List of future astronomical events

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A list of future observable astronomical events. These are by no means all events, but only the notable or rare ones. In particular, it does not include solar eclipses or lunar eclipses unless otherwise notable, as they are far too numerous to list (see below for articles with lists of all these). Nor does it list astronomical events that have yet to be discovered. And some points of the list miss the last date of the events.

21st century[edit]

Date Event
2024 March 25 March 2024 lunar eclipse.
2024 April 8 A total solar eclipse will be visible in the Central Pacific Ocean, northern Mexico, eastern, southwestern and central US, southeastern Canada and northern Atlantic Ocean.
2024 May 26 Comet 9P/Tempel 1 will pass 0.55 AU from Jupiter and may break apart due to gravitational forces.[1]
2024 September 18 September 2024 lunar eclipse.
2024 October 2 Solar eclipse of October 2, 2024.
2026 August 12 Total solar eclipse near lunar perigee.
2027 February 6 Annular solar eclipse.
2027 August 2 Total solar eclipse.
2027 August 7 Asteroid (137108) 1999 AN10 will pass within 388,960 km (0.0026 AU) of Earth.
2028 January 12 Partial lunar eclipse.
2028 January 26 Small annular solar eclipse.
2028 July 22 A total solar eclipse will be visible across Australia, including Sydney, and New Zealand.[2]
2028 October 26 Asteroid (35396) 1997 XF11 will pass 930,000 km (0.0062 AU) from the Earth.
2029 NASA's New Horizons spacecraft is scheduled to leave the solar system.
2029 April 13 Near-Earth asteroid (99942) Apophis will pass Earth at a relatively small distance of 31,200 kilometres (19,400 mi) above Earth's surface, closer than some geosynchronous satellites.[3]
2029 June 26 Total lunar eclipse. With an umbral eclipse magnitude of 1.84362, it will be the largest total lunar eclipse of the 21st century.
2029 December 20 The December 2029 lunar eclipse, the second of two Metonic twin eclipses, will occur. The first of the twin eclipse pair happened from December 21 to 22 in 2010.
2030 June 1 An annular solar eclipse will be visible in Northern Africa, the Balkans, and Russia.
2030 November 25 A total solar eclipse will be seen in Southern Africa and Australia.
2031 March 17 Transit of Venus from Uranus.
2031 May 7 Penumbral lunar eclipse[4]
2031 May 21 Annular solar eclipse[5]
2031 June 5 Penumbral lunar eclipse[4]
2031 October 29 Transit of Venus from Uranus.
2031 October 30 Penumbral lunar eclipse[4]
2031 November 14 Hybrid solar eclipse[5]
2031 December 17 Transit of Earth from Uranus.
2032 November 13 Transit of Mercury.[6]
2032 Projected return to Earth orbit of object J002E3, the discarded S-IVB third stage of the Apollo 12 Saturn V.[7]
2033 October 8 Supermoon lunar eclipse.[8]
2034 March 20 Total solar eclipse.[9][5]
2034 April 3 Penumbral lunar eclipse.[10][4]
2034 September 12 Annular solar eclipse.[5]
2034 September 28 Partial lunar eclipse.[4]
2034 November 25 Supermoon.[11][12]
2036 April A METI message Cosmic Call 2 sent from the 70-meter Eupatoria Planetary Radar on July 6, 2003, arrives at its destination, HIP 4872 star.
2036 April 13 As of 2013, it is projected that 99942 Apophis will pass at least 14 million miles (23,000,000 km) from the Earth, most likely by approximately 35 million miles (56,000,000 km).[13]
2038 January 5 An annular solar eclipse will occur in the Caribbean Sea, Atlantic Ocean, and western Africa.[importance?]
2038 July 2 An annular solar eclipse will be visible in northern South America, the Atlantic Ocean, and Africa.[importance?]
2038 December 26 A solar eclipse will be seen in Australia and New Zealand.[importance?]
2038 December New Horizons passes 100 AU from the Sun.[14]
2038 The next triple ring plane crossing of Saturn will occur.[15][16][17]
2038 Comet 9P/Tempel 1 will pass near the Earth.[18]
2039 June 21 An annular solar eclipse will occur over the Northern Hemisphere.
2039 November 7 Transit of Mercury
2039 December 15 Total solar eclipse
2040 September 8 Planetary alignment of Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and the crescent Moon.[19]
2040 The Great Red Spot on Jupiter's atmosphere will become circular according to calculations based on its reduction rate at present.[20]
2044 May A METI message Cosmic Call 2 sent from the 70-metre Evpatoria Planetary Radar arrives at its destination, 55 Cancri.
2044 September Another METI message Cosmic Call 2 sent from the 70-metre Evpatoria Planetary Radar arrives at its destination, HD 10307.
2044 October 1 Occultation of Regulus by Venus. The last was on July 7, 1959, and the next will occur on October 21, 3187, although some sources claim it will occur on October 6, 2271.
2047 July A METI message called Teen Age Message sent from the 70-meter Eupatoria Planetary Radar will arrive at its destination, 47 UMa.
2048 February 29 There will be a rare full moon on a leap day; this event happens roughly once every century.[21] The next full moon on a leap day will not occur until February 29, 2124.[22]
2052 December 6 – The closest supermoon of the century will occur.[23]
2053 August 29 – A Total Penumbral Lunar Eclipse will occur, the first since 2006.[24]
2057 This year will see the very rare occurrence of two total solar eclipses in a single calendar year (on January 5 and December 26). The last time this occurred was 1889. The next time it will occur is 2252. (Eclipse predictions by Fred Espenak, NASA/GSFC.)
2060 Between October 26–28, periodic comet 15P/Finlay will pass about 6 million km from Earth.
2061 July 28 Halley's Comet reaches its perihelion, the closest point to the Sun—the last return reached its perihelion on February 9, 1986.[25]
2062 May 10 Transit of Mercury.[26]
2063 Triple conjunction Mars-Uranus.[citation needed]
2065 November 11 Transit of Mercury
2065 November 22 At 12:45 UTC, Venus will occult Jupiter. It will be very difficult to observe from Earth, because the elongation of Venus and Jupiter from the Sun at this time will be only 7 degrees. This event will be the first occultation of a planet by another since January 3, 1818; however the next will occur less than two years later, on July 15, 2067.[27]
2066 Triple conjunction Jupiter-Uranus.[citation needed]
2067 July 15 At 11:56 UTC, Mercury will occult Neptune. This rare event will be very difficult to observe from Earth's surface, because of the constant low elongation of Mercury from the Sun, and the magnitude of Neptune always under the limit of visibility with the naked eye.[citation needed]
2067 October A METI message Cosmic Call 1 sent from the 70-meter Eupatoria Planetary Radar arrives at its destination, HD 178428.
2069 A METI message, Cosmic Call 1, sent from the 70-meter Eupatoria Planetary Radar in 1999, arrives at its destination, 16 Cyg A.[28]
2070 February The Teen Age Message, an Active SETI message sent in 2001 from the 70-meter Eupatoria Planetary Radar, arrives at its destination, the star HD 197076.[29]
2076 The planetoid 90377 Sedna is expected to reach its perihelion (closest point to the Sun in its orbit). This date is subject to adjustment as Sedna's highly elliptical orbit is still being refined.[30]
2079 August 11 Mercury occults Mars, the first since at least 1708.[31]
2083 A star system known as "V Sagittae" is expected to go nova this year (+/- 11 years).
2084 November 10 Transit of Earth as seen from Mars, the first and the only one in this century.
2085 November 7 Transit of Mercury.
2088 October 27 Mercury occults Jupiter for the first time since 1708, but very close to the Sun and impossible to view with the naked eye.[32]
2090 September 23 Total solar eclipse in the United Kingdom. The next total eclipse visible in the UK follows a track similar to that of August 11, 1999, but shifted slightly further north and occurring very near sunset. Maximum duration in Cornwall will be 2 minutes and 10 seconds. Same day and month as the eclipse of September 23, 1699.
2094 April 7 Mercury occults Jupiter; it will be very close to the Sun and impossible to view with the naked eye.[citation needed]
2096 The dwarf planet 2015 RR245 is expected to make its closest approach to the Sun.[33]
2100 March 24 Polaris appears furthest North. Polaris' maximum apparent declination (taking account of nutation and aberration) will be 0.4526° from the celestial north pole.[34]

22nd to 30th centuries[edit]

Date Event
2113 August The first time Pluto reaches aphelion since its discovery.[35]
2114 Sedna overtakes Eris as the farthest known planet-like object orbiting the Sun.
2117 December 11 Transit of Venus.[36]
2123 Triple conjunction of MarsJupiter.
2123 June 9 Long-duration lunar eclipse of approximately 106.1 minutes.[37]
2123 September 14 At 15:28 UTC, Venus will occult Jupiter.[38]
2125 December 8 Transit of Venus.[39]
2126 July 29 At 16:08 UTC, Mercury will occult Mars.[40]
2130 March 10 At 07:32 UTC, Sun passes through the Solar System barycenter.[41]
2133 December 3 At 14:14 UTC, Mercury will occult Venus.
2134 March 27 Halley's Comet will be at perihelion during its following pass.[42]
2134 May 7 Halley's Comet will get within 13.9 million km (8.6 million mi) of Earth.[42]
2141 June 19 Long-duration lunar eclipse of about 106.1 minutes. This lunar eclipse is in the same Saros series (132) as the long lunar eclipse in 2123, and has an almost identical duration.[43]
2148 Triple conjunction Mars–Saturn.
2150 June 25 Long duration (7 min 14 s) total solar eclipse, Solar Saros 139.[44]
The first "long" (> 7 min.) total solar eclipse since June 30, 1973.[45]
2150 August 5 Main-belt asteroid 78 Diana (~125 km in diameter) will pass about 0.003 AU (450,000 km; 280,000 mi) from Earth threatening asteroid (29075) 1950 DA and perturb 1950 DA's long-term trajectory.[46]
2161 May 19 All eight planets are predicted to be on the same side of the Sun, within 69 degrees.[47]
2168 July 5 The largest total solar eclipse of the 3rd millennium, with an eclipse magnitude of 1.08074, lasting 7 minutes and 26 seconds exactly, saros 139.[48]
2169 June–October Triple conjunction of Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.[49]
2170 Triple conjunction MarsJupiter.[50]
2174 The second full orbit of Neptune around the Sun since its discovery in 1846.
2177 "First Plutonian anniversary" of Pluto's discovery, given its orbit is just under 248 Earth years.
2178 January 28
2182 With an estimated probability of 0.07%, Apollo asteroid 1999 RQ36 could hit the Earth.
2185 Triple conjunction MarsSaturn.[51]
2186 July 16 The longest total solar eclipse of the century.[52] Lasting 7 min 29 s, it is very close to the theoretical maximum,[53] and is predicted to be the longest eclipse between 4000 BC and AD 6000 (eclipse predictions by Fred Espenak, NASA/GSFC.DEPP).[54]
2187 Triple conjunction MarsSaturn.[51]
2197 September 2 Venus occults Spica. Last occultation of Spica by Venus was on November 10, 1783.[55]
2197 December 24 Earth's Moon will occult Neptune.
2209 Perihelion of Comet Halley.
2221 May 27 Near-Earth asteroid (285263) 1998 QE2 will pass Earth at a distance of 0.038 AU (5,700,000 km; 3,500,000 mi).[56]
2221 Triple conjunction of Mars and Saturn.
2223 December 2 At 12:39 UTC, Mars will occult Jupiter, this comes after a gap of 836 Earth years.[57]
2227 Pluto's orbit takes it closer to the Sun than Neptune.[58]
2238/2239 Triple conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn (whose last triple conjunction was in 1981).
2243 August 12 At 04:52 UTC, Venus will occult Saturn.
2247 June 11 Transit of Venus.
2251 March 4 At 10:52 UTC, Venus will occult Uranus.
2252 The planetoid Orcus will have completed one orbit of the Sun since its discovery in 2004, based upon current orbital measurements which give it a period of 248 Earth years.
2253 August 1 Mercury occults Regulus (for the first time since August 13, 364 BC).
2255 June 9 Transit of Venus.
2256–2258 Eris will reach perihelion for the first time since discovery.
2265 Return to perihelion by the Great Comet of 1861.
2271 October 6 Close conjunction between Venus and Regulus, perhaps occultation of Regulus by Venus.
2279 Triple conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn.
2281-82 Grand Trine of Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto. This last occurred in 1769 and 1770.
2284 The Comet Halley could come back again for another perihelion.
2287 August 28 Closest perihelic opposition of Mars and Earth since August 27, 2003, at 55,688,405 km (34,603,170.6 mi; 0.372254 AU).
2288 The planetoid Quaoar will have completed one orbit of the Sun since its discovery in 2002, which, based upon current orbital measurements, gives it a period of 286 Earth years.
2307 September 11 At 22:50 UTC, Venus will occult Uranus.
2309 June 9 The longest total solar eclipse of the century, at 6 min 30 s.[59]
2313 Triple conjunction Mars-Jupiter.
2319 Triple conjunction Mars-Saturn.
2327 June 4 At 00:54 UTC, Venus will occult Mars.
2335 October 8 At 14:51 UTC, Venus will occult Jupiter.
2351 April 7 At 17:22 UTC, Mercury will occult Uranus.
2360 December 13 Transit of Venus.
2365 Perihelion of Comet Halley.
2368 December 10 Transit of Venus.
2388 Triple conjunction Mars-Saturn.
2391 May 11 Partial transit of Mercury.
2400 November 17 Venus occults Antares (for the first time since September 17, 525 BC).
2419 December 30 At 01:38 UTC, Venus will occult Uranus.
2426 Pluto completes the second orbit of the Sun since its discovery.
2441 Comet Halley at perihelion.
2456 Triple conjunction MarsJupiter.
2478 August 29 At 23:11 UTC, Mars will occult Jupiter.
2490 June 12 Transit of Venus.
2492 May 6 Belgian astronomer Jean Meeus asserts that the orbits of all eight planets and Pluto will be within the same 90° arc of the Solar System. The last time this is believed to have occurred was on February 1, 949.[60]
2498 June 10 Transit of Venus.
2515 April 7 At 10:37 UTC, Mars will occult Neptune.[61]
2518 January 25 At 22:41 UTC, Venus will occult Saturn.[61]
2562 The dwarf planet Eris will have completed one orbit of the Sun since its discovery in 2005.
2599 Triple conjunction Mars–Jupiter.
2600 May 5 First total solar eclipse[62] visible from London since 2151.[63] Its path is predicted to be exceptionally wide at its maximum point.
2603 December 16 Transit of Venus.
2608 May 13 Grazing transit of Mercury.
2611 December 13 Partial transit of Venus.
2626/2627 Triple conjunction Mars-Saturn.
2629 Triple conjunction Mars-Saturn.
2633 Possible that the C/2011 W3 (Lovejoy) could come back after reaching its perihelion in 2011.
2649 February 16 At 11:17 UTC, Venus will occult Neptune.
2650 September 3 The distance between Mars and the Earth will reach a remarkable new minimum of 55,651,582.118 km. It will be a slightly closer encounter by perihelic opposition (by 37,000 km) than the previous one of the August 28, 2287.[64] The following closer encounter will be on September 8, 2729.
2655/2656 Triple conjunction Jupiter-Saturn.
2663 Triple conjunction Mars-Saturn.
2699–2700 3 triple conjunctions occur within a 2-year time, between Mars-Jupiter, Mars-Neptune and Jupiter-Neptune.
2714 October 24 Transit of Jupiter from Uranus, the first one in 800 years (last time this occurred was on May 3, 1914).
2729 September 8 The distance between Mars and the Earth will arrive at a new remarkable minimum, at 55,651,033.122 km.
It will be the closer encounter of perihelitic opposition slightly shorter (of 549 km) than the previous one of the September 3, 2650.[65]
2733 June 15 Transit of Venus.
2741 June 13 Transit of Venus.
2742 Triple conjunction MarsJupiter.
2744 Triple conjunction Mars–Jupiter.
2761 Triple conjunction Mars–Saturn.
2781 December 3 At 06:45 UTC, Venus will occult Neptune.
2791 Triple conjunction Mars–Jupiter.
2794 / 2795 Triple conjunction Jupiter–Saturn.
2800 February 29 The Gregorian calendar and the more accurate Revised Julian calendar will no longer be synchronized.[66]
2800-99 The remnants of Comet Ikeya-Seki are expected to return to the inner solar system. It was last seen from Earth in 1965–1966, and broke into three pieces as it approached the Sun.[citation needed]
2816 March 25 At 15:47 UTC, Mercury will occult Jupiter.[citation needed]
2817 March 6 At 09:36 UTC, Venus will occult Saturn.[citation needed]
2818 April 11 At 20:41 UTC, Mercury will occult Mars.[citation needed]
2825 February 6 At 10:50 UTC, Mars will occult Uranus.[citation needed]
2829/2830 Triple conjunction Mars-Saturn.[citation needed]
2830 December 15 At 09:40 UTC, Venus will occult Mars.[citation needed]
2842/2843 Triple conjunction Mars-Jupiter.[citation needed]
2846 December 16 Transit of Venus.[citation needed]
2854 December 14 Partial transit of Venus.[citation needed]
2855 July 20 At 05:15 UTC, Mercury will occult Jupiter.[citation needed]
2866 Triple conjunction Mars-Saturn.[citation needed]
2880 March 16 Predicted possible impact date for asteroid (29075) 1950 DA, the near-Earth object with the highest known probability of crashing into Earth, although the probability of an impact is only 1 in 8,300 (0.012%).[67][68]
3000 Due to the precession of the equinoxes, Gamma Cephei becomes the North star.

Long solar eclipses[edit]

Eclipse Type Duration Saros no.
August 2, 2027 Total 6 min 23 s 136
January 26, 2028 Annular 10 min 27 s 141
August 12, 2045 Total 6 min 06 s 1361
February 5, 2046 Annular 9 min 42 s 141
August 24, 2063 Total 5 min 49 s 136
February 17, 2064 Annular 8 min 56 s 141
May 11, 2078 Total 5 min 40 s 139
November 4, 2078 Annular 8 min 29 s 144
May 22, 2096 Total 6 min 07 s 139
November 15, 2096 Annular 8 min 53 s 144
December 8, 2113 Annular[69] 9 min 35 s Solar Saros 134
June 3, 2114 Total[70] 6 min 32 s Solar Saros 139
October 16, 2126 Total[71] 4 min 0 s Solar Saros 155
December 19, 2131 Annular[72] 10 min 14 s saros 134
June 13, 2132[73] Total 6 min 55 s saros 139
December 30, 2149 Annular[74] 10 min 42 s saros 134
June 25, 2150[75] Total 7 min 14 s Solar Saros 1392
January 10, 2168 Annular[76] 10 min 55 s saros 134
July 5, 21683 Total 7 min 26 s saros 139
January 20, 2186 Annular[77] 10 min 53 s saros 134
July 16, 2186[78] Total 7 min 29 s4 Saros 1395
July 27, 2204[79] Total 7 min 22 s saros 139
August 8, 2222[80] Total 7 min 06 s saros 139
August 18, 2240[81] Total 6 min 40 s saros 139
May 7, 2255[82] Total 6 min 22 s saros 142
August 29, 2258[83] Total 6 min 09 s saros 139
May 17, 2273[84] Total 6 min 31 s saros 142
May 28, 2291[85] Total 6 min 34 s saros 1427
June 9, 2309[86] Total 6 min 30 s saros 142
June 20, 2327[87] Total 6 min 21 s saros 142
June 30, 2345[88] Total 6 min 07 s saros 142
July 12, 2363[89] Total 5 min 51 s saros 142
July 22, 2381[90] Total 5 min 33 s saros 142
August 2, 2399[91] Total 5 min 14 s saros 142
April 20, 2414[92] Total 5 min 33 s saros 145
April 30, 2432[93] Total 5 min 56 s saros 145
May 12, 2450[94] Total 6 min 19 s saros 145
May 22, 2468[95] Total 6 min 41 s saros 145
June 2, 2486[96] Total 6 min 59 s saros 145
December 28, 2494[97] Annular 10 min 22 s saros 1456
June 14, 2504[98] Total 7 min 10 s saros 145
June 25, 2522 at 9:04 TD[99] Total 7 min 12 s8 saros 145[Note 1]
July 5, 2540[100] Total 7 min 04 s saros 145
July 17, 2558[101] Total 6 min 43 s saros 145
August 6, 2567[102] Total 6 min 26 s saros 164
August 16, 2585[103] Total 6 min 16 s saros 164
May 5, 2600[104]10 Total 2 min 57 s Saros 167
August 28, 2603[105] Total 6 min 02 s saros 164
September 8, 2621[106] Total 5 min 45 s saros 164
September 19, 2639[107] Total 5 min 28 s saros 164
May 17, 2645[108] Total 5 min 17 s saros 148
September 29, 2657[109] Total 5 min 11 s saros 164
May 29, 2663[110] Total 5 min 07 s saros 148
June 28, 2671[111] Total 5 min 07 s saros 157
July 9, 2689[112] Total 5 min 31 s saros 157
July 21, 2707[113] Total 5 min 48 s saros 157
July 31, 2725[114] Total 5 min 57 s saros 1579
August 12, 2743[115] Total 5 min 56 s saros 157
July 31, 2744[116] Total 5 min 59 s saros 167[Note 2]
August 12, 2762[117] Total 6 min 11 s saros 167
August 22, 2780[118] Total 6 min 16 s saros 16711
September 2, 2798[119] Total 6 min 14 s saros 167
May 21, 2813[120] Total 6 min 11 s saros 170
June 1, 2831[121] Total 6 min 39 s saros 170
June 12, 2849[122] Total 7 min 00 s saros 170
June 23, 2867[123] Total 7 min 10 s saros 170
July 3, 2885[124] Total 7 min 11 s saros 17012
July 16, 2903[125] Total 7 min 04 s saros 170
July 26, 2921[126] Total 6 min 50 s saros 170
August 6, 2939[127] Total 6 min 33 s saros 170
August 16, 2957[128] Total 6 min 13 s saros 170
August 28, 2975[129] Total 5 min 53 s saros 170
September 7, 2993[130] Total 5 min 33 s saros 170
1The eclipse of 2045 will be visible from the United States, producing a path from California to Florida. Some parts of Florida are predicted to experience totality for six minutes, the longest in US history.[citation needed]
2Exceeding 7 minutes of totality, this will be the first time this has happened in 177 years; the last one occurred on June 30, 1973,[131] when the Concorde prototype followed the totality spot for 73 minutes.
3Largest total solar eclipse in the 3rd millennium, with a magnitude of 1.08074[132]
4Very close to the theoretical maximum.
5"Crowning" this series. This is predicted to be the longest eclipse during the current 10,000-year period, from 4000 BC to 6000 AD (eclipse predictions by Fred Espenak, NASA/GSFC.DEPP).[133]
6"Crowning" this series.
7This will be the longest solar eclipse of the 25th century.
8"Crowning" at the top the series.
9First total solar eclipse visible from London since 2151.[134] The width of its path is predicted to be exceptionally wide at its maximum point.
10"Crowning" this series.
11"Crowning" this series.
12"Crowning" this series.

4th to 8th millennia[edit]

Date Event
3089 December 18 First transit of Venus which is not part of a pair since November 23, 1396.
3332 December 20 Transit of Venus.
3412 Expected return of Comet McNaught-Russell.
3711-12 Multi-triple conjunction between Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.
3973 July 13 At 18:54:49 UTC a long (7 min 12 s) total solar eclipse.
3991 July 25 At 02:29:22 UTC a long (7 min 18 s) total solar eclipse.
4000–4999 The expected return of Comet Donati.
4009 August 4 At 10:00:56 UTC a long (7 min 12 s) total solar eclipse.
4285 August 6 Venus occults Regulus.
4296 November 22 Venus occults Antares.
4385 Comet Hale–Bopp is expected to return to the inner solar system. It last dominated the skies of Earth in 1996–97.
4557 November 10 Venus occults Regulus.
4747 August 14 Venus occults Regulus.
c. 4876 The Great Comet of 1811 is expected to return to the inner solar system. According to calculations made at the time, the comet should return around the year 4876.
4903 June 29 At 8:55:01 UTC a long (7 min 0 s) total solar eclipse.
4921 August 8 At 16:28:39 UTC a long (7 min 3 s) total solar eclipse.
5001 September 11 Mercury occults Regulus.
c. 5200 Due to axial precession, ι Cephei will replace the previous target, γ Cephei, as Earth's northern pole star (the next naked eye North star will be Deneb, c.9800).
5366 August 27 Venus occults Aldebaran, the first occultation of Aldebaran by a planet since July 15, 18,980 BC.
5898 August 30 Venus occults Regulus.
5963 August 16 Longest hybrid solar eclipse between 4000 BC and 6000 AD occurs, lasting 1 minute and 52 seconds. It is of Solar Saros 267.[135]
5974 September 25 Mercury occults Regulus.
6212 November 7 Mercury occults Regulus.
6587 September 9 Venus occults Regulus.
6727 August 25 Mars occults Regulus for the first time since June 28, 17,619 BC. Despite the over 24,300 years wait, it will happen three more times over the next 677 years.
6757 July 5 There is anticipated to be a simultaneous solar eclipse and transit of Mercury, the first such simultaneous eclipse and planetary transit in recorded history.[136]
7541 February 17 Jupiter occults Saturn (the first time since prehistoric times, and the first of a double row in a year, the only occurrence of this for perhaps at least a million years).[137]
7541 June 18
c. 7800 Planetoid 90377 Sedna passes its aphelion in the decades around the year 7800 AD.

9th and 10th millennia[edit]

All these dates are in a uniform time scale such as Terrestrial Time. When converted to our ordinary solar time or Universal Time, which is decidedly non-uniform, via ?T, the dates would be about one day earlier. Because of this difference, these dates have no anniversary relation to historical dates and should not be linked to them. Furthermore, they are only astronomical dates, so they are given in the astronomical format of Year Month Day, which allows them to be ordered.

Date Event
8007 October 5 Venus occults Aldebaran.
8018 December 30 Venus occults Regulus.
8059 July 20 Simultaneous annular solar eclipse and transit of Mercury.[138]
8136 September 6 Mercury occults Aldebaran.
8183 October 26 Mercury occults Regulus.
8192 October 3 Venus occults Regulus.
8362 December 7 Mercury occults Regulus.
8444 October 18 Mars occults Regulus.
8492 October 30 Mercury occults Regulus.
8674 February 27 Jupiter occults Saturn.
8775 October 27 Mars occults Regulus.
8786 C/2020 F3 (NEOWISE) is expected to return to the inner Solar System. It last dominated the skies of Earth in July 2020.
8881 October 14 Venus occults Regulus.
8971 September 23 Mercury occults Aldebaran.
9106 November 5 Venus occults Regulus.
9168 November 21 Mean solar time and atomic time will be two days apart.
9361 August 4 Simultaneous annular solar eclipse and transit of Mercury.[139]
9622 February 4 Simultaneous annular solar eclipse and transit of Mercury.[139]
9682 November 16 Mercury occults Regulus.
c. 9800 Earth's roughly 26,000-year route of axial precession returns to Deneb as the North star.[140]
9847 November 21 Mars occults Regulus.
9966 August 11 Simultaneous total solar eclipse and transit of Mercury.[139]

After 10,000 AD[edit]

Extremely rare or remarkable astronomical events in the years after the beginning of the 11th millennium AD (Year 10,000).

Date / Years from now Event
August 20, 10,663 AD A simultaneous total solar eclipse and transit of Mercury.
10,720 AD The planets Mercury and Venus will both cross the ecliptic at the same time.
August 25, 11,268 AD A simultaneous total solar eclipse and transit of Mercury.
February 28, 11,575 AD A simultaneous annular solar eclipse and transit of Mercury.
September 17, 13,425 AD A near-simultaneous transit of Venus and Mercury.
13,727 AD Vega becomes the North Star.[141][142][143][144]
April 5, 15,232 AD A simultaneous total solar eclipse and transit of Venus.
April 20, 15,790 AD A simultaneous annular solar eclipse and transit of Mercury.
14,000–17,000 years Canopus becomes the South Star, but it will only be within 10° of the South Celestial Pole.[145]
20,346 AD Thuban becomes the North Star.[146]
27,800 AD Polaris again is the North Star.[147]
27,000 years The eccentricity of Earth's orbit will reach a minimum, 0.00236 (it is now 0.01671).[148][149]
October, 38,172 AD A transit of Uranus from Neptune, the rarest of all planetary transits.[150]
66,270 AD Sirius becomes the South Star at 1.6° of the South Celestial Pole, due to the combination of precession and its own proper motion.[151]
67,173 AD The planets Mercury and Venus will both cross the ecliptic at the same time.
July 26, 69,163 AD A simultaneous transit of Venus and Mercury.
70,000 years Estimated time for Comet Hyakutake to return to the inner solar system, after having travelled in its orbit out to its aphelion 3410 A.U. from the Sun and back.[152]
93,830 AD Sirius becomes once again the South Star, but at 2.3° of the South Celestial Pole.[151]
March 27 and 28, 224,508 AD Respectively, Venus and then Mercury will transit the Sun.
571,741 AD A simultaneous transit of Venus and the Earth as seen from Mars.
6 million years Estimated time for Comet C/1999 F1 (Catalina), one of the longest period comets known to return to the inner solar system, after having travelled in its orbit out to its aphelion 66,600 A.U. (1.05 light years) from the Sun and back.[153]
~600 million years Last total solar eclipse.

Calendar projections[edit]

This assumes that these calendars continue in use, without further adjustments.

(Some of these are not astronomical events.)

Key.svg Years from now Gregorian
date
Event
Astronomy and astrophysics 56 2077 Beginning of the 16th century in the Islamic calendar.
Mathematics 79 2100, March 1 First century non-leap year since 1900.
Mathematics 79 2100, March 14 On March 14 (which will be February 29 in the Julian calendar), the difference between the Julian calendar and the Gregorian calendar reaches 14 days. Since 14 is divisible by 7, this will be the first time in history since its inception that the Gregorian calendar has the same day of the week for each day of the year as the Julian calendar. This will last until February 28, 2200 of the Gregorian Calendar.
Mathematics 193 2214 Rosh Hashanah will fall on October 6 for the first time.
Astronomy and astrophysics 219 2239 September 29 The Year 6000 begins in the Hebrew calendar.
Mathematics 239 2260 Rosh Hashanah will fall on September 6 for the last time.
Mathematics 264 2285 Unless changes are made in the religious calendar, the Western Easter will fall on March 22 for the first time since 1818, the earliest possible date on which Easter can occur.[154]
Mathematics 779 2800, March 1 The Revised Julian and Gregorian calendars will differ by a day.
Mathematics ≈2750 4772 October 13 The Mesoamerican Long Count calendar, assuming a turnover value of 20 b'ak'tuns, will require a sixth order.
Mathematics ≈4000 6009 The first Strobogrammatic numbered year since 1961.
Astronomy and astrophysics 10,000
The Gregorian calendar will have drifted by about 10 days in relation to the seasons.[155]
Astronomy and astrophysics 10,871 June 10, AD 12,892 In the Hebrew calendar, due to a gradual drift in relation to the solar year, Passover will fall on the northern summer solstice (it has historically fallen around the spring equinox).[156]
Astronomy and astrophysics 18,853 AD 20,874 The lunar Islamic calendar and the solar Gregorian calendar will share the same year number. After this, the shorter Islamic calendar will slowly overtake the Gregorian.[157]
Astronomy and astrophysics 25,000
The Tabular Islamic calendar will be roughly 10 days out of sync with the Moon's phases.[158]
Astronomy and astrophysics 46,880 March 1, AD 48,901[note 1] The Julian calendar (365.25 days) and Gregorian calendar (365.2425 days) will be one year apart.[159]
The Julian day number (a measure used by astronomers) at Greenwich mean midnight (start of day) is 19 581 842.5 for both dates.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The series from the last total eclipse of the last millennium taken on August 11, 1999.
  2. ^ The saros 167 presents eclipses with very similar to those of the saros 145. For example, the Solar eclipse of July 21, 2726 Archived August 8, 2007, at the Wayback Machine (5 min 43 s), the previous one of the July 31, 2744 in this series of saros 167, would have a pathway very similar to the last one of the last millennium taken on August 11, 1999, one of the series of saros 145. It would happen at a far anniversary of the first step on the Moon by Neil Armstrong, in 1969. It would also be 1 millennium, 2 years, 2 months, minus 1 day (calendar durations) after the historical eclipse of May 22, 1724 (29th of saros 133), which was seen by Jacques Cassini and the king Louis XV. And obviously, this solar eclipse of July 31, 2744 in this series of saros 167, would have a pathway very similar to the one of the first "US Solar Eclipse of the 21st century" on August 21, 2017, the following one of the series of saros 145.

References[edit]

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External links[edit]