List of giant sequoia groves

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This is a list of giant sequoia groves. All naturally occurring giant sequoia groves are located in the moist, unglaciated ridges and valleys of the western slope of the Sierra Nevada range in California, United States. They can be found at elevations between 1400 – 2400 meters (4593 – 7874 ft).

Groves in the northern half of the range (north of the Kings River) are widely scattered and host smaller collections of giant sequoias than groves found within and south of the Kings River watershed. The total area of all the groves combined is approximately 14,416 hectares (35,607 acres). The groves are listed from north to south in the list below.

This list is based on five different sources, with slightly varying views on what constitutes a discrete grove; the differing interpretations are noted in italics. The lists of groves were compiled by Rundel (1972; recognizing 75 groves), Flint (1987; recognizing 65 groves), Willard (1994; recognizing 65 groves), the Giant Sequoia National Monument Visitor's Guide (2003), and the Draft Giant Sequoia National Monument Plan 2010. Currently, the U.S. National Park Service cites Rundel's total of 75 groves in its visitor publications. The updated lists from Willard and Flint are now known to be more accurate, therefore some of Rundel's 75 groves have been removed from this list. Below compiles a list of 81 giant sequoia groves.[1][failed verification]

North of the Kings River[edit]

The 7 groves north of the Kings River watershed are in Tahoe National Forest, Calaveras Big Trees State Park, Yosemite National Park, or Sierra National Forest (listed north to south):

Name Location Coordinates Elevation Comments
(m) (ft)
Placer County Big Trees Grove Tahoe National Forest
Placer County
39°03′30″N 120°34′30″W / 39.05833°N 120.57500°W / 39.05833; -120.57500 (Placer County Grove) 1,700 5,600 The northernmost grove, with only six trees, the largest being 3.66 m (12.0 ft) in diameter. The grove is also the furthest removed from all other giant sequoia groves. Part of the American River watershed.
North Calaveras Grove Calaveras Big Trees State Park
Calaveras County
38°17′N 120°18′W / 38.283°N 120.300°W / 38.283; -120.300 (North Calaveras Grove) 1,425–1,480 4,675–4,856 The first giant sequoia grove to be visited by Europeans (1833), as well as the first to be documented (1852). Part of the Calaveras River watershed.
South Calaveras Grove Calaveras Big Trees State Park
Tuolumne County
38°15′N 120°14′W / 38.250°N 120.233°W / 38.250; -120.233 (South Calaveras Grove) 1,390–1,500 4,560–4,920 The lowest average elevation of any giant sequoia grove. Includes the Louis Agassiz tree, one of the largest giant sequoias in the world. Part of the Stanislaus River watershed.
Tuolumne Grove Yosemite National Park
Tuolumne County
37°46′N 119°48′W / 37.767°N 119.800°W / 37.767; -119.800 (Tuolumne Grove) 1,700–1,800 5,600–5,900 The grove features about six visible giant sequoias amongst a dense understory of dogwood. Includes the "Dead Giant", a fallen giant sequoia with a stagecoach-sized tunnel cut through it. Part of the Tuolumne River watershed.
Merced Grove Yosemite National Park
Mariposa County
37°45′N 119°50′W / 37.750°N 119.833°W / 37.750; -119.833 (Merced Grove) 1,700–1,800 5,600–5,900 The grove features about 20 large trees. Part of the Merced River watershed.
Mariposa Grove Yosemite National Park
Mariposa County
37°31′N 119°36′W / 37.517°N 119.600°W / 37.517; -119.600 (Mariposa Grove) 1,750–2,050 5,740–6,730 Includes the 'Grizzly Giant' and many other famous trees. Part of the Merced River watershed.
Nelder Grove Sierra National Forest
Madera County
37°26′N 119°35′W / 37.433°N 119.583°W / 37.433; -119.583 (Nelder Grove) 1,600–1,700 5,200–5,600 Three units, partially logged; site of the Shadow of the Giants National Recreation Trail. This grove was heavily impacted by the Railroad Fire in 2017. Part of the Fresno River watershed.

Kings River watershed[edit]

The 18 groves in the Kings River watershed are in Kings Canyon National Park, the northern section of Giant Sequoia National Monument, or Sequoia National Forest, in southern Fresno County and northern Tulare County (listed north to south):

Name Location Coordinates Elevation Comments
(m) (ft)
McKinley Grove Sierra National Forest
Fresno County
37°01′N 119°06′W / 37.017°N 119.100°W / 37.017; -119.100 (McKinley Grove) 1,900–1,950 6,230–6,400 The grove features between 150-200 large trees.
Converse Basin Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°48′N 118°58′W / 36.800°N 118.967°W / 36.800; -118.967 (Converse Basin Grove) 1,800–2,000 5,900–6,600 The grove was the second-largest giant sequoia grove before being heavily logged in the 1890s. Despite this, nearly 100 widely scattered old-growth trees remain and has experienced significant regrowth. The grove is also the home of Boole, the 6th largest giant sequoia in the world. It is also the home of the Chicago Stump, the remnant of what was once the General Noble tree which was the second largest tree in the grove. This grove was significantly impacted by the Rough Fire in 2015.[2]
Indian Basin Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°48′N 118°56′W / 36.800°N 118.933°W / 36.800; -118.933 (Indian Basin Grove) 1,800–2,000 5,900–6,600 A mid-size grove that was logged between 1901 and 1907. The grove contains many young sequoias approaching diameters of up to 3.05 m (10.0 ft).[3]
Lockwood Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°48′N 118°52′W / 36.800°N 118.867°W / 36.800; -118.867 (Lockwood Grove) 1,700–1,800 5,600–5,900 Part of the Evans Complex. The grove was heavily impacted by the Rough Fire in 2015, which killed 14 trees with diameters of at least 1.22 m (4.0 ft).[4][2]
Monarch Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°47′30″N 118°46′45″W / 36.79167°N 118.77917°W / 36.79167; -118.77917 (Monarch Grove) 1,600–1,900 5,200–6,200 Immediately north of the Agnew Grove, near Monarch Wilderness boundary. On Forest Service GSNM map. Despite its close proximity to Agnew Grove, this grove was not significantly impacted by the Rough Fire in 2015.[2]
Agnew Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°47′20″N 118°46′45″W / 36.78889°N 118.77917°W / 36.78889; -118.77917 (Agnew and Deer Meadow Grove) 1,950–2,000 6,400–6,560 This grove was heavily impacted by the Rough Fire in 2015.[2]
Deer Meadow Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°47′20″N 118°46′45″W / 36.78889°N 118.77917°W / 36.78889; -118.77917 (Agnew and Deer Meadow Grove) 1,950–2,000 6,400–6,560 This grove was heavily impacted by the Rough Fire in 2015.[2]
Cherry Gap Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°46′40″N 118°57′30″W / 36.77778°N 118.95833°W / 36.77778; -118.95833 (Cherry Gap Grove) 2,070 6,790 Logged. Located between Converse Basin Grove and General Grant Grove, near McGee Overlook. This grove was significantly impacted by the Rough Fire in 2015.[2]
Evans Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°46′26″N 118°49′09″W / 36.773937°N 118.819094°W / 36.773937; -118.819094 (Evans Grove) 2,050–2,250 6,730–7,380 Heavily logged before 1920. Part of Evans Grove Complex. This grove was heavily impacted by the Rough Fire in 2015.[4][2]
Abbott Creek Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°46′N 118°58′W / 36.767°N 118.967°W / 36.767; -118.967 (Abbott Creek Grove) 1,900 6,200 Listed by Rundel and Flint; very small (largely logged); too few trees to qualify as a grove according to Willard.
Kennedy Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Kings Canyon National Park
Sequoia National Forest
36°46′0″N 118°49′20″W / 36.76667°N 118.82222°W / 36.76667; -118.82222 (Kennedy Grove) 2,050–2,250 6,730–7,380 Home of 'Ishi Giant'. Part of Evans Complex. This grove was heavily impacted by the Rough Fire in 2015.[4][2]
Little Boulder Creek Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°45′10″N 118°49′0″W / 36.75278°N 118.81667°W / 36.75278; -118.81667 (Little Boulder Creek Grove) 2,000 6,600 This grove features about 20 large trees scattered along an old logging road.[5] Part of Evans Complex. This grove was heavily impacted by the Rough Fire in 2015.[2]
Bearskin Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°45′0″N 118°54′40″W / 36.75000°N 118.91111°W / 36.75000; -118.91111 (Bearskin Grove) 1,850–1,900 6,070–6,230 The grove was the first to be affected by the clearcutting of giant sequoia groves by U.S. Forest Service in the 1980s.[6] Features many large giant sequoias along road 13S98A, which runs through the heart of the grove.[7]
Boulder Creek Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°45′N 118°49′W / 36.750°N 118.817°W / 36.750; -118.817 (Boulder Creek Grove) 2,050 6,730 Part of Evans Complex. This grove was heavily impacted by the Rough Fire in 2015.[2]
General Grant Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Kings Canyon National Park
Sequoia National Forest
36°45′N 118°58′W / 36.750°N 118.967°W / 36.750; -118.967 (General Grant Grove) 1,750–2,000 5,740–6,560 Includes 'General Grant'. This grove was significantly impacted by the Rough Fire in 2015.[2]
Landslide Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°45′0″N 118°51′50″W / 36.75000°N 118.86389°W / 36.75000; -118.86389 (Landslide Grove) 2,050–2,250 6,730–7,380
Sequoia Creek Grove Kings Canyon National Park 36°43′50″N 118°58′20″W / 36.73056°N 118.97222°W / 36.73056; -118.97222 (Sequoia Creek Grove) 1,850 6,070
Big Stump Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Kings Canyon National Park
Sequoia National Forest
36°43′N 118°58′W / 36.717°N 118.967°W / 36.717; -118.967 (Big Stump Grove) 1,850 6,070 Includes the Burnt Monarch, the remains of which are larger than any living tree.

Kaweah River watershed[edit]

The 31 groves in the Kaweah River watershed are all in Sequoia National Park or in mixed BLM and private ownership, except the northernmost in Sequoia National Forest & Kings Canyon National Park (listed north to south):

Name Location Coordinates Elevation Comments
(m) (ft)
Redwood Mountain Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Kings Canyon National Park
Sequoia National Forest
36°41′38″N 118°55′08″W / 36.69389°N 118.91889°W / 36.69389; -118.91889 (Redwood Mountain Grove) 1,960 6,430 The largest grove, 1240 hectares (3100 acres), with 15,800 sequoias 30.5 cm (1.00 ft) or more in diameter at the base. Home of 'Roosevelt' and 'Hart', the 22nd and 25th largest giant sequoias in the world, respectively.
Big Baldy South Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°39′40″N 118°54′05″W / 36.661037°N 118.901251°W / 36.661037; -118.901251 (Big Baldy South Grove) 1,722 5,650
Lost Grove Sequoia National Park 36°39′04″N 118°49′39″W / 36.65111°N 118.82750°W / 36.65111; -118.82750 (Lost Grove) 2,030 6,660 Contains no exceptionally large trees, but one giant sequoia has a ground perimeter of 31.88 m (104.6 ft), one of the largest of any giant sequoia.
Muir Grove Sequoia National Park 36°37′53″N 118°50′10″W / 36.63139°N 118.83611°W / 36.63139; -118.83611 (Muir Grove) 1,918 6,293 A dense collection of giant sequoias at the end of a 3.1 km (1.9 mi) trail. Home of 'Dalton', the 36th largest giant sequoia in the world.
Skagway Grove Sequoia National Park 36°37′00″N 118°50′55″W / 36.61667°N 118.84861°W / 36.61667; -118.84861 (Skagway Grove) 1,820 5,970
Pine Ridge Grove Sequoia National Park 36°37′12″N 118°51′41″W / 36.619864°N 118.861361°W / 36.619864; -118.861361 (Pine Ridge Grove) 1,523 4,997
Suwanee Grove Sequoia National Park 36°35′21″N 118°47′53″W / 36.58917°N 118.79806°W / 36.58917; -118.79806 (Suwanee Grove) 1,880 6,170 A 28.3 hectare (70 acre) grove.[8]
Giant Forest Sequoia National Park 36°33′45″N 118°45′05″W / 36.56250°N 118.75139°W / 36.56250; -118.75139 (Giant Forest) 2,130 6,990 This grove contains half of the ten largest trees by volume, including the largest, 'General Sherman', and 8,400 others at least 0.3 m (0.98 ft) in diameter.
Granite Creek Grove Sequoia National Park 36°32′18″N 118°37′39″W / 36.538425°N 118.627456°W / 36.538425; -118.627456 (Granite Creek Grove) 1,921 6,302 An exceptionally small grove located along Granite Creek.
Redwood Meadow Grove Sequoia National Park 36°31′47″N 118°38′38″W / 36.52972°N 118.64389°W / 36.52972; -118.64389 (Redwood Meadow Grove) 1,690 5,540
Little Redwood Meadow Grove Sequoia National Park 36°30′45″N 118°36′52″W / 36.512572°N 118.614318°W / 36.512572; -118.614318 (Little Readwood Meadow Grove) 2,369 7,772 Located southeast of Redwood Meadow Grove.
Castle Creek Grove Sequoia National Park 36°31′11″N 118°41′06″W / 36.51972°N 118.68500°W / 36.51972; -118.68500 (Castle Creek Grove) 1,610 5,280 A 345 acre grove of widely scattered sequoias.[8]
Douglass Grove Sequoia National Park 36°28′42″N 118°43′22″W / 36.478265°N 118.722711°W / 36.478265; -118.722711 (Douglass Grove) 1,967 6,453 An exceptionally small grove west of Paradise Peak and north of Oriole Lake Grove.
Atwell Mill Grove Sequoia National Park 36°27′57″N 118°40′50″W / 36.46583°N 118.68056°W / 36.46583; -118.68056 (Atwell Mill Grove) 2,100 6,900 The grove reaches the highest elevation of any sequoia grove, 2,560 m (8,400 ft), and contains four trees that are among the largest giant sequoias in the world: Diamond, AD, Dean and Arm.[9][10]
East Fork Grove Sequoia National Park 36°26′45.2″N 118°39′48.4″W / 36.445889°N 118.663444°W / 36.445889; -118.663444 (East Fork Grove) 1,646–2,487 5,400–8,159 A large, unlogged giant sequoia grove home to many widely dispersed giant sequoias. Located immediately southeast of Atwell Mill Grove and Atwell Mill Campground, along the northern slopes of Hengst Peak.[11][12]
Oriole Lake Grove Sequoia National Park 36°28′08″N 118°43′36″W / 36.46889°N 118.72667°W / 36.46889; -118.72667 (Oriole Grove) 2,030 6,660 Located northeast of Oriole Lake.
New Oriole Lake Grove Sequoia National Park 36°27′04″N 118°44′10″W / 36.451058°N 118.736225°W / 36.451058; -118.736225 (New Oriole Grove) 1,743 5,719 Located south of Oriole Lake.
Eden Creek Grove Sequoia National Park 36°24′34″N 118°43′55″W / 36.40944°N 118.73194°W / 36.40944; -118.73194 (Eden Creek Grove) 1,720 5,640 A 350 hectare (865 acre) grove with many large, widely scattered trees.[8]
Lower Horse Creek Grove Sequoia National Park 36°25′10″N 118°42′17″W / 36.419443°N 118.704850°W / 36.419443; -118.704850 (Lower Horse Creek Grove) 1,644 5,394 A small grove located downstream of both Horse Creek and Cahoon Creek groves.
Horse Creek Grove Sequoia National Park 36°25′02″N 118°41′37″W / 36.41722°N 118.69361°W / 36.41722; -118.69361 (Horse Creek Grove) 1,840 6,040 A (36.4 hectare (90 acre) grove containing approximately 70 trees more than 3 metres (9.8 ft) in diameter.[8]
Cahoon Creek Grove Sequoia National Park 36°24′40″N 118°42′08″W / 36.410999°N 118.702224°W / 36.410999; -118.702224 (Cahoon Creek Grove) 1,834 6,017
Case Mountain Grove Near Three Rivers, California 36°24′18″N 118°47′37″W / 36.40500°N 118.79361°W / 36.40500; -118.79361 (Case Mountain Grove) 1,750 5,740 Located in a bowl-shaped valley southeast of Case Mountain. The land is administered by the Bureau of Land Management.[13]
Coffeepot Canyon Grove Sequoia National Park 36°23′57″N 118°45′01″W / 36.399200°N 118.750194°W / 36.399200; -118.750194 (Coffeepot Canyon Grove) 1,762 5,781 Located west of Eden Creek Grove.
Surprise Grove Sequoia National Park 36°22′38″N 118°45′57″W / 36.377155°N 118.765785°W / 36.377155; -118.765785 (Surprise Grove) 1,697 5,568
Homers Nose Grove Sequoia National Park 36°22′53″N 118°44′14″W / 36.38139°N 118.73722°W / 36.38139; -118.73722 (Homers Nose Grove) 2,330 7,640
Board Camp Grove Sequoia National Park 36°22′08″N 118°42′51″W / 36.368786°N 118.714063°W / 36.368786; -118.714063 (Board Camp Grove) 2,022 6,634 Located northeast of Cedar Flat Grove, southeast of Homers Nose Grove, and north of South Fork Grove.
Cedar Flat Grove Sequoia National Park 36°21′28″N 118°43′57″W / 36.357782°N 118.732608°W / 36.357782; -118.732608 (Cedar Flat Grove) 1,504 4,934 A small grove located at the northern end of Ladybug Trail.
South Fork Grove Sequoia National Park 36°21′28″N 118°43′05″W / 36.35778°N 118.71806°W / 36.35778; -118.71806 (South Fork Grove) 1,630 5,350
Garfield Grove Sequoia National Park 36°20′00″N 118°43′06″W / 36.33333°N 118.71833°W / 36.33333; -118.71833 (Garfield Grove) 2,030 6,660 A 549 hectare (1,356 acre) grove with many large specimens. The lowest elevation at which the giant sequoia is known to grow naturally, 884 m (2,900 ft), is located beside the river below this grove. Home of 'King Arthur', the 9th largest giant sequoia in the world. Now also includes the Dillonwood Grove.[8]
Forgotten Grove Sequoia National Park 36°19′58″N 118°45′55″W / 36.332810°N 118.765317°W / 36.332810; -118.765317 (Forgotten Grove) 1,916 6,286
Devil's Canyon Grove Sequoia National Park 36°19′12″N 118°46′05″W / 36.320075°N 118.768015°W / 36.320075; -118.768015 (Devil's Canyon Grove) 2,004 6,575 Located north of Dennison Grove and west of Dennison Mountain in the southwestern corner of Sequoia National Park.

Tule River, Kern River, and Deer Creek watersheds[edit]

The 25 groves in the Tule River, Kern River, and Deer Creek watersheds are mostly in Giant Sequoia National Monument, with some areas in Sequoia National Park, Mountain Home Demonstration State Forest, and Tule River Reservation; all are in southern Tulare County (listed north to south):

Name Location Coordinates Elevation Comments
(m) (ft)
Dennison Grove Sequoia National Park 36°18′48″N 118°45′47″W / 36.313197°N 118.763008°W / 36.313197; -118.763008 (Dennison Grove) 1,966 6,450 Located on the southwestern slope of Dennison Mountain in southeastern Sequoia National Park.
Dillonwood Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
Sequoia National Park
36°18′13″N 118°42′35″W / 36.303643°N 118.709728°W / 36.303643; -118.709728 (Dillonwood Grove) 1,837 6,027 Located at the southernmost point of Sequoia National Park.
Upper Tule Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°16′36″N 118°40′27″W / 36.276631°N 118.674212°W / 36.276631; -118.674212 (Upper Tule Grove) 2,400 7,900 The highest average elevation of any giant sequoia grove, located immediately east of Moses Mountain. Included on Forest Service GSNM map.
Middle Tule Grove Sequoia National Forest
Sequoia National Forest
36°16′07″N 118°39′46″W / 36.268587°N 118.662712°W / 36.268587; -118.662712 (Middle Tule Grove) 2,062 6,765
Maggie Mountain Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°15′41″N 118°38′26″W / 36.261298°N 118.640424°W / 36.261298; -118.640424 (Maggie Mountain Grove) 2,234 7,329 A small, inaccessible grove located in a ravine just west of Maggie Mountain.
Silver Creek Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°14′29″N 118°38′54″W / 36.24139°N 118.64833°W / 36.24139; -118.64833 (Silver Creek Grove) 1,650 5,410
Mountain Home Grove Balch County Park
Mountain Home Demonstration State Forest
Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°14′24″N 118°40′18″W / 36.24000°N 118.67167°W / 36.24000; -118.67167 (Mountain Home Grove) 1,970 6,460 Home of the 'Genesis', the 7th largest giant sequoia in the world. This grove also contains the smaller Middle Tule Grove in the Sequoia National Forest. This grove was heavily impacted by the Pier Fire in 2017.[14]
Burro Creek Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°13′31″N 118°38′38″W / 36.22528°N 118.64389°W / 36.22528; -118.64389 (Burro Creek Grove) 1,550 5,090
Wishon Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°13′04″N 118°38′57″W / 36.217728°N 118.649062°W / 36.217728; -118.649062 (Wishon Grove) 1,393 4,570 Located south of Silver Creek Grove. Included on Forest Service GSNM map.
Alder Creek Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
Private land
36°11′08″N 118°37′41″W / 36.18556°N 118.62806°W / 36.18556; -118.62806 (Alder Creek Grove) 2,120 6,960 Also known as Hossack, Pixley, or Ross Creek Grove. Home of 'Stagg', the 5th largest giant sequoia in the world. Also home to the Waterfall tree, which has the largest ground perimeter of any sequoia.
Freeman Creek Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°08′22″N 118°30′33″W / 36.13944°N 118.50917°W / 36.13944; -118.50917 (Freeman Creek Grove) 1,890 6,200 The easternmost giant sequoia grove. Home of 'Great Goshawk' and 'Bannister', the 29th and 48th largest giant sequoias, respectively. Part of the Kern River watershed.
McIntyre Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°08′07″N 118°35′05″W / 36.13528°N 118.58472°W / 36.13528; -118.58472 (McIntyre Grove) 1,720 5,640 Part of Belknap Complex.
Carr Wilson Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°07′32″N 118°36′38″W / 36.125475°N 118.610498°W / 36.125475; -118.610498 (Carr Wilson Grove) 1,512 4,961 Also known as Bear Creek Grove. Part of Belknap Complex.
Wheel Meadow Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°06′40″N 118°33′54″W / 36.111196°N 118.564961°W / 36.111196; -118.564961 (Wheel Meadow Grove) 2,012 6,601 Part of Belknap Complex.
Black Mountain Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
Tule River Reservation
Private land
36°06′16″N 118°39′19″W / 36.10444°N 118.65528°W / 36.10444; -118.65528 (Black Mountain Grove) 1,950 6,400 Heavily logged in 1984, though no mature sequoias were cut. This grove was heavily impacted by the Pier Fire in 2017.[15]
Red Hill Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
Private land
36°04′17″N 118°36′46″W / 36.07139°N 118.61278°W / 36.07139; -118.61278 (Red Hill Grove) 1,960 6,430
Peyrone Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
Tule River Reservation
36°03′07″N 118°36′22″W / 36.05194°N 118.60611°W / 36.05194; -118.60611 (Peyrone Grove) 1,880 6,170 Medium-sized grove containing more than 100 scattered specimens.[8]
South Peyrone Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
36°01′32″N 118°37′17″W / 36.025496°N 118.621477°W / 36.025496; -118.621477 (South Peyrone Grove) 1,851 6,073 New discovery by Willard in 1992. Located west of Onion Meadow Peak.
Parker Peak Grove Tule River Reservation 35°59′10″N 118°39′22″W / 35.98611°N 118.65611°W / 35.98611; -118.65611 (Parker Peak Grove) 1,980 6,500 Medium-sized grove containing more than 100 scattered specimens.[8]
Long Meadow Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
35°58′58″N 118°36′05″W / 35.98278°N 118.60139°W / 35.98278; -118.60139 (Long Meadow Grove) 2,040 6,690 Site of the "Trail of 100 Giants", a popular loop trail that winds through the heart of the grove. Home of 'Red Chief', the 40th largest giant sequoia in the world. Part of the Kern River watershed.
Cunningham Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
35°58′56″N 118°34′06″W / 35.98222°N 118.56833°W / 35.98222; -118.56833 (Cunningham Grove) 1,870 6,140 Part of the Kern River watershed.
Starvation Creek Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
35°56′03″N 118°37′26″W / 35.93417°N 118.62389°W / 35.93417; -118.62389 (Starvation Creek Grove) 1,730 5,680 A small, inaccessible giant sequoia grove. Part of the Starvation Creek Complex and the Deer Creek watershed.[8]
Powderhorn Grove Sequoia National Forest
Giant Sequoia National Monument
35°55′53″N 118°36′14″W / 35.931527°N 118.603789°W / 35.931527; -118.603789 (Powderhorn Grove) 2,022 6,634 A small giant sequoia grove. Part of the Starvation Creek Complex and the Kern River watershed.[8]
Packsaddle Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
35°55′26″N 118°35′34″W / 35.92389°N 118.59278°W / 35.92389; -118.59278 (Packsaddle Grove) 2,060 6,760 A grove of about 300 large but scattered trees, including 'Packsaddle Giant', the 33rd largest giant sequoia measuring over 6.7 m (22 ft) in diameter and 85.34 m (280.0 ft) tall. Part of the Kern River watershed.[8]
Deer Creek Grove Giant Sequoia National Monument
Sequoia National Forest
35°52′19″N 118°36′12″W / 35.87194°N 118.60333°W / 35.87194; -118.60333 (Deer Creek Grove) 1,800 5,900 The grove is southernmost giant sequoia grove and is home to a small collection of 31 widely dispersed giant sequoias. Part of the Deer Creek watershed.[8]

See also[edit]

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX

References[edit]

  1. ^ Willard, Dwight. The Natural Giant Sequoia (Sequoiadendron Giganteum) Groves of the Sierra Nevada, California—An Updated Annotated List (PDF). USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. USFS. pp. 159–164. PSW-GTR-151. Retrieved 2014-05-14.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "District Personnel Actively Managing Land burned in Rough Fire". www.fs.usda.gov. Retrieved 2019-12-08.
  3. ^ "Indian Basin Grove". USFS - Sequoia National Forest. Retrieved 9 December 2019.
  4. ^ a b c "Giant sequoias - long survivors of the forest - succumbing to climate-driven wildfires". SFChronicle.com. 2019-09-12. Retrieved 2019-11-08.
  5. ^ "Little Boulder Creek Grove". www.redwoodhikes.com. Retrieved 2019-11-16.
  6. ^ Willard, Dwight (September 1, 2000). A Guide to the Sierra Groves of California. Yosemite Conservancy. ISBN 978-0939666812.
  7. ^ "Bearskin Grove". www.redwoodhikes.com. Retrieved 2019-11-16.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "NPS: The Giant Sequoias of California (Brief Description and Location of Giant Sequoia Groves)". www.nps.gov. Retrieved 2019-12-09.
  9. ^ "Atwell Grove". www.redwoodhikes.com. Retrieved 2019-11-16.
  10. ^ "Atwell Mill Grove - Famous Redwoods". famousredwoods.com. Retrieved 2019-11-16.
  11. ^ "East Fork Grove". www.redwoodhikes.com. Retrieved 2019-11-16.
  12. ^ "East Fork Grove". Natural Atlas. Retrieved 2019-11-16.
  13. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-10-23. Retrieved 2014-10-20.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  14. ^ "Giant sequoias - long survivors of the forest - succumbing to climate-driven wildfires". SFChronicle.com. 2019-09-12. Retrieved 2019-11-08.
  15. ^ "Giant sequoias - long survivors of the forest - succumbing to climate-driven wildfires". SFChronicle.com. 2019-09-12. Retrieved 2019-11-08.

External links[edit]