List of hospitals in Brooklyn

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This is a list of hospitals in Brooklyn, sorted by hospital name, with addresses and a brief description of their formation and development. Hospital names were obtained from these sources.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10] A list of hospitals in New York State is also available.

Hospitals[edit]

A-I[edit]

  • Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center, 555 Rockaway Parkway, now also 1 Brookdale Plaza, Brooklyn. Opened as Brownsville and East New York Hospital on April 11, 1921, renamed Beth-El Hospital in 1932, renamed Brookdale Hospital Center in 1963, renamed Brookdale Hospital Medical Center in 1971, then renamed Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center.[11][12]
  • Brooklyn Hospital Center, 121 DeKalb Avenue, Brooklyn. Founded as Brooklyn City Hospital in 1845, renamed Brooklyn Hospital on February 10, 1883, merged with Caledonian Hospital and renamed Brooklyn Hospital-Caledonian Hospital in 1982, renamed Brooklyn Hospital in 1983, renamed Brooklyn Hospital Center in 1990. Its outpatient clinics include the site of the former Cumberland Hospital several blocks away.[13][14]
  • Brooklyn V.A. Medical Center, 800 Poly Place, Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. Opened in 1950.[15]
  • Coney Island Hospital, 2601 Ocean Parkway, Brooklyn. Opened as a first aid station near West 3rd Street in 1875, moved to a rented building on Sea Breeze Avenue and named Reception Hospital on May 12, 1902, but also called Sea Breeze Hospital and Coney Island Reception Hospital, officially part of Kings County Hospital, and open only for seasonal care from April through October. Moved to its current location, opened full-time, and renamed Coney Island Hospital on May 18, 1910.[16]
  • Interfaith Medical Center, 1545 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn. Formed in 1982 by merger and consolidation of Jewish Hospital and Medical Center and St. John's Episcopal Hospital of Brooklyn in 1982. Former Jewish Hospital at 555 Prospect Place is now apartments.[13][17]

K-M[edit]

  • Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center, 585 Schenectady Avenue, Brooklyn. Opened on April 24, 1929 as the Jewish Sanitarium for Incurables, renamed the Jewish Sanitarium and Hospital for Chronic Diseases in 1933, renamed Jewish Chronic Disease Hospital in 1954, became an acute medical care hospital and renamed Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center in 1968.[18][19][20]
  • Kings County Hospital Center, 451 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn. Opened in 1837. In 1955 absorbed Kingston Avenue Hospital, which opened in 1891 as a Hospital for Contagious Diseases.[21][22][23]
  • Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Avenue, Brooklyn. Its constituent institutions were The New Utrecht Dispensary, which opened at 1275 37th Street in 1911 was renamed Israel Hospital when it became a hospital; Zion Hospital, which opened at 2140 Cropsey Avenue in 1911; and Beth Moses Hospital, which opened at 404 Hart Street on October 24, 1920. Israel and Zion Hospitals merged in May 1920 to form Israel Zion Hospital and opened at 10th Avenue and 48th Street on September 17, 1922. Israel Zion merged with Beth Moses Hospital to form Maimonides Hospital on July 30, 1947, and acute medical services were consolidated at the Israel Zion location. Renamed Maimonides Medical Center in 1996.[24][25][26][27][28][29]
  • Mount Sinai Brooklyn, 3201 Kings Highway. Opened as Kings Highway Hospital in 1955, renamed Beth Israel-Kings Highway Division when acquired by Beth Israel Medical Center in 1995, renamed Beth Israel Brooklyn on February 27, 2012, renamed Mount Sinai Beth Israel Brooklyn on January 22, 2014 following the merger of Mount Sinai and Beth Israel, renamed Mount Sinai Brooklyn on July 20, 2015.[30][31][32]

N[edit]

  • New York Community Hospital, 2525 Kings Highway, Brooklyn. Founded as Madison Park Hospital in 1929. Later Hospital of the Jacques Loewe Foundation. Renamed Community Hospital of Brooklyn in the mid-1960s. Became New York Community Hospital when it was acquired by New York-Presbyterian Hospital in 1997. By 2015 had dropped NewYork Presbyterian, affiliated with Maimonides.[33] (NYTimes: One Address, Many Hospitals)
  • NewYork-Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital, 506 6th Street, Brooklyn. Incorporated on May 27, 1881, opened as the Methodist Episcopal Hospital in the City of Brooklyn on December 15, 1887, renamed Methodist Hospital of Brooklyn in 1939, renamed New York Methodist hospital upon its affiliation with New York-Presbyterian Hospital in 1993.[34][35][36]
  • NYU Langone Hospital- Brooklyn, 150 55th Street, Brooklyn. Founded by Sister Elisabeth Fedde as the Norwegian Lutheran Deaconess Home and Hospital at 441 4th Avenue in 1883,[37] moved to 4520 4th Avenue in 1889, merged with Lutheran Hospital of Manhattan to form Our Savior's Lutheran Hospital in July 1956[38] and then renamed Lutheran Medical Center, moved to its current site in 1977, renamed NYU Lutheran Medical Center upon its affiliation with N.Y.U. in 2015[39] and then renamed again to NYU Langone Hospital- Brooklyn in 2017.[40]

O-Z[edit]

  • SUNY Downstate Medical Center, consisting of three parts:
    • SUNY Downstate College of Medicine
    • SUNY Downstate at Bay Ridge, 9036 Seventh Avenue, an outpatient clinic, formerly Victory Memorial Hospital
    • University Hospital of Brooklyn, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn. Founded as the Brooklyn German General Dispensary at 132 Court Street in March 1856, moved to 145 Court Street in 1857, renamed the St. John's Hospital on November 6, 1857, renamed Long Island College Hospital on February 4, 1858, incorporated March 6, 1858, moved to the Perry Mansion on Henry Street between Amity and Pacific Streets May 1, 1858. The college and the hospital separated in 1930, the college was re-chartered as the Long Island College of Medicine in 1931 and merged into the State University of New York on April 5, 1950. The hospital opened in the 1960s.[41][42]
  • Woodhull Medical and Mental Health Center, 760 Broadway at Flushing Avenue, Brooklyn. Named for Richard M. Woodhull, the original owner of the site, by Victor Morales, a local student at Intermediate School 318, who traced his origins. Opened on May 24, 1982.[43][44]
  • Wyckoff Heights Medical Center, 374 Stockholm Street, Brooklyn. Founded as German Hospital in 1889, dedicated at St. Nicholas Avenue and Stanhope Street on May 21, 1899, and opened later that year. Renamed Wyckoff Heights Hospital because of anti-German sentiment after World War 1, then renamed Wyckoff Heights Medical Center. The address has changed because of additional buildings, but it is still on the original block.[45][46][47]

Closed hospitals[edit]

A-Bo[edit]

Br[edit]

Bu-E[edit]

  • Bushwick Hospital, Putnam Avenue at Howard Avenue, Brooklyn. Founded in 1891, closed in the late 1950s, now a New York State facility for youth.
  • Caledonian Hospital, 10 Saint Paul's Place, Brooklyn. Merged with Brooklyn Hospital in 1982 and closed in 2003. The building is now co-op apartments.[13][14]
  • Carson C. Peck Memorial Hospital, 570 Crown Street, Brooklyn. Opened in 1919, merged with Methodist Hospital of Brooklyn in the 1970s. Later a nursing home and in 1985 became Crown Palace Hotel. Demolished in 2003 and replaced by a girl's yeshiva.[74]
  • Cholera Hospital, Hamilton Avenue and Van Brunt Street, Brooklyn. Opened in July 1866, closed October 1 in the same year.[75]
  • Churchill Sanitarium, 716 Marcy Avenue, Brooklyn
  • Crown Heights Hospital, Brooklyn 1928-1958 (See Lefferts General)[76][77]
  • Cumberland Hospital, 35 Auburn Place, Brooklyn. Opened as Brooklyn Homeopathic Hospital at 109 Cumberland Street on February 13, 1873. Rebuilt in 1918, renamed Cumberland Hospital in 1922, had an address of 35 and then 39 Auburn Place, closed as a hospital on August 24, 1983, became an outpatient clinic called Neighborhood Family Care Center, now Cumberland Diagnostic Treatment Center, address 100 North Portland Avenue, and part of Brooklyn Hospital Center.[65][66]
  • Doctor's Hospital of Brooklyn (Brooklyn Doctor's Hospital, privately owned).[78] 4413-4421 15th Avenue, Brooklyn. Closed. School. see Boro Park Maternity Hospital.
  • Eastern District Dispensary and Hospital, Brooklyn. Opened in 1851.[61]
  • Emanuel Unity Hospital, Unity Hospital merged with Emanuel Hospital, later known as Unity hospital. Closed 1978; now an apartment building, 1545 St. John's Place.[79][80][81]
  • Evangelical Deaconess Hospital, 629 Chauncey Street, Brooklyn. Opened 1931. Closed 1968. Now a homeless shelter.[82]

F-H[edit]

Greenpoint Hospital

I-K[edit]

  • Interboro General Hospital, 2749 Linden Boulevard, Brooklyn. Converted into a nursing home, demolished in 2013.
  • Interfaith Medical Center, the 1982-formed result of Jewish Hospital of Brooklyn, initially the larger of the pair, reducing its number of beds per a state directive, and merging with St. John's Episcopal Hospital of Brooklyn. Both sites remained open,[85] until the combined Interfaith closed and both sites became apartments.
  • Israel Hospital, 1275 37th Street, Brooklyn. See Maimonides Medical Center, in the section on hospitals in Brooklyn above.
  • Israel Zion Hospital, 10th Avenue and 49th Street, Brooklyn. See Maimonides Medical Center, in the section on hospitals in Brooklyn above.
Jewish Hospital of Brooklyn
  • Jewish Hospital of Brooklyn, 555 Prospect Place, Brooklyn. Opened as a dispensary at 70 Johnson Avenue, incorporated as Jewish Hospital on November 9, 1901, opened on December 17, 1906, renamed Jewish Hospital and Medical Center of Brooklyn by 1968, merged with St. John's Episcopal Hospital of Brooklyn to become Interfaith Medical Center in 1982. Each site remained open.[85] Both buildings are now apartments.[13][17][86][87]
  • Jewish Sanitarium and Hospital for Chronic Diseases, East 49th Street at Rutland Road, Brooklyn. See Kingsbrook Jewish Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Brooklyn above.
  • Jewish Sanitarium for Incurables, East 49th Street at Rutland Road, Brooklyn. See Kingsbrook Jewish Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Brooklyn above.
  • Kings Highway Hospital, Brooklyn. See Mount Sinai Brooklyn, in the section on hospitals in Brooklyn above.
  • Kingston Avenue Hospital, Brooklyn. opened in 1891 as Hospital for Contagious Diseases; absorbed by Kings County Hospital Center in 1955.[88]
  • Kingsway Hospital, 4422 Avenue J, Brooklyn;[89][90] previously Mayflower Hospital.

L-M[edit]

Linden General Hospital
  • Linden General Hospital, 501 New Lots Avenue, Brooklyn.[91] Now a homeless shelter.
  • Long Island College Hospital, 339 Hicks Street, Brooklyn. Founded as the Brooklyn German General Dispensary at 132 Court Street in March 1856, moved to 145 Court Street in 1857, renamed the St. John's Hospital on November 6, 1857, renamed Long Island College Hospital on February 4, 1858, incorporated March 6, 1858, moved to the Perry Mansion on Henry Street between Amity and Pacific Streets May 1, 1858, closed in 2014.[41][92]
  • Lutheran Hospital of Brooklyn, 22 Junius Street, Brooklyn. Opened in 1881, closed on August 15, 1979.[93][94] buildings razed in the 1980s.[95]
  • Madison Park Hospital, 2525 Kings Highway, Brooklyn. Renamed Community Hospital of Brooklyn in the early 1960s, renamed New York Community Hospital when it was acquired by New York-Presbyterian Hospital in 1997.
  • Maternity Hospital of Brownsville and East New York, 1395 Eastern Parkway. Later Brooklyn Hebrew Maternity Hospital[96] and then Brooklyn Women's Hospital (1930-1960s).
  • Mayflower Hospital, Kings Highway and Avenue J (Later Kingsway Hospital).
  • Menorah Maternity Hospital, Rockaway Parkway & Avenue A, Brooklyn.[97]
  • Midwood Hospital, 19 Winthrop Street, Brooklyn. Opened 1907 as Midwood Sanitarium. Rebuilt and renamed 1929 after a fire. Open at least til 1973. Was St. John's Elementary School (a private school) from 1979 to 2000. Now in use by CAMBA, Inc. for social services.[98]

N-R[edit]

  • Norwegian Lutheran Deaconess Hospital, 4520 Fourth Avenue, Brooklyn. See N.Y.U. Lutheran Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Brooklyn above.
  • Ocean Hill Memorial Dispensary and Hospital, 343-345 Ralph Ave,[99] Brooklyn. Originally named Bedford Dispensary and Hospital, name changed in 1920.[100][53]
  • Prospect Heights Hospital, 775 Washington Ave, Brooklyn. Founded as the Brooklyn Homeopathic Lying-In Asylum in 1871, renamed Brooklyn Maternity Hospital on June 21, 1875, renamed Prospect Heights Hospital on September 12, 1902. Merged with Long Island College Hospital in the 1960s. Now senior housing.[67]
  • Reception Hospital. This name was used for a hospital on Sea Breeze Avenue in Brooklyn that transferred patients to Kings County Hospital and then became Coney Island Hospital. (A hospital with the same name was located in the Storehouse Building on Blackwell's Island that transferred patients to the city, Metropolitan, and Central and Neurological Hospitals on Blackwell's Island.)
  • Riverdale Hospital, Brooklyn. 501 New Lots Ave.[101] (See Linden General)

S[edit]

T-Z[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Richmond, Rev. J.F. (1872). New York and Its Institutions (1609-1873). New York, N.Y.: E.B. Treat. p. 480.
  2. ^ Standing Committee on Hospitals (January 1, 1908). New Hospitals Needed in Greater New York - Recommendations by the Standing Committee on Hospitals of the State Charities Aid Association with a Report on Present Conditions and Future Needs. Albany, N.Y.: State Charities Aid Association of New York. pp. 79–82. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  3. ^ The Medical Directory of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut, 1909: volume 11. New York, N.Y.: Medical Society of the State of New York. 1909. pp. 705–724. Retrieved September 28, 2015.
  4. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York, 137th Session, 1914 (vol. 23, no. 57, part 3 ed.). Albany, N.Y. 1914. pp. 226–229, 281–299, 369, 476–512, 616–620, 648–649. Retrieved September 28, 2015.
  5. ^ Walsh, James J. (1919). History of Medicine in New York - Three Centuries of Medical Progress. New York, N.Y.: National Americana Society. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  6. ^ "Approved Hospitals in This Area". New York Times. October 17, 1939. p. 22. Retrieved October 7, 2015.
  7. ^ "Hospitals in New York State - Profiles". health.ny.gov. New York State Department of Health. Retrieved October 7, 2015.
  8. ^ Directory of Activities of Public and Private Welfare Agencies (2 (revised January 1, 1921) ed.). City of New York Department of Public Welfare. September 29, 1920. p. 1. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  9. ^ "62 Hospitals Win City Endorsement - Ony 7 Others in Proprietary Group Fail to Meet New Set of Standards - They, Too, Will Comply - Failure to Do So Would Mean Loss of Their Licenses, Dr. Goldwater Says". New York Times. September 30, 1936. p. 21. Retrieved October 16, 2015.
  10. ^ "Hospitals Approved by Surgeons". New York Times. February 1, 1946. p. 17. Retrieved October 17, 2015.
  11. ^ Abelow, Samuel (1937). History of Brooklyn Jewry. 1098 Park Place, Brooklyn, N.Y.: Scheba Publishing. pp. 222–227. Retrieved October 4, 2015.CS1 maint: location (link)
  12. ^ "Brookdale - History". brookdalehospital.org. Brookdale University Hospital Medical Center. Archived from the original on September 23, 2015. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  13. ^ a b c d e Sullivan, Ronald (December 3, 1981). "Four Brooklyn Hospitals Plan to Merge Into Two New Ones". New York Times. Retrieved October 9, 2015.
  14. ^ a b "History of the Brooklyn Hospital Center". The Brooklyn Hospital Center. Archived from the original on December 17, 2007. Retrieved September 27, 2015.
  15. ^ "Administrator of Veterans' Affairs - Annual Report for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1950" (PDF). va.gov. United States Veterans' Administration. Retrieved October 12, 2015.
  16. ^ Walsh (1919), p. 851.
  17. ^ a b c Sullivan, Ronald (December 17, 1982). "Hospitals Merge, Joining Two Faiths in Deprived Area". New York Times. Retrieved October 9, 2015.
  18. ^ Abelow (1937), pp. 227-230, and 336.
  19. ^ "25-Year-Old Hospital Employing New Name". New York Daily News. July 8, 1954.
  20. ^ "1,200 to Attend Hospital Fete". New York Daily News. May 16, 1968.
  21. ^ Ostrander, Stephen M. (1894). A History of the City of Brooklyn and Kings County, volume 2. Brooklyn, N.Y.: by subscription. p. 223. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  22. ^ Bolduan, Charles F. (March 1916). Over a Century of Health Administration in New York City - Monograph Series, no. 13. New York, N.Y.: New York City Department of Health. p. 24. Retrieved October 9, 2015.
  23. ^ "TB Patients Moved - 28 Children Taken to Kings County Hospital Center". New York Times. January 26, 1956. p. 19. Retrieved October 9, 2015.
  24. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 243.
  25. ^ Walsh (1919), p. 817.
  26. ^ "Beth Moses Hospital Dedicated". New York Times. October 25, 1920. p. 11. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  27. ^ Abelow (1937), pp. 218-222.
  28. ^ "Two Hospitals Merge in South Brooklyn - Beth Moses and Israel Zion to be Known as Maimonides - 'Acute' and 'Chronic' Care Units". New York Times. July 31, 1947. p. 22. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  29. ^ "Maimonides Celebrates 100 Years of Excellence and Innovation in its Department of Medicine". maimonidesmed.org. Maimonides Medical Center. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  30. ^ "Seven Hospital Campuses and a Single Medical School Serve as Basis for Integrated Health Care System" (PDF). wehealny.org. Beth Israel Medical Center. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  31. ^ "Beth Israel Medical Center Renames Its Brooklyn Division "Beth Israel Brooklyn" (press release)" (PDF). wehealny.org. Beth Israel Medical Center. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  32. ^ "Mount Sinai Health System Launches Major Advertising Campaign". mountsinai.org. Mount Sinai Hospital. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  33. ^ Michael Pollak (June 11, 2006). "Plaza's Gift to Canned Foods; One Address, Many Hospitals". The New York Times.
  34. ^ "For The Care Of The Sick - A New And Splendid Brooklyn Hospital Dedicated". New York Times. December 16, 1887. p. 8. Retrieved October 16, 2015.
  35. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 290-291.
  36. ^ "New York Methodist Hospital - Celebrating 125 Years of Service" (PDF). nym.org. New York Methodist Hospital. Retrieved October 16, 2015.
  37. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 291.
  38. ^ "Two Hospitals Merge". New York Times. July 30, 1956. p. 9. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  39. ^ "History of N.Y.U. Lutheran". lutheranhealthcare.org. Lutheran Medical Center. Retrieved September 27, 2015.
  40. ^ "NYU Langone Health History". med.nyu.edu. NYU. Retrieved August 31, 2021.
  41. ^ a b Raymond, Joseph (1899). History of The Long Island College Hospital and Its Graduates. Brooklyn, N.Y.: Association of the Alumni. p. 1. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  42. ^ Termine, Jack E. (2000). SUNY Downstate Medical Center. Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia Publishing. ISBN 0-7385-0069-0. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  43. ^ "Woodhull Hospital - History". nyc.gov. New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  44. ^ "Woodhull Hospital Taking Patients". New York Times. May 24, 1982. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  45. ^ "German Hospital Dedicated - Five Thousand People Attended the Exercises at the New Brooklyn Institution". New York Times. May 22, 1899. p. 12. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  46. ^ "Woman Gives $10,000 to a Hospital". New York Times. July 6, 1899. p. 12. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  47. ^ "When Brooklyn Dedicated its German Hospital". ephermeralnewyork.wordpress.com. Ephemeral New York. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  48. ^ "Joseph Fishbein - Historical records and family trees". She died after an operation at Dr. Wade's private hospital at 493 Greene avenue.
  49. ^ "Walkup Apartments".
  50. ^ David C. Berliner (May 5, 1974). "Closing of Hospital Is Bitter". New York Times.
  51. ^ "BAZAAR TO AID HOSPITAL.; Fair for Bay Ridge Institution". The New York Times. October 12, 1919. The Women's Auxiliary of the Bay Ridge Hospital has arranged to hold a bazaar on Oct. 17 and 18 in the hospital building, Seventh Avenue and Ninetysecond Street
  52. ^ "Mr. Charlie and the Spices of His Life". New York Times. April 6, 2008. I was born right here in Bay Ridge Hospital, which is now St. Nicholas Home for the elderly.
  53. ^ a b "New Incorporations - Name Changes". New York Times. April 29, 1920. p. 23. Retrieved October 16, 2015.
  54. ^ "Births". The New York Times. November 27, 1938. joyfully announce the arrival of .. at Bensonhurst Maternity Hospital
  55. ^ "Historic American Buildings Survey, Mid-Atlantic Region, HABS no. NY-5731" (PDF). Library of Congress (cdn.loc.gov). National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior. Retrieved September 27, 2015.
  56. ^ State of New York Supreme Court Appellate Division-Third, July 18, 1940, Boro Park General Hospital 4413 to 4421 Fifteenth Ave.
  57. ^ Actually several: the hospital had an affiliated nursing school at 4420 15th Ave, across the street. After a fire that structure was torn down. Several schools used/are using 4420 and 4413 to 4421, including Bais Yaakov High School at 4420, Shalsheles Bais Yaakov at 4421, and Yeshiva Sharei Hatzlucha's Middle School.
  58. ^ "HOSPITAL ANNEX FNISHED.; Addition to Borough Park Maternity Cost $100,000". The New York Times. December 13, 1925.
  59. ^ Standing Committee on Hospitals, (1908), p. 79.
  60. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), pp. 281-282.
  61. ^ a b c d e f g Ostrander (1894), p. 223.
  62. ^ a b "New Matron for Maternity Hospital". The Hebrew Standard. October 28, 1921.
  63. ^ "FIREMEN RACE IN VAIN TO REVIVE DEAD INFANT; Inhalator of Hospital Might Have Saved Baby, Says Head of Brooklyn Rescue Squad". New York Times. July 28, 1928.
  64. ^ "Opening of the Brooklyn Homeopathic Hospital". The New York Times. February 14, 1873. p. 12. Retrieved September 24, 2015.
  65. ^ a b "Last Patient Gone From Cumberland". New York Times. August 25, 1983. Retrieved October 9, 2015.
  66. ^ a b Morris, Montrose. "Past and Present: Decades of Change for Fort Greene's Cumberland Street Hospital". brownstoner.com. Brownstoner. Retrieved September 27, 2015.
  67. ^ a b c Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 292.
  68. ^ a b c NYC City Council "The City Record: Board of Estimate and Apportionment (1899)" (PDF). September 7, 1899. Retrieved January 29, 2021.
  69. ^ a b c "Dr. Isidor Cohen". The New York Times. July 11, 1964. He interned at the former Williamsburg Hospital in Brooklyn after his graduation in 1913.
  70. ^ a b c "Samuel Goldstein, Lawyer, Dies; Ex-Assistant District Attorney". The New York Times. October 9, 1964. former Assistant District Attorney in Kings County, died yesterday at Williamsburg General Hospital.
  71. ^ Ostrander (1894) p. 223.
  72. ^ a b Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 298.
  73. ^ Abelow (1937), pp. 230-231.
  74. ^ "A Model Hospital". New York Times. January 13, 1919. p. 10. Retrieved October 16, 2015.
  75. ^ Ostrander (1894), p. 134.
  76. ^ a b "Five Men Carrying M-16 Rifles Take $15,000 in Ambush". New York Times. at the Lefferts General Hospital
  77. ^ "Dr. Harry Koster Killed In Fall as Horse Bolts". Brooklyn Eagle. June 3, 1943. p. 13. which dated from 1928 ... Lefforts and Brooklyn Avenues
  78. ^ "Dr. Philip Mininberg, Owned Brooklyn Doctors Hospital". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 21, 1951. p. 21. Philip Mininberg, an obstetrician, who owned and operated Brooklyn Doctors Hospital
  79. ^ "Brooklyn Borough, Kings County, New York: 1930 Federal Census Team Transcription; Microfilmed on 55 rolls, T626-1491 to T626-1544". Retrieved December 9, 2020.
  80. ^ "OBJECT TO JEWISH HOSPITAL.; Incorporation of Emanu-El Hospital and Dispensary Disapproved". The New York Times. December 16, 1899.
  81. ^ Ronald Sullivan (February 12, 1978). "Jewish Hospital in Brooklyn Wins Its Battle to Survive, as State Aides Close Nearby Unity". The New York Times.
  82. ^ Steven R. Weisman (February 28, 1971). "Old Bushwick Hospital to Be Used to House Homeless Families". New York Times.
  83. ^ "Hospital Employees Strike in Brooklyn". New York Times. February 18, 1960.
  84. ^ "Court Upholds Closing of Greenpoint Hospital". New York Times. July 16, 1982. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  85. ^ a b c Howard W. French (March 20, 1989). "In Brooklyn, a Hospital Faces Its Own Mortality". The New York Times.
  86. ^ Abelow (1937), pp. 197-213.
  87. ^ "Hospital Association Elects New President". New York Times. April 25, 1968. p. 18. Retrieved October 9, 2015.
  88. ^ "TB Patients Moved - 28 Children Taken to Kings County Hospital Center". New York Times. January 26, 1956. p. 19.
  89. ^ "Lieutenant Served 25 Years on the Force". New York Times. November 29, 1937.
  90. ^ "BROOKLYN HOSPITAL TO COST $1,500,000; Plans Are Announced for the Kingsway, to Contain 250 Beds". New York Times. November 11, 1928.
  91. ^ David Bird (March 31, 1975). "Hospital in Brooklyn Open Despite Accreditation Loss". The New York Times.
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  97. ^ "Clipping from the Brooklyn Daily Eagle". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. February 14, 1941. p. 5. .. have announced the birth of a daughter, Elaine, in the Menorah Maternity Hospital, Rockaway Parkway and Av
  98. ^ Suzanne Spellen (aka Montrose Morris) (October 1, 2018). "A Look Back at Flatbush's Small Hospital for Cradle to Grave Medical Care". Brownstoner Magazine. The words 'sanatorium' and 'sanitarium' are interchangeable.
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  101. ^ "Born in Riverdale Hospital, 501 New Lots Ave". Brooklyn Eagle. November 1, 1935. p. 3.
  102. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 293.
  103. ^ a b Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 294.
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  107. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 295.
  108. ^ "Charles Greenfield". New York Times. April 15, 1979.
  109. ^ "Swedish Hospital Open - Dedicated After Ten Years' Work of Brooklyn Swedes". New York Times. June 25, 1906. p. 7. Retrieved October 25, 2015.
  110. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 297.
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  112. ^ Mindlin, Alex (December 3, 2006). "Dark Days at the Baby Hospital". New York Times. Retrieved September 24, 2015.
  113. ^ "GIRL TRIPLETS BORN, 1 DIES; Two Others Have Good Chance to Survive, Hospital Reports". The New York Times. August 15, 1938.
  114. ^ "Local Newspapers on Microfilm Collection". Brooklyn Public Library. with births at Williamsburg Maternity Hospital being regularly published
  115. ^ "Jewish Local Organization in the United States". JSTOR.org. JSTOR 23601045.
  116. ^ Jake Mooney (June 19, 2005). "How Williamsburg Got Its Groove". The New York Times.

External links[edit]