List of women philosophers

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Hannah Arendt considered herself a political theorist, but she has also been classified as a philosopher.

This is a list of women philosophers ordered alphabetically by surname. While the vast majority of major philosophers have been male, there are a number of influential female philosophers. Women have engaged in philosophy throughout the field's history. While there were women philosophers since the earliest times, and some were accepted as philosophers during their lives, almost no woman philosophers have entered the philosophical Western canon.[1] [2] According to Eugene Sun Park, "[p]hilosophy is predominantly white and predominantly male. This homogeneity exists in almost all aspects and at all levels of the discipline."[3] Some notable philosophers include Hypatia of Alexandria (ca. 370-415 AD), Anne Conway (1631-1679), Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797), Sarah Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986), Ayn Rand (1905-1982), Hannah Arendt (1906-1975), Elizabeth Anscombe (1919-2001), Mary Warnock (born 1924) and Susan Haack (born 1945).

By period[edit]

Ancient philosophy[edit]

Medieval philosophy[edit]

From the fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century C.E. to the Renaissance in the 16th century.

Modern philosophy[edit]

The 17th and early 20th centuries roughly mark the beginning and the end of modern philosophy.

Contemporary philosophy[edit]

Alphabetically[edit]

A[edit]

Moretto da Brescia - Portrait of Tullia d'Aragona as Salome - WGA16230

B

Brown before she married.

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

R

S

T

V

W

Z

Notes[edit]

  • ^A  – For more information about this person's contribution to philosophy see her entry in Margaret Atherton's Women Philosophers of the Early Modern Period. Hackett; 1994. ISBN 0-87220-259-3
  • ^B  – For more information about this person's contribution to philosophy see her entry in Jacqueline Broad's Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century. Cambridge; 2003. ISBN 0-521-81295-X
  • ^C  – For more information about this person's contribution to philosophy see her entry in The Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy. Cambridge University Press; 1999. ISBN 0-521-63722-8
  • ^D1  – For more information about this person's contribution to philosophy see her entry in Jane Duran's Eight Women Philosophers: Theory Politics and Feminism. University of Illinois Press; 2006. ISBN 0-252-03022-2
  • ^D2  – For more information about this person's contribution to philosophy see her entry in Therese Boos Dykeman's The Neglected Canon: Nine Women Philosophers – First to the Twentieth Century. Kluwer; 1999. ISBN 0-7923-5956-9
  • ^G  – For more information about this person's contribution to philosophy see her entry in Catherine Villanueva Gardner's Women Philosophers. Westview; 2003. ISBN 0-8133-4133-7 (paperback); ISBN 0-8133-6610-0 (hardcover)
  • ^O  – For more information about this person's contribution to philosophy see her entry in The Oxford Companion to Philosophy. Oxford University Press; 1995. ISBN 0-19-866132-0
  • ^R  – For more information about this person's contribution to philosophy see her entry in the Concise Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Routledge; 2000. ISBN 0-415-22364-4
  • ^W  – For more information about this person's contribution to philosophy see her entry in Mary Warnock's Women Philosophers. J.M. Dent; 1996. ISBN 0-460-87721-6

References[edit]

  1. ^ Duran, Jane. Eight women philosophers: theory, politics, and feminism. University of Illinois Press, 2005.
  2. ^ http://read.hipporeads.com/why-i-left-academia-philosophys-homogeneity-needs-rethinking/#
  3. ^ http://read.hipporeads.com/why-i-left-academia-philosophys-homogeneity-needs-rethinking/#
  4. ^ Scott Firsing, Top Thirty-Five Young Foreigners Making an Impact in Africa, International Policy Digest, 1 October 2013
  5. ^ Scott Firsing, Top Thirty-Five Young Foreigners Making an Impact in Africa, International Policy Digest, 1 October 2013