List of federally recognized tribes by state

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Yellow = states with federal-recognized tribal entities; Red = states with state-recognized tribal entities; Orange=states with both federal- and state-recognized tribal entities; Grey=states with neither

Federally recognized tribes are those Native American tribes recognized by the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs for certain federal government purposes. For an alphabetical listing, see list of federally recognized tribes and federally recognized Alaska Native tribes. As of 19 February 2020, 574 Indian tribes were legally recognized by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) of the United States.[1][2][3] Of these, 231 are located in Alaska.

Description[edit]

In the United States, the Native American tribe is a fundamental unit of sovereign tribal government, and the constitution grants to the U.S. Congress the right to interact with tribes. More specifically, the Supreme Court of the United States in United States v. Sandoval (231 US. 28 [1913]) warned, "it is not ... that Congress may bring a community or body of people within range of this power by arbitrarily calling them an Indian tribe, but only that in respect of distinctly Indian communities the questions whether, to what extent, and for what time they shall be recognized and dealt with as dependent tribes" (at 46).[4] Federal tribal recognition grants to tribes the right to self-government, as well as certain benefits. The recognition process is largely controlled by the United States federal agency the Bureau of Indian Affairs, in consultation with federally recognized tribes.

In January 2015 the United States' Federal Register issued an official list of 566 tribes that are Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible To Receive Services From the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs.[5] The number of tribes increased to 567 in July 2015 with the federal recognition of the Pamunkey tribe in Virginia.[6] USA.gov, the federal government's official web portal, maintains a list of tribal governments which is constantly updated. Ancillary information present in former versions of this list but no longer contained in the current listing have been included here in italics print.

In 2018, six more Virginia-based tribes were added to the list, then in 2020 the Little Shell Chippewa were recognized bringing the total to 574.[7] Of these, 231 are located in Alaska.

Alabama[edit]

Alaska[edit]

Arizona[edit]

Multiple states:

California[edit]

Multiple states:

Colorado[edit]

Multiple states:

Connecticut[edit]

Florida[edit]

Hawaii[edit]

Idaho[edit]

Multiple states:

Indiana[edit]

Multiple states:

Iowa[edit]

Kansas[edit]

Multiple states:

Louisiana[edit]

Maine[edit]

Massachusetts[edit]

Michigan[edit]

Multiple states:

Minnesota[edit]

Multiple states:

Mississippi[edit]

Montana[edit]

Multiple states:

Nebraska[edit]

Multiple states:

Nevada[edit]

Multiple states:

New Mexico[edit]

Multiple states:

New York[edit]

North Carolina[edit]

North Dakota[edit]

Multiple states:

Oklahoma[edit]

Oregon[edit]

Multiple states:

Rhode Island[edit]

South Carolina[edit]

South Dakota[edit]

Multiple states:

Texas[edit]

Utah[edit]

Multiple states:

Virginia[edit]

Washington[edit]

Wisconsin[edit]

Flags of Wisconsin tribes in the state capitol

Multiple states:

Wyoming[edit]

See also[edit]

United States

Aboriginal peoples in Canada

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Federal Register, Volume 83, Number 141 dated July 23, 2018" (PDF). Loc.gov. Retrieved 5 October 2018.
  2. ^ Federal Acknowledgment of the Pamunkey Indian Tribe Archived 2015-07-14 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ "Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 19 / Friday, January 29, 2016 / Notices" (PDF). Gpo.gov. Retrieved 23 April 2018.
  4. ^ Sheffield (1998) p. 56
  5. ^ Federal Register, Volume 80, Number 9 dated January 14, 2015
  6. ^ Federal Acknowledgment of the Pamunkey Indian Tribe Archived 2015-07-14 at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ Hilleary, Cecily (January 31, 2018). "US Recognizes 6 Virginia Native American Tribes". Voice of America. Retrieved May 24, 2021.
  8. ^ McLaughlin, Kathleen (21 Dec 2019). "A big moment finally comes for the Little Shell: Federal recognition of their tribe". Retrieved 21 December 2019.
  9. ^ "Federal Register: "Final Determination for the Federal Acknowledgment of the Pamunkey Indian Tribe"". 8 July 2015.
  10. ^ Heim, Joe (2 July 2015). "A renowned Virginia Indian tribe finally wins federal recognition". Washington Post. Retrieved 2 July 2015.
  11. ^ Federal Registrar, July 23, 2018: p. 34865