List of fictional non-binary characters

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2008 Taipei International Book Exhibition - Opening Ceremony for Comic Pavilion: Riyoko Ikeda, author of The Rose of Versailles manga

This is a list of non-binary characters in fiction, i.e. fictional characters that either self-identify as non-binary (or genderqueer) or have been identified by outside parties as such. Listed are agender, bigender, genderfluid, genderqueer, and other characters of non-binary gender, as well as characters of any third gender.

For more information about fictional characters in other parts of the LGBTQ community, see the lists of lesbian (with sub-pages for characters in anime and animation), bisexual (with sub-sections for characters in anime and animation), gay, pansexual, trans, asexual, and intersex characters.

The names are organized alphabetically by surname (i.e. last name), or by single name if the character does not have a surname. If more than two characters are in one entry, the last name of the first character is used.

Anime and animation[edit]

Character Show title Portrayed by Identity Duration Notes
Acid Storm Transformers: Cyberverse Jaime Lamchick Genderfluid 2018–2020 Acid Storm is a Seeker and member of the Decepticons. While initially conceived as male, in the series itself, despite Acid Storm having a female voice actress, the character has often switched back and forth between "male" and "female" Seeker models in episodes 14, 15, 16, and 17. Commenting on this, writer Mae Catt stated that the difference was "just something Acid Storm likes to do."[1]
Asher Kipo and the Age of Wonderbeasts River Butcher Non-binary 2020 When asked by a fan about the gender of Asher, series creator Radford "Rad" Sechrist said that Asher is non-binary and uses they/them pronouns,[2] which was later confirmed by Bill Wolkoff, co-screenwriter of Kipo.[3]
D'eon de Beaumont (Lia de Beaumont) Le Chevalier D'Eon Multiple actors Genderqueer 2006–2007 Lia de Beaumont is killed and her brother D'eon de Beaumont seeks her murderers.[4] Ultimately, her spirit begins to inhabit his body whenever his life is in danger.[5] This character is based on the identity that real-life cross-dresser, Chevalier d'Eon claimed in a 1756 mission to Russia.[6]
Odee Elliott Madagascar: A Little Wild Iris Menas Non-binary 2021–Present An okapi, voiced by Iris Menas,[a] who first appears in the season 3 Pride-themed episode "Whatever Floats Your Float," with none of the floats seeming right for Odee, and then sings a song titled "Be Proud" about being proud of your identity.[7] GLAAD consulted on the episode and Menas said the episode resonated with hir.
Double Trouble She-Ra and the Princesses of Power Jacob Tobia 2018–2020 Showrunner Noelle Stevenson described them at New York Comic Con 2019 as a "nonbinary shapeshifting mercenary".[8] They are voiced by Jacob Tobia, a non-binary person.[9] Double Trouble reappears for brief periods in the show's final season, posing as "Peekablue," a male prince.
Fred Ridley Jones Ezra Menas 2021 Fred is a non-binary bison who prefers they/them pronouns and is the first non-binary character in a Netflix kids series.[10][11]
Garnet Steven Universe Estelle 2013–2020 Ruby and Sapphire are two sexless but feminine-presenting members of the Crystal Gems who have a romantic relationship with each other, and stay permanently fused to form Garnet.[12] In July 2015, the co-executive producer, Ian Jones-Quartey, has confirmed that, according to human standards and terminology, calling Ruby and Sapphire non-binary, feminine-presenting lesbians would be "a fair assessment".[13] On July 6, 2018, the episode "Reunited" aired, in which Ruby and Sapphire get married, kiss, and fuse into Garnet, after Ruby proposed to Sapphire in a previous episode, "The Question".[14] Series creator Rebecca Sugar has also said that "the Gems are all non-binary women," which includes Garnet, and her friends, Amethyst and Pearl.[15]
Steven Universe Future
Zoë Hange Attack on Titan Romi Park (Japanese) Ambiguous 2013–present Hange Zoë is a Section Commander of the Scouting Regiment who serves as its veteran leader of 4th Squad and a scientist who studies the Titans. In the original English translation of the original manga, Hange is referred to as a female, and is also portrayed as one in the anime adaptation. However, in a blog post in 2011, Isayama responded to a question regarding Hange's gender, saying, "Perhaps [Hange's gender] is better left unstated".[16] In 2014, Kodansha USA stated they went back through volume 5 and removed gender-specific pronouns they had used for reprint,[17] and references from volume 6 onwards.[18]
Jessica Calvello (English)
Angel Jose Craig of the Creek Angel Lorenzana Agender 2018–present One of the characters, Angel, is non-binary and uses they/them pronouns. They are voiced by Angel Lorenzana who is a storyboard artist and writer for the show, who identifies as agender and uses the same pronouns.[19][20]
Kazi The Dragon Prince Ashleica Edmond Non-binary 2019–present After the release of the third season, the official Dragon Prince Twitter account revealed that Kazi, the Sunfire Elf sign language interpreter, is non-binary and goes by they/them pronouns.[21][22]
Brother Ken bro'Town David Fane Fa'afafine 2004–2009 Brother Ken is the principal of the school and is fa'afafine, a Samoan concept for a third gender, a person who is born biologically male but is raised and sees themself as female. Because the concept does not readily translate, when the series was broadcast on Adult Swim Latin America, a decision was made not to translate Samoan words and just present them as part of the "cultural journey".[23]
Kino Kino's Journey Ai Maeda Transmasculine 2003 Kino was assigned female at birth, but has a "androgynous persona," alternating between using feminine and masculine pronouns, while resisting those that attempt to pin a gender on them as a "girl" or "boy."[24] This led some reviewers to call Kino one of the "rare transmasculine anime protagonists."
Korvo Solar Opposites Justin Roiland Genderless 2020–Present Korvo is an intelligent alien scientist who hates Earth and wants to leave as soon as possible, while Terry is his evacuation partner and a Pupa specialist who is fascinated with human culture. In March 2021, series creators Justin Roiland and Mike McMahan confirmed that both are a romantic couple in a committed relationship.[25] Roiland also described Korvo and Terry as genderless aliens which asexually reproduce but are not asexual.[26]
Terry Thomas Middleditch
Merkid Craig of the Creek N/A Non-binary 2020 A Creek Kid who dresses as a mermaid who appears as a mermaid in the episode "Beyond the Creek" and cameos in the episode "In the Key of the Creek," and uses they/them pronouns.[27][28][29][30]
Milo Danger & Eggs Tyler Ford Agender 2017 In the fifth episode, the two protagonists, DD Danger and Phillip, meet Milo, who uses they/them pronouns.[31] In the following episode, they form a band with DD and Philip named the Buck Buck Trio and play a music festival together.[32][33][34] Tyler Ford, an agender model and speaker is the voice of Milo, said they loved that their character, is an "accurate representation" of them.[33]
Obsidian Steven Universe Various actors overlayed Non-binary 2013–2019 A fusion of Steven Universe and fellow Crystal Gems Garnet, Amethyst and Pearl, which first appeared in the episode "Change Your Mind." They later were imagined in the episode "In Dreams," and shown in a flashback in "Growing Pains." Joe Johnson, a storyboard artist for the show confirmed that Obsidian uses they/them and she/her pronouns.[35]
Oscar François de Jarjayes The Rose of Versailles Reiko Tajima Ambiguous 1979–1980 A young woman raised as a soldier, dressing and behaving as a man, Oscar is open about being female.[36][37] Oscar's love interest is one of the series protagonists, Marie Antoinette.[38][39] She also has a relationship with Andre,[40] a childhood friend, but is only able to share one passionate night with Oscar.
Najimi Osana Komi Can't Communicate Rie Murakawa Genderfluid 2021–present Najimi is a friend of the main characters, and has a habit of switching their gender. They wear a school uniform with a skirt, but a boy's tie.[41]
Violet Harper (Halo) Young Justice Zehra Fazal Genderqueer 2010–present Violet Harper, also known as Halo, is the soul of a sentient technology known as a Mother Box that entered the body of Gabrielle Dhaou.[42] Though the sex of her body is female, Halo does not identify as male or female as defined in Earth language as shown in the episode "Influence,"[43] while intensely kissing Harper Row in the episode "Early Warning."
Rainbow Quartz 2.0 Steven Universe Alastair James Non-binary 2013–2020 A fusion of Steven Universe and fellow Crystal Gem Pearl, debuting in "Change Your Mind" and reappeared in "A Very Special Episode." Rainbow Quartz 2.0 uses they/them and he/him pronouns, the only fusion to use these pronouns together, as confirmed by Colin Howard, a character designer, former writer and storyboard artist for Steven Universe and Steven Universe Future.[44]
Steven Universe Future
Princess Sapphire Princess Knight Not known Ambiguous 1967–1968 Princess Sapphire is raised as a boy by their father since women are not eligible to inherit the throne.[45] In addition, they are born with both a male and female heart but refuses to give up their boy heart as they need it to vanquish evil.[46] Nonetheless, they fall in love with and marry Prince Frank.
Nathan Seymour (Fire Emblem) Tiger & Bunny Kenjiro Tsuda (Japanese) Gay 2011 Nathan is a highly effeminate homosexual man[47] who identifies as genderqueer though he prefers to be identified as a woman at times,[24] often spending more time with the female heroes while flirting with the male heroes.[48] In the past, they tried to present themselves femininely but was harshly criticized, and they still hold a strong romantic infatuation towards men. They also run their own successful company, Helios Energy, and have been described as a "confident canonically agender queer POC."[49]
John Eric Bentley (English) Genderqueer
Stevonnie Steven Universe AJ Michalka Non-binary 2013–2020 Stevonnie is a fusion of both Steven and Connie. Steven and Connie identify as male and female respectively, but the gender of Stevonnie is difficult to describe,[50] with series creator Rebecca Sugar describing it as the "living relationship between Steven and Connie."[51] Stevonnie is commonly referred to with gender neutral pronouns (such as the singular they), while male and female characters seem to be physically attracted to Stevonnie.[52]
Steven Universe Future
Natsuru Senō Kämpfer Marina Inoue (Japanese) Genderqueer October 2, 2009 Natsuru is a second-year student at Seitetsu High School and has a crush on Kaede Sakura, one of the school's beauties.[53] At the start of the story, he discovers that he has transformed into a girl, and learns that he has been chosen to be a Kämpfer with Zauber, or magic, powers such as casting fireballs from the beginning of the series. As a girl, he has longer hair styled in a ponytail. After a fight with Shizuku causes him to expose his Kämpfer form to other students of the school, Natsuru is enrolled as a girl of the same name at the school, quickly ranking among the school beauties Kaede and Shizuku. Natsuru's female form becomes the subject of intense affection from Kaede Sakura (who has displayed no particular interest in his normal male form), nearly the entire female student body, and the boys, including his male classmates.
Howard Wang (male)
Sabrina Owen (female) (English)
Shep[b] Steven Universe Future Indya Moore Non-binary 2020 Partner of Sadie Miller, voiced by Indya Moore who is also non-binary, transgender, uses gender neutral they/them pronouns, and is a person of color.[54] In their episode debut in "Little Graduation," Shep helped Steven work out his mental problems and come to his senses.
Smoky Quartz Steven Universe Natasha Lyonne 2013–2020 A fusion of Steven Universe and fellow Crystal Gem Amethyst,[55] bonding at first out of a low point for Steven and Amethyst as noted by Michaela Dietz, the voice actress for Amethyst on the official Steven Universe podcast.[56] Smoky debuted in the episode "Earthlings," and reappeared in three other episodes: "Know Your Fusion," "Change Your Mind", and "Guidance." It is implied that Smoky uses singular they/them pronouns, as series creator Rebecca Sugar has stated that the Gems are "all non-binary women,"[57] with this applying to Amethyst specifically.
Steven Universe Future
Sunstone Steven Universe Shoniqua Shandai A fusion of Steven Universe and fellow Crystal Gem Garnet, debuting in "Change Your Mind" and reappearing in "A Very Special Episode". Uses singular they and feminine pronouns as confirmed on the official Steven Universe podcast, with Sunstone's pronouns also confirmed in this episode.[58]
Steven Universe Future
Val/entina Romanyszyn Gen:Lock Asia Kate Dillon Genderfluid 2019–present In the episode "Training Daze", Val(entina) mentioned that they are genderfluid, going by the name "Val" when male-presenting and "Valentina" when female-presenting.[59] In the episode "Together. Together," Val is revealed to be pansexual.[60] Austin Chronicle reported that the character was written as genderfluid, but is feminine-presenting, altering their gender performance seneral times.[61]
Izana Shinatose Knights of Sidonia Aki Toyosaki Third gender 2014–2015 Izana belongs to a new, nonbinary third gender that originated during the hundreds of years of human emigration into space, as first shown in the episode "Commencement."[62] Izana later turns into a girl after falling in love with Nagate Tanasake.
Thomas City of Ghosts Blue Chapman Non-binary 2021–present Thomas is a 7-year-old child who goes by they/them pronouns.[63][64] They are voiced by transgender child actor Blue Chapman.
Raine Whispers The Owl House Avi Roque 2021 The head witch of the Bard Coven who uses they/them pronouns.[65][66] Raine is Disney's first non-binary character.[67][68] The episode "Knock, Knock, Knockin' on Hooty's Door", reveals that Eda and Raine were formerly dating, before breaking up.[69]
Wren Middle School Moguls Tim Gunn 2019 One of the professors in the show, Mogul Wren, has been stated to be non-binary.[70] They have a big role in the episode "Mo'gul Money, Mo Problems".
Yū Asuka Stars Align Yoshitaka Yamaya 2019 Yū, formerly known as Yuta, is a kind and mild-mannered person, who Touma thinks of them as nice, even though he is unaware Yū has a crush on him, as noted in the second episode. In one episode, Yū revealed that they wear women's clothing, not sure of whether they are "binary trans, x-gender, or something else entirely" and is still figuring their gender identity.[71]
Non-Binary/Gender Nonconforming
Zoit Lloyd in Space Pamela Adlon Agender 2002 Zoit is a Padillikon, whose species is neither boy or girl until their 13th birthday, and appears in the episode "Neither Boy Nor Girl," declaring it no one's business what gender they are.[27][72]

Books, print comics, and manga[edit]

Character Title Author Identity Year Notes
Alan Two Strand River Keith Maillard Genderfluid 1976 One of the earliest literary novels to star gender-fluid characters.[73]
Leslie
Annabel Annabel Kathleen Winter 2010 Born intersex and assigned male at birth, Wayne sometimes takes on the name "Annabel".[74][75]
Riley Cavanaugh Symptoms of Being Human Jeff Garvin 2016 Riley writes a viral blog about being genderfluid, and struggles to come out to parents and friends, using they/them pronouns often.[76]
Desire The Sandman Neil Gaiman Genderfluid 1989–2015 Desire is the personification of desire itself. Desire is both male and female, because the character represents everything someone might desire.[77] Desire is called "sister-brother" or "sibling" by their siblings and "uncle-aunt" by their nephew Orpheus.
Elliot On a Sunbeam Tillie Walden Non-binary 2018 Elliot "Ell" is a non-speaking "mechanical genius" who uses they/them singular pronouns.[78]
Alex Fierro Magnus Chase & the Gods of Asgard Rick Riordan Genderfluid 2015 Introduced in the second MCGA book, The Hammer of Thor, Alex Fierro is described as "transgender and gender-fluid," going by both masculine and feminine pronouns depending on state of mind and even changing appearance to suit pronouns.[79][80]
Inanna The Wicked + The Divine Kieron Gillen Non-binary 2014 An incarnation of the Sumerian goddess Inanna in the 2014 Recurrence, formerly a teenager called Zahid who had tendency to "blend in". Inanna uses he/him pronouns, except for the last issue in which they use they/them pronouns.[81][82]
Kinetiq Sovereign April Daniels Genderqueer 2017 Kinetiq is an Iranian-American genderqueer superhero who has light based superpowers.[83]
Krazy Kat Krazy Kat George Herriman Genderfluid 1913–1944 Krazy alternates pronouns. Herriman sought to leave Krazy ungendered, describing the character in private correspondence as "something like a sprite, an elf" with "no sex".[84]
Loki Loki Al Ewing 2014–present Takes on both male and female forms, alternating between using he/him and she/her pronouns, and does not feel like they have a gender or orientation.[85]
Eleodie Maracavanya Star Wars: Aftermath Chuck Wendig Non-binary 2015–2017 A pirate ruler referred to by either male, female or gender-neutral pronouns like "zhe" or "zher".[86][87]
Mogumo Love Me for Who I Am Kata Konayama 2018 Mogumo is an AMAB non-binary high school student who generally presents femme, and is mistaken for a cross-dresser and invited to work at a cross-dresser maid cafe.[88]
Najimi Osana Komi Can't Communicate Tomohito Oda Genderfluid 2016–present Najimi is a friend of the main characters, and has a habit of switching their gender. They wear a school uniform with a skirt, but a boy's tie.[41]
Porcelain Secret Six Gail Simone Genderfluid 2014–2016 A new member of the Secret Six. When questioned about their gender presentation, replied "Some days I feel like a girl, other days, not-so-much."[89][90]
Hero Shackleby River of Teeth Sarah Gailey Non-binary or agender 2017 A poisons and demolitions expert and love interest of Houndstooth, Hero goes by singular they/them pronouns, and their gender assigned at birth is never mentioned.[91][92]
The Fool[c] Realm of the Elderlings Series[d] Robin Hobb 1995-2017 Genderfluid The Fool is not explicitly described using terms like "gender fluid" in the medieval fantasy series but there are multiple passages in Golden Fool and Fool's Quest that deal with his/her gender and the character presents as male and female at different times, and refuses to say that the female character of Amber is any less a part of them than the male character of The Fool[93] There is a lot of debate among fans as to what The Fool's biological sex is, but in terms of gender/self identity the Fool canonically identifies as male and female at different times.[94]
Travertine On the Steel Breeze Alastair Reynolds Non-binary 2013 Travertine uses "ve/ver" pronouns, and there is no mention of it being unusual in the book.[95]
Dust Devil My Little Pony Jeremy Whitley Non-binary 2020 Dust Devil is a non-binary abada who uses the singular they/them pronouns.[96]
Aziraphale Good Omens Terry Pratchett

Neil Gaiman

1990 The book mentions that Aziraphale is perceived as a gay man and that this is incorrect because angels are sexless.[97] Neil Gaiman specified that this meant that he has no gender identity, despite pretending to be a human male most times.[98]
Alanna of Trebond The Song of the Lioness Tamora Pierce Genderfluid 1983-1988 Though the book itself never mentions her to be genderfluid, Pierce has said in a tweet on Dec. 4, 2019, "Alanna has always defied labels. She took the best bits of being a woman and a man, and created her own unique identity. I think the term is 'gender-fluid', though there wasn't a word for this (to my knowledge) when I was writing her."[99]

Film[edit]

Character Title Portrayed by Identity Year Notes
All Zoolander 2 Benedict Cumberbatch Androgyne 2016 All is presented as a famous androgyne supermodel. The character was subject to a large backlash, being described as "an over-the-top, cartoonish mockery of androgyne/trans/non-binary individuals."[100][101]
Biaggio The Kings of Summer Moisés Arias Agender 2013 In the film, Biaggio states that he does not see himself as having a gender.[102][103]
Little Horse Little Big Man Robert Little Star Two-Spirit 1970 [104]
J They Rhys Fehrenbacher Genderfluid 2017 J is a trans teen on puberty blockers that needs to decide their gender before meeting with a doctor. J says they feel male, female, or neither at various times. The actor, Fehrenbacher, was also undergoing gender transition at the time of filming.[105]
Jamie Upgrade Kai Bradley Non-gendered 2018 A hacker not identifying with any of the genders. Requests that the protagonist not ask their gender, and states that Jamie is not their name and that they do not have a name.[106]
S. LaFontaine The Carmilla Movie Kaitlyn Alexander Non-binary 2017 In this film, and the web series it serves as a sequel to, LaFontaine uses singular they/them pronouns.[107]
The Adjudicator John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum Asia Kate Dillon 2019 The character did not have a specified gender in the script; Dillon, a nonbinary person, came up with the idea of making their character nonbinary while talking with the director.[108]
Hedwig Robinson Hedwig and the Angry Inch John Cameron Mitchell Genderqueer 2001 Hedwig is described by her creator as "more than a woman or a man. She's a gender of one."[109][110][111]
Yivo Futurama: The Beast with a Billion Backs David Cross Non-binary 2008 Yivo is a planet-sized alien with no determinable gender, using neopronouns. Yivo dates, then marries all people of the universe at once.[112] Later, they break up. Afterwards, Yivo remains in a relationship with Colleen O'Hallahan.[113] Some have said that Yivo may have been "the first non-binary character defined as such in animated history."[114]

Live-action television[edit]

Character Show title Portrayed by Identity Year Notes
Adira Tal Star Trek: Discovery Blu del Barrio Non-binary 2020 Adira, the first non-binary character in the Star Trek universe,[115] is a highly intelligent character on the U.S.S. Discovery and unexpectedly becomes friends with Lt. Commander Paul Stamets and Dr. Hugh Culber.[116] Adira is also an introvert who does not originally tell the crew they are non-binary, using "she/her" pronouns until episode 8 when Adira comes out as non-binary and asks to be referred to as "they or them."[117]
Alex The A List Rosie Dwyer Genderqueer 2018–present Uses singular they/them pronouns along with she/her pronouns in the show.[118]
Crowley Good Omens David Tennant Non-binary 2019 In the show's context, book co-author and series writer Neil Gaiman considers all angels and demons to be non-binary,[119] and cast all such roles gender-blind. The demon Crowley, specifically, is shown to change gender presentations over time.[120]
Pollution Lourdes Faberes Uses singular they/them pronouns; described by book co-author and series writer Neil Gaiman as non-binary.[121]
Yael Baron Degrassi: Next Class Jamie Bloch Genderqueer 2016–present Assigned female at birth, Yael begins to question their identity starting in season 4, before realizing they are genderqueer and uses singular they/them pronouns.[122]
Cal Bowman Sex Education Dua Saleh Non-binary 2021–present Cal is a non-binary student at Moordale Secondary School, introduced in season 3.[123] The headmistress, Hope Haddon, tries to force Cal to wear the girls' uniform, but Cal repeatedly defies Hope by wearing the boys' uniform instead. Uses singular they/them pronouns.
Sah Brockner Casualty Arin Smethurst Non-binary 2021–present Sah is a non-binary paramedic who uses singular they/them pronouns.[124]
Miss Bruce Star Miss Lawrence Genderfluid 2017 Bruce is a fierce genderfluid person who became a fan favorite for those who watched the show.[125]
Bishop Deputy Bex Taylor-Klaus Non-binary 2020 Bishop is considered the first non-binary character on broadcast television.[126][127][128]
Chris The Switch Amy Fox 2016–present Chris uses "zie/zir" pronouns in the show.[129]
Grencia Mars Elijah Guo Eckener Cowboy Bebop Mason Alexander Park 2021 Gren is a 29 year old non-binary individual who is connected to Spike and Vicious' past, and is overtly shown as non-binary, as confirmed by Netflix and their voice actor as part of promotional information for the series.[130] Gren describes themselves as "I am both at once, and neither one" in the original anime series the live action is based on, Cowboy Bebop.
Janet The Good Place D'Arcy Carden Genderless 2016–2020 A non-human, genderless entity who uses she/her pronouns. Janet corrects other characters who attempt to gender her by saying she is "not a girl".[131]
Brooke Hathaway Hollyoaks Tylan Grant Non-binary 2018–present An autistic person who learns about non-binary identities from non-binary friend Ripley Lennox (Ki Griffin). Brooke feels that they relate to the identity.[132][133]
Loki Laufeyson Loki Tom Hiddleston Genderfluid 2021–present A character from the Marvel Cinematic Universe which first appeared in Thor (2011), like their comics counterpart and the Norse deity they were based upon, Loki's shapeshifting abilities allow them to change sex at will. In the show, Time Variance Authority paperwork lists Loki's sex as "fluid".[134]
Mo Zoey's Extraordinary Playlist Alex Newell Genderfluid 2020–present He is openly genderfluid, and generally uses he/him pronouns, but is open to the use of any pronouns.[135]
Ripley Lennox Hollyoaks Ki Griffin Non-binary 2020–present Ripley runs a shop for second-hand clothes and befriends some of the show's younger characters like Peri Lomax (Ruby O'Donnell) and Romeo Nightingale (Owen Warner), while also an established friend of Tom Cunningham (Ellis Hollins).[136][137] They later come out to their friends as non-binary.[138]
Sam Malloy The Riches Aidan Mitchell 2007-2008 Sam, the youngest Malloy child, is transgender and frequently dresses in feminine clothing. The idea for Sam's non-binary gender expression came about before Izzard, a gender non-conforming comedian, joined the show.[139] Sam's gender expression is accepted and respected by the Malloy parents and siblings.
Trans woman
Taylor Mason Billions Asia Kate Dillon Non-binary 2016–present A non-binary person who uses singular they/them pronouns and has a storyline centered on a romantic relationship.[140][141][e][142] (2016–Present)
S. LaFontaine Carmilla Kaitlyn Alexander 2014–2016 Uses singular they/them pronouns.[107][143]
Sam Vida Michelle Badillo 2018–present Sam's gender identity was not revealed until her sex scene with Emma Hernandez.[144]
Syd One Day at a Time Sheridan Pierce 2017–present Uses singular they/them pronouns.[145] Syd is also the 'syd'nificant other of Elena Maria Alvarez Riera Calderón Leyte-Vidal Inclán, an activist and feminist teenage daughter of Penelope who later discovers that she is lesbian and comes out to her family.[146][147]
Tam Younger Jesse James Keitel Genderqueer 2018 Uses singular they/them pronouns.[148]
Lommie Thorne Nightflyers Maya Eshet Genderfluid 2019 Lommie is a gender-fluid cyber technician specialist who prefers to interface with computers more than humans. She uses she/her pronouns.[149]
Zoey The Switch Vincent Viezzer Genderqueer 2016–present Zoey is a feisty "transgender genderqueer" woman who is guarded by her neighbor, Detective Sandra McKay, a cisgender lesbian.[150]
Joey Riverton Good Trouble Daisy Eagan Non-binary 2019–present Joey comes out as nonbinary to their cisgender lesbian girlfriend, Alice, and begins using they/them pronouns.[151]
Lindsay Brady River Butcher Uses singular they/them pronouns.[152]
Klaus Hargreeves The Umbrella Academy Robert Sheehan Uses singular they/them and he/him pronouns, Robert Sheehan also referred to Klaus as neither male nor female.[153]

Theatre[edit]

Character Title Original actor Identity Premiere Notes
Hedwig Robinson Hedwig and the Angry Inch John Cameron Mitchell Genderqueer 1998 Hedwig is described by her creator as "more than a woman or a man. She's a gender of one."[109][110][154]
Pythio Head Over Heels Peppermint Non-binary 2018 Pythio is a non-binary character.[155]
Musidorus Andrew Durand Genderfluid Comes out by saying that they are both a son and daughter to their mother-in-law.[156][157]
May & Juliet Arun Blair-Mangat Non-binary 2019 May is defined as a character who is "not [confined] to any bracket of gender."[158]
Solar Over and Out: A New Musical Sushi Soucy 2021 Solar is a student at A New School who is trying to contact aliens after stargazing for years and connects with an alien named Nova on their walkie-talkie, wth both later striking up a relationship.[159][160] The Twitter account for the musical confirmed that Solar is non-binary.[161]

Video games[edit]

Character Game Voice actor Identity Year Notes
Setsu Gnosia N/A Non-binary 2019 Refers to themselves as non-binary in the game.[162]
Ash Wandersong N/A 2018 Referred to with they/them pronouns in game. The game creator later confirmed they are a nonbinary character.[163]
Bloodhound Apex Legends Allegra Clark 2019 Bloodhound is referred to as non-binary and uses singular they/them pronouns.[164]
Bolt Crypt of the NecroDancer N/A Genderqueer 2015 Bolt is genderqueer, meaning they do not identity "fully as either male or female," according to Ted Martens, the artist of this video game.[165]
Chaos Hades Peter Canavese Non-binary 2019 Characters ingame refer to Primordial Chaos with they/them pronouns. Additionally, they were referred to with such pronouns on the official Chaos Update from Supergiant Games' twitter.[166]
Alex Cyprin Astoria: Fate's Kiss N/A 2015 Uses singular they/them pronouns.[167][168]
Floofty Fizzlebean Bugsnax Casey Mongillo 2020 Referred to with they/them pronouns and by another character as their "sibling" in game. Developers have confirmed that they are intended to be non-binary representation.[169]
Jordan "JD" Davies Havenfall is For Lovers N/A 2017 Uses singular they/them pronouns.[170][171]
FL4K Borderlands 3 SungWon Cho Non-binary 2019 Fl4k was confirmed non-binary before the game's release, and is referred to with singular they/them pronouns in-game. They also wear a non-binary pride flag pin.[172]
Fang Goodbye Volcano High Lachlan Watson 2021 Uses singular they/them pronouns.[173]
Cirava Hermod Hiveswap N/A 2017 Cirava is referred to with singular they/them pronouns in all official media.[174]
Charun Krojib N/A Charun is stated by What Pumpkin, the production team, to be non-binary, and is referred to with singular they/them pronouns in all official media.[175]
Coach of "You Make Me Feel (Mighty Real)" Just Dance 2022 N/A 2021 The coach is referred to with they/them pronouns by the official Just Dance Twitter account, confirming they are non-binary.[176]
Povar EverQuest N/A 1999 Povar is stated to be neither male or female in form, and is referred to with singular "they" pronouns.[177]
The Bard Wandersong John Robert Matz Non-binary 2018 The Bard is referred to with singular they/them pronouns, but it is also mentioned that any pronouns are fine for them in a QA session.[178]
Vivec The Elder Scrolls Robin Atkin Downes Intersex 2002 The ingame book Varieties of Faith in the Empire refers to Vivec as "he/she".[179]
"Every gender"

Webcomics[edit]

Character Title Author Identity Year Notes
Angel Ménage à 3 Gisele Lagace & Dave Lumsdon Genderfluid 2008–2019 Assigned female, alternates between presenting as male and female. Character first appeared in 2013.[180] Also later appeared in the webcomic Sticky Dilly Buns by Gisele Lagace & M. Victoria Robado which ran from 2013 to 2019.
Tilly Birch Questionable Content Jeph Jacques Non-binary 2003–present Uses singular they/them pronouns. Character first appeared in 2017.[181]
Ciel Serious Trans Vibes Sophie Labelle 2014–Present This long-running webomic counters "misconceptions about transgender people," and features a trans girl named Stephie and a non-binary girl named Ciel who both "explore their gender identity, relationships, and just life in general."[182]
Davepetasprite^2 Homestuck Andrew Hussie 2009–2016 A fusion of a male character(Dave Strider) and a female character (Nepeta Leijon), Davepetasprite^2 had a short crisis with regards to their gender identity, but quickly settled as non-binary. Character first appeared in 2015.[183]
Eth Eth's Skin Sfé R. Monster Gender-neutral 2014–present Using singular they/them pronouns in the webcomic, author Sfé Monster has stated that Eth presents and identifies as gender-neutral.[184][185]
Calliope The Homestuck Epilogues Andrew Hussie Non-binary 2009–2019 Comes out as non-binary in the "Meat" path of The Homestuck Epilogues and uses singular they/them pronouns.[186] Character first appeared in 2012.
Roxy Lalonde Comes out as non-binary in the "Meat" path of The Homestuck Epilogues, initially using singular they/them pronouns and later masculine pronouns; in the "Candy" path of The Homestuck Epilogues, Roxy questions her gender, but ultimately continues to identify as female. Character first appeared in 2011.[186][187]
Female ("Candy")
Lucy Marlowe Never Satisfied Taylor Robin 2015–present Uses singular they/them pronouns.[188]
Tetsu
Patrick Strong Female Protagonist Brennan Lee Mulligan & Molly Ostertag Genderqueer 2012–present Patrick does not identify as a person, although primarily using masculine pronouns.[189] Character first appeared in 2012.
Menace
R.J. Paranatural Zack Morrison Non-binary 2010–present Uses singular they/them pronouns.[190][191]
Vaarsuvius The Order of the Stick Rich Burlew Genderqueer 2003–present Vaarsuvius' gender is deliberately ambiguous. Berlew states in the commentary of the series fifth book that the Vaarsuvius is genderqueer[192] and has no intentions to further elaborate.
Watch Go Get a Roomie! Chloé C Agender 2010–present Watch is comfortable with whichever pronouns the speaker chooses and does not identify with any particular gender.[193]
Garden Boy

Other[edit]

Character Title Author Identity Year Notes
Niko Aris Magic: The Gathering Katie Allison, Chris Mooney, Allison Steele, and Lake Hurwitz Non-binary 2021 Introduced in Kaldheim.[194][195] Niko Aris uses they/them pronouns.[196]
Bryce Feelid Critical Role Matthew Mercer Genderfluid 2018–2021 Bryce Feelid is a non-binary character introduced in the second campaign of the show; Feelid uses they/them pronouns, as confirmed by Matthew Mercer on Twitter.[197][198]
Nine 17776 Jon Bois Non-binary 2017 A fictional depiction of the Pioneer 9 space probe. Bois also considered including a non-binary human character, but was unable to do so "completely matter-of-factly".[199]
2020
Hollis The Adventure Zone Griffin McElroy 2018 Leader of the Kepler Stunt Club "The Hornets". Hollis used they/them pronouns.[200]
2019

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Formerly known as Ezra Menas according to Playbill
  2. ^ All Gems in Steven Universe are non-binary, but Shep is the first character to be a non-binary human.
  3. ^ Also uses names like Beloved, Amber, and Lord Golden to describe their gender
  4. ^ The Farseer Trilogy, Liveships Trilogy, Tawny Man Trilogy, Fitz & Fool Trilogy
  5. ^ Even though GLAAD appears to call Mason non-binary and trans, no other source can confirm that Taylor is both.

References[edit]

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