List of hills of Hampshire

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This is a list of hills in Hampshire. It is based on the online Database of British and Irish Hills,[1] Jackson's More Relative Hills of Britain[2] and list of 30 metre prominences[3] and the Ordnance Survey mapping service.

Many of these hills are important historic, archaeological and nature conservation sites, as well as popular hiking and tourist destinations in the county of Hampshire in southern England.

Colour key[edit]

Class Prominence
Marilyns 150 – 599 m
HuMPs 100 – 149 m
TuMPs 30 – 99 m
Unclassified 0 – 29 m

The table is colour-coded based on the classification or "listing" of the hill. The types that occur in Hampshire are Marilyns, HuMPs and TuMPs, listings that are based on the topographical prominence. "Prominence" correlates strongly with the subjective significance of a summit. Peaks with low prominences are either subsidiary tops of a higher summit or relatively insignificant independent summits. Peaks with high prominences tend to be the highest points around and likely to have extraordinary views.

A Marilyn is a hill of any height that has a prominence of at least 150 metres or about 500 feet.[4] A "HuMP" (the acronym comes from "Hundred Metre Prominence) is a hill with a prominence of at least 100 but less than 150 metres.[2] In this table Marilyns are in beige and HuMPs in lilac. The term "sub-Marilyn" or "sub-HuMP" is used, e.g. in the Database of British and Irish Hills to indicate hills that fall just below the threshold.

To qualify for inclusion, hills must either be 200 metres or higher with a prominence of at least 30 metres, below 200 metres with a prominence of at least 90 metres (the threshold for a sub-HuMP), or be in some other way notable. For further information see the Lists of mountains and hills in the British Isles and the individual articles on Marilyns, HuMPs and TuMPs.

In this context, "TuMP" is used to connote a hill with a prominence of at least 30 but less than 100 metres. By way of contrast, see also the article listing Tumps (a traditional term meaning a hillock, mound, barrow or tumulus).

The county tops (i.e. highest points) of Portsmouth and Southampton unitary authorities are not strictly in the modern county of Hampshire, but are included because they fall within Hampshire's historic county boundary.

Table[edit]

Hill Height (m) Prom. (m) Grid ref. Class Parent Range/Region Remarks Image
Pilot Hill[5] 286 45 SU398601 County top, TuMP Walbury Hill[3] Hampshire Downs[6] Hampshire's county top.

West flank in the county of Berkshire.

Downland, East Woodhay - geograph.org.uk - 762435.jpg
Butser Hill[7] 270 158 ST437012 Marilyn, HuMP, TuMP Walbury Hill South Downs[6] Hampshire's only Marilyn.

Highest point on the South Downs.
Iron Age earthworks, SSSI, NNR.

Butser Hill.jpg
Sidown Hill[3] 266 34 SU444573 TuMP Walbury Hill Hampshire Downs Grade II listed building, Heaven's Gate, on summit. Trig point, Watership Down - geograph.org.uk - 305480.jpg
Beacon Hill[3] 261 73 SU458572 TuMP Walbury Hill Hampshire Downs[6] Near Burghclere.

Formerly site of most famous beacon in Hampshire.
Hill fort, SSSI, NNR.

Beacon-hill-seven-barrows-field-from-a34.jpg
Wheatham Hill[7][8] 249 125 SU731277 HuMP Butser Hill Hampshire Downs,[6] East Hampshire Hangers Looking across farmland to Steep Farm and Wheatham Hill - geograph.org.uk - 463195.jpg
War Down[5] 244 90 SU726198 (est.) sub-HuMP, TuMP Butser Hill[3] South Downs Farmland at Stroud from bridlepath up Lythe Hanger - geograph.org.uk - 324482.jpg
Watership Down[5] 237 90 SU495568 sub-HuMP, TuMP Walbury Hill[3] Hampshire Downs Setting for Richard Adams' novel. Watership from northeast.jpg
Wether Down[3] 234 37 SU675197 TuMP Butser Hill South Downs Wether Down - geograph.org.uk - 228343.jpg
Ladle Hill[3] 232 41 SU478568 TuMP Walbury Hill Hampshire Downs[6] Unique example of an unfinished hill fort. Ladle-Hill-geograph-306526-by-Andrew-Smith.jpg
Holybourne Hill[3] 225 64 SU725437 TuMP Butser Hill Hampshire Downs Near the village of Holybourne

Also known as Holybourne Down

Holybourne Down - geograph.org.uk - 117586.jpg
Red Hill[3] 221 48 SU672359 TuMP Butser Hill Hampshire Downs Picnic Area at Chawton Park Woods - geograph.org.uk - 148394.jpg
Goleigh Hill[3] 220 53 SU726308 TuMP Butser Hill Hampshire Downs
East Hampshire Hangers
Near Empshott and Noar Hill Trig point near Goleigh Farm - geograph.org.uk - 286307.jpg
King's Hill[3] 218 46 SU672375 TuMP Butser Hill Hampshire Downs On the road between Medstead and Beech Abbey of Our Lady and St John, Wivelrod, Alton - geograph.org.uk - 1492997.jpg
Noar Hill[3] 214 59 SU747318 Tump Butser Hill Hampshire Downs,[6] East Hampshire Hangers Near Empshott and Goleigh Hill Noar Hill 01.jpg
Pidham Hill[3] 213 57 SU694229 TuMP Butser Hill South Downs
Selborne Hill[3] 211 53 SU736331 TuMP Butser Hill Hampshire Downs, East Hampshire Hangers Selborne Common occupies the crown of the hill. Looking Down the Zig-Zag Walk, Selborne Hanger. - geograph.org.uk - 179853.jpg
Farleigh Hill[3] 208 34 SU616472 TuMP Butser Hill Hampshire Downs Farleigh Hill top - geograph.org.uk - 1766545.jpg
Head Down[3] 205 68 SU735191 TuMP Butser Hill South Downs 1 km S of Buriton Beech woodland - geograph.org.uk - 351223.jpg
Oakham Hill[3] 202 65 SU749188 TuMP Butser Hill South Downs
Beacon Hill[3] 201 88 SU602224 TuMP Butser Hill South Downs[6] Beacon Hill from Wheely Down - geograph.org.uk - 831810.jpg
Henwood Down[3] 201 64 SU661219 TuMP Butser Hill South Downs Downland above Coombe, East Meon - geograph.org.uk - 1593165.jpg
Old Winchester Hill 197 SU643205 South Downs[6] Iron Age hill fort, Bronze Age cemetery.

SSSI, NNR. On spur of unnamed hill that is over 210 m high and not listed.

Old Winchester Hill 2.jpg
Windmill Hill[3] 194 84 SU716160 TuMP Butser Hill South Downs Grade II listed windmill at summit. Windmill Hill - geograph.org.uk - 844646.jpg
Farley Mount[3] 178 83 SU403290 TuMP Butser Hill Hampshire Downs Folly near summit. Farley mount.JPG
Broadhalfpenny Down[3] 158 43 SU672160 TuMP Butser Hill South Downs Historic cricket venue. HambledonCCPitch.jpg
Fort Southwick[5]

Portsdown[3][9]

122 84 SU626069 TuMP Butser Hill South Hampshire Lowlands Portsmouth's county top. North slope of Portsdown - geograph.org.uk - 1007412.jpg
King John's Hill[10] 115[11] 21 SU755377 TuMP Hampshire Downs Iron Age hillfort and medieval hunting lodge King John's Hill, East Worldham, Hampshire 05.jpg
St. Catherine's Hill[3] 97 35 SU484276 TuMP Butser Hill Hampshire Downs SSSI, Iron Age hill fort. St Catherine's ramparts.jpg
Bassett Avenue[5] 82 5 SU419169 None South Hampshire Lowlands Southampton's county top.

Bassett district of Southampton

A33 Bassett Avenue - geograph.org.uk - 813864.jpg

The following summits have been omitted from the table as they are considered sub-peaks, alternative names of hills in the main list or are otherwise not eligible at this stage:

See also[edit]

References and footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Database of British and Irish Hills at www.hill-bagging.co.uk. Accessed on 1 Apr 2013.
  2. ^ a b Jackson, Mark. "More Relative Hills of Britain" (PDF). Relative Hills of Britain. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 October 2013. Retrieved 31 March 2013.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y Summit Listings by Relative Height by Mark Jackson, compiled by Jonathan de Ferranti. Accessed on 1 Apr 2013.
  4. ^ Dawson, Alan (1992). The Relative Hills of Britain. Milnthorpe: Cicerone Press. ISBN 1-85284-068-4. Archived from the original on 2010-09-21.
  5. ^ a b c d e Name, height, prominence, grid and class data from Database of British and Irish Hills - Hampshire. Accessed on 1 Apr 2013.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Varley, Telford (1922). Hampshire, Cambridge County Geographies, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2013 paperback edition, p. 17. ISBN 978-1-107-62028-5. Varley's use of the term "North Downs" is taken to mean the main "Hampshire Downs", not the "North Downs" of Surrey and Kent.
  7. ^ a b Name, height, prominence, grid and parent data from: Jackson, Mark (2009). More Relative Hills of Britain, Marilyn News Centre, UK, p. 144. E-book Archived 2013-10-12 at the Wayback Machine.
  8. ^ Class data from Database of British and Irish Hills - Hampshire. Accessed on 1 Apr 2013.
  9. ^ Jackson calls it "Portsdown" and gives the height as 131 m, drop as c93 m and grid as SU627069.
  10. ^ Historic England (2015). "PastScape: Monument No. 243207". London, England: Historic England. Retrieved 2017-03-18.
  11. ^ Ordnance Survey Explorer Map 133: Haslemere, Petersfield, Midhurst & Selborne.
  12. ^ a b Ordnance Survey 1:50,000 Landranger series.
  13. ^ Kingsclere at www.british-history.ac.uk. Accessed on 3 Apr 2013.