List of geographic anagrams and ananyms

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An animation illustrating the anagrammatical origin of the name of the Florida town El Jobean

These are geographic anagrams and ananyms. Anagrams are rearrangements of the letters of another name or word. Ananyms (also called reversals) are other names or words spelled backwards. Technically, a reversal is also an anagram, but the two are derived by different methods, so they are listed separately.

Anagrams[edit]

Name Anagram of Notes Reference
Birson, Saskatchewan[1] Robins George Cornelius Robins, early settler; now known as Fir Ridge [2]
Boncar, West Virginia carbon Now known as Alloy, West Virginia [3]
Carol City, Florida Coral name changed after Coral Gables threatened to sue [4]
Delmita, Texas (arbitrary letters) seven sons of founder Nicéforo G. Peña, Sr. each drew a letter [5]
Dongola, Wisconsin Gondola name misspelled (during post office approval?) and never corrected [6]
Elroy, Wisconsin Leroy chosen to avoid post office name duplication [6]
Garus, California sugar   [7]
Goliad, Texas Hidalgo (except silent H) indirect naming for Miguel Hidalgo, Mexican national hero [8]
El Jobean, Florida Joel Bean developer anagrammed his own name [4]
Kinhop, Saskatchewan[9] Hopkins (minus the S) William Hopkins [2]
Landrose, Saskatchewan Roseland William Roseland [2]
Lerado, Kansas Laredo, Texas post office clerical error resulted in a swap of the E and A [10]
Linbro Park, Sandton, South Africa Brolin local family name [11]
Lipona Plantation, Florida Napoli owned by Prince Achille Murat, former prince of Naples [4]
Malesus, Tennessee[12] Samuels Samuels was a prominent local who did not want the town named for him. Malesus was a compromise [13]
Medina, North Dakota median name changed from Midway, so named because it's about halfway between the extreme east and west of the continent [14]
Nada, Kentucky Dana Dana Lumber Company, which owned the sawmill [15]
Neola, West Virginia Olean, New York   [3]
Romley, Colorado[16] Morely Colonel B. F. Morely, mine owner; now a ghost town [17]:323
Salitpa, Alabama Satilpa Creek error when someone apparently crossed the wrong letter (thus switching the L and T) when applying for a post office [18]
Shallmar, Maryland Marshall "a New Yorker who founded the community"

[19]

Solina, Ontario (arbitrary letters) School teacher John Hughes suggested a name be coined from the letters A I L N O and S. Solina was chosen over several other choices such as Linosa and Sinola [20]
Ticona, Illinois[21] Tonica, Illinois a nearby town [22]
Vadis, West Virginia Davis   [3]
Vinsulla, British Columbia[23] Sullivan Michael Sullivan, early pioneer [24]
Windber, Pennsylvania Berwind Charles and Edward Berwind, mine owners [25]

Ananyms[edit]

Name Reversal of Notes Reference
Adanac, Nipissing District, Ontario Canada   [citation needed]
Adanac, Parry Sound District, Ontario Canada community within Carling, Ontario. [citation needed]
Adanac, Saskatchewan Canada   [2]
Adaven, Nevada Nevada ghost town [26]
Aksarben Village, Omaha, Nebraska Nebraska mixed-use development. Formerly, the Ak-Sar-Ben (arena), a horse race track and indoor arena [27]
Amabala, Oklahoma[28] Alabama   [29]
Atokad Park Dakota location of Atokad Downs horse racing track in South Sioux City, Nebraska [30]
Cleo, Oregon[31] O(regon) E(xport) L(umber) C(ompany) reversed acronym; railroad stop [32]
Egnar, Colorado range   [33]
Ekal, Florida lake   [34]
Ekoms, Oregon smoke post office approved but never established; up river from Ragic (q.v.) [32]
Enola, South Carolina[35] alone   [34]
Enola Hill[36] alone hill in Oregon, applied by a homesteader whose house was isolated [32]
Etlah, Missouri halte German for "stop" [37]
Lebam, Washington Mabel Goodell daughter of early settler [38]
Lennut, Kentucky[39] tunnel now known as Combs, Kentucky [15]
Maharg, Oklahoma Graham reversed due to postal name conflict; now named Foss, Oklahoma [40]
Muroc, California Ralph and Clifford Corum now the location of Edwards Air Force Base, formerly Muroc Field [34]
Nagrom, Washington Elmer G. Morgan owner of Morgan Lumber Company [38]
Namorf, Oregon[41] George Froman local resident [32]
Narod, California[42] Daron railroad section foreman's name; RR stop south of Montclair, California [7]
Nikep, Maryland Pekin former name arbitrarily reversed to avoid postal confusion [43]
Nillup, Western Australia Harold Maughan Pullin popular local who did not want the place named after him [44]
Nilrem, Alberta Merlin   [45]
Nivloc, Nevada[46] Colvin mine owner [26]
Nolem, Florida melon   [34]
Niton, Alberta not in   [45]
Notla, Texas Alton Grocery Company landowner also owned Alton grocery store in Enid, Oklahoma [34]
Ocapos, Arizona SO(uthern) PA(acific) CO(mpany) reversed acronym; also known as Southern Pacific Railroad [47]
Orestod, Colorado Dotsero, Colorado opposite ends of a short railroad line; Dotsero is derived from dot-zero, origin point of rail line [33]
Radec, California cedar   [7]
Ragic, Oregon cigar post office on the Rogue River(1898-1900); see also Ekoms [32]
Redart, Virginia Trader early settler's name [48]
Reklaw, Texas Margaret Walker land donor; reversed due to post office name conflict [34]
Remlap, Alabama James W. Palmer first postmaster [49]
Remlig, Texas Alexander Gilmer owner of the Gilmer Lumber Company [50]
Remlik, Virginia[51] Willis Sharpe Kilmer estate owned by Kilmer, a patent medicine entrepreneur [52]
Retlaw, Alberta Walter R. Baker Canadian Pacific Railway official [53]
Retlaw, Oregon H. L. Walter Southern Pacific Railroad employee [32]
Retrop, Oklahoma Ira J. Porter first postmaster [29]
Retsil, Washington Ernest Lister Washington Governor (1913-1919) [38]
Retsof, New York Foster town founder [citation needed]
Revilo, Tennessee[54] Oliver brand name of a plow [13]
Revloc, Pennsylvania Colver, Pennsylvania two company towns, owned by Monroe Coal Company [citation needed]
Robat, South Carolina[55] Mount Tabor locality in Union County [citation needed]
Rolyat, Oregon Taylor probably the name of a Post Office official in Washington [32]
Rotavele, California elevator   [citation needed]
Sacul, Texas Lucas land owner's name; reversed due to post office name conflict [56]
Saxet, Texas[57] Texas locality in Shelby County [58]
Saxet Lake Park Texas park in Victoria County, Texas [59]
Seloc, South Carolina Coles   [40]
Senoj Lake (Oregon) Jones person unknown [32]
Setag, Texas James T. Gates company owner [60]
Silaxo, California Oxalis, California Silaxo is a few miles south of Oxalis [7]
Sniktaw, California W. F. Watkins journalist who used Sniktaw as an pseudonym [34]
Tesnus, Texas sunset sunset appearing on a logo of Southern Pacific Railroad [61]
Ti, Oklahoma I(ndian) T(erritory) reversed abbreviation; named before territory was renamed to Oklahoma [29]
Tinrag, Texas Garnit local family name [62]
Trebloc, Mississippi Colbert local family name [citation needed]
Trevlac, Indiana Colonel Calvert resort developer; reversed to avoid duplication [34]
Wabasso, Florida Ossabaw Island in Georgia   [34]
Yellek, Ontario R J. Kelley trainmaster for Canadian Northern Railway [citation needed]
Yewed, Oklahoma Admiral George Dewey reversed due to post office name conflict [29]

Imperfect ananyms[edit]

Name Reversal of Notes Reference
Enola, Nebraska T. J. Malone founder; omitted the M when reversed. [34]
Lionilli, Kentucky[63] Illinois intended to be Sionilli, but name misrecorded by post office clerk [15]
Nonnell, Kentucky John Lennon L&N RR maintenance supervisor; extra L [15]
Revelo, Kentucky Oliver railroad construction engineer; formerly spelled Revilo; name changed for unknown reasons [15]
Revillo, South Dakota J. S. Oliver railroad man; extra L added. [34]
Samoth, Illinois John R. Thomas Congressman from Illinois; TH kept intact for pronunciation [22]
Sarben, Nebraska Nebraska omitting the KA [64]:85
Mount Sniktau, Colorado Watkins "Sniktau" was a pen name of journalist E. H. N. Patterson, who borrowed and modified W. F. Watkins's nom de plume; see Sniktaw above [33]
Tensed, Idaho Pierre-Jean De Smet Belgian missionary; reversed due to post office name conflict, and then misspelled during name approval process [34]
Yelrome, Illinois Isaac Morley Mormon elder; E added for pronunciation; town burned down by anti-Mormon mob in 1845 [22]
Yesmar, Alabama Ramsay local family name, but with an E replacing an A. [34]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Birson, Saskatchewan". Geographical Names Data Base. Natural Resources Canada.
  2. ^ a b c d Barry, Bill (September 2005). Geographic Names of Saskatchewan. Regina, Saskatchewan: People Places Publishing, Ltd. ISBN 1-897010-19-2.
  3. ^ a b c Kenny, Hamill (1945). West Virginia Place Names: Their Origin and Meaning, Including the Nomenclature of the Streams and Mountains. Piedmont, WV: The Place Name Press. p. 57.
  4. ^ a b c Morris, Allan (1995). Florida Place Names: Alachua to Zolfo Springs. Sarasota, Florida: Pineapple Press, Inc. ISBN 1-56164-084-0.
  5. ^ Heller Jr., Dick D. "Delmita, TX". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 12 November 2017.
  6. ^ a b Gard, Ropbert E. (2015). The Romance of Wisconsin Place Names. Wisconsin Historical Society. ISBN 9780870207082.
  7. ^ a b c d Gudde, Erwin Gustav (1960). California Place Names: The Origin and Etymology of Current Geographical Names. University of California Press.
  8. ^ Robison Turner, Jeri. "Goliad, TX". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 27 November 2017.
  9. ^ "Kinhop, Saskatchewan". Geographical Names Data Base. Natural Resources Canada.
  10. ^ McCoy, Sondra Van Meter; Hults, Jan (1989). 1001 Kansas Place Names. Lawrence, Kansas: University Press of Kansas. ISBN 0-7006-0392-1.
  11. ^ Jenkins, Elwyn (2007). Falling into Place: The Story of Modern South African Place Names. New Africa Books. ISBN 9780864866899.
  12. ^ "Malesus, Tennesee". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  13. ^ a b Miller, Larry (2001). Tennessee Place-names. Indinan University Press. ISBN 9780253214782.
  14. ^ Williams, Mary Ann Barnes (1966). Origins of North Dakota Place Names. Bismarck, ND: Bismarck Tribune. p. 306.
  15. ^ a b c d e Rennick, Robert M. (2013). Kentucky Place Names. University Press of Kentucky. ISBN 9780813144016.
  16. ^ "Romley, Colorado". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  17. ^ Temple, Robert D. (2009). Edge Effects: the Border-Name Places (2nd ed.). Bloomington, Indiana: iUniverse, Inc. ISBN 978-0-595-47758-6.
  18. ^ McLeod Matthews, Mitford (1948). Some Sources of Southernisms. University of Alabama Press. p. 73.
  19. ^ Kenny, Hamill (1984). The Placenames of Maryland : their origin and meaning. Baltimore, Md.: Maryland Historical Society. ISBN 0-938420-28-3.
  20. ^ Rayburn, Alan (1997). Place names of Ontario. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. ISBN 0-8020-7207-0.
  21. ^ "Ticona, Illinois". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  22. ^ a b c Callary, Edward (October 2009). Place Names of Illinois. Champaign, Illinois: University of Illinois Press. ISBN 978-0-252-03356-8.
  23. ^ "Vinsulla, British Columbia". Geographical Names Data Base. Natural Resources Canada.
  24. ^ Akrigg, G. P. (Philip) V.; Akrigg, Helen (2011). British Columbia Place Names (Third ed.). UBC Press. ISBN 0774841702.
  25. ^ Espenshade, A. Howry (1925). Pennsylvania place names. State College, PA: The Pennsylvania State College.
  26. ^ a b Carlson, Helen S. (1974). Nevada Place Names: A Geographical Dictionary. University of Nevada Press. ISBN 9780874170948.
  27. ^ Casey, Sarah. "Throwback Thursday: Aksarben". University of Nebraska Omaha. Retrieved 5 November 2018.
  28. ^ "Amabala, Oklahoma". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  29. ^ a b c d Shirk, George H, (1987). Oklahoma Place Names. University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 0-8061-2028-2.
  30. ^ "Atokad Park". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  31. ^ "Cleo, Oregon". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  32. ^ a b c d e f g h McArthur, Lewis A.; McArthur, Lewis L. (1992). Oregon Geographic Names (6th ed.). Oregon Historical Society Press. ISBN 0-87595-237-2.
  33. ^ a b c Bright, William (2004). Colorado Place Names. Big Earth Publishing. ISBN 9781555663339.
  34. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Stewart, George R. (1970). American place-names; a concise and selective dictionary for the continental United States of America. New York: Oxford University Press.
  35. ^ "Enola, South Carolina". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  36. ^ "Enola Hill, Oregon". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  37. ^ Ramsay, Robert L. (1952). Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names. University of Missouri Press.
  38. ^ a b c Meany, Edmund S. (1923). Origin of Washington geographic names. Seattle: University of Washington Press.
  39. ^ "Lennut, Kentucky". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  40. ^ a b Stewart, George R. (1982). Names on the land : a historical account of placenaming in the United States (4th ed.). San Franciso: Lexikos. ISBN 093853002X.
  41. ^ "Namorf, Oregon". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  42. ^ "Narod, California". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  43. ^ Kelly, John. "Answer Man: Nam Rewsna". John Kelly's Washington. The Washington Post Company. Retrieved 27 November 2017.
  44. ^ "Unusual place names". Landgate. Western Australian Land Information Authority. Retrieved 30 November 2018.
  45. ^ a b Marden, Ernest G.; Marden, Austin (2010). Community Place Names of Alberta. Lulu.com. ISBN 189747217X.
  46. ^ "Noivloc, Nevada". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  47. ^ Barnes, Will Croft (2016). Arizona Place Names. University of Arizona Press. ISBN 9780816534951.
  48. ^ Hanson, Raus McDill (1969). Virginia Place Names: Derivations, Historical Uses. McClure Press.
  49. ^ Foscue, Virginia O. (1989). Place Names in Alabama. University of Alabama Press. ISBN 9780817304102.
  50. ^ Wooster, Robert. "Remlig, TX". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 27 November 2017.
  51. ^ "Kilmer, Virginia". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  52. ^ Sharpe, Dwight Allen. "My Wealthy New York Relative, Willis Sharpe Kilmer". Retrieved 27 November 2017.
  53. ^ Canadian Board on Geographical Names (1928). Place-names of Alberta. Ottawa: F. A. Acland, printer.
  54. ^ "Revilo, Tennessee". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  55. ^ "Robat, South Carolina". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  56. ^ Long, Christopher. "Sacul, TX". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Associtation. Retrieved 27 November 2017.
  57. ^ "Saxet, Texas". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  58. ^ Taylor, D. R. "Saxet, TX". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 27 November 2017.
  59. ^ "Saxet Lake Park". Explore Victoria. Victoria CVB, City of Victoria. Retrieved 17 October 2018.
  60. ^ Wooster, Robert. "Setag, TX". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 27 November 2017.
  61. ^ Bruhn, Richard. "Tesnus, TX". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 27 November 2017.
  62. ^ Long, Christopher. "Tinrag TX". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 12 November 2017.
  63. ^ "Lionilli, Kentucky". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  64. ^ Fitzpatrick, Lilian L. (1925). Nebraska Place-Names. University of Nebraska Press.