List of geographic acronyms and initialisms

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This is a list of geographic acronyms and initialisms. Acronyms are abbreviations formed by the initial letter or letters of the words that make up a multi-word term. Other names have been formed from the initials of multiple people, geographic names, or ordinary words. The main difference between the two is that, in the latter group, the names can be ordered in whatever way is convenient to form the new name.

For the most part, the geographic names in this list were derived from three or more other names or words. Those derived from only two names are usually considered portmanteaus and can be found in the List of geographic portmanteaus. However, there are exceptions to this two/three rule in both lists, so it is more of a guideline than a hard-and-fast rule.

Acronyms[edit]

Company names[edit]

Many of these places are former company towns.

Neighbourhood names[edit]

New York[edit]

Other cities[edit]

  • CARAG, Minneapolis, Minnesota — Calhoun Area Residents' Action Group
  • LoDo, Denver, Colorado — LOwer DOwntown
  • LoHi, Denver, Colorado — LOwer HIghland
  • NoMa, Washington, DC — NOrth of MAssachusetts Avenue
  • NoPa, San Francisco, California — NOrth of the PAnhandle
  • RiNo, Denver, Colorado — RIver NOrth Art District
  • SoBe, Miami Beach, Florida — SOuth BEach
  • SoBo, Mumbai — SOuth BOmbay
  • SoBro, Denver, Colorado —SOuth BROadway
  • Sobro, Nashville, Tennessee — SOuth of BROadway
  • SoDo, Seattle, Washington — originally SOuth of the DOme; now SOuth of DOwntown
  • SoHo, Hong KongSOuth of HOllywood Road
  • SoHo, London, Ontario — SOuth of HOrton Street
  • SoHo (Tampa), Florida — SOuth of HOward Avenue
  • Soho, West Midlands (Birmingham, England) — SOuth HOuse
  • SoMa, San Francisco, California — SOuth of MArket Street
  • SoPi, Paris — SOuth of PIgalle

Bodies of water[edit]

  • Ayceecee Creek, British Columbia[41]Alpine Club of Canada (creek draining glaciers on Three Bears Mountain)[42]
  • Copco Lake, California — California Oregon Power COmpany
  • Emar Lake, Saskatchewan[43]Eldorado Mining And Refining[9]
  • Lake Jacomo, Missouri — JAckson COunty, MissOuri
  • Owaa Lake, Saskatchewan[44]Outdoor Writers Association of America (to mark a meeting of that organization in June 1967)[9]
  • Sareco Bay, Saskatchewan[45]SAskatchewan REsearch COuncil; contains Sareco Island[9]
  • Snafu Lake, Yukon — Situation Normal, All Fucked Up[46]:69 (drained by Snafu Creek[47]); there is also a Snafu Lake in Ontario[48] and a Snafu Creek in Northwest Territories[49]
  • Lake Taneycomo, Missouri — TANEY COunty, MissOuri
  • Tarfu Lake, Yukon — Things Are Really Fucked Up[46]:69 (fed and drained by Tarfu Creek[50])

Topography[edit]

  • Fasp Mountain, British Columbia[51]First Aid Ski Patrol[52]
  • Isar Mountain, Washington/British Columbia[53]Internation Search And Rescue[54]
  • Tamu MassifTexas A&M University; large undersea volcano in the western Pacific named by scientist after the school he taught at
  • Ubyssey Glacier, Mount Garibaldi, British Columbia[55]University of British Columbia[10]
  • Veeocee Mountain, British Columbia[56]Varsity Outdoor Club of the University of British Columbia[57]

Personal names[edit]

These are derived from the names of a single person and always include parts, but not all, of more than one of their names. Since the order of such names is fixed, they can be considered a form of acronym. When combining names of more than one person, the order is not fixed, so such names are either in the List of geographic portmanteaus if from only two names, or in the Initialism section below for those from multiple names.

Reversed acronyms[edit]

  • Cleo, Oregon — Oregon Export Lumber Company[29]
  • Ocapos, Arizona — SOuthern PAacific COmpany (i.e. Southern Pacific Railroad)[21]
  • Ti, OklahomaIndian Territory[68]

Other acronyms[edit]

Initialisms[edit]

The names in this section are composed of elements of three or more other names or words. Unlike acronyms, there's no predefined ordering for the names, so they can be placed in whatever order makes for a good name. Names combining only two other names are more properly called portmanteaus. See List of geographic portmanteaus for such names.

Personal names[edit]

  • Aitch, PennsylvaniaAumen, Isett, Trexler, Crexwell, and Harker, town founders[71]
  • Alcolu, South CarolinaALderman COldwell LUla; mill owner, friend, and eldest daughter, respectively[5]
  • Almadane, Louisiana — three early settlers: AL Damereal, MAnn Huddleston, and DAN Knight + E for euphony[2]
  • Amdewanda No. 630 — school near Eston, Saskatchewan; first trustees: Clyde AMey, Sid DEan, Robert WAmsley plus NDA for alliteration[9]
  • Archerwill, Saskatchewan — councilors ARCHie Hamilton Campbell and ERvie Edvin Hanson, and secretary-treasurer WILLiam S. Pierce of Barrier Valley Rural Municipality[9]
  • Bahama, North Carolina — three leading families of the community: BAll, HArris, and MAngum [5]
  • Balmorhea, TexasBALcolm, MOrrow, RHEA, town founders[35]
  • Barholis No. 746 — school near Glenbain, Saskatchewan; early settlers: BARnes, HOLmes and InnIS[9]
  • Bolada, Arizona — three family names: BOnes LAne DAndera[21]
  • Bresaylor, Saskatchewan — three founding families: BREmner, SAYers, and TayLOR[9]
  • Bromer, Indiana — early settlers: Boyd, Roll, Oldham, McCoy, Ellis, and Reid[18]
  • Bucoda, Missouri — early settlers: BUchanan, COburn, and DAvis[58]
  • Bucoda, Washington — investors in local industry: J. M. BUckley, Samuel COulter, John B. DAvid[33]
  • Chaney, Oklahoma[72] — six family names: Carey, Hull, Adams, Nichols, Edmonds, Yarnold[73]
  • Comrey, Alberta — names of six early settlers: Columbus Larson, Ole Roen, Mons Roen, R. Rolfson, J. J. Everson, Ed Yager[6]
  • Dacono, ColoradoDAisy Baum, COra Van Vorhies and NOra Brooks[38]
  • Delmar, Iowa — initials of six women on the first train to the new town: Della, Emma, Laura, Marie, Anna, and Rose,[74][75]
  • Emida, IdahoEast, MIller, and DAwson, three early family names[5]
  • Eram, Oklahoma[76] — four children of Ed Oates: Eugene, Roderick, Anthony, and Marie[68]
  • Faloma, OregonForce Love Moore, three original land-owners, with added vowels[29]
  • Fastrill, Texas — F. F. FArrington, P. H. STRause, and Will HILL, postmaster and two lumbermen[77]
  • Gamoca, West VirginiaGAuley, MOley, and CAmpbell[3]:259
  • Gathon, Illinois — Gallager, Adams, Tremblay, and Herzog (ON added by the post office)[11]
  • Germfask Township, Michigan — town founders: John Grant, Matthew Edge, George Robinson, Thaddeus Mead, Dr. W. W. French, Ezekiel Ackley, Oscar (O.D.) Sheppard, and Hezekiah Knaggs[32]
  • Golah, New York[78] — coined by Rev H. W. Howard from five local family names (names unknown)[5]
  • Hacoda, AlabamaHArt, COleman, DAvis, three local businessmen[1]
  • Hemaruka, Alberta — daughters of A. E. Warren, General Manager of Canadian National Railway: HElen, MArgaret, RUth and KAthleen[23]
  • Hisega, South Dakota — six women who built a camp site and country club at the location: Helen Scroggs, Ida Anding, Sadie Robinson, Ethel Brink, Grace Wasson, and Ada Pike[79]
  • Jetson, KentuckyJ. E. Taylor and SON, co-owners of a local business[13]
  • Kinnorwood, Illinois — H. L. KINney, George H. NORris, Robert P. WOODworth, land owners[11]
  • Klej Grange, MarylandJoseph William Drexel's four daughters: Katherine, Lucy, Elizabeth, and Josephine[80]
  • Lake Wagejo, Michigan — WAlter Koelz, GEorge Stanley, JOhn Brumm, zoologists[5]
  • Lake Carasaljo — daughters of Joseph Brick, owner of local Bergen Iron Works: CARrie (A for pronunciation), SALly, and JOsephine[63]:322
  • Lamasco (district of Evansville, Indiana) — town founders: John and William LAw, James B. MAcCall, Lucius H. SCOtt[13]
  • Lecoma, Missouri — three local merchants: LEnox, COmstock, and MArtin [58]
  • Le Mars, Iowa — six women from Cedar Rapids on a railroad excursion who were asked to name the town: Lucy Ford or Laura Walker; Elizabeth Underhill or Ellen Cleghorn; Mary Weare or Martha Weare; Adeline Swain; Rebecca Smith; Sarah Reynolds.[66]
  • Lookeba, OklahomaLOwe, KElly and BAker, town founders (with an extra O)[68]
  • Maleb, Alberta — initials of the Bowen family: Morley, Amy, Lorne, Elizabeth, Bowen; disagreement over whether these are the initials of the parents[23] or the children[6]
  • Maljamar, New MexicoMALcolm, JAnet, MARgaret, children of William Mitchell, oil operator[81]
  • Mesena, Georgia — coined by Dr. J. F. Hamilton, using the initial letters of the first names of his six daughters (names unknown)[4]
  • Milo, Oklahoma — initials of four daughters of J. W. Johnson (names unknown)[68]
  • Mohrland, Utah — four investors in a coal mine: Mays, Orem, Heiner, and Rice plus LAND[36]
  • Newport, Texas — initials of seven founding families: Norman, Ezell, Welch, Pruitt, Owsley, Reiger, and Turner[35]
  • Neyami, Georgia — three subdevelopers: NEwton, YAncy, MIlner[4]
  • Pawn, Oregon — local residents who applied for a post office: Poole, Ackerley, Worthington, Nolen[29]
  • Primghar, Iowa — initials of eight people who had a major part in platting the town: Pumphrey; Roberts; Inman; McCormack; Green; Hayes or Hays; Albright; Rereick or Renck[82][66]
  • Renwer, Manitoba — A. E. WarREN and W. E. Roberts, railway officials[65]
  • Safe, Missouri — possibly early settlers: Shinkle, Aufderheide, Fann, and Essman[71]
  • Tako, Saskatchewan[83] — homesteaders: Taylor, Aked, Krips, Olsen[9]
  • Tamalco, Illinois — W. H. TAylor, John M(A)cLaren, Frank COlwell, prominent locals[11]
  • Texico, IllinoisTEXas, Illinois, Claybourn, Osborn, the latter two being local family names[84]
  • Viento State Park — Henry VIllard, William ENdicott, TOlman[29]
  • Wimauma, FloridaWIlma, MAUd, MAry, daughters of Captain C. H. Davis, first postmaster[20]

Other initialisms[edit]

  • Alwinsal — potash mine at Guernsey, Saskatchewan named after a French-German consortium that invested: 1) Mines Domanials de Potasse d'ALsace (French) 2) WINtersall AG (German) 3) SALzfuther AG (German)[9]
  • BeneluxBElgium NEtherlands LUXembourg
  • Calabarzon — the Southern Tagalog Mainland region of the Philippines, comprising five provinces: CAvite, LAguna, BAtangas, Rizal, and QueZON
  • Cal-Nev-Ari, NevadaCALifornia, NEVada, ARIzona
  • Camanava — the Northern Manila District of Metro Manila, Philippines; cities: CAloocan, MAlabon, NAvotas, VAlenzuela
  • Camp Shagabec, Saskatchewan — church campground for parishes at Shaunavon, Hazenmore, Assinaboia, Govenlock, Abbey, Bracken, Eastend, Consul-Cabri-Climax[9]
  • Chariho Regional School DistrictCHArlestown, RIchmond, and HOpkinton, three towns in southwestern Rhode Island who share the district.
  • Covada, Washington — six nearby mines: Columbia, Orin, Verin, Ada, Dora, and Alice[5]
  • Cudsaskwa Beach, SaskatchewanCUDworth, SASKatchewan WAkaw[9]
  • Delmarva PeninsulaDELaware MARyland VirginiA
  • Gerbangkertosusila — official acronym for the Surabaya Extended Metropolitan Area in East Java, Indonesia: GREsik BANGkalan MojoKERTO SUrabaya SIdoarjo LAmongan
  • Ilasco, Missouri — elements and ingredients of cement: Iron, Lime, Aluminum, Silica, Carbon, and Oxygen
  • Jabodetabek — the capital of Indonesia and suburbs: JAkarta, BOgor, DEpok, TAngerang and BEKasi
  • Kemoca Park, Montmartre, Saskatchewan — KEndal, MOtmartre, and CAdiac; three communities the park serves[9]
  • Kenora, Ontario — three predecessor communities: KEewatin, NOrman and RAt Portage[26]
  • Kenova, West VirginiaKENtucky, Ohio, VirginiA[3]:346
  • Lockridge, Oklahoma — Logan, Oklahoma, Canadian, and Kingfisher Counties plus RIDGE[5]
  • Luzviminda — three island groups in the Philippines: LUZon, VIsayas, and MINDAnao
  • Malampa Province, Vanuatu — islands that make up the province: MALakula, AMbrym, PAama
  • Mandaree, North DakotaMANdan, HiDAtsa and REE, the three tribes whose reservation the place is on. (Ree is another name for the Arikara)[28]
  • Mimaropa, Philippines — provinces comprising the Southwestern Tagalog Region: MINdoro (East and West), MArinduque, Romblon and PAlawan
  • Multorpor Butte or Mountain[85] — a mountain near Mount Hood: MULTnomah County, ORegon, PORtland[29]
  • Muntapat, Metro Manila, Philippines — three cities: MUNtinlupa, TAguig, PATeros
  • Muntiparlas, Metro Manila, Philippines — three cities: MUNTInlupa, PARañaque, LAS Piñas
  • Okarche, OklahomaOKlahoma ARapaho CHEyenne[86]
  • Ovapa, West VirginiaOhio, VirginiA, PennsylvaniA[3]:465
  • Pakistan — the five northern regions of the British Raj: Punjab, Afghania, Kashmir, (I for pronunciation), Sindh, BaluchisTAN
  • Penama Province, Vanuatu — islands that make up the province: PENtecost, Ambae, MAewo
  • Shoshanguve, South Aftrica — SOtho, SHAngaan, NGUni and VEnda, the languages of the peoples relocated to this township[61]
  • Soccsksargen, Philippines — administrative region: SOuth Cotabato, Cotabato City, North Cotabato, Sultan Kudarat, SARangani and GENeral Santos City
  • Soda, Texas — initials of four names submitted to the post office (names unknown; now a ghost town)[87]
  • Swenoda Lake and Swenoda Township, Swift County, MinnesotaSWEdish NOrwegian DAnish, nationalities of settlers in that region[88]
  • Tafea Province, Vanuatu — five islands that comprise the province: Tanna, Aneityum, Futuna, Erromango and Aniwa
  • TAG CornerTennessee Alabama Georgia
  • Texarkana, Texas/Arkansas — TEXas ARKansas LouisiANA
  • Veyo, Utah — either Virtue, Enterprise, Youth, and Order or VErdure and YOuth[5]
  • Viropa, West VirginiaVIRginia, Ohio, PennsylvaniA[3]:650
  • Walden, OntarioWAters, Lively, DENison, three of the several communities that merged to form the town[26]
  • Wamac, IllinoisWAshington, MArion, and Clinton Counties[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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