List of giant squid specimens and sightings (21st century)

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A frame from the first film of a live giant squid in its natural habitat, recorded from a manned submersible off Japan's Ogasawara Islands in July 2012. The animal (#507 on this list) is seen feeding on a 1-metre-long Thysanoteuthis rhombus (diamondback squid), which was used as bait in conjunction with a flashing squid jig (Widder, 2013a, b). The giant squid's silvery-metallic appearance came as a surprise to the expedition team, and had never been observed previously (stranded specimens invariably have reddish skin, if it is present at all; Lyden, 2013; Frazer, 2013).
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This list of giant squid specimens and sightings from the 21st century is a comprehensive timeline of recent human encounters with members of the genus Architeuthis, popularly known as giant squid. It includes animals that were caught by fishermen, found washed ashore, recovered (in whole or in part) from sperm whales and other predatory species, as well as those reliably sighted at sea. The list also covers specimens incorrectly assigned to the genus Architeuthis in original descriptions or later publications.

The beginning of the 21st century marked a turning point in humanity's understanding of the life habits of the giant squid, as it ushered in the first visually documented and incontrovertible observations of live animals, both adult and paralarval (Dery, 2013; Mullen, 2013; Schrope, 2013). The quest to photograph or film a live giant squid—mooted since at least the 1960s—had begun in earnest in the 1980s and intensified significantly in the following decade, with several multi-million-dollar expeditions launched in the late 1990s. While these were all unsuccessful, they were followed by a steady stream of live giant squid "firsts" in the nascent years of the 21st century, and spurred further efforts that ultimately culminated in the first footage of a live giant squid in its natural deep-ocean habitat—recorded from a manned submersible off Japan's Ogasawara Islands in 2012.

The turn of the century also roughly coincided with a shift in the way new giant squid specimens were reported and information on them was disseminated. The rapidly growing popularity of the World Wide Web resulted in a proliferation of both online news sources and platforms for sharing and discussing said news, the latter facilitating a never-before-seen level of engagement between professional teuthologists and amateur enthusiasts.[nb 1] Consequently, much of the information on recent specimens is drawn from online rather than print sources, though scholarly papers continue to be published on individual specimens (examples include Leite et al., 2016; Funaki, 2017; Romanov et al., 2017; Shimada et al., 2017; and Guerra et al., 2018).

Overview[edit]

Quest for a live animal[edit]

Though the total number of recorded giant squid specimens now runs into the hundreds, the species remains notoriously elusive and little known. By the turn of the 21st century, the giant squid remained one of the few truly large extant megafauna to have never been photographed alive, either in the wild or in captivity. Marine writer and artist Richard Ellis described it as "the most elusive image in natural history" (Ellis, 1998a:211).

Steve O'Shea (left) and Clyde F. E. Roper examining a giant squid specimen during the 1999 "In Search of Giant Squid" expedition

Early expeditions[edit]

Early attempts to capture a glimpse of the animal in its natural habitat included a submersible expedition by Frederick Aldrich in the late 1980s (Ellis, 1998a:3; Lien, 2000:279).[nb 2] A photograph purporting to show a live Architeuthis dux alongside a diver was published by Poppe & Goto (1993), but this turned out to be a sick or dying Onykia robusta (misidentification #[7]; Ellis, 1998a:211; Norman, 2000:174). A number of expeditions were mounted in the 1990s with the aim of capturing footage of a live giant squid in its natural habitat (Pope, 1994; Fisher, 1995; Judd, 1996; [Anonymous], 1996), but all were unsuccessful. They included Smithsonian-backed expeditions to the Azores in July 1996 and to Kaikoura Canyon off New Zealand in January–March 1997 and February–March 1999 (the former covered by National Geographic; Allen, 1997; McCarey & Rubin, 1998). These expeditions—the latter two each costing around $10 million—employed a combination of sperm whale–mounted crittercams, baited "ropecams" or "drop-cams", an Odyssey IIB autonomous underwater vehicle, and the single-person submersible Deep Rover (Fisher, 1997; Ellis, 1997a; Grzelewski, 2002). All three were led by giant squid expert Clyde Roper, with the first two also involving marine biologist Malcolm Clarke (Herring, 2014:115; Rodhouse et al., 2015:868; Gomes-Pereira et al., 2017:823) and the last two Steve O'Shea of NIWA (Roper et al., 1997, 1999; Roper, 1998a, 1998b, 2000, 2006, 2013). Richard Ellis took part in the first of the New Zealand expeditions and in 1998 released a popular nonfiction book, The Search for the Giant Squid, further raising interest in the pursuit of a live animal (Miller, 1996; Ellis, 1998a). Oceanographic explorer Jean-Michel Cousteau, son of Jacques-Yves Cousteau, led another unsuccessful expedition to New Zealand that ended in early 2001 ([Anonymous], 2001b).

21st century breakthroughs[edit]

The specimen from Goshiki beach (#442) is seen here tied with a rope, its delicate reddish skin only partially intact. Muscular constriction around the squid's giant eye obscures much of its surface in this image (O'Shea, 2003f).

In 2001 Steve O'Shea succeeded in capturing the first footage of a live giant squid when he caught and filmed several paralarval individuals—measuring 9–13 mm (0.35–0.51 in)—in captivity (#428; Baird, 2002; Young, 2002). This milestone was followed by the first images of a live adult giant squid (at the surface) on 15 January 2002, near Goshiki beach in Amino-cho, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan (#442).[nb 3] The animal, which measured about 2 m (6.6 ft) in mantle length and 4 m (13 ft) in total length, was found near the water's surface. It was captured and tied to a quay, where it died overnight ([Anonymous], 2002b; O'Shea, 2003f; Hellwarth, 2012). These images were joined by a number of little-publicised photographs of live adults at the surface off Okinawa (#449, 450, and 464).[nb 4] Renewed interest in filming a live giant squid followed the 2001 recording of an enormous specimen of bigfin squid (?Magnapinnidae) at great depth off Hawaii, which received global media attention (Morelli, 2002a), and the observation of a possible giant squid egg mass in early 2002 (later determined to be that of Nototodarus gouldi—misidentification #[9]; [Anonymous], 2002d). This included further efforts by O'Shea to capture live paralarval specimens (Morelli, 2002b; Grann, 2004) and another unsuccessful attempt to film a live adult in the wild, dubbed Proyecto Kraken ("Project Kraken"), made off the Spanish coast of Asturias in September 2002 and led by giant squid expert Ángel Guerra (Barreiro, 2002; Sitges, 2003; Soriano, 2003; Guerra, 2013). Amid growing competition between researchers, in September 2003 it was reported that O'Shea was leading a team that planned to image a live giant squid by suspending cameras in the water column that would release "puréed" female gonads to attract a male ([Anonymous], 2003c).

It was only on 30 September 2004 that a live giant squid was photographed in its natural deep-water habitat, off the Ogasawara Islands, by Tsunemi Kubodera and Kyoichi Mori (#466), the culmination of an effort that spanned three years and 26 week-long expeditions (Dery, 2013). The squid attacked the deployed bait at a depth of some 900 m (3,000 ft) and in so doing became snagged on the associated jig. Over the next 4.5 hours it periodically came into camera view as it struggled to free itself, eventually severing its own tentacle to escape. The tentacle was recovered and used to confirm the squid's taxonomic identity via DNA sequencing (Kubodera & Mori, 2005; Kubodera, 2010:25). Kubodera and his team, again working off the Ogasawara Islands, subsequently became the first to film a live adult giant squid on 4 December 2006 (#473).[nb 5] The animal was caught on a baited hook at 650 m (2,130 ft) depth and pulled to the surface, where it was recorded waving its arms and ejecting large volumes of water from its funnel. It was then brought aboard the research vessel, dying in the process ([Reuters], 2007; Kubodera, 2010:38).

"The color was utterly different than any of us expected. The one that had been brought to the surface and that there's pictures of on the web was red, and a lot of deep-sea squid are red. But this was a spectacular silver and gold. It looks like it's carved out of metal; it's just absolutely breathtaking and completely unexpected."

Edith Widder, speaking about the live animal filmed in July 2012 (#507) on NPR's All Things Considered, 13 January 2013 (Lyden, 2013; see also Dery, 2013)

However, the quest to film a live giant squid in its natural habitat continued, with an unsuccessful National Geographic–backed attempt off the Azores in 2011, headed by camera expert Martin Dohrn and assisted by Malcolm Clarke ([Anonymous], 2011a; Herring, 2014:115; Gomes-Pereira et al., 2017:824). The following year a team including Natacha Aguilar de Soto of the University of La Laguna lowered a camera to a depth of 200–800 m (660–2,620 ft) off El Hierro, Canary Islands, but to no avail (Ardoy, 2013). The elusive footage was finally captured in July 2012 by a team comprising Kubodera, O'Shea and Edith Widder, after more than 285 hours underwater and 55 submersible dives (Schur, 2013).[nb 5] The squid (#507), which was about 3 m (9.8 ft) long and missing its feeding tentacles, was observed—like Kubodera's two previous "firsts"—off the Ogasawara archipelago, initially at a depth of 630 m (2,070 ft) and later followed to around 900 m (3,000 ft). It was drawn into viewing range by both artificial bioluminescence created to mimic panicking Atolla jellyfish and using a Thysanoteuthis rhombus (diamondback squid) as bait. The giant squid was filmed feeding for about 23 minutes until it departed ([NHK], 2013a, b; Widder, 2013a, b). In August 2013 an effort was announced to film a fully intact adult giant squid in its natural habitat off the Azores and thereby determine how the species uses its long tentacles (missing in the 2012 specimen) for feeding ([Evonik], 2013; [Evonik], N.d.).

A diver swimming with a live giant squid (#581) in Toyama Bay on 24 December 2015. The animal spent several hours in the harbour, where it was filmed by local divers before being guided out to sea. The resulting videos rank among the highest-quality live giant squid footage ever captured (Keartes, 2015). Note the animal's splayed arms, which it repeatedly wrapped around the divers when approached (Hunt, 2015).

Since then, live giant squid have been photographed and filmed at the surface on a number of occasions, mostly in Japanese waters (#519, 524, 556, 561, 562, 563, 565, 573, 576, 580, 581, 582, 586, and 596)—the majority of these being related to the mass appearance event in the Sea of Japan between January 2014 and March 2015 (Kubodera et al., 2016)—but also off Spain (#589) and South Africa (#590). Additionally, a freshly stranded animal was photographed alive on a South African beach (#515), and at least four individuals were briefly kept alive in tanks in Japan (#528, 534, 541, and 578).[nb 6] Notable among these encounters was a specimen (#581) seen in Toyama Bay, Japan, on 24 December 2015, the video of which is one of the highest-quality ever recorded (Keartes, 2015). The squid was apparently swimming normally when a local diving shop owner dove alongside it, and after a few hours of being filmed in a harbour the animal was guided back into the open ocean. It was estimated to be 3.7 m (12 ft) long excluding the tentacles (McKirdy & Ogura, 2015; Murai, 2015). Two other specimens from Toyama Bay (#561 and 565) were similarly filmed by divers. Another noteworthy encounter was that between a paddleboarder and a badly injured individual (#590) off Melkbosstrand, South Africa, in March 2017, with the stricken animal filmed wrapping its arms around the paddleboard (Keartes, 2017b; Payne, 2017).

"In terms of Architeuthis sightings, historically, all we’ve had are dead animals. Now, we’re seeing live animals being photographed and filmed. The progress that’s been made in securing footage of these animals, and in understanding their life history and biology, over the last few years is phenomenal, compared to where we were several years ago."

Steve O'Shea, quoted by Dery (2013)

Another video of a live giant squid in its natural deep-water habitat (#599)—reported at the time as the second ever recorded—was captured in the Gulf of Mexico at 759 m (2,490 ft) depth in June 2019 by a NOAA-funded team that included Widder and visual ecologist and marine biologist Sönke Johnsen (Johnsen & Widder, 2019; [NOAA], 2019; Jarvis, 2019). The animal was seen approaching an "e-jelly" lure before retreating. It subsequently came to light that a seven-second clip of a live giant squid (#594)—little publicised initially (Escánez et al., 2018)—had been captured in October 2017, off the southern coast of El Hierro in the Canary Islands at around 500 m (1,600 ft) depth, making the Gulf of Mexico video the third such recording (Ocampo, 2019).

List of giant squid[edit]

# Date Location Nature of encounter Identification Material cited Material saved Sex Size and measurements Repository Main references Additional references      Notes     
424 12 January 2001 approximately 34 miles (55 km) from Gijón, off coast of Asturias, Spain (43°52.54′N 05°18.74′W / 43.87567°N 5.31233°W / 43.87567; -5.31233 (Giant squid specimen)) at 300–600 m depth
{NEA}
By trawl; caught alive Architeuthis dux Steenstrup, 1857 Entire; missing arms III; arm II (L) not intact Entire Female (immature) ML: 1350 mm; MW: 400 mm; EL: 8010 mm; WT: 81 kg; VML: 1190 mm; MT: 22 mm; HW: 260 mm; AL(I): 2310/2400 mm; AL(II): 1791/1900 mm [first not intact]; AL(IV): 1870/1920 mm; TL: 6370/6530 mm; TCL: 770/790 mm; DC: 120/160 mm; MaL: 510/490 mm; CaL: 140/140 mm; LRL: 15.9 mm; URL: 16.5 mm; GL: 1180 mm; GW: 150 mm; FL: 560 mm; FW: 400 mm; EyD: 120 mm [estimate]; FuL: 160 mm; FuCL: 135 mm; FuCW: 25 mm; GiL: 370 mm; NGL: 150 mm CEPESMA González et al. (2002); Guerra et al. (2004b:4); Guerra et al. (2006:259) Second record of a living specimen collected in Spanish Atlantic waters. Specimen was frozen immediately after measurements were taken. It was later defrosted, dissected, and reconstructed. It was placed in a transparent glass case and fixed for 48 hours in 4% formalin. It is now preserved in 70% alcohol.
425 7 February 2001 (reported; caught prior week) off south-west Australia
{SWP}
"Caught by commercial fishermen" "giant squid" Entire; "near-perfect specimen" Entire? WT: 200 kg "Australian museum" [Anonymous] (2001a) Placed in preservative fluid. Mark Norman interviewed about find.
426 May 2001 Caladero Lastres, Asturias, Spain
{NEA}
Architeuthis ?EL: 9 m; WT: 90 kg Guerra et al. (2006:259)
10 June 2001 22 mi (35 km) east of Pacific Light, Florida Keys, Florida, United States (Straits of Florida) (24°40′N 80°30′W / 24.667°N 80.500°W / 24.667; -80.500 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWA}
Found floating at surface Architeuthis dux Not stated None given RSMAS; "ex UMML 31.3149" [specimen No. 20 of Roper et al. (2015)] Roper et al. (2015:81) Found over bottom depth of 725 m.
427
(📷)
25 June 2001 off Málaga, Andalusia, Spain, at ~400 m depth
{MED}
By trawl, alive; died shortly thereafter Architeuthis Entire; tentacles intact Entire Female (immature) ML: 125 cm; EL: 750 cm; WT: 65 kg Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Madrid, Spain [Anonymous] (2001c); Guerra et al. (2006:89) Rivas (2003) On public display. Nicknamed "Archi". Second known giant squid specimen from the Mediterranean Sea. Caught by trawler Neptuno. Examined at Instituto Oceanográfico de Málaga, based in Fuengirola. Delivered to Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales in Madrid in freezer truck (−18 °C) on 1 October 2001 and there preserved under supervision of cephalopod expert Oscar Soriano; exhibited in tank. According to Guerra et al. (2006:89), found washed ashore dead but relatively fresh on Fuengirola beach on 27 June 2001 (confusion with #380?).
428
(📷)
spring/summer 2001 off east coast of South Island, New Zealand
{SWP}
Paralarvae caught alive and filmed "swimming robustly" in tank Architeuthis Seven live individuals ?EL: 9–13 mm Baird (2002); Young (2002) Lamb (2018:51) First video of live giant squid, albeit paralarval. Specimens caught by team led by Steve O'Shea and also including Malcolm Clarke and Chung Cheng Lu, after ~100 tows in 12 days. Attempts by aquaculturist Mike Tait to simulate natural conditions in tank proved unsuccessful as paralarvae soon died. Featured in Discovery Channel documentary Chasing Giants: On the Trail of the Giant Squid.
2 July 2001 west of Carrandi, Asturias, Spain
{NEA}
Caught Architeuthis ?EL: 7.10 m; WT: 60 kg Guerra et al. (2006:259) Caught by the Spanish vessels Elena María and Bautista Pino from Cillero.
6 July 2001 30 mi (48 km) off Bermuda (32°00′N 64°40′W / 32.000°N 64.667°W / 32.000; -64.667 (Giant squid specimen); given as "32°N 64°40'W")
{NWA}
Found floating at surface Architeuthis dux Not stated Male "total length": ~5 ft (1.5 m) [specimen No. 21 of Roper et al. (2015)] Roper et al. (2015:81)
429 12 September 2001 Playa de Rodiles (Villaviciosa), Asturias, Spain [off Luarca fide Bustamante et al. (2008)]
{NEA}
Found washed ashore [by trawl fide Bustamante et al. (2008)] Architeuthis dux Entire?, missing tentacles Entire? Female (immature) ML: 127 cm; EL: 710 cm; WT: 90 kg [WT: 60 kg fide Guerra et al. (2006:259)] Guerra et al. (2006:259); Bustamante et al. (2008) Tissues studied for concentrations of 14 trace elements. Digestive gland, gills, ink sac, branchial hearts, appendages, systemic heart, and brain removed during study.
430 20 September 2001 Playa de Torimbia (Llanes), Asturias, Spain
{NEA}
Found washed ashore Architeuthis ?EL: 10 m; WT: 104 kg Museo del Mar de Biarritz, Biarritz Guerra et al. (2006:259) On public display. Exhibited at the Museo del Mar de Biarritz in Biarritz.
431 23 September 2001 Caladero de El Corbiro, Asturias, Spain
{NEA}
By trawl Architeuthis Female (immature) WT: 73.5 kg Guerra et al. (2006:259)
432 8 October 2001 Kerguelen waters in southern Polar Frontal Zone (47°19′S 69°11′E / 47.317°S 69.183°E / -47.317; 69.183 (Giant squid specimen)) at 600 m depth
{SIO}
Found in stomach contents of sleeper shark (Somniosus sp.) Architeuthis dux Lower and upper beak Entire LRL: 18.13 mm; ML: 220 cm [estimate] Cherel (2003:1296); Cherel & Duhamel (2004:25) Rincon (2004) Mantle length estimated using allometric equation from Roeleveld (2000).
433 8 October 2001 Kerguelen waters in southern Polar Frontal Zone (47°19′S 69°11′E / 47.317°S 69.183°E / -47.317; 69.183 (Giant squid specimen)) at 600 m depth
{SIO}
Found in stomach contents of sleeper shark (Somniosus sp.) Architeuthis dux Lower and upper beak; broken Entire Cherel (2003:1296); Cherel & Duhamel (2004:25) Rincon (2004)
434 23 October 2001 Playa de S. Cosme de Barreiros (Lugo), Asturias, Spain [Ribadesella fide Bustamante et al. (2008)]
{NEA}
Found washed ashore Architeuthis dux Entire? Entire? Female (maturing) ML: 150 cm; EL: 800 cm; WT: 104 kg [EL: 9.5 m; WT: 90 kg fide Guerra et al. (2006:259)] Guerra et al. (2006:259); Bustamante et al. (2008) Tissues studied for concentrations of 14 trace elements. Digestive gland, gills, ink sac, branchial hearts, appendages, systemic heart, and brain removed during study.
435 21 November 2001 Kerguelen waters in southern Polar Frontal Zone (48°06′S 71°18′E / 48.100°S 71.300°E / -48.100; 71.300 (Giant squid specimen)) at 453–575 m depth
{SIO}
Found in stomach contents of sleeper shark (Somniosus sp.) Architeuthis dux Lower beak only Entire LRL: 10.43 mm; ML: 45 cm [estimate] Cherel (2003:1296); Cherel & Duhamel (2004:25) Rincon (2004) Mantle length estimated using allometric equation from Roeleveld (2000).
436 Unknown (reported 2002) North Atlantic (otherwise "no data")
{NEA/NWA}
Architeuthis Female (maturing) ML: 1480 mm; TL: 5910 mm [right]; CL: 830 mm [right]; CSC: 255 [right]; TSC: 279 [right]; additional indices and counts VSM [specimen NA-21 of Roeleveld (2002)] Roeleveld (2002:727) Tentacle morphology examined by Roeleveld (2002).
437 Unknown (reported 2002) North Atlantic (otherwise "no data")
{NEA/NWA}
Architeuthis Right club TL: 1490+ mm; CL: 880 mm; CSC: 277; TSC: >288; additional indices and counts VSM [specimen NA-26 of Roeleveld (2002)] Roeleveld (2002:727) Tentacle morphology examined by Roeleveld (2002).
438 Unknown (reported 2002) North Atlantic (otherwise "no locality data")
{NEA/NWA}
Architeuthis Left club at least Male (mature) ML: 1180 mm VSM [specimen NA-20 of Roeleveld (2002)] Roeleveld (2002:726, fig. 1) Only referred to in single caption; not included in main study of Roeleveld (2002).
439 2002 off Santa Catarina, Brazil
{SWA}
"found" Architeuthis Martins & Perez (2009) Unreported prior to Martins & Perez (2009).
440 2002 off Nishiizu, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Photographed by diver Architeuthis Entire? None? (larva) ?EL: ~2 cm Yoshikawa (2014) First time "baby" giant squid photographed by diver, according to Yoshikawa (2014).
441
(📷)
3 January 2002 west of St Kilda, Scotland, at 770 m depth
{NEA}
By trawl Architeuthis Entire, missing tentacles Entire Female WL: 3.15 m; EL: 5.5 m [estimate] National Marine Aquarium (Plymouth) [Anonymous] (2002a); [Anonymous] (2002c) [Anonymous] (2003a) On public display. Caught by Fraserburgh trawler Marina Polaris. Specimen preserved in formaldehyde and displayed in custom-made tank at the National Marine Aquarium in Plymouth.
442
(📷)
15 January 2002 Goshiki beach, seashore of Amino-cho, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Found alive near surface; tied to quay with rope; later died Architeuthis Entire; outer mantle layer damaged/missing Entire; preserved ?ML: 2 m; ?WL: 4 m National Museum of Nature and Science (Tokyo) [Anonymous] (2002b); O'Shea (2003f); [Anonymous] (2006d); [Anonymous] (2008a); [Anonymous] (2008b) Hellwarth (2012) On public display. First images of live adult giant squid (but see #449 and 450). Identified by Koutarou Tsuchiya of the Tokyo University of Fisheries. Exhibited at the National Museum of Nature and Science in Tokyo.
[9]
(📷)
mid-February 2002 off Poor Knights Islands, Northland Region, North Island, New Zealand
{SWP}
Large egg mass photographed in shallow water ball-like salp; egg mass of pelagic squid (possibly giant squid owing to size); egg mass of Nototodarus gouldi Egg mass None diameter: 2 m None Doak (2002a); Doak (2002b); [Anonymous] (2002d) Bolstad (2009) Non-architeuthid. Photographed by photojournalists Jenny and Tony Enderby and posted on website of marine researcher Wade Doak. First known photo of such a squid egg mass (at least from New Zealand). Identified as egg mass of pelagic squid by Steve O'Shea (species later determined to be Nototodarus gouldi; Bolstad, 2009). Resulting discussions brought to light several similar sightings (including a photograph from the same area), one later identified by DNA analysis as the egg mass of an arrow squid (Nototodarus sp.).
443 11 March 2002 Playa del Gayo (Luanco, Gozón), Asturias, Spain
{NEA}
Found washed ashore Architeuthis Female (immature) WT: 70 kg Guerra et al. (2006:259)
444 20 July 2002 Seven Mile Beach, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
{SWP}
Found washed ashore Architeuthis sp.; initially speculated to be a new species Entire, in two pieces, missing tentacles Entire Female (adult) EL: 50 ft (15 m) [estimate]; WT: ~250 kg Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery [Anonymous] (2002e, 2 figs.); Trivedi (2002) [Anonymous] (2003a, fig.); [Anonymous] (2007b) Reported as a possible new species: "Experts found several characteristics which they say they have never encountered before – including long, thin flaps of muscle attached to each of the squid's eight arms." Spermatophores found around mantle. Study supervised by David Pemberton, senior curator of zoology at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery. Sucker marks and scar on head point to likely encounter with male.
August 2002 [week prior to 19 August] Hokitika Canyon, off West Coast, South Island, New Zealand
{SWP}
"caught" Architeuthis dux 5 specimens Entire? None given O'Shea (2002) According to Steve O'Shea, specimens indicated that giant squid were migrating into New Zealand waters to spawn "a month later than usual".
445 24 August 2002 near beach between Praia da Galé and Melides lagoon, west coast of Portugal (approximately 38°11′N 08°46′W / 38.183°N 8.767°W / 38.183; -8.767 (Giant squid specimen))
{NEA}
Found floating at surface Architeuthis sp. Entire; "fresh" condition Male (mature) ML: 111 cm; EL: 619.5 cm; ?WL: 188.5 cm ["total length without tentacles"]; WT: 60 kg (fresh weight) Marques (2002); Rosa et al. (2005:740) First recorded specimen from Portuguese coast. Found during upwelling when surface water temperatures in region were 10–17 °C. Collected by technicians of Sado Estuary Natural Reserve and taken to Museu Oceanográfico do Portinho da Arrábida where it was deep-frozen. Studied for biochemical composition by Rosa et al. (2005).
446 13 September 2002 in the proximity of "Pozo de la Vaca", off coast of Asturias, Spain (43°54.26′N 5°29.38′W / 43.90433°N 5.48967°W / 43.90433; -5.48967 (Giant squid specimen)) at c. 450–475 m depth
{NEA}
By trawl Architeuthis dux Steenstrup, 1857 Entire Entire Male (mature) ML: 98/100 cm; MW: 33 cm; WT: 42/43 kg; EL: 600 cm; VML: 92 cm; BC: 76 cm; HL: 27 cm; HW: 28 cm; AL(IV): 176 cm; LAL: 176 cm; AC(I): 15.4 cm; AC(II): 19.7 cm; AC(III): 21.6 cm; AC(IV): 20+ cm; AF: 4.3.2.1; TL: 420/470 cm; TCL: 51 cm; DC: 15 cm; MaL: 29 cm; CaL: 7.9 cm; FL: 30 cm; FW: 28 cm; TaL: 8 cm; HeL: 4.5 cm [IV pair]; EyD: 8/10 cm; FuL: 17 cm; FuD: 5.5 cm; FuCL: 12 cm; FuCW: 3 cm; PL: 88 cm; SSL: 30 cm; SoA: yes; SL: 11.0–20.0 cm; LRL: 1.2 cm; URL: 1.0 cm CEPESMA Guerra et al. (2004a); Guerra et al. (2004b:8) Guerra et al. (2006:259) Captured by Spanish pair trawlers Helena María and Bautista Pino. Spermatophores embedded in skin.
447 10 October 2002 El Agudo, Asturias, Spain
{NEA}
Caught by ships Architeuthis WT: 87 kg Guerra et al. (2006:259) Caught by ships Luscinda and Peña la Deva.
448 23 December 2002 off Motobu Peninsula, Okinawa, Japan, at c. 500 m depth
{NWP}
Caught by vertical long-line squid jig Architeuthis sp. Entire Entire Female ML: 1410 mm Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium Kubodera & Horikawa (2005:206, pl. 1A); Kubodera (2007, fig. 1) Donated to aquarium by local fisherman. According to Kubodera & Horikawa (2005), specimen belongs to morphological type with thick arms of medium length and longest arm IV measuring 1.2–1.3 times mantle length. Photographed lying alongside Ryukyu woman for size comparison.
449
(📷)
Unknown (reported 2003) off Okinawa, Japan
{NWP}
Photographed alive at surface Architeuthis Entire, seemingly in perfect condition; red skin fully intact None? [Anonymous] (c. 2003); O'Shea (2003g) Eyden (2006); Kubodera (2010:39) Photographed alive at surface after being attracted by jig-caught Thysanoteuthis. Possibly first adult giant squid to be photographed alive (but see #442).
450
(📷)
Unknown (reported 2003) off Okinawa, Japan
{NWP}
Photographed alive at surface Architeuthis Entire, seemingly in perfect condition; red skin fully intact None? [Anonymous] (c. 2003); O'Shea (2003g) Eyden (2006); Kubodera (2010:39) Photographed alive at surface with Megalocranchia. Possibly first adult giant squid to be photographed alive (but see #442). Countershading observed in Architeuthis for the first time.
451
(📷)
Unknown (reported 2003) off Tonga
{SWP}
Found floating at surface, dead Architeuthis? Entire, large gash in mantle near fins None ML: 2 m [estimate] O'Shea (2003a); O'Shea (2007a) Unsuccessful attempt made to haul specimen onto boat deck. Carcass was probably attacked by an animal, but was very fresh upon discovery. Photographs taken of floating carcass and severed arm. Steve O'Shea noted that suckers at base of arm fragment in photo appear unusually large relative to arm thickness for it to be Architeuthis (O'Shea, 2003a), though he considered this the "most likely" ID, with the "only alternative" being a giant onychoteuthid, though he thought this unlikely due to the locality (O'Shea, 2007a).
452 11 January 2003 off Madeira
{NEA}
Seen clinging onto boat hull Architeuthis dux Entire None ?EL: 7–8 m / nearly 30 ft (9.1 m) [estimate]; "tentacle [...] thicker than [...] leg" [Anonymous] (2003a) Grann (2004) Crew of trimaran Geronimo, competing in round-the-world Jules Verne Trophy, reported being "attacked" by giant squid several hours after departing from Brittany, France. Squid purportedly latched onto boat and blocked rudder with two of its "tentacles". First seen by first mate Didier Ragot, by shining flashlight through porthole. Also seen by captain Olivier de Kersauson, who stopped boat, causing squid to let go.
453 January 2003 off Maizuru, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Caught in net giant squid [Anonymous] (2008a); [Anonymous] (2008b)
454 around 20 July 2003 Pringle Bay, Hermanus, Western Cape, South Africa
{SEA}
Found washed ashore Architeuthis Entire, missing tentacles Several pieces of bait, buccal mass, beak; remainder cut up for bait ?WL: 4 m [estimate]; WT: 200 kg [estimate] Avenier (2003); Merwe (2003) Found in shallows by four fishermen. Length estimated by fisherman Anton Barnard. Remains in possession of Hermanus squid enthusiast Jean Francis Avenier.
455
(📷)
August 2003 off New Zealand
{SWP}
Caught in net Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles intact Entire Male (mature) EL: 6 m; ML: ~1 m; PL: 40 cm; LSD: 3 cm; WT: 49/60 kg German Oceanographic Museum, Stralsund [Anonymous] (2004b); [Anonymous] (2005a); Strauß & Reinicke (2007:87); [Anonymous] (2010e); Nordsieck (N.d.); [Pottwale] (N.d.) On public display. Acquired by Steve O'Shea who examined it with Volker Miske of the University of Greifswald. Spermatophores found embedded in tissue outside range of own penis, suggesting male-on-male mating. Transferred to German Oceanographic Museum in Stralsund in May 2004 where it was examined by Miske and Götz Reinicke; exhibited there in 6 m tank filled with formalin since 16 January 2005 as the first specimen on public display in Germany (unveiled at press event with Miske, Reinicke and museum manager Harald Benke).
13 September 2003 La Griega (Colunga), Asturias, Spain
{NEA}
Not specified Architeuthis ?EL: 11 m; WT: 140 kg Guerra et al. (2006:259) [Anonymous] (2003b)
456 15 September 2003 La Isla (Colunga), Asturias, Spain
{NEA}
Found washed ashore Architeuthis dux Entire? Entire? Female (immature) ML: 152 cm; EL: 1200 cm; WT: 80 kg [EL: 10 m fide Guerra et al. (2006:259)] Guerra et al. (2006:259); Bustamante et al. (2008) [Anonymous] (2003b) Tissues studied for concentrations of 14 trace elements. Digestive gland, gills, ink sac, branchial hearts, appendages, systemic heart, and brain removed during study.
457 16 September 2003 Gozón, Asturias, Spain [off Gijón fide Bustamante et al. (2008)]
{NEA}
Found floating at surface, dying Architeuthis dux Entire? Entire? Male (mature) ML: 122 cm; EL: 620 cm; WT: 66 kg Guerra et al. (2006:259); Bustamante et al. (2008) [Anonymous] (2003b) Tissues studied for concentrations of 14 trace elements. Digestive gland, gills, ink sac, branchial hearts, appendages, systemic heart, and brain removed during study.
458 23 September 2003 Bañugues (Gozón), Asturias, Spain
{NEA}
Found stranded Architeuthis Male (mature) WT: 60 kg Guerra et al. (2006:259)
459 10 October 2003 Pozos- Carrandi, Asturias, Spain
{NEA}
Caught by ships Architeuthis ?EL: 10 m; WT: 67.5 kg Guerra et al. (2006:259) Caught by ships Travesía and Valdés Vega of Avilés.
460 16 October 2003 off Gijón, off coast of Asturias, Spain (43°53.23′N 5°32.15′W / 43.88717°N 5.53583°W / 43.88717; -5.53583 (Giant squid specimen))
{NEA}
Found moribund and floating at the surface Architeuthis dux Steenstrup, 1857 Entire, missing tentacles Entire Male (mature) ML: 122 cm; MW: 38 cm; WT: 66 kg; VML: 116 cm; HL: 28.9 cm; AC(I): 16.2 cm; AC(II): 20.4 cm; AC(III): 21.2 cm; AC(IV): 25.1 cm; AF: 4.3.2.1; FL: 42 cm; BC: 82 cm; EyD: 9.5/10.3 cm; FuL: 17 cm; FuD: 7.6 cm; FuCL: 14.5 cm; FuCW: 3.6 cm; PL: 96.5 cm; SSL: 32.9 cm; SoA: no obs.; SL: 12.3–20.1 cm; LRL: 1.34 cm; URL: 1.2 cm CEPESMA Guerra et al. (2004a); Guerra et al. (2004b:8) Guerra et al. (2004a) give capture date as 16 September 2003.
461 18 October 2003 La Griega (Colunga), Asturias, Spain
{NEA}
Not specified Architeuthis Entire?, missing tentacles Female WT: 70 kg Guerra et al. (2006:259)
462 Unknown (reported 2004) off New Zealand, probably at 400–600 m depth
{SWP}
By hoki trawl Architeuthis dux Mantle only; caecum distended with prey, including fragments of an Architeuthis tentacular club (carpus, manus, and dactylus suckers, and the dactylic pouch) Female (mature) ML: 1.6 m; additional measurements of Architeuthis remains found in caecum Stomach contents accessioned into the Auckland University of Technology (AUT), Earth & Oceanic Sciences (EOS) Research Institute, accession # AUT G.22 Bolstad & O'Shea (2004:16) Caught in one of two locations: either off the west coast of South Island, near Hokitika Canyon, between July and August; or off Banks Peninsula, on the east coast of South Island, between December and February. Contents of caecum examined. Prey items attributed to Nototodarus sp. and Architeuthis dux. Presence of Architeuthis remains in caecum suggests cannibalism or autophagy.
463
(📷)
15 March 2004 15.6 km NW of Port Stephens Settlement, Falkland Islands (~2 km from coast; 52°02′S 61°25′W / 52.03°S 61.41°W / -52.03; -61.41 (Giant squid specimen)) at 200/220 m depth
{SWA}
By bottom trawl, caught alive Architeuthis dux Steenstrup, 1857 Entire, almost complete Entire Female? EL: 8.62 m; WT: >200 kg BMNH; reg. no. 20040669 [Anonymous] (2006a); Morelle (2006); Ablett (2012:16); Hendry (2015); Bonnett (2015); Westwood (2015) Colwell (2015); Lamb (2018:50); numerous media sources On public display. Nicknamed "Archie". Caught by Falkland-registered trawler John Cheek (Fortuna Ltd.). Donated by Alexander Arkhipkin of Falkland Islands Fisheries Department. Preservation overseen by mollusc curator Jonathan Ablett. DNA samples taken. Defrosted over 3 days and then measured by museum scientist Oliver Crimmen. Next injected with ~15 litres of 10% formol-saline solution and placed in purpose-built wooden container lined with rubber, filled with 3250 litres of water, 350 litres of formalin, and 125 kg of rock salt. Finally transferred to 9.45 m-long acrylic tank filled with 10% formol-saline solution. On display in undissected state at Darwin Centre, BMNH, but only viewable to public as part of Spirit Collection Tour (see photos). Central to plot of 2010 fantasy novel Kraken.
464
(📷)
15 April 2004 southeast of Okinawa Island, Japan
{NWP}
Photographed alive at surface Architeuthis Entire, seemingly in perfect condition; red skin fully intact None ML: 2 m [estimate]; ?WL: 5–6 m [estimate] None [Anonymous] (2004a) Eyden (2006); Kubodera (2010:39)
11 August 2004 off Arguineguín, southern Gran Canaria, Canary Islands
{NEA}
Caught by fishermen Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacle(s) intact Entire EL: 8.5 m; WT: 83/85 kg Instituto Canario de Ciencias Marinas, Telde [Anonymous] (2004c); Alcalá (2004) Taken to Instituto Canario de Ciencias Marinas (ICCM) in Telde for study, with necropsy planned for winter. Identification provided by Patricia Navajas of ICCM.
11 August 2004 between Fuerteventura, Canary Islands and Morocco
{NEA}
Found by Salvamento Marítimo Architeuthis dux Mantle only? Entire ML: 1 m Instituto Canario de Ciencias Marinas, Telde [Anonymous] (2004c); Alcalá (2004) Taken to Instituto Canario de Ciencias Marinas (ICCM) in Telde for study, with necropsy planned for winter. Identification provided by Patricia Navajas of ICCM.
465 23 August 2004 (morning) 3 km from lighthouse, Ocean Beach, Farewell Spit, New Zealand
{SWP}
Found washed ashore Architeuthis Entire Entire ?WL: 5.7 m; WT: "near" 300 kg Auckland University of Technology [Anonymous] (2004d); [Anonymous] (2004e); [Anonymous] (2004f) [Anonymous] (2007d) Reportedly largest known giant squid specimen. Found by British tourists Nick and Rosemary Pinfield on Farewell Spit Tours trip. Transferred to Steve O'Shea of Auckland University of Technology on August 25. Available for public viewing at university on October 11.
466
(📷)
30 September 2004 off Ogasawara Islands, c. 600 miles (970 km) south of Tokyo, Japan (26°57.3′N 142°16.8′E / 26.9550°N 142.2800°E / 26.9550; 142.2800 (Giant squid specimen)) at 900 m depth
{NWP}
Sighted in natural habitat; line baited with squid and shrimp Architeuthis Entire; live animal sighted and photographed 5.5 m long portion of tentacle attached to line; squid broke free and swam away Recovered tentacle: 5.5 m long; TCL: 720 mm; LSD: 28 mm; ML: 1615 mm [estimate based on TCL]; ML: 1709 mm [estimate based on LSD]; WL: ~4.7 m [estimate]; EL: >8 m [estimate] Kubodera & Mori (2005); Owen (2005); Hopkin (2005); [Anonymous] (2005b, 3 figs.); [Anonymous] (2005c); Staedter (2005); Morelli (2005); Kubodera (2007); Kubodera (2010:25) Dery (2013); Sakamoto (2013b); Hanlon & Messenger (2018:266); numerous media sources First images of live giant squid in its natural deep-water habitat. Feeding behaviour observed; "Architeuthis appears to be a much more active predator than previously suspected, using its elongate feeding tentacles to strike and tangle prey" (Kubodera & Mori, 2005). Distal tentacle portion was still functioning upon retrieval at surface, with club suckers "repeatedly gripping the boat deck and any offered fingers". Press event with Tsunemi Kubodera held at Tokyo's National Museum of Nature and Science ([Anonymous], 2005c).
5 December 2004 [6 December fide Roper et al. (2015:81)] near the Red Rock local landmark, Ghaneys Beach, Colliers, Conception Bay, Newfoundland (47°28.747′N 53°11.515′W / 47.479117°N 53.191917°W / 47.479117; -53.191917 (Giant squid specimen)) [47°27′N 53°14′W / 47.450°N 53.233°W / 47.450; -53.233 (Giant squid specimen) fide Roper et al. (2015:81)]
{NWA}
Found stranded on rocks, ~1 ft (30 cm) above sea level Architeuthis dux Entire; missing skin Female (maturing) ML: 131 cm; ?EL: 18 ft (5.5 m) [specimen No. 22 of Roper et al. (2015)] "Flynnsbeach" (2013); Roper et al. (2015:81) Found and first reported by Jimmy Conway of Colliers; later identified by scientists. Photographed with Dennis Flynn at 10:45 pm (local time) on 5 December 2004; specimen left untouched by photographer.
22 December 2004 near shore off Triton, Green Bay, Newfoundland (49°31′N 55°37′W / 49.517°N 55.617°W / 49.517; -55.617 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWA}
Found floating at surface Architeuthis dux Not stated Male (maturing) "total length": 405 cm [specimen No. 23 of Roper et al. (2015)] Roper et al. (2015:81)
467
(📷)
2005 off South Island, New Zealand
{SWP}
Caught by commercial fishermen Architeuthis Entire? Entire EL: 7 m; WT: 250 kg Melbourne Aquarium Holroyd (2005) On public display. Purchased by Melbourne Aquarium curator Nick Kirby for more than A$100,000. Displayed in 3.5 tonne block of ice.
468 2005 (summer) Long Beach, Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, near Tofino, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada (49°04.185′N 125°45.679′W / 49.069750°N 125.761317°W / 49.069750; -125.761317 (Giant squid specimen))
{NEP}
Found washed ashore Architeuthis dux Entire; "poor condition"; all arms and tentacles damaged and incomplete (both tentacular clubs missing), mantle torn open and bearing row of sperm whale teeth holes, most internal organs missing Entire (juvenile) ML: 960 mm; EL: 2340 mm; WT: 22,600 g [wet]; MW: 780 mm; HL: 410 mm; HW: 360 mm [across eyes]; EyD: 40 mm; TL: 1270/1105 mm; AL(I): 1165/1430 mm; AL(II): 940/810 mm; AL(III): 805/710 mm; AL(IV): 745/700 mm; AD(I): 180/200 mm; AD(II): 180/180 mm; AD(III): 195/180 mm; AD(IV): 150/140 mm; BAC: 280 mm; BAL: 135 mm Royal British Columbia Museum (RBCM 006-00085-001) Cosgrove & Sendall (2007); Horner (2009) Found by Parks Canada staff. Photographed on beach by Heather Holmes. Beak and radula extracted for identification. Identification of specimen as A. dux confirmed by Steve O'Shea. Apparently attacked and killed by a sperm whale.
2 July 2005 10 mi (16 km) south of Key West, Florida, United States (Straits of Florida) (coordinates given as "~24°32'N 81°84'W" [sic])
{NWA}
Found floating at surface Architeuthis dux Entire; "whole specimen" WL: ~10 ft (3.0 m) [specimen No. 24 of Roper et al. (2015)] Roper et al. (2015:81) Found over bottom depth of 592 m. Identified based on photo.
469 19 July 2005 12 mi (19 km) off Gandia, Valencia, western Mediterranean Sea
{MED}
By trawl Architeuthis dux Entire? Entire? Male (mature) ML: 107 cm; EL: 600 cm; WT: 50 kg CEPESMA Bustamante et al. (2008); [Anonymous] (2014d); [Anonymous] (2014e) [Anonymous] (2013b) First male specimen from Mediterranean. Caught by fishing boat Nova Emi. Taken to Grau de Gandia fish market off Playa de Piles and auctioned to fishmonger Jesús Caudeli for 37 euros. Initially offered to University of Valencia, who rejected it; donated to CEPESMA. Tissues studied for concentrations of 14 trace elements. Digestive gland, gills, ink sac, branchial hearts, appendages, systemic heart, and brain removed during study. One of few CEPESMA specimens not destroyed during storm of 2 February 2014. On temporary display in Biarritz from June 2014.
470 22 July 2005 off Gijón, Asturias, North Spain
{NEA}
By trawl Architeuthis dux Entire? Entire? Female (maturing) ML: 146 cm; EL: 820 cm; WT: 139 kg Bustamante et al. (2008) Tissues studied for concentrations of 14 trace elements. Digestive gland, gills, ink sac, branchial hearts, appendages, systemic heart, and brain removed during study.
October 2005 Los Cristianos, Tenerife, Canary Islands
{NEA}
Not stated; dead Architeuthis Not given [Anonymous] (2009)
~March 2006 ["six months" prior to 23 September] off West Coast of South Island, New Zealand
{SWP}
By trawl "giant squid" Entire, "largely intact, albeit with a few battle scars"; tentacles intact Entire Male? (mature) EL: 8.23 m; TL: 5 m; WT: 100 kg Coursey (2006) Nicknamed "Squid Vicious". Supplied by Steve O'Shea. Formerly on public display in 3.8 m tank at Kelly Tarlton's Underwater World in Auckland, New Zealand, as part of "Freaky Fish" exhibit from 23 September 2006; partly preserved but displayed in chilled sea water (10–18 °C) in new experimental approach.
7 May 2006 Florida Current, 9.7 mi (15.6 km) offshore, New Smyrna Beach, Florida, United States (29°01′N 80°56′W / 29.017°N 80.933°W / 29.017; -80.933 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWA}
Found floating at surface Architeuthis dux "most of mantle missing" "total length": 13 ft (4.0 m) [specimen No. 25 of Roper et al. (2015)] Roper et al. (2015:81) Most of mantle bitten off by mako shark. Sample used as part of mitogenomic study of Winkelmann et al. (2013).
471 11 August 2006 about eight miles (13 km) off Santa Cruz Island
{NEP}
Found floating at surface "giant squid" "a tentacle and two arms" Entire?; stored in cooler after being found TL: ~13 ft (4.0 m); TD: "about the diameter of a broomstick"; AL: ~4 ft (1.2 m); ASD: "about the size of a nickel" Not stated [Anonymous] (2006c) Found by sport fisherman Bennett Salvay from the Los Angeles suburb of Tarzana. "Eric Hochberg, a squid expert at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, said the rest of the squid might have ended up in the stomach of a sperm whale or orca."
472 October? 2006 (caught "two months" prior to being reported on December 21); December 2006 fide Lee (2013) Pacific Ocean, about 900 nautical miles (1,700 km) northwest of Midway (35°30′N 168°20′W / 35.500°N 168.333°W / 35.500; -168.333 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Found floating at surface; caught with fishing spear Architeuthis Entire Entire WT: 211 kg; BC: 1.5 m; BL+HL?: 3 m; ?EL: 6 m [7 m fide [Anonymous] (2013g); Lee (2013)] China Times 21 December 2006; [Anonymous] (2006e) [Anonymous] (2013g); Lee (2013) Caught by skipper Hong Jeh Shan and mechanic Hong Shih Cheng (who came to global prominence in 2013 as the only fatality in the Guang Da Xing No. 28 incident). Sold for around $530 USD at Tong Goang fish market (東港). Kept in freezer for 2 months prior to being reported. Identified as giant squid by C. C. Wu of the Taiwan Department of Fish and Game. Photographed separately with kindergarten children and with Hong Chieh Shang, son-in-law of Hong Shih Cheng.
473
(📷)
4 December 2006 Chichi-jima, about 960 kilometers (600 mi) southeast of Tokyo, Japan, at 650 m depth
{NWP}
Caught on baited hook; videotaped alive at surface; brought aboard research vessel "after putting up quite a fight"; died in the process Architeuthis sp. Entire Entire Female (immature?) ML: 1.43 m; ?EL: ~7 m; BL+HL?: 3.5 m; WT: 50 kg Talmadge (2006); de Pastino (2006); [Reuters] (2007); Kubodera (2010:38); Nilsson et al. (2012:Supplemental Information) Dery (2013); Sakamoto (2013b); numerous media sources First video of live adult giant squid. Carcass preserved in formalin displayed at a news conference at the National Science Museum in Tokyo on December 22. Giant squid was hooked when it attempted to eat a smaller squid, "about 55 cm in length", which was attracted by the bait. Eye preserved in 4% formalin; sections of retina embedded in histological Araldite used by Nilsson et al. (2012) to measure rhabdom diameter (5–6 µm).
474 24 January 2007 off Ine, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Caught in net, escaped giant squid Entire None [Anonymous] (2008a)
June 2007 off southern Tenerife, Canary Islands
{NEA}
Pilot whale observed at surface with a tentacle in its mouth Architeuthis? Tentacle None EL: 4–5 m [estimate]; TL: >2 m [estimate]; WT: 180 kg [estimate] [Anonymous] (2007e); Soto et al. (2008); Walker (2008) Pilot whale made several side jumps to release tentacle and eat it. Photographed by Pablo Aspas; video also recorded. Led scientists to suggest that pilot whales may feed on giant squid. Size estimates by teuthologist Ángel Guerra. Piece of "fresh" arm and other remains also found near diving pilot whales.
475 10 July 2007 Ocean Beach, near Strahan, Tasmania, Australia
{SWP}
Found washed ashore Architeuthis Entire, missing tentacles ML: ~1.7 m; EL: ~6–8 m [estimate]; BD: ~1 m; WT: ~250 kg Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery [Anonymous] (2007a); [Anonymous] (2007b); [Anonymous] (2007f) Kept in formalin for a month before being preserved in ethanol. Photographed in situ with Ritchie Bauer of the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery.
476 22 or 23 July 2007 (morning) ~6 km from base of spit, Ocean Beach, Farewell Spit, New Zealand
{SWP}
Found washed ashore Architeuthis Entire? ?EL: 4.2 m [Anonymous] (2007c); [Anonymous] (2007d) Found by members of Farewell Spit Eco Tours.
477 8 August 2007 [9 August fide Roper et al. (2015:81)] Marathon Hump, south of Marathon, Florida Keys, Florida, United States (Straits of Florida)
{NWA}
Found floating at surface Architeuthis dux? Entire, "completely intact"; both eyes and all arms and tentacles intact Male (immature) EL: 6.79 ft (2.07 m); WT: 2.7 lb (1.2 kg) Mote Marine Laboratory [specimen No. 26 of Roper et al. (2015)] Lollar (2007); [Anonymous] (2007j); Roper et al. (2015:81) Possibly the smallest and most intact giant squid found in the region. Recovered by David Stout of North Fort Myers while fishing for tuna and mahi-mahi aboard Concrete Gringo in 1,200 ft (370 m) of water. Kept on ice by Stout before being transported to Mote Marine Laboratory, where it was examined and tentatively idenfitied by Debi Ingrao. Preserved in formalin. Sample used as part of mitogenomic study of Winkelmann et al. (2013).
478 21 August 2007 (reported) New Zealand
{SWP}
By trawl Architeuthis Entire, missing tentacles EL: ~10 m [estimate] Bolstad (2007) Submerged in and injected with 5% formalin after thawing. Eyes in very good condition.
[10] 23 August 2007 (reported) off Elba, Italy
{MED}
Caught in a deep sea net by fisherman Architeuthis; Thysanoteuthis rhombus Troschel, 1857 Entire, with mature eggs Female EL: 1.7 m; WT: 17.6 kg Marine Biology Laboratory, Livorno, Italy [Anonymous] (2007g); [Anonymous] (2007h); [Anonymous] (2007i) Non-architeuthid. Identified by Paolo Sartor. Specimen retrieved in "excellent condition".
479 29 August 2007 (reported) beach in Port Underwood, New Zealand
{SWP}
Found washed ashore; likely discarded by a trawler Architeuthis Entire, missing tentacles ?WL: ~3 m; EL: ~4 m [estimate] Johnston (2007) Found by retired whaler Ted Perano.
480 25 October 2007 off Macaé, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
{SWA}
Caught by fishermen Architeuthis Entire Unknown ?EL: ~4 m; WT: 130 kg [Anonymous] (2007k) Martins & Perez (2009) Specimen was taken to Niterói, where it was purchased by Alessandro Mello. Martins & Perez (2009) write "the fate of this specimen is currently unknown".
481 27 December 2007 beach near mouth of Yura River, Maizuru, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Found washed ashore giant squid Entire? Female (mature) ?EL: 3.3–3.7 m; ML: ~1.8 m; WT: 100 kg [estimate] National Museum of Nature and Science (Tokyo) [Anonymous] (2008a); [Anonymous] (2008b) Initially frozen at the Kyoto Prefectural Marine Center. Dissection carried out on 4 February 2008.
482 February 2008 off Suzu, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
captured giant squid ("ダイオウイカ") [Anonymous] (2014n)
485 9 May 2008 (reported) 40 km off Hickory Bay, Banks Peninsula, New Zealand, at 112 m depth
{SWP}
Caught by trawler Austro Carina "giant squid" Mantle and tentacles, head missing ML: 2 m; TL: 4 m Brown (2008) Head lost when caught in net. Capture of squid described by Lyttelton skipper Dale Robertson.
486 25 May 2008 about 40 km off Portland, Victoria, Australia, at 556 m depth
{SWP}
Caught by trawler Zeehaan "giant squid" Entire; eyes, skin and fins intact Entire Female EL: >12 m [intact estimate]; ?EL: 5.5–6 m; WT: 245 kg Melbourne Museum, Museum Victoria Burgess (2008); [Anonymous] (2008e); [Anonymous] (2008f); McNamara (2008); [Anonymous] (2008g); [Anonymous] (2008i) Largest recorded specimen from Australian waters. Capture of squid described by skipper Rangi Pene. Identified as a "colossal squid" in some media reports. Public dissection took place at Melbourne Museum on 17 July 2008, carried out by team of experts led by Mark Norman.
487 25 June 2008 about 20 miles (32 km) off Santa Cruz, Monterey Bay, California
{NEP}
Found floating at surface with gulls feeding on remains Architeuthis Entire; missing parts of mantle, most of one tentacle, eyes, sex organs, stomach, ink sac, and heart Entire EL: ~25 ft (7.6 m) [estimate]; ?WL: 16 ft (4.9 m); BC: 4 ft (1.2 m); WT: ~170 lb (77 kg); WT: 225–390 lb (102–177 kg) [intact estimate] Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History Alexander (2008); Rusk (2008); Hirschmann (2008); [Anonymous] (2008h); Kettmann (2008); Meyers (2011); Williams (2011) Found by Santa Cruz researcher Sean Van Sommeran and other crew of the Pelagic Shark Research Foundation. Possibly died as a result of shark attack. Numerous photographs taken of specimen in water, during retrieval, on boat deck, and during dissection. Dissected on 26 June 2008 at Long Marine Lab by team including William Gilly, Ken Baltz, and John Field. Specimen was measured, checked for parasites, and tissue samples were taken. Examined again on August 22 at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. Covered in 2011 book Kraken: The Curious, Exciting, and Slightly Disturbing Science of Squid (Williams, 2011).
488 16 October 2008 "beginning" of Farewell Spit, New Zealand
{SWP}
Found washed ashore Architeuthis Entire Entire? Female? ?EL: 5 m; WT: ~200 kg Auckland University of Technology Holst (2008); Rowe (2008) Gale (2011) Found by team including Chris Pomeroy and Tim Rowe of Farewell Spit Eco Tours. Transferred in refrigerated truck by Department of Conservation to Steve O'Shea at Auckland University of Technology. Viewed by children from three local primary schools prior to transfer.
489 2009 (reported) Kerguelen waters
{SIO}
Found in stomach contents of sleeper shark (Somniosus sp.) Architeuthis dux Lower beak Entire (adult) LRL: 16.2 mm Xavier & Cherel (2009:51, fig. 5)
490 2009 (reported) Kerguelen waters
{SIO}
Found in stomach contents of sleeper shark (Somniosus sp.) Architeuthis dux Lower beak Entire (juvenile) LRL: 10.1 mm Xavier & Cherel (2009:51, fig. 5)
491 2009 (reported) Kerguelen waters
{SIO}
Found in stomach contents of sleeper shark (Somniosus sp.) Architeuthis dux Upper beak Entire URL: 18.1 mm Xavier & Cherel (2009:82, fig. 5)
19 February 2009 (reported; first seen several days prior) Charco Manso, El Hierro, Canary Islands
{NEA}
Found floating at surface; later washed ashore, dead Architeuthis Entire? "large size" [Anonymous] (2009) Analysed and identified by members of Instituto Español de Oceanografía.
492 2 April 2009 Island Bay beach, New Zealand
{SWP}
Found in shallow water; dragged onto beach "giant squid" Entire; "fantastic condition" Entire Male? ?EL: 3 m NMNZ Paulin (2009); Wood & Easton (2009) Found by Alana Spragg and Bella Spragg. Probably died only a few hours before being found. Thought to be either a male or a juvenile due to small size.
493 30 July 2009 off Louisiana, United States (Gulf of Mexico), at >1,500 ft (460 m) depth
{NWA}
Caught in research cruise trawl net Architeuthis Entire, "intact" Entire Female EL: 19.5 ft (5.9 m); WT: 103 lb (46.7 kg) NMNH [specimen No. 27 of Roper et al. (2015)] Melvin (2009); Schleifstein (2009); Roper et al. (2015:81) Roper & Shea (2013:115, 117, figs. 5a–c, 8) Capture announced by Interior Department on 21 September. Stomach contents examined and found to contain mostly fluid with few solid remains. White tissue on posterior tip of ink sac interpreted as putative light organ (Roper & Shea, 2013:117, fig. 8). Sample used as part of mitogenomic study of Winkelmann et al. (2013).
[11] 15 August 2009 near a small bay just west of Beaver Point on Saltspring Island, Canada
{NEP}
Found floating at surface Architeuthis dux; Moroteuthis robusta (now known as Onykia robusta; see Bolstad, 2008:106, 2010) Entire Entire; "badly decomposed" (juvenile) ?EL: 11 ft (3.4 m) Horner (2009) Non-architeuthid. Found by Saanich residents Karia Leschke and Ron Lysek on their boat Stealaway. Identified (and re-identified) by invertebrate research biologist Graham Gillespie. Reported on 5 October.
495 14 October 2009 off Bonin Islands, Japan
{NWP}
Found floating at surface Architeuthis Single tentacle TL: 3.5 m Hansford (2009); Wu (2009a); Wu (2009b) Found and measured by Tony Wu.
496 15 October 2009 off Bonin Islands, Japan
{NWP}
Female sperm whale photographed near surface carrying giant squid remains in its jaws Architeuthis Remains None ?EL: 9 m [estimate] Hansford (2009) Group of five adult sperm whales and one calf photographed by Tony Wu. Steve O'Shea suggested adult whales may use remains of giant squid to teach calves about hunting.
497 2010 Fosa de Hércules, off Province of A Coruña, Spain
{NEA}
By trawl Architeuthis Entire? Not stated [Anonymous] (2011b); [Anonymous] (2011c) Caught by the trawler Minchos VI. Both this specimen and another caught by Minchos VI in April 2011 were noted for differing anatomically from other Spanish giant squid specimens.
15 January 2010 Pohang, Gyeongbuk, South Korea
{NWP}
Found stranded on beach Architeuthis sp. Entire; tentacles intact, skin largely missing Female ML: 1750 mm; TL: 5060 mm; AL(I): 1550/1560 mm; AL(II): 1420/1560 mm; AL(III): 1620/1730 mm; AL(IV): 1500/1410 mm; LSD: 20 mm; MT: 30.6–40.2 mm; HL: 310 mm; HW: 230 mm; EyD: 50 mm; FL: 594 mm; FW: 545 mm; GiL: 460 mm; WT: 2764 g [ovary]; WT: 1290 g [stomach] Lee et al. (2013:856, figs. 2–3) Total weight not measured.
498 20 February 2010 off Niigata, Niigata Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Found washed ashore, dead Architeuthis sp. Entire?, good condition Entire? ML: 1.7 m; WL: 3.4 m; WT: 109.2 kg National Museum of Nature and Science (Tokyo) [Anonymous] (2010a); [Anonymous] (2010b) Local newspapers Identified by Niigata City Aquarium based on fin shape.
499 4 July 2010 near southern seamount off continental shelf out from Narooma, Australia
{SWP}
Found floating at surface "giant squid" Parts of head, arms, and tentacles[?]; partially eaten None; discarded into ocean TL[AL?]: "close to" 3 m; ?EL: 5 m [estimate] Gorton (2010) Found by Narooma fisherman Tony Lawson and his crew while chasing bluefin tuna.
500 7 August 2010 (morning) Houghton Bay, Wellington, New Zealand
{SWP}
Found washed ashore in stormwater channel, dead "giant squid" Entire; "in bad shape" Beak; other remains left to the elements, washed out to sea around 3 pm ?EL: 3.5–4 m [estimate; "small"] NMNZ Harvey (2010); [Anonymous] (2010f); Pollock (2010) Probably attacked at sea. Initially identified as a colossal squid by Department of Conservation Wellington area manager, Rob Stone. Correct identification by Te Papa communications manager, Jane Kieg. Te Papa only interested in beak for examination due to poor condition of specimen.
501 early April 2011 Fosa de Hércules, off Province of A Coruña, Spain, at 600 m depth
{NEA}
By trawl Architeuthis Entire, missing one tentacle Entire Female EL: 6 m; WT: 48 kg CEPESMA [Anonymous] (2011b); [Anonymous] (2011c) Caught by the trawler Minchos VI. Reported 11 April 2011; captured week prior. Both this specimen and another caught by Minchos VI the previous year were noted for differing anatomically from other Spanish giant squid specimens. Transferred to CEPESMA in Luarca for planned necropsy.
502 26 June 2011 (morning) 12 miles (19 km) off Jensen Beach, Florida, United States, over 170 ft (52 m) deep waters
{NWA}
Found floating at surface, dead [fide Mayfield (2011)] or "barely alive" [fide Torrent (2011)] Architeuthis dux Entire, "extremely well-preserved"; missing one tentacle, patches of red skin intact Entire Female ?EL: 23–25 ft (7.0–7.6 m) [19 ft (5.8 m) fide Roper et al. (2015:81)]; ?WL: 11 ft (3.4 m); WT: 200 lb (91 kg) Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida [specimen No. 28 of Roper et al. (2015)] Crabbe (2011); Mayfield (2011); Than (2011); Torrent (2011); Thomas (2011, 2 figs.); Roper et al. (2015:81) May have died shortly after mating. Found by Stuart fishermen Robert Benz, Paul Peroulakis, and Joey Asaro. Transferred to Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission field laboratory in Tequesta on 27 June 2011, and to University of Florida later that day. Genetic samples taken. Mantle injected with formalin and specimen submerged in 10% formalin as part of two-week preservation process.
503 July 2011 (reported 24 August 2011) around 2 miles (3.2 km) south of Los Gigantes cliff, Tenerife, Canary Islands, over 800–1200 m deep waters
{NEA}
Found floating at/just below surface, dead Architeuthis Entire, missing tentacles, eyes, ends of arms, patches of red skin intact; "in good general condition" Beak and sucker samples Female? EL: ~8 m [estimate with intact tentacles] Association for the Study of Cetaceans in the Canary Islands (SECAC) Corniola (2011); Lamar (2011) Millán (2019) Found by Aquawork film crew during filming of documentary on local cetaceans. Floating specimen filmed with diver. Several shearwaters observed in area prior to discovery of carcass.
504 23 August 2011 (reported) Ocean Beach, entrance to Farewell Spit, New Zealand
{SWP}
Found washed ashore Architeuthis Entire None; left to the elements ?EL: "nearly four metres" Gale (2011) Found by Paddy Gillooly of Farewell Spit Eco Tours.
505 31 March 2012 (afternoon) Kaikoura Canyon, New Zealand
{SWP}
Male sperm whale photographed at surface with severed giant squid arm attached to side of head "giant squid" Single arm None; seen to have detached by following day None Nicoll (2012) Observed by Whale Watch Kaikoura tour group, including tour guide Sarah Rousseaux. Sperm whale (nicknamed "MatiMati") had been diving for around 45 minutes prior to observation.
506 1 June 2012 about 50 km off Jervis Bay, New South Wales, Australia
{SWP}
Found floating at surface, dead Architeuthis Entire, portions of arms and tentacles missing, orange skin intact, not foul-smelling; likely very fresh Beak and tissue samples; carcass too heavy to bring aboard ?WL: 3 m [estimate]; WT: >400 lb (180 kg) [estimate] Australian Museum Holland (2012); Smith (2012); Thomas (2012); Hill (2012); numerous media sources Found by The Daily Telegraph columnist Al McGlashan during tuna and swordfish fishing expedition, after spotting albatross sitting on carcass. Tied to boat; photographed and filmed over period of 3 hours. Blue shark measuring 2.5 m filmed feeding on remains. Others on board included Justin Lewis, a film crew, and Phil Bolton, fisheries officer with New South Wales Fishing and Aquaculture. Beak went on display as part of Australian Museum's Deep Ocean exhibition, beginning 16 June 2012.
507
(📷)
July 2012 ~15 km east of Chichi Island, Japan, initially at 630 m depth; later followed to ~900 m depth
{NWP}
Filmed and photographed from submersible, alive Architeuthis Entire, missing both tentacles None WL: 3 m; EL: 8 m [estimate] Robey (2012); Schur (2013); Ito (2013); Revkin (2013); Mullen (2013); [Anonymous] (2013a); Lyden (2013); Schrope (2013); Millikan (2013); Dawkins (2013); Johnston (2013); Frazer (2013); Widder (2013a); Widder (2013b); [NHK] (2013a); [NHK] (2013b); [NHK] (2013c); [NHK] (2013d); Kubodera (2013a); Kubodera (2013b); Sakamoto (2013a); [NHK] (2014); Sakamoto (N.d.) Hellwarth (2012); Dery (2013); Sakamoto (2013b); Lamb (2018:50); numerous media sources Widely reported as first video of live giant squid in natural habitat. Observed swimming against current and holding bait squid in arms. Filmed for 23 minutes by three-man crew from Japan's National Museum of Nature and Science in collaboration with NHK and the Discovery Channel, after around 100 missions and 400 hours. Team included Tsunemi Kubodera, Steve O'Shea, and Edith Widder. Footage officially announced on 10 December 2012, by Robey (2012).
508 10 October 2012 (afternoon) Playa de Getares, Punta Carnero, Algeciras, Andalusia, Spain
{MED}
Found washed ashore Architeuthis dux Entire Entire Female (immature) EL: 6.45/7.5 m; ?WL: 3.6 m; WT: 70 kg El Estrecho Natural Park [Anonymous] (2012a); [Anonymous] (2012b); [Anonymous] (2013b); [Anonymous] (2013c); [Anonymous] (2013d); Muñoz (2013); Prieto (2013); [Anonymous] (2013h) Numerous media sources Largest known specimen from Mediterranean. Found by volunteers who moved it to Cala Arenas, then handed over to CEGMA who transferred it to Algeciras for freezing. Dissected in front of TV cameras on 1 February 2013 by staff from CEPESMA, CSIC, and CEGMA, including Ángel Guerra and Luis Laria. Internal organs examined and tissues sampled for heavy metals and genetic analysis. Specimen found to be extremely thin, with changes in digestive gland and hematopoietic organs. Placed in methacrylate container, first in preservative fluid for 1.5–2 months, then formalin. On public display at El Estrecho Natural Park information point from 22 May through October 2013.
509 3 February 2013 (morning) off Shark's Tooth point, South Bay, Kaikoura, New Zealand
{SWP}
Found floating at surface, dead but fresh "giant squid" Entire, posterior end of mantle missing (otherwise in "perfect" condition) Entire Female EL: ~8 m [estimated ~11 m if complete]; TL: ~6.5 m; WT: >140/150 kg [estimate?] Kaikoura Marine Centre and Aquarium / NMNZ (one tentacle) [Anonymous] (2013e); Dangerfield (2013a); Dangerfield (2013b); Williams (2013) Hill (2015); numerous media sources On public display. Found by Christchurch recreational fishermen Jack and Sharon Osikai around 8 am while returning from fishing trip; towed ashore behind boat. Marine biologist Megan Bosch of Kaikoura Marine Centre and Aquarium speculated bite marks on mantle might have resulted from attack by larger squid. Bosch dissected specimen live on TV3's Campbell Live on 4 February 2013. Stomach contents found to be "well-digested". Specimen on display at aquarium from March 2013 in five custom-made glass containers each holding different parts.
510 19 April 2013 (early morning) Uchinoura Bay, off Uchinoura, Kimotsuki District, Kagoshima Prefecture, Kyushu Island, Japan (31°17′N 131°08′E / 31.283°N 131.133°E / 31.283; 131.133 (Giant squid specimen)) at 45 m depth
{NWP}
Caught alive in set net Architeuthis dux Entire Entire Unclear (young) EL: 608.5 mm; ML: 140.8 mm; VML: 131.0 mm; MW: 29.4 mm [maximum]; HL: 34.7 mm; HW: 32.2 mm; FL: 56.2 mm; FW: 40.5 mm; EyD: 18.2 mm; LRL: 2.2 mm; URL: 2.0 mm; FuCL: 10.2/8.7 mm [left/right]; FuCW: 2.9/2.7 mm [left/right]; WT: 44.8 g; extensive additional measurements Kagoshima City Aquarium "Io World" Wada et al. (2015:3); Jozuka (2015); Yuhas (2015) Shimada et al. (2017:9); numerous media sources Caught by Shioji Maru. Species identification confirmed by COI sequence analysis. Exhibited at Kagoshima City Aquarium "Io World" between 20 November 2015 and 31 January 2016, preserved in ethanol.
511 28 April 2013 near Cape Campbell Lighthouse, Marlborough, New Zealand
{SWP}
Found washed ashore Architeuthis dux Entire, missing tentacles and arm tips, bite damage (otherwise in good condition; eye(s) and red skin intact) None; left to decompose on beach WL: 1.5 m; AL: ~0.5 m Kirk (2013); [Anonymous] (2013f) Found by Marlborough resident Jason Gluer while quad biking. Inspected by ranger and photographs sent to Te Papa for research purposes. Measurements provided by Department of Conservation spokesperson Clare Duston.
512
(📷)
30 May 2013 off Brazil (25°36′S 042°21′W / 25.600°S 42.350°W / -25.600; -42.350 (Giant squid specimen); see map)
{SWA}
Found floating at surface, dead Architeuthis dux Entire; "looked relatively well preserved, but had begun to deteriorate due to wave action" None; not collected "length": ~2 m [estimate] Leite et al. (2016) Sighted by three Marine Mammal Observers (Luciana Leite, Daniel Campbell & Leonardo Versiani) on duty onboard an operating seismic vessel. As the specimen was not examined its death cannot be unequivocally attributed to the seismic activity. Species identified by teuthologist Ángel Guerra from photograph by Leite. A "similar, smaller squid" was seen by Versiani in the same area earlier that month, but no photos were taken.
513 14 June 2013 off Hamada, Shimane Prefecture, Japan (34°56′N 131°59′E / 34.933°N 131.983°E / 34.933; 131.983 (Giant squid specimen)) at 120–130 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in purse seine net Architeuthis dux Entire Entire Unclear (young) EL: 1629.0 mm; ML: 332.0 mm; MW: 88.5 mm [maximum]; HL: 47.0 mm; HW: 43.1 mm; FL: 100.1 mm; FW: 63.1 mm; EyD: 36.3 mm; LRL: 4.0 mm; URL: 4.2 mm; FuCL: 30.1/28.3 mm [left/right]; FuCW: 6.7/6.7 mm [left/right]; WT: 390.6 g; extensive additional measurements Shimane Prefectural Fisheries Technology Center Wada et al. (2015:3); Jozuka (2015); Yuhas (2015) Shimada et al. (2017:9); numerous media sources Caught by Yoshikatsu Maru in same purse seine net as 1487 mm EL specimen; one of the two was exhibited at the Shimane Prefectural Fisheries Technology Center from 18 March 2015, preserved in ethanol (Shimada et al., 2017:9). Species identification confirmed by COI sequence analysis.
514 14 June 2013 off Hamada, Shimane Prefecture, Japan (34°56′N 131°59′E / 34.933°N 131.983°E / 34.933; 131.983 (Giant squid specimen)) at 120–130 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in purse seine net Architeuthis dux Entire Entire Unclear (young) EL: 1487.0 mm; ML: 332.0 mm; MW: 58.5 mm [maximum]; HL: 33.0 mm; HW: 38.5 mm; FL: 111.9 mm; FW: 67.3 mm; EyD: 36.2 mm; LRL: 4.2 mm; URL: 4.1 mm; FuCL: 27.0/26.5 mm [left/right]; FuCW: 6.4/6.7 mm [left/right]; WT: 357.0 g; extensive additional measurements Shimane Prefectural Fisheries Technology Center Wada et al. (2015:3); Jozuka (2015); Yuhas (2015) Shimada et al. (2017:9); numerous media sources Caught by Yoshikatsu Maru in same purse seine net as 1629 mm EL specimen; one of the two was exhibited at the Shimane Prefectural Fisheries Technology Center from 18 March 2015, preserved in ethanol (Shimada et al., 2017:9). Species identification confirmed by COI sequence analysis.
515
(📷)
2013 McDougalls Bay, South Africa
{SEA}
Found washed ashore, alive Architeuthis Entire; eye(s) and skin largely intact, tentacles missing Scheepers (2017) Kemper (2017:2) Photographed on beach while alive ("still breathing").
16 August 2013 (afternoon) ~0.5 mi (0.80 km) off Merón beach, Villaviciosa, Asturias, Spain
{NEA}
Found floating at surface, dead Architeuthis dux Entire, fresh; with multiple bite marks, missing ends of arms and tentacles, eyes intact Entire Female WT: >70/80 kg; EL: 8 m [estimate] CEPESMA Ramos (2013); [Anonymous] (2013i); [Anonymous] (2013j); [Anonymous] (2013k); [Anonymous] (2013l); Salas (2013) Likely carried from Carrandi Trench by strong northeast winds. Found by Gijón fishermen Caesar Ceñal and Pachi Sánchez. Brought to Gijón port and there examined by Luis Laria. Transferred by CEPESMA to Museo del Calamar Gigante in Luarca and frozen for necropsy. Necropsied on 29 September 2013 with male specimen from Palombina. Cause of death determined to be asphyxiation by larger female of possibly more than twice its weight, according to Luis Laria.
516 mid-September 2013 [recovered just over 10 days prior to 1 October] Palombina beach, Llanes, Asturias, Spain
{NEA}
Not stated Architeuthis Entire; poor condition Entire Male WT: 55 kg CEPESMA Salas (2013); [Anonymous] (2013l); del Castillo (2013) Necropsied on 29 September 2013 with female specimen from Merón.
517 1 October 2013 (morning) by mouth of Deva River, La Arena beach, near Pechón, Val de San Vicente, Cantabria, Spain
{NEA}
Found washed ashore Architeuthis dux Entire, missing skin and part of one tentacle, eyes present though burst; good condition with no external signs of bites or attacks Entire Female (adult) EL: 8.08 m; ML: 1.68 m; HL: 40 cm; AL: 2.3 m; TL: 6 m; WT: 150 kg Maritime Museum of Cantabria del Castillo (2013); Chato (2013); San José (2013); [Anonymous] (2013m); [Anonymous] (2013n); [Anonymous] (2013o); Thomas (2013); Bryner (2013) Bolívar (2015); numerous media sources Found and documented by underwater photographer Enrique Talledo. Moved to Maritime Museum of Cantabria in Santander where specimen was cleaned, sampled for analysis, and placed in cold storage (initial cold shock at −20 °C followed by −18 °C) under direction of Gerardo García-Castrillo. On morning of 2 October specimen was injected with alcohol, covered with paper moistened with 10% formalin, and finally covered with transparent film; may eventually be put on display. Entire length initially reported as >10 m and weight as 170, 174, or 180 kg.
19 October 2013 (morning) Grosse Bucht, near Lüderitz, ǃNamiǂNûs, Namibia
{SEA}
Found washed ashore Architeuthis Entire, in "decomposed state"; most limbs missing ML: 1.35 m; ?EL: 4–5 m [estimate]; AC: 18 cm ["tentacles"] Ngulu (2013) Kemper (2017:2) Found by someone on 19 October, then again the next day by Walvis Bay resident Johan van den Westhuizen, who provided measurements. Marine scientist Jean-Paul Roux from the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources said "inspectors could not verify the species due its decomposed state".
518 4 January 2014 off Himi-shi, Toyama Prefecture, Japan (36°32′N 137°02′E / 36.54°N 137.04°E / 36.54; 137.04 (Giant squid specimen)) at <100 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net for Japanese amberjack, dead Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing WL: 350 cm [specimen A-1 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Yoshikawa (2014); Saul (2014); Kubodera et al. (2016, 1 fig. in supplementary material) Fuji News Network report, 4 January 2014; [Anonymous] (2014h); Sakamoto (2014) Found by fisherman; landed at Himi fishing port. Covered by TBS News.
519
(📷)
8 January 2014 (morning) 1 km off Shirose, Sado Island, Niigata Prefecture, Japan (38°04′N 138°16′E / 38.07°N 138.27°E / 38.07; 138.27 (Giant squid specimen)) at 70 m depth
{NWP}
Found in stationary net; filmed alive at surface; died during retrieval Architeuthis dux Entire Entire; missing tentacles and most of red skin Female [fide Kubodera et al. (2016); reported as male by other sources] DML: 187 cm; WL: 411.4 cm [406 cm fide Kubodera et al. (2016)]; EL: ~8 m [estimate]; WT: 163 kg Fisheries Ocean Research Institute, Niigata Prefecture [specimen A-2 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Yamamoto (2014); Thomas (2014); [Anonymous] (2014a); Hofilena (2014); Krishnan (2014); Saijo (2014); Yoshikawa (2014); Saul (2014); [Anonymous] (2015a); Higuchi et al. (2016); Kubodera et al. (2016, 1 fig. in supplementary material) Sakamoto (2014); numerous media sources Caught by fisherman Shigenori Goto, who also caught specimen on 10 February 2014. Found in net for Japanese amberjacks (Seriola quinqueradiata) at 70 m depth at around 7 am local time; video footage recorded. Animal died shortly after being brought to surface. Reported by M. Higuchi of the Niigata Prefectural Fisheries and Marine Research Institute (where specimen was studied), who photographed it in Sado Ryotsu Fishing Port. Delivered frozen to Sapporo Maruyama Zoo in Hokkaido, where thawed, spread out for display and frozen again; briefly exhibited there in frozen state in the open air from 1 January 2015 (freezing temperatures at the time kept it "fresh"). Visitors were invited to touch it but warned of its strong smell.
520 19 January 2014 Arahama Beach, Kashiwazaki-shi, Niigata Prefecture, Japan (37°14′N 138°20′E / 37.24°N 138.34°E / 37.24; 138.34 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Found stranded on beach, dead Architeuthis dux Head and arms only; tentacles missing AL: 1.2 m [specimen A-3 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Yoshikawa (2014); Kubodera et al. (2016) Sakamoto (2014) Found by local people. Reported by K. Minowa of Kashiwazaki City Museum.
521 20 January 2014 [21 January fide Yoshikawa (2014) and Shimada et al. (2017:9)] off Ajiro port, Iwami / 30 km off Aoya-cho, Tottori-shi, Tottori Prefecture, Japan (35°31′N 134°07′E / 35.52°N 134.11°E / 35.52; 134.11 (Giant squid specimen)) at 236 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in bottom gillnets for flounder, alive Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing Entire Female (mature) DML: 170 cm [148 cm fide Shimada et al. (2017:9)]; WL: 340 cm [3.2 m fide Shimada et al. (2017:9)]; EL: ~8 m [estimate] San'in Kaigan Geopark Museum of the Earth and Sea [specimen A-4 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Yoshikawa (2014); Saul (2014); Kubodera et al. (2016) Sakamoto (2014); Shimada et al. (2017:9) On public display. Found by fisherman and reported by T. Wada. Photographed next to person (see Yoshikawa, 2014). Exhibited at San'in Kaigan Geopark Museum of the Earth and Sea from 2 February 2016, preserved in formalin.
522 10 February 2014 [11 February fide Yoshikawa (2014)] 2 km off Shirose, Sado Island, Niigata Prefecture, Japan (38°05′N 138°18′E / 38.08°N 138.30°E / 38.08; 138.30 (Giant squid specimen)) at <274 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in bottom gillnets for anglerfish, alive Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing Male DML: 136 cm; WL: 305 cm; WT: ~100 kg [specimen A-5 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Yoshikawa (2014); Higuchi et al. (2016); Kubodera et al. (2016, 1 fig. in supplementary material) Sakamoto (2014) Caught by fisherman Shigenori Goto, who also caught specimen on 8 January 2014. Reported by M. Higuchi of the Niigata Prefectural Fisheries and Marine Research Institute, who photographed and dissected it with his co-worker at Niigata Sado Ryotsu Fishing Port.
523 13 February 2014 off Washizaki, Sado Island, Niigata Prefecture, Japan (38°11′N 138°20′E / 38.19°N 138.33°E / 38.19; 138.33 (Giant squid specimen)) at <159 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net, alive Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles intact Male DML: 91 cm; EL: 394 cm; WT: 25.2 kg [specimen A-6 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016, 1 fig. in supplementary material) Sakamoto (2014) Reported by S. Abe of the Niigata Prefectural Fisheries and Marine Research Institute, who photographed it in Sado Washizaki Fishing Port.
524
(📷)
25 February 2014 (morning) ~5 km from Moroyose fishing port, Shinonsen, Hyogo Prefecture, Japan (35°23′N 134°15′E / 35.38°N 134.25°E / 35.38; 134.25 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Photographed alive at surface; snared with rope; died during retrieval Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing Not stated Female WL: 4.13 m [410 cm fide Kubodera et al. (2016)]; EL: 8–9 m [estimate]; WT: 150–200 kg [~200 kg fide Kubodera et al. (2016)] [specimen A-7 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] [Anonymous] (2014f); Kubodera et al. (2016) Sakamoto (2014) Spotted by fisherman Tetsuo Okamoto while diving for turban shells at around 10:30 am local time. Squid swam above Okamoto when he was at depth of ~8 m. Squid was secured to boat with a rope and taken to Moroyose port; video footage of live animal recorded. Reported by T. Yamaguchi of NHK.
525 2 March 2014 on the shore of Shiidomari, Sado Island, Niigata Prefecture, Japan (38°05′N 138°17′E / 38.08°N 138.29°E / 38.08; 138.29 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Found stranded on beach, dead Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing Female DML: 135 cm; WL: 285 cm [specimen A-8 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016, 1 fig. in supplementary material) Sakamoto (2014) Reported by S. Abe of the Niigata Prefectural Fisheries and Marine Research Institute, who photographed it as found.
526 4 March 2014 on the rocky shore of Akasaki, Kotoura-cho, Tottori Prefecture, Japan (35°19′N 133°22′E / 35.31°N 133.37°E / 35.31; 133.37 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Found stranded on beach, dead Architeuthis dux Entire DML: 120.8 cm; EL: 462.5 cm [specimen A-9 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) Reported by T. Wada.
527 5 March 2014 off Amarube, Kasumi-ku, Kami-cho, Hyogo Prefecture, Japan (30°32′N 134°20′E / 30.53°N 134.34°E / 30.53; 134.34 (Giant squid specimen)) at <223 m depth
{NWP}
By bottom trawl for firefly squid, dead Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles intact DML: 123 cm; EL: 430 cm; WT: 50 kg [specimen A-10 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) Found by fisherman and reported by T. Wada. Displayed at Kinosaki Marine World.
528
(📷)
12 March 2014 Tokyo Bay, ~50 m offshore, off Yokosuka, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Found floating at surface; captured alive; housed in tank and transported by truck but "died several hours after being caught" Architeuthis Entire Entire, including internal organs; tentacles intact, red skin partly intact Female (immature) ML: 91 cm; EL: 4.38 m [initially reported as 3.6 m]; WT: 24.28 kg; extensive additional measurements [see [Keikyu] (2014b)] Keikyu Aburatsubo Marine Park [Anonymous] (2014g); [Anonymous] (2014t); [Anonymous] (2014u); [Anonymous] (2014v); [Anonymous] (2014w); [Keikyu] (2014a); [Keikyu] (2014b) [Anonymous] (2015i); Shimada et al. (2017:9) On public display. Caught by local fisherman affiliated with Kanagawa Eastern Fisheries Cooperative Association. Public dissection carried out by Tsunemi Kubodera, Toshiaki Kuramochi and Akiko Yatabe at Keikyu Aburatsubo Marine Park, Miura, on 8 August 2014 (covered by TV Tokyo). Dissection took 2 hours and involved removal of internal organs, sex determination, and measurements. Small fish bones found in stomach and scales (likely from sardine) in buccal area. Specimen estimated to be 1–2 years old. On display at Keikyu Aburatsubo Marine Park (as is #578) in acrylic tank (2 m × 1 m × 55 cm), preserved in formalin, from 13 September 2014.
529 16 March 2014 Benten-hama, Itoigawa-shi, Niigata Prefecture, Japan (37°02′N 137°34′E / 37.04°N 137.56°E / 37.04; 137.56 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Found stranded on beach, dead Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing Female DML: 196 cm; WL: 446 cm; WT: ~200 kg [specimen A-11 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016, 1 fig. in supplementary material) Sakamoto (2014) Reported and photographed as found by M. Baba of Joetsu Aquarium Museum.
530 24 March 2014 30 km off Mishima, Hagi-shi, Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan (35°05′N 131°06′E / 35.08°N 131.10°E / 35.08; 131.10 (Giant squid specimen)) at <121 m depth
{NWP}
By bottom trawl Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles intact Entire Male DML: 116 cm; WL: 270 cm; EL: 5.71 m Shimane AQUAS Aquarium [specimen A-12 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) Sakamoto (2014); Shimada et al. (2017:9) On public display. Found by fisherman and reported by T. Fujita of Shimane AQUAS Aquarium, where specimen has been on display since 18 March 2015, preserved in formalin.
531 26 March 2014 (early morning) 200 m off Hayoshi Port, Sado Island, Niigata Prefecture, Japan (38°04′N 138°16′E / 38.07°N 138.26°E / 38.07; 138.26 (Giant squid specimen)) at ~20 m depth [<206 m fide Kubodera et al. (2016)]
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net, alive Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles intact, red skin missing Entire Female DML: 84 cm; EL: 448 cm; WT: 33.2 kg National Museum of Nature and Science facility (Tsukuba) [specimen A-13 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kakuno (2014); Higuchi et al. (2016); Kubodera et al. (2016) Sakamoto (2014) Caught by local fisherman Yuji Kawaguchi. Reported by M. Higuchi of the Niigata Prefectural Fisheries and Marine Research Institute.
532 26 March 2014 off Ryotsu Port, Sado Island, Niigata Prefecture, Japan (38°02′N 138°16′E / 38.04°N 138.26°E / 38.04; 138.26 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Found floating at surface, alive Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles, eye(s) and red skin intact Entire Male DML: 110 cm; EL: 435 cm; WT: 37.7 kg National Museum of Nature and Science facility (Tsukuba) [specimen A-14 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kakuno (2014); Higuchi et al. (2016); Kubodera et al. (2016, 1 fig. in supplementary material) Sakamoto (2014) Caught later the same day as Hayoshi Port specimen, by different local fisherman. Reported by M. Higuchi of the Niigata Prefectural Fisheries and Marine Research Institute, who photographed it in Sado Ryotsu Fishing Port.
533 7 April 2014 Toyama Bay, 1 km off Yokataminatomachi, Toyama-shi, Toyama Prefecture, Japan (36°28′N 137°09′E / 36.46°N 137.15°E / 36.46; 137.15 (Giant squid specimen)) at <100 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net for firefly squid, alive Architeuthis dux Entire; missing ends of tentacle(s) Not stated Male DML: ~1.5 m; WL: ~3.5 m; EL: 7 m [estimate] [specimen A-15 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] [Anonymous] (2014h); Kubodera et al. (2016) The Sankei Shimbun, 7 April 2014; [Anonymous] (2014i); [Anonymous] (2014m); Sakamoto (2014) Alive at time of capture, dead when landed. Found by fisherman; examined and measured by expert(s) from Uozu Aquarium.
534
(📷)
8 April 2014 (morning) Toyama Bay, 1.5 km off Shinminato, Imizu-shi, Toyama Prefecture, Japan (36°29′N 137°04′E / 36.48°N 137.07°E / 36.48; 137.07 (Giant squid specimen)) at <300 m depth
{NWP}
By bottom trawl, alive; briefly kept alive in tank Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles intact Not stated DML: 110 cm; WL: 275 cm; EL: 510 m [specimen A-16 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] [Anonymous] (2014i); [Anonymous] (2014j); Kubodera et al. (2016) The Sankei Shimbun, 8 April 2014; [Anonymous] (2014m); Sakamoto (2014) Second specimen from Toyama Bay in two days. Caught in net for Japanese glass shrimp (fide Kubodera et al., 2016) or Metapenaeopsis lata (broad velvet shrimp). Landed at Shinminato fishing port. Survived in tank for two hours after landing. Tasted by Kazuhisa Hagiwara of Shinminato Fisheries Cooperative Association who described it as very salty. Osamu Inamura, director of Uozu Aquarium, suggested global warming might be responsible for influx of specimens as giant squid's range is pushed northward.
535 9 April 2014 west of Nekozaki Peninsula, Toyooka-shi, Hyogo Prefecture, Japan (35°24′N 134°27′E / 35.40°N 134.45°E / 35.40; 134.45 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Found floating at surface, dead Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles intact DML: 112 cm; EL: 594 cm Kinosaki Marine World [specimen A-17 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) Found by angler and reported by T. Wada.
536 12 April 2014 (morning) off Aika-cho, Matsue-shi, Shimane Prefecture, Japan (35°18′N 132°32′E / 35.30°N 132.54°E / 35.30; 132.54 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Found floating at water's edge, alive Architeuthis dux Entire Not stated EL: ~5 m [specimen A-18 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] [Anonymous] (2014k); Kubodera et al. (2016) The Shikoku Shimbun, 12 April 2014; Sakamoto (2014) Found by Etsuo Harada and others at 9 am. Pulled to land and died soon afterwards.
537 12 April 2014 off Waki, Sado Island, Niigata Prefecture, Japan (38°05′N 138°17′E / 38.09°N 138.29°E / 38.09; 138.29 (Giant squid specimen)) at <200 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net Architeuthis dux Entire? DML: ~100 cm [specimen A-19 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) Reported by M. Higuchi of the Niigata Prefectural Fisheries and Marine Research Institute.
538 13 April 2014 at the mouth of Yoshida river, Makidani, Iwami-cho, Tottori Prefecture, Japan (35°21′N 134°12′E / 35.35°N 134.2°E / 35.35; 134.2 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Found stranded on beach, dead Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles intact Female DML: 121.5 cm; EL: 637 cm [specimen A-20 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) Reported by T. Wada.
539 18 April 2014 (morning) 2/3 km off Ohtomari-machi, Nanao-shi, Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan (36°35′N 137°03′E / 36.58°N 137.05°E / 36.58; 137.05 (Giant squid specimen)) at <94 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net for Japanese amberjack, dead Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles intact Not stated ML: 0.78 m; EL: 4.7/4.8 m; WT: ~30/50 kg [specimen A-21 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] [Anonymous] (2014l); [Anonymous] (2014m); [Anonymous] (2014n); Shinya (2014); Kubodera et al. (2016) The Hokkoku Shimbun, 19 April 2014; [Anonymous] (2014q); [Anonymous] (2014r); [Anonymous] (2014s); Sakamoto (2014) Became entangled in fixed net around 5:30 am. Taken in Styrofoam box to supermarket in Shinbohon, Kanazawa, and there displayed on ice between 18 and 19 April. Identification confirmed by Shinichiro Ikeguchi, assistant director of Notojima Aquarium, based on size and fin shape.
540 20 April 2014 ~130 km off Kitadaito, [Daitō Islands], Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, at 500 m depth
{NWP}
Caught giant squid ("ダイオウイカ") Entire, fresh; missing ends of tentacles and some arms Entire WL: ~2.7 m; WT: ~32 kg Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium? [Anonymous] (2014o) Caught by fishermen targeting Thysanoteuthis rhombus (ソデイカ). Transferred to Okinawa Churashima Foundation in Motobu, where specimen was examined beginning on 25 April. Photographed being measured, later fixed in formalin.
541
(📷)
27 April 2014 (morning) ~1 km off Furai port, Saikai, Shika-machi, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan (37°04′N 136°23′E / 37.07°N 136.39°E / 37.07; 136.39 (Giant squid specimen)) at <57 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net, alive; briefly kept alive in tank Architeuthis dux Entire, good condition; eyes, tentacles and some red skin intact Entire Female [fide Kubodera et al. (2016); reported as male by other sources] DML: 111 cm; WL: 289 cm; EL: 5.02 m [565 cm fide Kubodera et al. (2016)]; WT: ~60 kg Notojima Aquarium [specimen A-22 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] [Anonymous] (2014p); [Anonymous] (2014q); [Anonymous] (2014r); [Anonymous] (2014s); Kubodera et al. (2016) Sakamoto (2014) Caught around 4:30 am by fishermen including deputy helmsman Isamu Mukai and landed in Togi fishing port. Still alive, specimen was transported in container to Notojima Aquarium in Nanao, but died 3 hours after capture. During transport, specimen was observed opening and closing its eyes and hyponome and clinging to container with its suckers; video footage of live animal recorded. Measured at aquarium and displayed there between 3 and 5 May (Golden Week); also dissected there. Reported by S. Ikeguchi of Notojima Aquarium.
542 6 May 2014 north off Kyotango-cho, Kyotango-shi, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan (35°31′N 135°03′E / 35.52°N 135.05°E / 35.52; 135.05 (Giant squid specimen)) at <218 m depth
{NWP}
By bottom trawl, dead Architeuthis dux Entire? None; discarded DML: ~100 cm None [specimen A-23 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) Sakamoto (2014) Found by fisherman and reported by Y. Ueno of the Fisheries Technology Department, Kyoto Prefectural Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Technology Center.
543 7 May 2014 off Awashima Island, Awashimaura-mura, Niigata Prefecture, Japan (38°16′N 139°10′E / 38.26°N 139.17°E / 38.26; 139.17 (Giant squid specimen)) at <79 m depth
{NWP}
By bottom trawl Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles intact DML: 92 cm; EL: 420 cm [specimen A-24 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) Nigataken Suikaiken Dayori (No. 30)
544 4 September 2014 off Hamada-shi, Shimane Prefecture, Japan (35°01′N 131°23′E / 35.02°N 131.39°E / 35.02; 131.39 (Giant squid specimen)) at 120 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net? Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing Entire Male DML: 140 cm; WL: 314 cm Shimane AQUAS Aquarium [specimen B-1 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) Isobe (2019) Reported by T. Fujita of Shimane AQUAS Aquarium, where specimen was exhibited.
545 7 September 2014 ~100 mi (160 km) off Matagorda coast, Texas, United States (Gulf of Mexico)
{NWA}
Found floating at surface, dead "giant squid" Entire; missing red skin and posterior end of mantle (bite marks) Not stated ?EL: 10 ft (3.0 m); WT: 200 lb (91 kg) "donated to researchers" Azad (2014) Found by fisherman Michael Belvin when returning from fishing trip with friends. Identification confirmed by Houston Zoo aquarium supervisor Mike Concannon. Belvin speculated it might have been attacked by a mako shark, based on bite marks. Find covered by KTRK-TV.
546 22 October 2014 900 m off Komeno, Echizen, Fukui Prefecture, Japan (35°32′N 135°35′E / 35.53°N 135.58°E / 35.53; 135.58 (Giant squid specimen)) at 65 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net, dead Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles largely missing Male DML: 117 cm; WL: 264 cm; EL: 288 cm; WT: ~40 kg [specimen B-2 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016, 1 fig. in supplementary material) Reported and photographed by S. Sasai of Echizen Matsushima Aquarium, where specimen was exhibited for four days.
547
(📷)
8 November 2014 1 km off Waki, Sado Island, Niigata Prefecture, Japan (38°05′N 138°17′E / 38.09°N 138.29°E / 38.09; 138.29 (Giant squid specimen)) at <200 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacle(s) present EL: 260 cm; WT: ~25 kg [specimen B-3 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] [Anonymous] (2014x); Kubodera et al. (2016); Higuchi et al. (2016) The Asahi Shimbun, 11 November 2014 Displayed at Sado Fish Festival in Ryotsu Port, Sado, on 9 November.
548 20 November 2014 east of Okinoshima, Tottori Prefecture, Japan (36°10′N 133°24′E / 36.16°N 133.4°E / 36.16; 133.4 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Caught in purse seine, dead Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing, head and mantle separated Female DML: 183.5 cm; WT: 130 kg [specimen B-4 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) Reported by K. Ichisawa of Tottori Prefectural Museum. Landed at Sakai port.
549 24 November 2014 off Tsunegami Peninsula, around Ongami-jima, Wakasa, Fukui Prefecture, Japan (35°23′N 135°28′E / 35.38°N 135.47°E / 35.38; 135.47 (Giant squid specimen)) at <60 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net?, alive Architeuthis dux Entire, good condition; tentacle(s) present Entire Male DML: 137 cm [134 cm fide Shimada et al. (2017:9)]; EL: 740 cm; WT: ~60 kg Echizen Matsushima Aquarium [specimen B-5 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016, 1 fig. in supplementary material) The Chunichi Shimbun, 24 November 2014; Shimada et al. (2017:9) On public display. Examined at Echizen Matsushima Aquarium and exhibited there since 27 March 2015, preserved in formalin. Photographed laid out on tarpaulin by S. Sasai.
550 24 November 2014 1 km off Tangocho-taiza, Kyotango-shi, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan (35°27′N 135°02′E / 35.45°N 135.04°E / 35.45; 135.04 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Found floating at surface, dead Architeuthis dux Head and arms only; tentacles missing None AL: 1.2 m [specimen B-6 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016, 1 fig. in supplementary material) Discovered by an angler and reported by Y. Ueno of the Fisheries Technology Department, Kyoto Prefectural Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Technology Center, who photographed it in the water. Specimen left undisturbed.
551
(📷)
27 November 2014 3.3 km off Yahatacho, Imizu-shi, Toyama Prefecture, Japan (36°29′N 137°04′E / 36.49°N 137.07°E / 36.49; 137.07 (Giant squid specimen)) at 330 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in bottom trawl for glass shrimp, alive Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacle(s) present DML: 155 cm; EL: 630 cm [specimen B-7 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) The Chunichi Shimbun 27 November 2014 Served at an event after being hard cured.
552 9 December 2014 Kirihama beach, Takenocho, Toyooka-shi, Hyogo Prefecture, Japan (35°23′N 134°26′E / 35.39°N 134.44°E / 35.39; 134.44 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Found stranded on beach, dead Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing WL: 350 cm; WT: ~100 kg Museum of Nature and Human Activities, Hyogo [specimen B-8 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) Discovered by local people and reported by T. Wada of Shimane AQUAS Aquarium.
553
(📷)
23 December 2014 off Ineura, Ine, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan (35°23′N 135°10′E / 35.38°N 135.17°E / 35.38; 135.17 (Giant squid specimen)) at <60 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net, alive Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing Entire WL: 3.2 m [~2.5 m after drying]; BL+HL?: 2.3 m; WT: ~70 kg Kyoto Aquarium [specimen B-9 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] [Anonymous] (2014y); [Anonymous] (2015j); [Anonymous] (2015k); [Anonymous] (2015l); [Anonymous] (2015m); [Anonymous] (2016g); Kubodera et al. (2016) Shimada et al. (2017:9) On public display. Died during retrieval. Stored frozen at Kyoto Aquarium where on public display 24–25 December 2014; subsequently sent to research facility. Specially dried by seafood processing company Gogyofuku Co. over 8 days beginning on 16 July 2015 (this process takes half a day for a squid of normal size); shrunk considerably during processing. Displayed at Suma Aqualife Park in Kobe from 30 July to 8 November 2015, and in Kyoto Aquarium from 20 April 2016.
554 24 December 2014 Honjyo beach, Ine, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan (35°26′N 135°10′E / 35.43°N 135.16°E / 35.43; 135.16 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Found stranded on beach, dead Architeuthis dux Entire; only one tentacle present DML: 178 cm; EL: 507 cm; WT: ~100 kg [specimen B-10 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) Discovered by local people and reported by Y. Ueno of the Fisheries Technology Department, Kyoto Prefectural Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Technology Center, which recovered the specimen.
555 28 December 2014 600 m off Tomari, Obama-shi, Fukui Prefecture, Japan (35°19′N 135°25′E / 35.32°N 135.42°E / 35.32; 135.42 (Giant squid specimen)) at <20 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net, alive Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing None; returned to sea WL: ~300 cm [specimen B-11 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) Fukui Shimbun 28 December 2014
556
(📷)
31 December 2014 2 km off Toyama-shi, Toyama Prefecture, Japan (36°28′N 137°08′E / 36.47°N 137.13°E / 36.47; 137.13 (Giant squid specimen)) at <100 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net, alive Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing ?WL: ~6 m [specimen B-12 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] [Anonymous] (2014z); Kubodera et al. (2016) Video footage recorded.
557 6 January 2015 Oobaneo beach, Iwami, Tottori Prefecture, Japan (35°22′N 134°12′E / 35.36°N 134.2°E / 35.36; 134.2 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Found stranded on beach, dead Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing DML: 180.5 cm; WL: 355 cm [specimen B-13 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016, 1 fig. in supplementary material) Discovered by local people and reported by Y. Kiyosue of Notojima Seaside Park, who photographed it as found.
558 13 January 2015 south of Tsubakiyama, Henashi, Fukaura-machi, Aomori Prefecture, Japan (40°21′N 139°31′E / 40.35°N 139.51°E / 40.35; 139.51 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Found stranded on beach, dead Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing Male DML: 127 cm [specimen B-14 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016, 2 figs. in supplementary material) Found by fisherman and reported by E. Koganezaki of the Ajigasawa Fisheries Office, who photographed it as found and dissected in situ. Specimen had empty stomach.
559 15 January 2015 500 m off Iino, Nyuzen-cho, Toyama Prefecture, Japan (36°34′N 137°15′E / 36.56°N 137.25°E / 36.56; 137.25 (Giant squid specimen)) at 50–60 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net for amberjack Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing WL: 420 cm [specimen B-15 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) Found by fisherman and reported by M. Kanbayashi of Kitanihon Broadcasting.
560 19 January 2015 2 km off Shinminato, Hachiman-machi, Imizu-shi, Toyama Prefecture, Japan (36°28′N 137°04′E / 36.47°N 137.06°E / 36.47; 137.06 (Giant squid specimen)) at 60 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net, alive Architeuthis dux Entire DML: ~200 cm; EL: ~600 cm; WT: ~200 kg [specimen B-16 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) The Toyama Shimbun, 20 January 2015 Found by fisherman. Exhibited at Michinoeki Shinminato.
561
(📷)
19 January 2015 2 km off Yokata fishing port, Toyama-shi, Toyama Prefecture, Japan (36°28′N 137°07′E / 36.46°N 137.11°E / 36.46; 137.11 (Giant squid specimen)) at 90 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net, alive; filmed in water by divers Architeuthis dux Entire WL: ~300 cm [specimen B-17 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] [Anonymous] (2015d); Kubodera et al. (2016) Fuji News Network report, 19 January 2015 Found by fisherman. Video footage recorded.
562
(📷)
22 January 2015 2 km off Iwase, Toyama-shi, Toyama Prefecture, Japan (36°28′N 137°08′E / 36.47°N 137.14°E / 36.47; 137.14 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net for amberjack, alive Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacle(s) present DML: ~200 cm; EL: ~600 cm; ?WL: ~3 m [specimen B-18 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] [Anonymous] (2015b); [Anonymous] (2015c); Kubodera et al. (2016) The Kitanippon Shimbun, 23 January 2015 Found alive in stationary net around 3:30 am; caught with school of Japanese common squid (Todarodes pacificus). Filmed and photographed alive in net. Died shortly after being pulled onto ship. Landed at Iwase port and there measured.
563
(📷)
24 January 2015 (reported) off Daitō Islands, Okinawa Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Filmed alive at surface "大王イカ" Entire, good condition; red skin somewhat damaged None given Uchima (2015) Filmed grasping Thysanoteuthis rhombus caught on fishing lure; seen inking after releasing prey.
29 January 2015 off Shinminato, Hachiman-machi, Imizu-shi, Toyama Prefecture, Japan (36°28′N 137°04′E / 36.47°N 137.07°E / 36.47; 137.07 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net, alive Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing DML: 170 cm; WL: ~400 cm [specimen B-19 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) The Kitanippon Shimbun, 30 January 2015 Found by fisherman. Specimen B-20 was found nearby on the same day.
564 29 January 2015 off Shinminato, Hachiman-machi, Imizu-shi, Toyama Prefecture, Japan (36°28′N 137°04′E / 36.47°N 137.07°E / 36.47; 137.07 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net, alive Architeuthis dux Entire Entire ML: 180 cm; EL: 6.3 m; WT: 150 kg [fide Shimada et al. (2017:9); none given by Kubodera et al. (2016)] [specimen B-20 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) The Kitanippon Shimbun, 30 January 2015; Shimada et al. (2017:9) On public display. Found by fisherman. Specimen B-19 was found nearby on the same day. Exhibited in dry state at local fish market (新湊きっときと市場) from February 2015.
565
(📷)
3 February 2015 (morning) 2 km off Yokata fishing port, Toyama-shi, Toyama Prefecture, Japan (36°28′N 137°07′E / 36.46°N 137.11°E / 36.46; 137.11 (Giant squid specimen)) at 78.4 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net, alive; filmed in water by two divers; swam away slowly once released Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing, red skin somewhat damaged None DML: ~200 cm; WL: ~400 cm None [specimen B-21 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] [Anonymous] (2015e); Kubodera et al. (2016) Fuji News Network report, 4 February 2015; Wakabayashi (2016); Matsumoto (2019a, fig.) Found by fisherman. Video footage recorded; seen inking. Featured in Japanese documentary (Matsumoto, 2019a, b).
566 4 February 2015 1 km off Aoshima, Uozu-shi, Toyama Prefecture, Japan (36°30′N 137°14′E / 36.5°N 137.23°E / 36.5; 137.23 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net Architeuthis dux Entire WL: ~400 cm [specimen B-22 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) Toyama Television report, 4 February 2015 Found by fisherman.
567 6 February 2015 500 m off Kodomari, Misakimachi, Suzu-shi, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan (37°16′N 137°13′E / 37.26°N 137.22°E / 37.26; 137.22 (Giant squid specimen)) at 40 m depth
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net, alive; released Architeuthis dux Entire WL: 335 cm [specimen B-23 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) The Hokkoku Shimbun, 6 February 2015 Found by fisherman.
568 7 February 2015 2 km off Iorimachi, Nanao-shi, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan (37°01′N 137°02′E / 37.02°N 137.04°E / 37.02; 137.04 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net, alive Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing WL: 420 cm; WT: ~200 kg [specimen B-24 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) The Yomiuri Shimbun, 8 February 2015 Found by fisherman. Exhibited at Notojima Seaside Park.
569 7 February 2015 2 km off Shichimi, Noto-cho, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan (37°09′N 137°04′E / 37.15°N 137.07°E / 37.15; 137.07 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net, alive Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing WL: 360 cm; WT: ~150 kg [specimen B-25 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) The Yomiuri Shimbun, 8 February 2015 Found by fisherman. Exhibited at Notojima Seaside Park.
570 16 February 2015 1.5 km off Shirouse, Sado Island, Niigata Prefecture, Japan (38°04′N 138°17′E / 38.07°N 138.28°E / 38.07; 138.28 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net, alive Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing WL: 415 cm [specimen B-26 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) The Niigata Nippo, 16 February 2015 Found by fisherman. Exhibited at a local supermarket.
571 17 February 2015 Gunkan rock, Gumizaki-cho, Fukui-shi, Fukui Prefecture, Japan (36°01′N 136°00′E / 36.02°N 136°E / 36.02; 136 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Found stranded at rock reef, dead Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing None Female DML: 175 cm; WL: 377 cm None [specimen B-27 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016, 2 figs. in supplementary material) Found by local people and reported by S. Sasai of Echizen Matsushima Aquarium, who photographed specimen. Dissected and then discarded.
572 18 February 2015 Tsunoshima, Toyokita-cho, Shimonoseki-shi, Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan (34°13′N 130°31′E / 34.21°N 130.51°E / 34.21; 130.51 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Found stranded at rock reef, dead Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing WL: 286 cm; WT: 65.5 kg [specimen B-28 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) The Yamaguchi Shimbun, 19 February 2015 Found by a tourist. Exhibited at Shimonoseki Kaikyokan aquarium during the summer holidays.
573
(📷)
23 February 2015 (morning) ferry pier Koshinokata-machi, Imizushi, Toyama Prefecture, Japan (36°28′N 137°04′E / 36.46°N 137.06°E / 36.46; 137.06 (Giant squid specimen)) at 1 m depth
{NWP}
Found floating at surface, alive; swam away Architeuthis dux Entire, seemingly in perfect condition; red skin fully intact None WL: 250–300 cm None [specimen B-29 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] [Anonymous] (2015f); Kubodera et al. (2016) Tulip Television report, 23 February 2015 Spotted by harbour official at around 8:50 am.
574 1 March 2015 1–3 km off Namerikawa-shi, Toyama Prefecture, Japan (36°28′N 137°11′E / 36.47°N 137.19°E / 36.47; 137.19 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net for firefly squid, alive; disposed of at sea Architeuthis dux Entire None DML: ~200 cm None [specimen B-30 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) Toyama Television report, 1 March 2015 Found by fisherman.
575 1 March 2015 off Takasu, Hamaju-cho, Fukui-shi, Fukui Prefecture, Japan (36.07°N ?°E) at 200 m depth
{NWP}
By bottom trawl, dead Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing Female DML: 177 cm; WL: 376 cm [specimen B-31 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016) Found by fisherman and reported by S. Sasai of Echizen Matsushima Aquarium. Specimen had empty stomach.
10 March 2015 Osaki beach, Nishiyama-cho, Kashiwazaki-shi, Niigata Prefecture, Japan (37°17′N 138°23′E / 37.29°N 138.38°E / 37.29; 138.38 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Found stranded on beach, dead Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing DML: 161 cm; WL: 327 cm [specimen B-32 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016, 1 fig. in supplementary material) Found by local people. Reported and photographed by K. Minowa of Kashiwazaki City Museum.
576
(📷)
25 March 2015 (reported) off Okinoerabujima, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Photographed alive at surface giant squid ("ダイオウイカ") Entire, seemingly in perfect condition; red skin fully intact ?WL: ~5 m [estimate] [Anonymous] (2015g); [Anonymous] (2015h) Photographed alive at surface by fisherman Shigeki Yamashita. Pink fishing lure (20 cm long) attracted large Thysanoteuthis rhombus (~1.2 m long, >20 kg), which in turn attracted giant squid.
577 26 March 2015 Yoneyama beach, Kashiwazaki-shi, Niigata Prefecture, Japan (37°11′N 138°15′E / 37.18°N 138.25°E / 37.18; 138.25 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Found stranded on beach, dead Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles missing None DML: 190 cm; WL: 360 cm None [specimen B-33 of Kubodera et al. (2016)] Kubodera et al. (2016, 1 fig. in supplementary material) Found by local people. Reported and photographed by M. Baba of Joetsu Aquarium Museum. Swept out to sea.
578
(📷)
6 May 2015 (afternoon) Tokyo Bay, Otsu fishing port, Yokosuka, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Found floating at surface, alive; scooped up with rake net and placed in water tank; died soon afterwards Architeuthis dux Entire Entire Unknown (juvenile) EL: 126.4 cm; DML: 29.0 cm; HL+AL: 46.6 cm; FL: 95.0 mm; FW: 69.7 mm; WT: 1.034 kg Keikyu Aburatsubo Marine Park [Anonymous] (2015i); [Keikyu] (2015a); [Keikyu] (2015b) Shimada et al. (2017:9) On public display. Found by fisherman Seiichi Ogawa while catching sea cucumbers. Briefly kept alive in tank. Frozen until examination at National Museum of Nature and Science facility (Tsukuba) on 29 June 2015, when identified as giant squid. On display at Keikyu Aburatsubo Marine Park (as is #528) from 29 November 2015; embedded in transparent acrylic block (88 cm × 33 cm × 7.8 cm) and installed on automatic rotating table to allow viewing from all sides. Specimen may belong to long arm type or middle arm type; cannot be determined due to juvenile nature. Estimated to be <1 year old.
13 May 2015 (morning) South Bay beach, Kaikoura, New Zealand
{SWP}
Found washed ashore "giant squid" Entire Entire BL: ~2 m; TL: >5 m; EyD: 19 cm Kaikoura Marine Centre and Aquarium Hill (2015) Numerous media sources Found by Bruce Bennett at 8:30 am while walking dog. Moved to Kaikoura Marine Centre and Aquarium and stored there in freezer.
579 6 August 2015 (morning) ~50 mi (80 km) north of Getaria and Zumaia, opposite Lekeitio, Basque Country, Spain
{NEA}
By trawl Architeuthis Entire Entire WL: <8 m; ?WL: ~4.5 m; WT: >80 kg CEPESMA (Parque de la Vida, Valdés) Bolívar (2015); Gómez & Bolívar (2015) [Anonymous] (2015o); Del Gallo (2015) Caught by fisherman Antonio Do Veriño. Landed in port of Santander where it was auctioned and won by BM supermarkets, which placed it on display at their store on Rubén Darío street, Sardinero, Santander. Later handed over to Instituto Español de Oceanografía, who passed it on to CEPESMA in Luarca.
[12] last week of September 2015 off Hawaii
{NEP}
Found floating at surface, dead Architeuthis?; Megalocranchia cf. fisheri (Berry, 1909) Entire; several limbs missing, bite mark in head Entire ?EL: ≥7 ft (2.1 m); WT: 52.7 lb (23.9 kg) [Anonymous] (2015n); Mosendz (2015) Non-architeuthid. Found and retrieved by fishermen with Kona Sea Adventures: boat captain Cyrus Widhalm, deckhands Manny Billegas II and Ian MacKelvie, and anglers Mathew and Miriam Fowler. Squid had apparently been attacked at sea. Landed in Kailua-Kona. Length estimated by laying alongside 72 in (180 cm) fishing bag. Later placed on ice and sent to Washington State for examination. Tentatively identified as Megalocranchia fisheri by marine biologist.
580
(📷)
17 November 2015 (reported) off Hahajima, Ogasawara Islands
{NWP}
Filmed alive at surface giant squid ("ダイオウイカ") Entire; red skin largely intact None given Murata (2015) Photographed and filmed at surface by Keisuke Murata; seen grasping line-caught swordfish.
23 November 2015 (night) El Cudillo fishing ground (#202 on map), near Cañón de Lastres, Gijón, Spain, at 300–400 m depth
{NEA}
By trawl Architeuthis dux Entire Entire Female (immature?) EL: 10 m; WT: 150 kg CEPESMA (Parque de la Vida, Valdés) [Anonymous] (2015o); Del Gallo (2015); [Anonymous] (2015p); Peláez (2015) Numerous media sources Caught by the trawler Minchos VI around 21:30 pm local time, in waters 300 fathoms (550 m) deep. Landed in Muelle del Rendiello, El Musel, Gijón. Frozen in Gijón fish market before being transferred to CEPESMA in Luarca. Planned to be dissected later that year before going on display.
581
(📷)
24 December 2015 (morning) Toyama Bay, Mizuhashi Fisherina, Toyama, Toyama Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Filmed and photographed alive near surface Architeuthis Entire, good condition; red skin somewhat damaged None WL: 3.7 m [estimate] None [Anonymous] (2015q); McKirdy & Ogura (2015); Feltman (2015); Hongo (2015); Keartes (2015); Murai (2015); [Anonymous] (2015r); Hunt (2015) Nippon TV report; ANN News report; Wakabayashi (2016); numerous media sources High quality video footage recorded. Spotted swimming under docked fishing boats around 7 am. Spent several hours in Toyama Bay harbour where it was filmed by local divers, including Akinobu Kimura, owner of local Diving Shop Kaiyu, and professional underwater cameraman Takayoshi Kojima, who swam alongside it (as did Yuki Igushi, a curator at Uozu Aquarium, who described the powerful action of its suckers upon touching). Also seen by harbourmaster and Mizuhashi Fisherina manager Tatsuya Wakasugi. Kojima and Kimura "helped guide" it out to sea; initially pushed back and forth by fast flowing water near entrance to marina, but eventually disappeared into depths around 2:30 pm. Squid "showed some signs of energy", including inking and attempting to wrap arms around divers. Display with 4.3 m resin giant squid model and Igushi's 8-minute video (and one of #582) opened at Uozu Aquarium on 16 January 2016.
582
(📷)
3 January 2016 Toyama-Shinko Port, Toyama Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Recorded alive at surface giant squid ("ダイオウイカ") Entire; red skin largely intact, missing from distal end ?WL: ~2.5–3 m [estimate] "yokotama37" (2016); "atelierichi" (2016) FNN News, 4 January 2016; [Anonymous] (2016b) Photographed and filmed alive at surface at around 1:30 am; seen by 3 people. Display with 4.3 m resin giant squid model and video of this specimen (and one of #581) opened at Uozu Aquarium on 16 January 2016.
583
(📷)
7 January 2016 (reported) Yaetsu Beach, Toyama, Toyama Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Found washed ashore giant squid ("ダイオウイカ") Entire ?WL: 3 m [Anonymous] (2016a) Found and photographed on beach. Speculated by Osamu Inamura, director of Uozu Aquarium, to have possibly escaped from fixed net prior to stranding.
11 January 2016 near Wushi Port, Yilan, Taiwan, at ~18–20 m depth
{NWP}
Caught by fishermen trawling for flathead grey mullet (Mugil cephalus) Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles, eye(s) and some reddish skin intact; portions of arms missing Entire Male (mature) EL: ~4 m; ML: 89 cm [fresh]; ML: 70 cm [after fixation and dehydration]; EyD: 8 cm; WT: 17 kg National Museum of Natural Science, Taichung, Taiwan Xiao (2016); Huang et al. (2016); Liu et al. (2017:2); Zhang (2017) First specimen from Taiwan. Caught by Hsien-Kun Lin; initial preservation and transportation assisted by Chun-Yen Lin and Yao-Chen Lee. Stored on ice for 6 hours after capture and transported at low temperature (<4 °C) to laboratory at National Chung Hsing University where dissected at <15 °C over 4 hours. Fully developed sperm mass present; small size for mature male. Stomach empty. Fixed in 10% formalin; replaced with 70% ethanol after 10 days. Left optic lobe scanned using high-resolution MRI as part of comparative study of giant squid optic lobe morphology and internal structure (Liu et al., 2017).
584 17 January 2016 (morning) near Noto, Hōsu District, Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan (37°21′12″N 137°15′17″E / 37.35333°N 137.25472°E / 37.35333; 137.25472 (Giant squid specimen))
{NWP}
Found stranded ashore, alive Architeuthis dux Entire; arm tips intact, red skin and tentacles largely missing (stubs only) Entire, including internal organs and eggs Female (mature) ML: 170 cm; WL: 417 cm; BC: 113 cm; FL: 52 cm; AL(IV): 210 cm [longest]; EL: ≥10 m [estimate]; WT: 110–180 kg [estimate] Ishikawa Prefectural Natural History Museum Takeda (2016); Shimada et al. (2017:1, figs. 1–5, suppl. figs. 1–24) On public display. Found by Mr. Kubota while walking along coast around 8 am. Dissection revealed well developed ovaries with an estimated 1.48 × 107 eggs. Fixed in formalin and placed on display at Ishikawa Prefectural Natural History Museum; eggs stored in 70% ethanol.
585 early 2016 [caught "several weeks" before 22 February] off Bain-Boeuf, northern Mauritius
{SIO}
Caught by fishermen "giant squid" Entire; eye(s) and skin largely intact, mantle cut open and damaged WT: 125 kg [Anonymous] (2016f); Touzé (2016) Caught by boat Lady Diana, with crew including captain Mikael Bardin, Karl Gentille, and angler Toorabally Adil. Misidentified as a Humboldt squid in some reports.
586
(📷)
6 February 2016 (early morning) 100 m off coast of Ine Bay, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Photographed alive in fixed net; escaped giant squid ("ダイオウイカ") Entire, seemingly in perfect condition; red skin fully intact None ?WL: 4 m None [Anonymous] (2016d) Caught by fisherman Shirasu Shu-Ichiro. Photographed by Katsuyoshi Nagashima.

(📷)
8 February 2016 off Imizu, Toyama Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Caught giant squid ("ダイオウイカ") Entire, good condition; eye(s) and most of red skin intact ?WL: ~5 m [Anonymous] (2016c)
587 13 February 2016 Kosagawa, Kisakata-machi, Nikaho-shi, Akita Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Found washed ashore giant squid ("ダイオウイカ") Entire; tentacles missing Entire (including separated part) ML: 136 cm; WL: 3.22 m; WT: 114/70 kg Akita Prefectural Museum [Anonymous] (2016e); Funaki (2017:3) Shimada et al. (2017:9) On public display. Exhibited at Akita Prefectural Museum from 1 April 2016, preserved in formalin and ethanol. Previously temporarily displayed at Oga Aquarium GAO, who collected it on 14 February.
588 4 March 2016 5–6 nmi (9.3–11.1 km) off Saint Gilles, Reunion Island (21°03′S 55°08′E / 21.050°S 55.133°E / -21.050; 55.133 (Giant squid specimen); coordinates estimated from eyewitness statements)
{SIO}
Found floating at surface, dead Architeuthis dux Steenstrup, 1857 Entire; missing distal part of mantle including fins Head with limbs LRL: 19.74 mm; DML: 2153–3060 mm [estimated from LRL]; EL: 7262–15,664 mm [estimated from DML] University of Reunion Island Romanov et al. (2017) Found by crew of game fishing vessel FV Maeva 4, including captain Loïc Jauneau and deckhand Joel Mussard. Possibly largest recorded giant squid specimen.
589
(📷)
7 October 2016 beach on Bares peninsula, Galicia, Spain (43°46.17′N 7°40.25′W / 43.76950°N 7.67083°W / 43.76950; -7.67083 (Giant squid specimen))
{NEA}
Photographed alive in water; 2.5 hours later found stranded on beach, dead Architeuthis dux Entire, "very fresh"; tentacles severed at base, mantle covered with sucker marks and scars Female (immature) DML: 123 cm; WT: 105 kg Keartes (2016b); Guerra et al. (2018:755, figs. 1–2); Preston (2018) First live adult photographed outside Japanese waters. Necropsy revealed no signs of mating, no food remains in digestive tract, and no traces of macroscopic parasites. mtDNA analysis confirmed species as A. dux.
21 December 2016 (morning) off Toyama, Toyama Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net giant squid ("ダイオウイカ") Entire, good condition; red skin partly missing ?WL: ~4 m [Anonymous] (2016h) Caught around 11:20 am. Landed at Mizuhashi Fishing Port in Toyama.
590
(📷)
March 2017 near Melkbosstrand, South Africa
{SEA}
Found floating at surface, alive; filmed wrapping itself around paddleboard; snared with rope and dragged to shore Architeuthis Entire, badly injured; covered with (seal?) bite marks, missing several arm tips and patches of skin Male (mature) Keartes (2017b); Grundhauser (2017); Payne (2017) Found by paddleboarder James Taylor. Once Taylor secured a rope around it and pulled at it the animal lethargically wrapped its arms around his board. He then pulled it to shore to save it "for research purposes". Once on the beach, Taylor severed its head to "put it out of its misery", after which the animal was seen to release spermatophores, confirming that it was male. The whole incident was captured on video, with further video and photos taken on the beach. Researchers reached beached remains several days later and salvaged some remains. Identified as a giant squid by teuthologist Michael Vecchione based on footage (which was posted online by Taylor and went viral). Poor state of animal might indicate post-spawning individual.
591 15 May 2017 near Porcupine Basin, 190 km off Dingle, County Kerry, Ireland
{NEA}
By trawl Architeuthis dux Entire; tentacles intact Entire Male (juvenile) EL: 5.8 m NMI O'Sullivan (2017); [Anonymous] (2017a); [Anonymous] (2017b); Flannery (2017); Keartes (2017a); O'Sullivan & Hamilton (2017) Numerous media sources Caught by crew of Cú na Mara, skippered by Pete Flannery, while trawling for prawns. Flannery's father caught two giant squid in the same area in 1995. First taken to Dingle Oceanworld in Dingle, where it was dissected by marine biologist Kevin Flannery and studied by marine science students from Sacred Heart University, Connecticut, then transferred to the Natural History Museum in Dublin. Total length misreported as 15.8 m by O'Sullivan & Hamilton (2017).
592 18 July 2017 Porcupine Bank, off Dingle, County Kerry, Ireland
{NEA}
By trawl Architeuthis dux Entire, good condition; tentacles and eye(s) intact Entire EL: 5.5 m Dingle Oceanworld Lucey (2017); [Anonymous] (2017c) Numerous media sources Caught by crew of Cú na Mara, skippered by Pete Flannery, while trawling for prawns. Flannery's father caught two giant squid in the same area in 1995. Studied by marine biologist Kevin Flannery. In "better condition" than specimen from 15 May 2017.
593
(📷)
28 August 2017 (morning) Guano Bay, near Lüderitz, Namibia
{SEA}
Found stranded on beach Architeuthis cf. sanctipauli Entire, "fresh [...] no visible injuries or obvious signs of illness"; tentacles, arm tips and skin missing Beak Female (mature) ML: 189 cm; WL: 401 cm [arm tips missing]; EL: 8–9 m [estimate] [Anonymous] (2017d); Finck (2017); Kemper (2017:1) Measurements taken on morning of discovery, when all arm tips were already missing. Kelp gulls seen feeding on remains and had shortened arms by a further 30 cm by next morning, when beach post mortem established sex as female. Beak extracted and kept refrigerated in ethanol. Reported by marine scientist Jean-Paul Roux from the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources, who was stationed with Lüderitz Marine Research. Examined and photographed by Roux and Jessica Kemper. Seen by kite surfers preparing for 2017 Lüderitz Speed Challenge.
594
(📷)
October 2017 (evening) south of El Hierro, Canary Islands, at ~500 m depth
{NEA}
Recorded briefly interacting with luminescent camera Architeuthis dux Entire None ?WL: >3 m [estimate]; WT: >300 kg [estimate] None Escánez et al. (2018); Ocampo (2019); Millán (2019); [Anonymous] (2019g) Second video of live giant squid in natural habitat. Caught on camera lowered from IEO research vessel B/O Ángeles Alvariño, by team studying diet of pilot whales and other cetaceans; filmed for 7 seconds at 7:46 pm. Team included biologist Alejandro Escánez and Eugenio Fraile of IEO. Footage first revealed on 20 June 2018, at 6th International Symposium on Marine Sciences (Escánez et al., 2018; oral presentation), but only widely reported in June–July 2019, after announcement of #599. Identification confirmed by researchers including giant squid expert Ángel Guerra, primarily on basis of arm and sucker morphology.
6 April 2018 (morning) Sibutu, Tawi-Tawi, Philippines
{NWP}
Found by fisherman, dead "giant squid" Entire; skin, tentacles and ends of arms missing Not stated (none?) WL: "just over" 8 ft (2.4 m) [arm tips missing]; BD: 1.5 ft (0.46 m) Nelz (2018); Dean (2018) First record from the Philippines. Photographed and filmed laid out on grass in local village with tape measure; see video. Seen by local fisherman Harold Eduardo Curtis.
2018 [reported on 27 April] off west coast of Tasmania, Australia, at 380 m depth
{SWP}
Caught Architeuthis dux Entire None; discarded at sea ?WL: ~3 m [estimate]; WT: 80–100 kg [estimate] None [Anonymous] (2018a); Blackwood (2018) Caught by crew of the Empress Pearl, including skipper Alec Harvey. Specimen photographed and thrown overboard. Tentatively identified as Architeuthis dux by Julian Finn of the Melbourne Museum.

(📷)
26 August 2018 (morning) near Red Rocks, south coast of Wellington, New Zealand
{SWP}
Found washed ashore "giant squid" Entire, in good condition with only "scratch" on top of head; tentacles and reddish skin missing Entire WL: 4.2 m [Anonymous] (2018b); [Anonymous] (2018c) Numerous media sources Found on beach by diving brothers Daniel, Jack and Matthew Aplin while driving along track next to shore; measured by them with tape measure. Two much-publicised photos show Jack lying, and Matthew kneeling, next to specimen, respectively. Specimen collection organised by NIWA.
595
(📷)
November 2018 Ama-cho, Nakanoshima, Oki Islands, Shimane Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Caught in net; filmed at surface giant squid ("ダイオウイカ") Entire; red skin missing ?WL: <2 m "shimashoku_terakoya" (2018); [Anonymous] (2018d) Filmed at surface. First reported on 28 November 2018. Flesh tasted; described as having strange acidity.
596
(📷)
29 December 2018 (reported; seen previous night) Shinminato port, Imizu-shi, Toyama Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Recorded alive at surface giant squid ("ダイオウイカ") Entire; red skin largely intact, missing from distal end None given Keisho (2018) Found alive at surface by Yasuyoshi Keisho; photographed and filmed multiple times.

(📷)
30 January 2019 off Izumo, Shimane Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Caught in net giant squid ("ダイオウイカ") Entire; mantle and limbs separated, red skin missing ML: 166 cm [Anonymous] (2019a) Landed on day of capture at Sakai Fishing Port in Sakaiminato, Tottori Prefecture. Announced by Tottori Prefectural Fisheries Experimental Station.

(📷)
31 January 2019 off Nanao, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Caught in fixed net giant squid ("ダイオウイカ") Entire; eye(s) intact, tentacles and red skin missing Entire WL: 3.22 m Notojima Aquarium [Anonymous] (2019b); [Notojima Aquarium] (2019) Caught in same net as oarfish, Regalecus russelii (3.84 m long). Both died at time of landing at Kishibata fishing port and were taken to Notojima Aquarium; placed on public display 1–3 February, then dissected.
597
(📷)
21 February 2019 mouth of Shimoko River, Shimoko-cho Hamada, Shimane Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Found washed ashore, dead giant squid ("ダイオウイカ") Entire; eye(s) intact, tentacles and majority of red skin missing Entire Female (mature) ML: 158 cm; WL: 340 cm; EL: 600–700 cm [estimate]; WT: 135 kg Shimane AQUAS Aquarium Isobe (2019); [Anonymous] (2019c); [Anonymous] (2019e); [Anonymous] (2019h) [Tsuriho] (2019) Spotted from car by local woman who contacted Shimane AQUAS Aquarium; collected by staff. Examination by Tsuyoshi Fujita and others revealed eggs. Stored frozen before being placed on public display on ice in late March as part of annual Aquas Spring Festival, where visitors could touch the thawed specimen. Public dissection performed on 3 November 2019.
598 1 April 2019 off Kisakata Fishing Port, Nikaho, Akita Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Found in gill net, dead giant squid ("ダイオウイカ") Entire; tentacles, arm tips and much of red skin missing Entire ?WL: 3 m Oga Aquarium GAO [Anonymous] (2019d); [Anonymous] (2019f) Found by local fisherman Kenichi Sasaki around 10:30 am; landed in Kisakata Fishing Port. Collected by staff from Oga Aquarium GAO on 2 April; placed on public display there on 6–7 April.
599
(📷)
17/18 June 2019 Gulf of Mexico, at 759 m depth
{NWA}
Recorded approaching e-jelly lure before retreating Architeuthis Entire None (juvenile?) ?EL: 3–3.7 m [estimate] None Johnsen & Widder (2019); [NOAA] (2019); Jarvis (2019); Adkins (2019); Mack (2019); Langlois (2019) Numerous media sources Widely reported as second video of live giant squid in natural habitat, but actually third (see #594). Captured on three short videos; filmed over bottom depth of 2200 m. NOAA-funded team included Nick Allen, Sönke Johnsen, Megan McCall, Nathan Robinson, Tracey Sutton, and Edith Widder, as well as FIU marine scientists Heather Bracken-Grissom and Lori Schweikert. Identified as almost certainly a juvenile giant squid by teuthologist Michael Vecchione.
600 28 June 2019 Jodogaura Coast, northeastern part of Okinoshima, Oki Islands, Shimane Prefecture, Japan
{NWP}
Found floating at surface by shore, dead giant squid ("ダイオウイカ") Entire; red skin and tentacles(?) missing ?WL: 3.12 m; ?AL: 1.9 m; WT: ~100 kg [estimate] Osada (2019); [Tsuriho] (2019) Photographed by local, Mr. Nozu. Estimated to have died 1 day prior to discovery.

Specimen images[edit]

The number below each image corresponds to the specimen or sighting in the List of giant squid that the image depicts. The date on which the specimen was first captured, found, or observed is also given (the little-endian day/month/year date format is used throughout).

Notes and references[edit]

Explanatory footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ An early example were the giant squid expeditions of 1997 and 1999, the progress of which could be tracked through online expedition journals that provided daily updates, many of them written by expedition leader and giant squid expert Clyde Roper (Roper et al., 1997, 1999; Allen, 1997). Also of note were the online contributions of marine biologist and giant squid expert Steve O'Shea, particularly in the first decade of the 21st century. During this time O'Shea was active on TONMO (The Octopus News Magazine Online), a website and forum for cephalopod enthusiasts, on which he often discussed and provided first-hand information on new giant squid finds (Morelli, 2002b; O'Shea, 2008). O'Shea put considerable effort into lowering the maximum size of the giant squid as reported in the media, especially the oft-quoted total length of 18 m (59 ft), which he countered with a more realistic 13 m (43 ft) based on the many specimens he had personally examined (O'Shea, 2003b; O'Shea & Bolstad, 2008; Dery, 2013).
  2. ^ More than 20 years earlier, in the summer of 1965, Aldrich had enquired about using the recently commissioned manned deep-ocean research submersible DSV Alvin to study the life habits of the giant squid (including a photo of #170 with his letter), but the idea never progressed due to funding issues. The original proposal for Aluminaut, another manned submersible launched around the same time as Alvin, also mentioned the giant squid, but this project was never realised either (Oreskes, 2003:716; Oreskes, 2014:29).
  3. ^ Though see specimen #320 from Tottori Prefecture, Japan, which was reportedly still alive when found stranded in shallow water on 16 April 1988, where it was photographed in situ (Wada et al., 2014:67, fig. 1).
  4. ^ A number of photographs of live adult giant squid at the surface off Okinawa came to light in 2003 (#449 and 450; [Anonymous], c. 2003; Kubodera, 2010:39), but it is uncertain when these were taken (O'Shea, 2003g; Eyden, 2006). Another live animal was photographed at the surface in the same area on 15 April 2004 (#464; [Anonymous], 2004a).
  5. ^ a b Though Kubodera et al. on 4 December 2006 (#473) and Kubodera, O'Shea, Widder et al. in July 2012 (#507) are widely recognised as the first to, respectively, film a live adult giant squid (at the surface) and the first to film a live (adult) giant squid in its natural habitat, there exists at least one competing claim to both of these milestones. In November 2006, American explorer and diver Scott Cassell led an expedition to the Gulf of California with the aim of filming a giant squid in its natural habitat. The team employed a novel filming method: using a Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas) carrying a specially designed camera clipped to its fin. The camera-bearing squid caught on film what was claimed to be a giant squid, with an estimated length of 40 feet (12 m), engaging in predatory behaviour ([Anonymous], 2010g; [Anonymous], N.d.). The footage aired a year later on a History Channel program, MonsterQuest: Giant Squid Found. Cassell subsequently distanced himself from this documentary, claiming that it contained multiple factual and scientific errors (Cassell, 2007).
  6. ^ All of the specimens kept alive in tanks were rather small individuals and survived for only a few hours at most. The idea of keeping a fully grown giant squid in captivity—long term—has been mooted on occasion but is considered exceedingly challenging and has never been attempted (Lamb, 2018).

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Contents: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z {Author unknown}