1962
Sichang class(l)  Italy HTMS Sichang (I)
HTMS Phangan (I)
1938-1983
1938-1961
Jula class(l) ? HTMS Jula (I) 1941-1953
Kledkaeo class(II)  Norway HTMS Kledkaeo 1956-2014 Former RNoMS Norfrost
Replenishment ships
Samui class(l)  Italy HTMS Samui (I) 1936-1945 Sunk by USS Sealion (SS-315).

Armaments[edit]

Model Origin Type Service Quantity Notes
Sea Cat  United Kingdom Surface-to-Air Missile 1973-1988 15 For Rajakumarn frigate
Gabriel missile  Israel Anti-ship missile 1977-2018 30 For TNC-45 (Prabparapak) FAC
C-801  China Anti-ship missile 1991-2009 50
Exocet  France Anti-ship missile 1980-2019 25

Future equipment[edit]

Procurement plans[edit]

The Thai navy has been lobbying for submarines for years.[19] In January 2017 the Thai National Legislative Assembly tacitly approved the expenditure of 13.5 billion baht (US$383 million) to buy one Chinese S26T submarine, a derivative of China's Yuan Class Type 039A submarine.[20][21][22][23] The S26T submarines are diesel-powered with a displacement of 2,400–3,000 tonnes.[24] It is projected to be the first of a three-boat, US$1 billion acquisition.[22] The cabinet approved one submarine purchase on 18 April 2017 with a budget of 13.5 billion baht (US$393 million), including weapons systems, spare parts and technology transfer.[25] The sub is expected to be delivered in about 2023. The Thai navy's submarine squadron has trained in Germany and South Korea but has no submarines—its last sub was decommissioned in 1950. It does have a submarine headquarters: in July 2014 a US$17.3 million submarine headquarters and training center was opened at the Thai navy's largest port in Sattahip. Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha has explained that Thailand will buy submarines, "not for battle, but so that others will be in awe of us."[26] Deputy Prime Minister and Defence Minister Gen Prawit Wongsuwon said that "...growing territorial threats and an increasing number of maritime missions has prompted the navy to strengthen its submarine units."[27] There are plans to base one submarine at Mahidol Adulyadej Naval Dockyard in Sattahip District, Chonburi, one at a submarine dockyard off the Sattahip coastline, and one on the Andaman coast, in either Krabi or Phang Nga.[27]

Future fleet[edit]

Vessel Origin Type Class Displacement Status Notes
Submarine
Type S26T Class  China
Submarine Yuan-class modified 2,600 tonnes (1 boat approved and another 2 boat planned)
Chalawan Class Midget submarine  Thailand
Midget submarine Chalawan (unofficial) 150–300 tonnes In 193 million baht design phase Crew: 10: Range: 300 km; Cost: 1 billion baht; Delivery c. 2024[28]
Frigate
HTMS Prasae
(FFG 472)
 Thailand
 South Korea
Multi-role stealth frigate DW 3000F class 3,700 tonnes Postponed Delivery in 202X
Amphibious warfare ship
Type 071E  China
Amphibious warfare ship "Type 071E" 20,000 tonnes Delivery in 2022

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wassana, Nanuam. "Navy submits B36bn plan to buy subs". Bangkok Post. Retrieved 1 Jul 2016.
  2. ^ "Submarine buy wins 'secret' nod".
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2018-08-07. Retrieved 2018-08-07.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ Wassana, Nanuam (2018-08-29). "Work to begin on China-sourced sub". Bangkok Post. Retrieved 3 September 2018.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i Trade Registers. Armstrade.sipri.org. Retrieved on 2019-11-21.
  6. ^ "Frigate named after Rama IX". Bangkok Post (Smart Edition). 2019-01-05. p. 3. Archived from the original on 25 January 2014. Retrieved 2019-01-05.
  7. ^ "DSME-Royal Thai Navy make collaboration". Korea Marine Equipment. Archived from the original on 12 April 2017. Retrieved 2018-12-19.
  8. ^ "Navy to build B5.5bn missile-equipped patrol vessel". Bangkok Post. 29 February 2016.
  9. ^ "Navy to build B5.5bn missile-equipped patrol vessel". Bangkok Post. 29 Feb 2016.
  10. ^ "Thai Shipyard Marsun to supply M58 Patrol Gun Boat for Royal Thai Navy". Navy Recognition. 2013-11-10. Archived from the original on 12 November 2013. Retrieved 1 July 2016.
  11. ^ "M58 Patrol Gun Boat". Marsun Shipbuilding. 2 July 2016. Archived from the original on 17 August 2016. Retrieved 1 July 2016.
  12. ^ "ShipTech3: Marson receiving order for 5 M21 boats". Thaiarmedforce.com. 3 March 2016. Archived from the original on 2016-08-03. Retrieved 2016-07-01.
  13. ^ http://www.wings-aviation.ch/45-Thai%20Navy/Ships/857/Panyee.htm
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j https://www.flightglobal.com/reports/world-air-forces-2020/135665.article
  15. ^ a b c d e "World Navies Today: Thailand". Hazegray.org. 2002-03-25. Retrieved 2010-04-13.
  16. ^ a b c d armedforce, thai (26 September 2019). "royal-thai-navy-ยุทโธปกรณ์ในกองทัพเรือ". thaiarmedforce.com. Retrieved 1 November 2019.
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