List of hospitals in New York City

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This is a list of hospitals in New York City, sorted by hospital name, with addresses and a brief description of their formation and development. Hospital names were obtained from these sources.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10] A list of hospitals in New York state is also available.

Hospitals in New York City[edit]

Manhattan[edit]

  • Bellevue Hospital Center, First Avenue and East 26th Street, Manhattan. The oldest public hospital in the United States, founded as City Hospital on the future site of City Hall and opened on March 31, 1736. Moved to its current site and was named Bellevue for the name of the location in 1794.[11][12]
  • Coler-Goldwater Specialty Hospital, 900 Main Street, Welfare Island (now Roosevelt Island), Manhattan. The Welfare Hospital for Chronic Disease opened on July 6, 1939 and was renamed Goldwater Memorial Hospital in 1942 for Dr. Sigismund Schulz Goldwater, a former New York City and Health Commissioner and Hospitals Commissioner who died that year. Bird S. Coler Hospital opened on July 15, 1952 and occupied most of the north tip of the island. The two hospitals merged in 1996, and is located on the Coler site. The Goldwater portion was closed in 2013 and is being converted to a high-technology center.[13][14][15]
  • Gracie Square Hospital, 420 East 76th Street, Manhattan. Opened on March 22, 1959.[16]
  • Harlem Hospital Center, 506 Lenox Avenue, Manhattan. Opened as Harlem Hospital on April 18, 1887 at East 120th Street and the East River, moved to Lenox Avenue on April 13, 1907, renamed Harlem Hospital Center.[17][18]
  • Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 East 70th Street, Manhattan. Opened in the residence of Dr. James A. Knight, its founder, as the Hospital for the Relief of the Ruptured and Crippled at 97 2nd Avenue on May 1, 1863. Moved to Lexington Avenue and 42nd Street on November 10 or 11, 1870, moved to 321 East 42nd Street in 1912, renamed Hospital for Special Surgery in 1940, moved to its present site in 1955.[19][20][21][22][23]
  • Lenox Hill Hospital, 100 East 77th Street, Manhattan. Incorporated at its as the German Hospital and Dispensary in the City of New York on April 13, 1861, opened on September 13, 1869, renamed Lenox Hill Hospital in 1918. The dispensary unit was located at 8 East 3rd Street.[24][25][26][27]
  • Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, 210 East 64th Street, Manhattan. Incorporated May 5, 1869.[28]
  • Manhattan Psychiatric Center, 600 East 125th Street, Ward's Island, Manhattan. Opened as The New York City Asylum for the Insane in July 1868, renamed Manhattan State Hospital on February 28, 1896, renamed Manhattan Psychiatric Center and split into Dunlap, Kirby, and Meyer divisions in the 1970s.[29][30][31][32]
  • Manhattan Veterans Administration Hospital, 423 East 23rd Street, Manhattan. Opened in 1954.[33]
  • Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, Manhattan. Founded as New York Cancer Hospital in 1884, renamed General Memorial Hospital for the Treatment of Cancer and Allied Diseases in 1899, renamed Memorial Hospital for the Treatment of Cancer and Allied Diseases in 1916, moved to its present location in 1939, renamed Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer in 1960.[34]
  • Metropolitan Hospital Center, 1901 1st Avenue, Manhattan. Founded as the Homeopathic Hospital affiliated with the New York Homeopathic Medical College (now New York Medical College) in 1875, in a building originally built for the Inebriate Asylum on Ward's Island. Later known as Ward's Island Hospital. Moved to the site of the former New York City Asylum for the Insane on Blackwell's Island (later known as Welfare Island and currently Roosevelt Island) in 1894, renamed Metropolitan Hospital, moved to its current location in 1955, renamed Metropolitan Hospital Center in 1965.[35]
  • Mount Sinai Beth Israel, 1st Avenue and East 16th Street, Manhattan. Incorporated as Beth Israel Hospital on May 28, 1890 and opened at 206 Broadway in 1891, moved to Jefferson and Cherry Streets in 1895, moved to Stuyvesant Square. Merged with Jewish Maternity Hospital which had opened at 270-272 East Broadway on February 15, 1909, on December 19, 1929. Moved to its current location in 1964, renamed Beth Israel Medical Center on March 10, 1965, renamed Mount Sinai Beth Israel on January 22, 2014 following its merger with Mount Sinai in 2013.[36][37][38][39][40][41][42][43]
  • Mount Sinai Hospital, 1 Gustave L. Levy Place, Manhattan. Incorporated on January 5, 1852, opened on West 28th Street and 8th Avenue as The Jews' Hospital on May 17, 1855, renamed Mount Sinai Hospital in 1866, moved to Lexington Avenue between East 65th and East 66th Streets in 1870, and moved in 1904 to Fifth Avenue and 100th Street, a portion of which was renamed Gustave L. Levy Place in 1977.[44][45][46][47]
  • Mount Sinai St. Luke's, 1111 Amsterdam Avenue, Manhattan. Incorporated on May 12, 1848, opened as St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital in 1856 and originally housed in the Church of the Holy Communion at Sixth Avenue and 20th Street in Manhattan, moved to Fifth Avenue between 54th and 55th Streets on May 13, 1858, moved to its current location in 1896, merged with Roosevelt Hospital to form St. Luke's–Roosevelt Hospital in 1979, acquired by Mount Sinai Hospital in 2013 and renamed Mount Sinai St. Luke's on January 22, 2014.[48][49][50][51]
  • Mount Sinai West, 1000 10th Avenue, Manhattan. Incorporated as Roosevelt Hospital on February 2, 1864, via a bequest of James H. Roosevelt, opened on November 2, 1871, merged with St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital to form St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in 1979, acquired by Mount Sinai Hospital in 2013, renamed Mount Sinai Roosevelt on January 22, 2014, renamed Mount Sinai West in November 2015.[52][53][54][55][56]
  • NewYork–Presbyterian - Allen Hospital, 5141 Broadway, Manhattan.
  • NewYork–Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, 630 West 168th Street, Manhattan. Founded as Presbyterian Hospital at Park Avenue and East 70th Street on February 28, 1868, renamed Columbia Presbyterian Hospital and moved to its current location in 1927, renamed Columbia University Medical Center upon its merger with New York Hospital in 1997.[57][58]
  • NewYork–Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital, 170 William Street, Manhattan. New York Infirmary was founded by Elizabeth Blackwell as the New York Dispensary for Poor Women and Children at 207 East 7th Street in 1853, renamed New York Infirmary for Indigent Women and Children in 1857, moved to 321 East 15th Street in 1858, and renamed New York Infirmary. St. Gregory's Free Emergency Accident Hospital and Ambulance Station was founded by the Volunteers of America at 93 Gold Street in 1905, and renamed Volunteer Hospital by 1908, moved to 117 Beekman Street in 1917, renamed Beekman Street Hospital in 1922, and renamed Beekman Hospital by 1924. Broad Street Hospital was founded on April 12, 1916, opened at 127-129 Broad Street on September 17, 1917, and was renamed Downtown Hospital in 1938. Beekman and Downtown Hospitals merged to form Beekman-Downtown Hospital on August 19, 1945. New York Infirmary and Beekman Downtown Hospitals merged to form New York Infirmary-Beekman Downtown Hospital on November 19, 1979, consolidated at the Beekman site in 1981, renamed New York Downtown Hospital in 1991, renamed N.Y.U. Downtown Hospital in 1997, reverted to New York Downtown Hospital in 2005, and renamed New York-Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital in 2013.[59][60][61][62][63][64][65][66][67][68]
  • NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, 525 East 68th Street, Manhattan. Granted a royal charter by William III on June 13, 1771 and opened as New York Hospital on January 3, 1791 on the block bounded by Broadway, Church Street, Catherine (now Worth) Street, and Anthony (now Duane) Street. Moved to 7-25 West 15th Street in 1877, became affiliated with Cornell University in 1927, moved to its current site in 1932, renamed Weill Cornell Medical Center upon its merger with Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center in 1997.[69][70][71][72]
  • New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, 310 East 14th Street, Manhattan. Incorporated March 29, 1822 as the New York Eye Infirmary at 218 2nd Avenue, renamed New York Eye and Ear Infirmary in 1864, renamed on January 22, 2014 after being acquired by Mount Sinai Hospital.[73]
  • N.Y.U. Hospital for Joint Diseases, 301 East 17th Street, Manhattan. Incorporated as the Jewish Hospital for Deformities and Joint Diseases on October 11, 1905 and opened on November 4, 1906 at 1919 Madison Avenue. The Jewish was dropped from the name within two years and Deformities by 1921. Moved to East 17th Street in 1979, merged with N.Y.U. in 2006.[74][75][76]
  • N.Y.U. Langone Medical Center, 550 First Avenue, Manhattan. Consists of Tisch Hospital, the Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, and the Hospital for Joint Diseases. Tisch Hospital was founded as New-York Post-Graduate Hospital and affiliated with the New York Post-Graduate Medical School on June 15, 1882, opened at 226 East 20th Street on March 21, 1884, moved to 222 East 20th Street on May 8, 1894, then to 303 East 20th Street, took over Reconstruction Hospital on December 1, 1929, merged with N.Y.U.-Bellevue on November 9, 1948, renamed University Hospital on December 1, 1948, moved to 560 First Avenue on June 9, 1963, renamed Tisch Hospital for the Tisch family on January 25, 1989, and is currently part of NYU Langone Medical Center. The Hospital for Joint Diseases opened as the Jewish Hospital for Deformities and Joint Diseases at 1919 Madison Avenue in 1906, moved to 301 East 17th Street in 1979 and was named The Hospital for Joint Diseases Orthopaedic Institute, and merged with N.Y.U. Medical Center in 2006. The Rusk Institute was founded as the Institute for Rehabilitation Medicine by Dr. Howard A. Rusk and opened on East 38th street in June 1948, and renamed the Rusk Institute in his honor on June 18, 1984.[77][78][79][80][81][82][83][84][74][76][85][86][87]
  • Rockefeller Institute Hospital, 1230 York Avenue, Manhattan. Opened on October 17, 1910, first patient hospitalized on October 26, 1910. This is a 20-bed research hospital, and all patients are subjects in research studies.[88][89]

The Bronx[edit]

Bronx-Lebanon Medical Center
  • Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center – formed via the merger of Bronx Hospital and Lebanon Hospital on October 8, 1962.[90]
    • Concourse Division, 1650 Grand Concourse, the Bronx. Incorporated as Lebanon Hospital on July 17, 1890. Opened on the block bounded by Westchester Avenue, East 150th Street, Cauldwell Avenue, and Trinity Avenue on February 22, 1893. Moved to its current location in June 1946.[91][92][93][94][95]
    • Fulton Division, 1276 Fulton Avenue, the Bronx. Opened on May 9, 1920.[96]
  • Calvary Hospital, 1740 Eastchester Road, the Bronx. Founded as Women of Calvary in 1899, treating patients in their private homes at 7 and 9 Perry Street in Manhattan. Renamed House of Calvary, moved to 1600 Macombs Road in the Bronx in 1915, renamed Calvary Hospital in 1968, moved to its current location in 1978. Its primary focus is on end-of-life and hospice care.[97][98][99]
  • Jacobi Medical Center, 1400 Pelham Parkway South, the Bronx. Named after Abraham Jacobi and opened on July 1, 1955 as part of Bronx Municipal Hospital Center.[100][101][102]
Veterans' hospital
  • James J. Peters V.A. Medical Center, 130 West Kingsbridge Road, the Bronx. Opened as United States Veterans' Hospital no. 81 on April 15, 1922.[103][104][105] Named after James J. Peters in 2002.[106]
  • Lincoln Medical Center, 234 East 149th Street, the Bronx. Founded by the Society for the Relief of Worthy Aged Indigent Colored Persons as the Home for the Colored Aged at West 51st Street and the Hudson River in Manhattan in 1841, moved to Park Avenue and East 40th Street in 1843, moved to First Avenue between East 64th and East 65th Streets in 1850, renamed the Colored Home and Hospital in 1882, moved to Concord Avenue and East 141st Street in the Bronx in 1898, renamed Lincoln Hospital and Home in 1902, renamed Lincoln Medical Center and opened in its current location in 1976.[107][108][109]
  • Montefiore Medical Center – named for Sir Moses Montefiore. Affiliated with the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.[110][111]
    • Moses Division, 111 East 210th Street, the Bronx. Founded as Montefiore Home for Chronic Invalids located at Avenue A and East 84th Street in Manhattan and opened on October 26, 1884, the day Moses Montefiore became 100 years old. Moved to Broadway and West 138th Street in 1888, renamed Montefiore Hospital for Chronic Diseases in 1901, moved to its current location and renamed Montefiore Home and Hospital for Chronic Diseases in 1913, renamed Montefiore Hospital for Chronic Diseases in 1920, renamed Montefiore Hospital and Medical Center on October 11, 1964, renamed the Henry and Lucy Moses Division of Montefiore Medical Center in 1981.[110][112][113]
    • Weiler Division, 1825 Eastchester Road, the Bronx. Opened as the Hospital of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in 1967, renamed for Jack D. Weiler in 1979. Its daily operations have been run by Montefiore since 1969.[110]
    • Wakefield Division, 600 East 233rd Street, the Bronx. Founded as Misericordia Hospital on Staten Island in 1887, moved to 531 East 86th Street in Manhattan in 1889, moved to its current location in 1958, renamed Our Lady of Mercy Hospital in 1985, acquired by Montefiore Medical Center in 2008 and renamed as their North Division, then renamed the Wakefield Division of Montefiore.[114]
  • North Central Bronx Hospital, 3424 Kossuth Avenue, the Bronx. Opened on October 25, 1976.[115][116]
  • St. Barnabas Hospital, 4422 Third Avenue, the Bronx. The first hospital for chronic diseases in the United States. Founded by the Reverend Washington Rodman in West Farms as the Home for the Incurables on April 6, 1866, moved to its present site in 1873, renamed St. Barnabas Hospital for Chronic Diseases in 1947, renamed St. Barnabas Health System in 2014. Became affiliated with the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education of the City College of New York in 2015, with plans to become the teaching hospital of the newly established, CUNY School of Medicine in 2016.[1][117][118][119][120]

Brooklyn[edit]

  • Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center, 555 Rockaway Parkway, now also 1 Brookdale Plaza, Brooklyn. Opened as Brownsville and East New York Hospital on April 11, 1921, renamed Beth-El Hospital in 1932, renamed Brookdale Hospital Center in 1963, renamed Brookdale Hospital Medical Center in 1971, then renamed Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center.[121][122]
  • Brooklyn Hospital Center, 121 DeKalb Avenue, Brooklyn. Founded as Brooklyn City Hospital in 1845, renamed Brooklyn Hospital on February 10, 1883, merged with Caledonian Hospital and renamed Brooklyn Hospital-Caledonian Hospital in 1982, renamed Brooklyn Hospital in 1983, renamed Brooklyn Hospital Center in 1990. Its outpatient clinics include the site of the former Cumberland Hospital several blocks away.[123][124]
  • Brooklyn V.A. Medical Center, 800 Poly Place, Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. Opened in 1950.[125]
  • Coney Island Hospital, 2601 Ocean Parkway, Brooklyn. Opened as a first aid station near West 3rd Street in 1875, moved to a rented building on Sea Breeze Avenue and named Reception Hospital on May 12, 1902, but also called Sea Breeze Hospital and Coney Island Reception Hospital, officially part of Kings County Hospital, and open only for seasonal care from April through October. Moved to its current location, opened full-time, and renamed Coney Island Hospital on May 18, 1910.[126]
  • Interfaith Medical Center, 1545 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn. Formed via the merger and consolidation of Jewish Hospital and Medical Center and St. John's Episcopal Hospital of Brooklyn in 1982, with the former moving into the latter's facilities.[123][127]
  • Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center, 585 Schenectady Avenue, Brooklyn. Opened on April 24, 1929 as the Jewish Sanitarium for Incurables, renamed the Jewish Sanitarium and Hospital for Chronic Diseases in 1933, renamed Jewish Chronic Disease Hospital in 1954, became an acute medical care hospital and renamed Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center in 1968.[128][129][130]
  • Kings County Hospital Center, 451 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn. Opened in 1837. Absorbed Kingston Avenue Hospital, which had opened in 1891 as a Hospital for Contagious Diseases, in 1955.[131][132][133]
  • Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Avenue, Brooklyn. Its constituent institutions were The New Utrecht Dispensary, which opened at 1275 37th Street in 1911 was renamed Israel Hospital when it became a hospital; Zion Hospital, which opened at 2140 Cropsey Avenue in 1911; and Beth Moses Hospital, which opened at 404 Hart Street on October 24, 1920. Israel and Zion Hospitals merged in May 1920 to form Israel Zion Hospital and opened at 10th Avenue and 48th Street on September 17, 1922. Israel Zion merged with Beth Moses Hospital to form Maimonides Hospital on July 30, 1947, and acute medical services were consolidated at the Israel Zion location. Renamed Maimonides Medical Center in 1996.[134][135][136][137][138][139]
  • Mount Sinai Brooklyn, 3201 Kings Highway, Brooklyn. Opened as Kings Highway Hospital in the 1950s, renamed Beth Israel-Kings Highway Division when acquired by Beth Israel Medical Center in 1995, renamed Beth Israel Brooklyn on February 27, 2012, renamed Mount Sinai Beth Israel Brooklyn on January 22, 2014 following the merger of Mount Sinai and Beth Israel, renamed Mount Sinai Brooklyn on July 20, 2015.[140][141][142]
  • New York Community Hospital, 2525 Kings Highway, Brooklyn. Founded as Madison Park Hospital in 1929, renamed Community Hospital of Brooklyn between 1962 and 1965, renamed New York Community Hospital when it was acquired by New York-Presbyterian Hospital in 1997.* New York Methodist Hospital, 506 6th Street, Brooklyn. Incorporated on May 27, 1881, opened as the Methodist Episcopal Hospital in the City of Brooklyn on December 15, 1887, renamed Methodist Hospital of Brooklyn in 1939, renamed New York Methodist hospital upon its affiliation with New York-Presbyterian Hospital in 1993.[143][144][145]
Lutheran Medical Center
  • NYU Lutheran Medical Center, 150 55th Street, Brooklyn. Founded by Sister Elisabeth Fedde as the Norwegian Lutheran Deaconess Home and Hospital at 441 4th Avenue in 1883,[146] moved to 4520 4th Avenue in 1889, merged with Lutheran Hospital of Manhattan to form Our Savior's Lutheran Hospital in July 1956[147] and then renamed Lutheran Medical Center, moved to its current site in 1977, renamed NYU Lutheran Medical Center upon its affiliation with N.Y.U. in 2015.[148]
  • University Hospital of Brooklyn, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn. Founded as the Brooklyn German General Dispensary at 132 Court Street in March 1856, moved to 145 Court Street in 1857, renamed the St. John's Hospital on November 6, 1857, renamed Long Island College Hospital on February 4, 1858, incorporated March 6, 1858, moved to the Perry Mansion on Henry Street between Amity and Pacific Streets May 1, 1858. The college and the hospital separated in 1930, the college was re-chartered as the Long Island College of Medicine in 1931 and merged into the State University of New York on April 5, 1950. The hospital opened in the 1960s.[149][150]
  • Woodhull Medical and Mental Health Center, 760 Broadway at Flushing Avenue, Brooklyn. Named for Richard M. Woodhull, the original owner of the site, by Victor Morales, a local student at Intermediate School 318, who traced his origins. Opened on May 24, 1982.[151][152]
  • Wyckoff Heights Medical Center, 374 Stockholm Street, Brooklyn. Founded as German Hospital in 1889, dedicated at St. Nicholas Avenue and Stanhope Street on May 21, 1899, and opened later that year. Renamed Wyckoff Heights Hospital because of anti-German sentiment after World War 1, then renamed Wyckoff Heights Medical Center. The address has changed because of additional buildings, but it is still on the original block.[153][154][155]

Queens[edit]

  • Elmhurst Hospital Center, 79-01 Broadway, Elmhurst, Queens. Opened as Elmhurst General Hospital on March 18, 1957.[156]
  • The Floating Hospital, 41-40 27th Street, Long Island City, Queens. Founded in 1872 or 1873.
  • Flushing Hospital Medical Center, 4500 Parsons Boulevard, Flushing, Queens. Founded as Flushing Hospital in 1884, opened in 1888.[157]
  • Forest Hills Hospital, 102-01 66th Road, Forest Hills, Queens. Opened as Forest Hills General Hospital on August 13, 1953, closed in November 1963 and re-opened in 1964 as LaGuardia Hospital. Sold in 1996 and renamed Forest Hills Hospital, currently part Northwell Health.[158][159]
  • Jamaica Hospital, Van Wyck Expressway at 89th Avenue, Jamaica, Queens. Opened at Fulton (now Jamaica) Avenue and Canal (now 169th) Street on July 28, 1891, incorporated February 20, 1892, moved to the east side of New York Avenue just north of South Street on June 18, 1898, moved to Van Wyck Boulevard on August 16, 1924.[160][161][162]
  • Long Island Jewish Medical Center, 270-05 76th Avenue, New Hyde Park (on the border of Queens and Nassau Counties - in Glen Oaks, Queens and Lake Success, Nassau County, with a New Hyde Park mailing address).
  • Mount Sinai Queens, 25-10 30th Avenue, Astoria Queens. Formerly called Astoria General Hospital, opened on Flushing Avenue on November 1, 1892, moved to Crescent Street on May 4, 1896, gradually expanded to 30th Avenue, renamed Western Queens Community Hospital, acquired by Mount Sinai Hospital and renamed Mount Sinai Queens on June 24, 1999.[47][163]
The former Booth Memorial Hospital in Flushing, now New York Hospital Queens.
  • NewYork–Presbyterian/Queens, 56-45 Main Street, at Booth Memorial Avenue, Flushing, Queens. Founded by the Salvation Army as the Rescue Home for Women on East 123rd Street in Manhattan in 1892, moved to 316 East 15th Street and renamed Red Cross Medical Station no. 1 in 1917, renamed for William Booth as Booth Memorial Hospital on March 13, 1919, moved to its current address in Queens on February 5, 1957, renamed New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens when it affiliated with New York Hospital in 1993, renamed NewYork-Presbyterian/Queens upon the merger of New York and Presbyterian Hospitals in 1997.[164][165][166][167]
  • Queens Hospital Center, 82-68 164th Street, Jamaica, Queens. Opened as Queens General Hospital on October 30, 1935, renamed upon its merger with Queensboro Hospital and Triboro Hospital for Tuberculosis on June 6, 1952, moved to its current location from across 164th Street in 2001.[168][169]
  • St. John's Episcopal Hospital South Shore, 327 Beach 19th Street, Far Rockaway, Queens. Opened as St. Joseph's Hospital on June 25, 1905, became the South Shore Division of Long Island Jewish Hospital in January 1973, renamed St. John's Episcopal Hospital South Shore on July 1, 1976.[170][171][172]
  • St. Mary's Children's Hospital, 29-01 216th Street, Bayside, Queens. Founded in Manhattan in 1870, moved to Queens in 1951.[173]
  • Zucker Hillside Hospital, 75-59 263rd Street, Glen Oaks, Queens. Founded as Hastings Hillside Hospital in Hastings-on Hudson in June 1926. Moved and opened at its current address as Hillside Hospital on October 19, 1941. Renamed Zucker Hillside Hospital in honor of Donald and Barbara Zucker, who made a substantial donation in 1999.[174][175]

Staten Island[edit]

  • Richmond University Medical Center, branches at 355 Bard Avenue and 75 Vanderbilt Avenue, Staten Island. The branch on Bard Avenue opened as St. Vincent's Hospital of Staten Island on Thanksgiving Day in 1903. The branch on Vanderbilt Avenue opened on October 1, 1831 as Seaman's Retreat which was part of the Marine Hospital Service, became a United States Public Health Service Hospital in the 1930s, and was sold to the Sisters of Charity of New York and renamed Bayley Seton in 1980. Both branches became Richmond University Medical Center on January 1, 2007.[176][177][178][179]
  • Staten Island University Hospital - formed via the merger of Staten Island and Richmond Memorial Hospitals in 1989.[180][181][182]
    • North Division, 475 Seaview Avenue. Founded as the S.R. Smith Infirmary in memory of Dr. Samuel Russell Smith in 1861, moved to Tompkins Avenue in 1864, moved to 85 Hannah Street in 1870, moved to 101 Stanley Avenue (later Castleton Avenue) in 1890, renamed Staten Island Hospital in 1916, moved to 475 Seaview Avenue in 1979.
    • South Division, 375 Seguine Avenue. Founded as Richmond Memorial Hospital in 1921.

Closed hospitals[edit]

Includes former names of hospitals

  • A.H. Wade's Hospital, Brooklyn
  • Adelphi Hospital, 50 Greene Avenue, Brooklyn; now apartments
  • Arthur C. Logan Memorial Hospital
  • Astoria General Hospital, 25-10 30th Avenue, Astoria, Queens. See Mount Sinai Queens Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Queens above.
  • Astoria Sanitarium, Queens
  • Babies' Hospital in the City of New York, Lexington Avenue and East 55th Street, Manhattan. Incorporated September 17, 1887. Became part of Columbia Presbyterian and is currently Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital.[183]
  • Baptist Medical Center, 2749 Linden Boulevard, Brooklyn. Later became a nursing home, demolished in 2013.
  • Bay Ridge Hospital, 437 Ovington Avenue, Brooklyn. Now a nursing home.
  • Bayley Seton Hospital, 75 Vanderbilt Avenue, Staten Island. See Richmond University Medical Center in the section on hospitals in Staten Island above.
  • Bedford Dispensary and Hospital, Brooklyn. Renamed Ocean Hill Memorial Dispensary and Hospital in 1920.[184]
  • Beekman-Downtown Hospital, 117 Beekman Street, Manhattan. See New York-Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Manhattan above.
  • Bensonhurst Maternity Hospital, Brooklyn
  • Beth David Hospital, 321 East 42nd Street, Manhattan. Incorporated as the Yorkville Dispensary for Women and Children at 246-248 East 82nd Street on November 29, 1886, moved to 1822-1828 Lexington Avenue and 113th Street in April 1912 and into a new building on the site on June 1, 1913, moved to its last location in 1957, renamed Grand Central Hospital in July 3, 1959, and closed in late 1962 or early 1963.[185][186][187]
  • Beth Moses Hospital, 404 Hart Street, Brooklyn. Demolished for city housing. See Maimonides Medical Center, in the section on hospitals in Brooklyn above.
  • Bethany Deaconess Hospital, 237 St. Nicholas Avenue, Brooklyn. Founded in 1901, building opened on September 16, 1902. Acquired by Wyckoff Heights Hospital in 1966 and renamed the Bethany Pavilion, closed in 1974, left vacant, demolished in 1985, and replaced by senior housing.[188]
  • Bird S. Coler Hospital, 900 Main Street, Welfare Island (now Roosevelt Island), Manhattan. See Coler-Goldwater Specialty Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Manhattan above.
  • Black's Sanitarium, the Bronx
  • Blackwell's Island Hospital, 800 beds
  • Bloomingdale Asylum for the Insane, Manhattan. Incorporated as the Society of the Hospital in the City of New York in America, and later as the Society of the New York Hospital. Renamed the Bloomingdale Asylum for the Insane and moved to the current site of Columbia University in Morningside Heights in 1821, renamed the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic and moved to White Plains in 1894.[189][190]
  • Booth Memorial Hospital, Flushing, Queens. See New York-Presbyterian/Queens Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Queens above.
  • Borough Park General, Brooklyn
  • Boulevard Hospital, 46-04 31st Avenue, Astoria, Queens. Now site is several private medical offices.
  • Bradford Street Hospital, 109 Bradford Street, Brooklyn[191]
  • Broad Hospital, 127-129 Broad Street, Manhattan. See New York-Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Manhattan above.
  • Bronx Area Station Hospital, 1650 Grand Concourse, the Bronx. Built as a new location for Lebanon Hospital and completed in 1943, but was used by the Army for its personnel and their wives and children from July 10, 1943 to September 30, 1945. Lebanon Hospital moved into the building in June 1946.[192]
  • Bronx Eye and Ear Hospital, 321 East Tremont Avenue, the Bronx. Opened as Bronx Eye and Ear Hospital on East 142nd Street prior to 1909, moved to 459-461 East 143rd Street in 1912 or 1913, moved to East Tremont Avenue on October 15, 1937, renamed Bronx Eye Hospital by 1968, unknown closing date.[193][194][195]
  • Bronx Hospital, 1276 Fulton Avenue, the Bronx. See the Fulton Division of Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center, in the section on hospitals in the Bronx above.
  • Bronx Maternity Hospital, 1072 Grand Concourse at 166th Street, the Bronx. Opened on October 31, 1931. Unknown closing date.[196][197][198]
  • Bronx Municipal Hospital Center, 1400 Pelham Parkway South, the Bronx. Opened in 1954. This was the name for Jacobi and Van Etten Hospitals and their associated buildings when they opened in 1954. The name fell out of use in the 1980s.
  • Bronx Sanitarium, the Bronx
  • Brooklyn Eastern District Hospital, 110 South 3rd Street, Brooklyn. Opened as the Williamsburg Dispensary in 1851, renamed in 1872.[199]
  • Brooklyn Eye and Ear Hospital, 29 Greene Avenue, Brooklyn. Opened in 1868. Now a nursing home.[200]
  • Brooklyn Hebrew Maternity Hospital, Brooklyn
  • Brooklyn Home for Consumptives, Kingston Avenue and St. John's Place, Brooklyn
  • Brooklyn Homeopathic Hospital, 105-111 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn. Opened on February 13, 1873, in the former building of the Cumberland Street Orphan Asylum, which moved out in 1870. Rebuilt in 1918, renamed Cumberland Hospital in 1922, had an address of 35 and then 39 Auburn Place, closed as a hospital on August 24, 1983, became an outpatient clinic called Neighborhood Family Care Center, now Cumberland Diagnostic Treatment Center, address 100 North Portland Avenue, and part of Brooklyn Hospital Center.[201][202][203]
  • Brooklyn Homeopathic Lying-In Asylum, 775 Washington Avenue, Brooklyn. See Prospect Heights Hospital, below.[204]
  • Brooklyn Maternity Hospital, 775 Washington Avenue, Brooklyn. See Prospect Heights Hospital, below.[204]
  • Brooklyn State Hospital, Brooklyn. Now Kingsborough Psychiatric Hospital.
  • Brooklyn Throat Hospital, Brooklyn. Opened in 1859, renamed Williamsburg Hospital in 1898.[205][206]
  • Brooklyn Women's Hospital, 1395 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn. Opened on August 1, 1930.[207]
  • Bryant Sanitarium, the Bronx
  • Bushwick Hospital, Putnam Avenue at Howard Avenue, Brooklyn. Founded in 1891, closed in the late 1950s, now a New York State facility for youth.
  • Cabrini Medical Center, 227 East 19th Street, Manhattan. Formed in September 1973 after the merger of Columbus and Italian Hospitals. Closed in March 2008, now co-op apartments.[208][209][210]
  • Caledonian Hospital, 10 Saint Paul's Place, Brooklyn. Merged with Brooklyn Hospital in 1982 and closed in 2003. The site is now co-op apartments.[123][124]
  • Carson C. Peck Memorial Hospital, 570 Crown Street, Brooklyn. Opened in 1919, merged with Methodist Hospital of Brooklyn in about 1970, closed in the 1990s. Demolished in 2003 and replaced by a girl's yeshiva and apartments.[211]
  • Centre Street Hospital, Manhattan (1872)
  • Charity Hospital, Blackwell's Island, Manhattan. See Penitentiary Hospital, below.
  • Charles B. Towns Hospital, Manhattan
  • Cholera Hospital, Hamilton Avenue and Van Brunt Street, Brooklyn. Opened in July 1866, closed October 1 in the same year.[212]
  • Churchill Sanitarium, Brooklyn
  • City Hospital, Blackwell's Island, Manhattan. See Penitentiary Hospital, below.
  • Columbus Hospital, 226 East 20th Street, Manhattan. Founded by the Salesian Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart in 1892, opened at 41 East 12th Street, became incorporated on March 26, 1895, moved to East 20th Street in 1895, renamed Cabrini Hospital in September 1973 after its merger with Italian Hospital, and closed in March 2008. The buildings are now co-op apartments.[208][209][210]
  • Concourse Hospital, the Bronx
  • Convalescent Hospital, Hart Island, the Bronx (1877)
  • Crotona Park Sanitarium, the Bronx
  • Crown Heights Hospital, Brooklyn (See Lefferts General)
  • Cumberland Hospital, 35 Auburn Place, Brooklyn. Opened as Brooklyn Homeopathic Hospital at 109 Cumberland Street on February 13, 1873. Rebuilt in 1918, renamed Cumberland Hospital in 1922, had an address of 35 and then 39 Auburn Place, closed as a hospital on August 24, 1983, became an outpatient clinic called Neighborhood Family Care Center, now Cumberland Diagnostic Treatment Center, address 100 North Portland Avenue, and part of Brooklyn Hospital Center.[202][203]
  • Debarkation Hospital no. 1, Ellis Island (Manhattan). Use of Ellis Island Immigration Center's Hospital buildings was transferred from the United States Department of Labor to the Army on March 8, 1918. The hospital closed on June 30, 1919.[213]
  • Debarkation Hospital no. 5, Manhattan. Lexington Avenue between 46th and 47th Streets. Opened in December 1918 in the building previously known as the Grand Central Palace, and closed on June 30, 1919.[213]
  • Deepdale General Hospital, 55-15 Little Neck Parkway, Little Neck, Queens. Renamed Little Neck Hospital in 1991, closed in 1996. Now senior housing.
  • Demilt Dispensary, 2nd Avenue and East 23rd Street, Manhattan. Opened in 1851, consolidated with Park Hospital and the Institute for Crippled and Disabled Men, on the site of Park Hospital, to form Reconstruction Hospital on February 19, 1921.([214][215]
  • Doctor Bregman's Sanitarium, the Bronx.
  • Doctor's Hospital of Brooklyn (Brooklyn), 15th Avenue at 45th Street, Brooklyn. Closed about 1965.
  • Doctors Hospital (Manhattan), 170 East End Avenue, Manhattan. Founded in 1929, formally opened on February 9, 1930, first patients hospitalized on February 19, 1930.[216][217] Demolished for condominium apartments in 2005.
  • Doctor's Hospital of Queens, 104-20 Van Wyck Expressway, Jamaica, Queens.
  • Doctor's Hospital of Staten Island, 1050 Targee Street, Staten Island. Founded as Sunnyside Hospital in 1940, moved to make way for the Staten Island Expressway in 1940 and relocated to Targee Street in 1963, merged with Staten Island University Hospital, closed in 2003. Building is vacant.[180][181]
  • Downtown Hospital, 127-129 Broad Street, Manhattan. See New York-Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Manhattan above.
  • Eastern District Dispensary and Hospital, Brooklyn. Opened in 1851.[200]
  • Eclectic Medical Dispensary of the City of New York, (1840–1870).
  • Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital. Opened in 1902 and closed in 1930.[218] From March 8, 1918 to June 30, 1919 it was designated as the United States Army's Debarkation Hospital no. 1.[213]
  • Elton Maternity Hospital, the Bronx.
  • Emanuel Unity Hospital
  • Embarkation Hospital no. 3, Hoffman Island, Staten Island. Opened as the Hoffman Island Army Hospital in December 1917. Renamed Embarkation Hospital no. 3 by the U.S. Army in July 1918, and closed on January 1, 1919.[213]
  • Embarkation Hospital no. 4, 345 West 50th Street, Manhattan. Opened via lease of the New York Polyclinic Medical School and Hospital was leased by the U.S. Army on October 20, 1918, formally opened on December 1918, and transferred back to New York Polyclinic on August 15, 1919.[213]
  • Emigrant's Hospital, Ward's Island, Manhattan.
  • Epileptic Hospital, Blackwell's Island, Manhattan. Opened in 1866.[219]
  • Evangelical Deaconess Hospital, 623 Chauncey Street, Brooklyn. Now a homeless shelter.
  • Fever Hospitals, Blackwell's Island, Manhattan. Two buildings for typhus and "ship fever."[220]
  • Fifth Avenue Hospital, Fifth Avenue between 105th and 106th Streets, Manhattan. Opened on September 28, 1922, merged with Fifth Avenue Hospital to form Flower and Fifth Avenue Hospitals with Flower moving into the Fifth Avenue Building on December 16, 1935, closed in the 1980s. Now the Terence Cardinal Cooke Health Center, a facility for patients with AIDS.[221][222][223]
  • Fitch's Sanitarium, 123 West 183 Street, the Bronx. Founded in 1920, closed in the early 1960s, now apartments.
  • Flatbush General Hospital, 719 Linden Boulevard, Brooklyn.
  • Flower and Fifth Avenue Hospital, Fifth Avenue between 105th and 106th Streets, Manhattan. Formed by the merger of Flower and Fifth Avenue Hospitals with the former moving into the latter's building on December 16, 1935, closed in the 1980s. Now the Terence Cardinal Cooke Health Center, a facility for patients with AIDS.[222][223]
  • Flower Hospital, Fifth Avenue between 105th and 106th Streets, Manhattan. Named for Roswell P. Flower and opened at Eastern Boulevard (later Avenue A, then York Avenue) between East 63rd and East 64th Street on January 7, 1890, merged with Fifth Avenue Hospital and moved into the Fifth Avenue Building to form Flower and Fifth Avenue Hospitals on December 16, 1935, closed in the 1980s. Now the Terence Cardinal Cooke Health Center, a facility for patients with AIDS.[222][223][224][225]
  • Fordham Hospital, Southern Boulevard and Crotona Avenue, the Bronx. Opened in 1892 on Valentine Avenue near Kingsbridge Road in 1892, moved to Aqueduct Avenue and St. James Place in 1898, moved to Southern Boulevard and Crotona Avenue on May 11, 1907, and closed on July 15, 1976. The site is now a parking lot.[226]
  • Francis Delafield Hospital, 99 Fort Washington Avenue, Manhattan. Named after Dr. Francis Delafield, now senior housing.
  • Franklin Maternity Sanitarium, the Bronx.
  • French Hospital, 330 West 30th Street, Manhattan. Opened at 450-458 West 34th Street in 1881, moved to its later location in the 1930s, closed on May 13, 1977, now apartments.[227][228]
  • General Hospital no. 1, Gun Hill Road and Bainbridge Avenue, the Bronx. Also called Columbia War Hospital. Temporary structures erected as an emergency war hospital on property of Columbia University, with additional facilities in the Montefiore Home, the Messiah Home, the Camp Estate (all also in the Bronx), and Bloomingdale Hospital (in White Plains), and run by Columbia University from July 1917 to October 15, 1919.[229]
  • German Hospital and Dispensary in the City of New York, East 77th street between Park and Lexington Avenues, Manhattan. Incorporated 1861, opened September 13, 1869, renamed Lenox Hill Hospital in 1918. The dispensary unit was located at 8 East 3rd Street.[24][25][26]>[27][230]
  • German Hospital Dispensary of Brooklyn, St. Nicholas Avenue and Stockholm Street, Brooklyn.
  • German Hospital of Brooklyn. Opened in 1879.[200]
  • Goldwater Memorial Hospital, Welfare Island (now Roosevelt Island), Manhattan. See Coler-Goldwater Specialty Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Manhattan above.
  • Gotham Hospital, 30 East 76th Street, Manhattan. Now apartments.
  • Gouverneur Hospital, 227 Madison Street, Manhattan. Opened in the financial district on October 5, 1885, moved to 621 Water Street at Gouverneur Slip and the East River on January 7, 1901, closed in 1961, re-opened on Madison Street on September 21, 1972, closed again in 1976. The Water Street building was converted to an assisted living residence and the Madison Street Building in an outpatient clinic.[231][232][233][234]
  • Gramercy Hospital, Manhattan.
  • Grand Central Hospital, 321 East 42nd Street, Manhattan. Originally Beth David Hospital, which was in other locations for many years, moved to its last location in 1957, renamed Grand Central Hospital on July 3, 1959, and closed in late 1962 or early 1963. Replaced by an office building.[187]
  • Grant General Hospital, Willett's Point, Queens.
Greenpoint Hospital
Jewish Hospital of Brooklyn
  • Jewish Hospital of Brooklyn, 555 Prospect Place, Brooklyn. Opened as a dispensary at 70 Johnson Avenue, incorporated as Jewish Hospital on November 9, 1901, opened on December 17, 1906, renamed Jewish Hospital and Medical Center of Brooklyn by 1968, merged with St. John's Episcopal Hospital of Brooklyn to become Interfaith Medical Center in 1982 and moved into St. John's facilities. The building is now apartments.[123][127][252][253]
  • Jewish Maternity Hospital, 270-272 East Broadway, Manhattan. See Mount Sinai Beth Israel, in the section on hospitals in Manhattan above.
  • Jewish Memorial Hospital, Broadway at West 196th Street, Manhattan. Founded in 1905, at Fifth Avenue and 128th Street by 1920, closed in 1983.
  • Jewish Sanitarium and Hospital for Chronic Diseases, East 49th Street at Rutland Road, Brooklyn. See Kingsbrook Jewish Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Brooklyn above.
  • Jewish Sanitarium for Incurables, East 49th Street at Rutland Road, Brooklyn. See Kingsbrook Jewish Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Brooklyn above.
  • Jews' Hospital, 8th Avenue and West 28th Street, Manhattan. See Mount Sinai Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Manhattan above.
  • Kew Gardens General Hospital, 80-02 Kew Gardens Road, Queens. Founded in 1941 in a former hotel, closed in the mid-1980s, replaced by an office tower.
  • Kings Highway Hospital, Brooklyn. See Mount Sinai Brooklyn, in the section on hospitals in Brooklyn above.
  • Kingston Avenue Hospital, Brooklyn.
  • Knickerbocker Hospital, 70 Convent Ave, Manhattan. Incorporated as Manhattan Dispensary on May 23, 1862, became a hospital in 1885, renamed J. Hood Wright Memorial Hospital on August 31, 1895, renamed Knickerbocker Hospital on June 16, 1913. Current building constructed in 1926 is now senior housing.[250][251]
  • Laura Franklin Hospital, 17-19 East 111th Street, Manhattan.
  • Lebanon Hospital, 1650 Grand Concourse, the Bronx. See the Concourse Division of Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center, in the section on hospitals in the Bronx above.
  • Leff-Central Park Hospital, Manhattan.
  • Lefferts General Hospital, 460 Lefferts Avenue, Brooklyn. Building demolished and replaced by a girl's Yeshiva in 1994.
  • Lefferts Maternity Hospital, 104-37 Lefferts Boulevard, Richmond Hill, Queens.
  • LeRoy Hospital, 40 East 61st Street, Manhattan. Opened in 1928, closed in 1980. Now condominium apartments.[254][255]
Linden General Hospital
Parkway Hospital
  • Parkway Hospital, 70-35 113th Street, Forest Hills, Queens. Opened in 1963, closed in 2008.
  • Parsons Hospital, 35-06 Parsons Boulevard, Flushing, Queens. Merged with Flushing Hospital.
  • Pelham Bay General Hospital, 1820 Pelham Parkway South, the Bronx. Now apartments.
  • Peninsula Hospital, 51-15 Beach Channel Drive, Far Rockaway, Queens. Opened as Rockaway Beach Hospital at 152 Beach 85th Street in Far Rockaway, Queens, on April 30, 1911, renamed Peninsula Hospital and moved to 51-15 Beach Channel Drive on June 12, 1960, closed in April 2012. Since 2014, an extended care and rehabilitation center.[281][282][283]
  • Penitentiary Hospital, Roosevelt Island, Manhattan. Opened in 1832 on what was then called Blackwell's Island, renamed Island Hospital on December 15, 1857, destroyed by fire on February 13, 1858, rebuilt as City Hospital and completed in 1861, renamed Charity Hospital in 1870, closed when it and Smallpox Hospital were moved to Queens in 1957, building demolished in 1994, stones salvaged for lining the paths in the Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park.[284]
  • Philanthropin Hospital, 2076 Fifth Avenue, Manhattan.[285]
  • Physicians Hospital, 34-01 73rd Street, Jackson Heights, Queens. Replaced by Junior High School 230 in 1998.
  • Polyclinic Hospital, 345 West 50th Street, Manhattan. Founded in 1895, merged with French Hospital in 1969 to form French and Polyclinic Hospital. The Polyclinic site closed in February 1977. The building is now co-op apartments.[228]
  • Prospect Heights Hospital, 775 Washington Ave, Brooklyn. Founded as the Brooklyn Homeopathic Lying-In Asylum in 1871, renamed Brooklyn Maternity Hospital on June 21, 1875, renamed Prospect Heights Hospital on September 12, 1902. Merged with Long Island College Hospital in the 1960s. Now senior housing.[204]
  • Prospect Hospital, 730 Kelly Street, the Bronx. Now a homeless shelter.
  • Queens General Hospital, Jamaica, Queens. Opened on October 30, 1935, renamed Queens Hospital Center upon its merger with Queensboro and Triboro Hospitals on June 6, 1952.[168]
  • Queens Memorial Hospital, Queens.
  • Queens Village Sanitarium, Queens.
  • Queensboro Hospital, Flushing Avenue and Lotts Lane, Queens. Opened in 1916, became the Queensboro Pavilion of Queens Hospital Center upon its merger with Queens General and Triboro Hospitals on June 6, 1952.[168]
  • Reception Hospital, Manhattan. This name was used for a hospital in the Storehouse Building on Blackwell's Island that transferred patients to the City, Metropolitan, and Central and Neurological Hospitals on Blackwell's Island; and for a hospital on Sea Breeze Avenue in Brooklyn that transferred patients to Kings County Hospital and then became Coney Island Hospital.
  • Reconstruction Hospital, 395 Central Park West, Manhattan. Founded as the Clinic for Functional Re-education on July 15, 1918, and renamed on February 19, 1921 upon consolidation with the DeMilt Dispensary, Park Hospital, and the Institute for Crippled and Disabled Men. Taken over by New-York Post-Graduate Hospital on December 1, 1929.[215]
  • Red Cross Hospital, 233 West 100th Street and 395 Central Park West, Manhattan. Opened in 1893, moved to 259 West 93rd Street on January 14, 1899, moved to 100th Street on January 14, 1899, became Park Hospital on October 27, 1915.[279][286][287][288]
  • Regent Hospital, 115 East 61st Street, Manhattan, now apartments.
  • Richmond Hill Sanitarium, Queens.
  • Richmond Memorial Hospital, 375 Seguine Avenue, Staten Island. Opened on September 18, 1920, merged with Staten Island University Hospital and became its South Division in 1989.[180][181][289]
  • Riverdale Hospital, Brooklyn. (See Linden General)
  • Riverside Hospital, North Brother Island, Manhattan. Originally named Smallpox Hospital when it opened on the southern end of Blackwell's Island in 1872, renamed Riverside Hospital in 1874, moved to North Brother Island in 1885.[290]
  • Rockaway Beach Hospital, 152 Beach 85th Street, Queens. Opened on April 30, 1911, renamed Peninsula Hospital and moved to 51-15 Beach Channel Drive on June 12, 1960, closed in April 2012.[281][282][283]
  • Roosevelt Hospital, 1000 Tenth Avenue, Manhattan. Founded in 1871, merged in 1979 with St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital to form St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital, acquired by Mount Sinai Hospital in 2013. Renamed Mount Sinai Roosevelt. In 2015, name changed to Mount Sinai West.
  • Royal Hospital, 2021 Grand Concourse, the Bronx. Now private medical offices.
  • Rusk Institute, Manhattan. See N.Y.U. Langone Medical Center, in the section on hospitals in Manhattan above.
  • S.R. Smith Infirmary, 101 Castleton Avenue, New Brighton, Staten Island. Named for Dr. Samuel Russell Smith. It was renamed Staten Island Hospital in 1917.[291]
  • St. Albans Sanitarium, Queens.
  • St. Ann's Maternity Hospital, 13 East 69th Street, Manhattan.
  • St. Anthony's Hospital, 89-15 Woodhaven Boulevard, Woodhaven, Queens. Founded in 1914, closed in 1966. Private homes built on the property in 2000.
  • St. Catharine's Hospital, 133 or 250 Bushwick Avenue, Brooklyn. Founded in 1869. Now senior housing.[200][292]
  • St. Cecilia's Maternity Hospital, 484 Humboldt Street, Brooklyn. Now apartments.
  • St. Christopher's Hospital for Babies, 283 Hicks Street, Brooklyn. Established in 1896.[293]
  • St. Clare's Hospital, 415 West 51st Street, Manhattan. Opened in the renovated buildings of St. Elizabeth's Hospital, which moved out during November 1927, on November 1, 1934, renamed St. Vincent's Midtown on July 1, 2003, closed in 2007.[294][295]
  • St. Elizabeth's Hospital, 689 Fort Washington Avenue, Manhattan. Opened at 225 West 31st Street in 1870, moved to 415 West 51st Street by 1905, moved to its last location in November 1927, closed in 1981. Now co-op apartments.[59][296][297]
  • St. Francis Hospital, 525 East 142nd Street, the Bronx. Founded on May 1, 1865 by the Poor Sisters of St. Francis at 407-409 East 5th Street, then 609 East 5th Street in Manhattan, moved to the Bronx on March 15, 1906, closed on December 31, 1966, replaced by apartments.[59][298][299][300][301][302]
  • St. Giles Hospital, 1346 President Street, Brooklyn. Opened by Sister Sarah, an Episcopal nun, on Degraw Street in 1891, moved to President Street in 1916, closed in 1978. The hospital cared for crippled children, many of whom had had polio, and the polio vaccine made it unnecessary. Now St. Mark's School, a Catholic day school.[303]
  • St. Gregory's Hospital, 93 Gold Street, Manhattan. See New York-Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Manhattan above.
  • St. John's Episcopal Hospital, 1545 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn. Founded in 1871, merged with Jewish Hospital and Medical Center of Brooklyn to become Interfaith Medical Center in 1982, with Jewish Hospital moving into St. John's facilities.[123][127][200][304]
  • St. John's Guild Seaside Hospital, New Dorp, Staten Island.
  • St. John's Long Island City Hospital, 25-01 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, Queens. Founded in 1890, replaced by One Court Square.[305]
  • St. John's Queens Hospital, 90-02 Queens Boulevard, Elmhurst, Queens. Closed in February 2009. Sold in 2014 for conversion to apartments.[266]
  • St. Joseph's Hospital, 158-40 79th Avenue, Flushing, Queens. Formerly Hillcrest General Hospital. As of 2007, a chemical drug dependency facility called Cornerstone Medical Arts Center.
  • St. Joseph's Hospital, 327 Beach 19th Street, Far Rockaway, Queens. See St. John's Episcopal Hospital South Shore, in the section on hospitals in Queens above.[170][171][172]
  • St. Joseph's Hospital for Chest Diseases, Brook Avenue and East 143rd Street, the Bronx. Founded in 1882. Also called St. Joseph's Hospital for Consumptives.
  • St. Lawrence Hospital, 457 West 163rd Street, Manhattan. Opened on August 10, 1906. A branch of St. Vincent's Catholic Medical Center. Uncertain closing date.[176]
  • St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital, Amsterdam Avenue at 114th Street, Manhattan. Founded in 1856 and originally housed in the Church of the Holy Communion at Sixth Avenue and 20th Street in Manhattan, moved to Fifth Avenue between 54th and 55th Streets in 1858, moved to its current location in 1896, merged with Roosevelt Hospital to become St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in 1979, acquired by Mount Sinai Hospital in 2013 and renamed Mount Sinai St. Luke's Hospital.
  • St. Mark's Hospital, 177 2nd Avenue, Manhattan. Opened at 66 St. Mark's Place in 1887, incorporated later on March 7, 1890, moved to 2nd Avenue on February 17, 1894.[306]
  • St. Mary's Female Hospital, 155 Dean Street, Brooklyn. Maternity.
  • St. Mary's Hospital, 170 Buffalo Avenue, Brooklyn. Opened in 1877, closed October 4, 2005.[293][307]
  • St. Mary's Hospital for Children, 405-411 West 34th Street, Manhattan.
  • St. Peter's Hospital, 380 Henry Street, Brooklyn. Founded on September 23, 1864. Now a nursing home.[200][308]
  • Saint Vincent's Catholic Medical Center, 170 West 12th Street, Manhattan. Incorporated on April 17, 1847 as the Sisters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul, opened on November 1, 1849, closed April 30, 2010. Replaced by condominium apartments.[309][310][311]
  • St. Vincent's Hospital, 355 Bard Avenue, West New Brighton, Staten Island. Opened on Thanksgiving Day, 1903. Became part of Richmond University Medical Center[176]
  • St. Vincent's Midtown, 415 West 51st Street, Manhattan. Formerly St. Clare's Hospital, renamed St. Vincent's Midtown when St. Vincent's Hospital in Greenwich Village took control on July 1, 2003. Closed in 2007.[295]
  • Samaritan Hospital, 759 President Street, Brooklyn. Founded in 1906.
  • Seaview Hospital, 460 Brielle Avenue Staten Island. Opened in 1913, closed in 1961. Some of the remaining buildings are a nursing home.[181][312][313][314]
  • Seney Hospital, Brooklyn. An alternative but unofficial name for New York Methodist Hospital. See the section on hospitals in Brooklyn above.
  • Seton Hospital, Henry Hudson Parkway, Riverdale, the Bronx. Opened by the Sisters of Charity of St. Vincent's de Paul in 1895, sold to New York City in 1948, closed in 1955.[100]
  • Shore Road Hospital, 9000 Shore Road, Brooklyn. Replaced by senior housing.
  • Sister Elizabeth Maternity Hospital, 362 51st Street, Brooklyn. Now a social services agency.
  • Sloane Hospital for Women, 447 West 59th Street, Manhattan. Established in 1888. A branch of Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital.
  • Smallpox Hospital, south end of Blackwell's Island (later Welfare Island, now Roosevelt Island), Manhattan. Opened in 1856, renamed Riverside Hospital in 1874, moved to Queens closed when it and Charity Hospital were moved to Queens in 1957.[290]
  • Society of the Lying-in Hospital, 2nd Avenue at East 17th Street, Manhattan.
  • Springfield Sanitarium, Queens.
  • Stuyvesant Polyclinic, 137 Second Avenue, Manhattan. Founded in 1906, closed in 2008.
  • Stuyvesant Square Hospital, 301 East 19th Street, Manhattan.
  • Sunnyside Hospital, Little Clove Road, Staten Island. Founded in 1940, moved to make way for the Staten Island Expressway in 1940 and relocated to Targee Street as Doctor's Hospital in 1963. Building was demolished for the highway.[180][181]
  • Swedish Hospital, 1350 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn. Opened at 126 Rogers Avenue on June 24, 1906, moved to 1350 Bedford Avenue on October 3, 1939, closed in September 1975. Now apartments.[315][316][317]
  • Sydenham Hospital, 565 Manhattan Avenue, Manhattan. Founded as a private hospital at 339-341 East 116th Street on June 20, 1892, moved to Manhattan Avenue in 1926, became part of the municipal hospital system on March 3, 1849, and closed in 1980.[59][318][319][320] Now senior housing.
  • Terrace Heights Hospital, 87-37 Palermo Street, Hollis, Queens, later renamed Holliswood Hospital. Closed in August 2013.[247][248]
  • Tonsil Hospital
  • Trafalgar Hospital, 161 East 90th Street, Manhattan. Now co-op apartments.
  • Triboro Hospital for Tuberculosis, Parsons Boulevard and 82nd Drive, Jamaica, Queens. Opened January 23, 1941, merged with Queens General and Queensboro Hospitals to form Queens Hospital Center on June 6, 1952, closed in 1984.[168][321]
  • Trinity Hospital, 50 Varick Street, Manhattan.
  • Union Hospital, 260 East 188th Street, the Bronx, now a community health center.
  • Unity Hospital, 1545 Saint John's Place, Brooklyn, now apartments.
  • University Heights Hospital, 74 West Tremont Ave, the Bronx.
  • University Hospital, 560 First Avenue, Mannhattan. See N.Y.U. Langone Medical Center, in the section on hospitals in Manhattan above.
  • Van Etten Hospital, 1400 Pelham Parkway South, the Bronx. Opened in September 1954 as part of Bronx Municipal Hospital Center and named after Nathan Bristol van Etten, a physician who practiced nearby in the Bronx and was the first president of the Bronx County Medical Society and later became President of the American Medical Association. The building is now a teaching center for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine across the street, and houses the Bronx offices of the Chief Medical Examiner of New York City, a children's clinic, and a research center.[100][309][322][323]
  • Van Wyck Hospital, 104-26 Van Wyck Boulevard, Queens.[324]
  • Verplanck State Emigrant Hospital, Ward's Island, Manhattan.
  • Veterans' Hospital, Fox Hills, Staten Island. Designated by the U.S. Army as Debarkation Hospital no. 2 and General Hospital no. 41, and opened as Fox Hills Base Hospital on June 1, 1918. Renamed United States Public Health Service Hospital 61 in 1920, renamed United States Veterans' Hospital 61 on February 13, 1922. Ordered closed on March 7, 1922, and all patients were transferred to other hospitals by some time in April.[213][325][326][327]
  • Veterans' Hospital, Willowbrook, Staten Island. Built as a hospital for retarded children, occupied by the U.S. Army and named Halloran General Hospital for. Col Paul Stacey Halloran, and open from November 1942 until April 1951. It became Willowbrook State Hospital.[238][239]
  • Victory Memorial Hospital, 9036 7th Avenue, Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. Opened in 1927, closed in 2006, now SUNY Downstate at Bay Ridge, an outpatient clinic that is part of SUNY Downstate Medical Center. It was known locally as the "Baby Hospital."[328]
  • Vincent Sanitarium and Hospital, 2348 7th Avenue, Manhattan. Named after Dr. U. Conrad Vincent, a urologist who owned it. Opened in 1929.[17][329]
  • Volunteer Hospital, 93 Gold Street, Manhattan. See New York-Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Manhattan above.
  • Wadsworth Hospital, 629 West 185th Street, Manhattan. Now private medical offices.
  • Washington Heights Hospital, 554 West 165th Street, Manhattan. Opened September 1, 1905.[59]
  • Webb Sanitarium, the Bronx.
  • West Eden Sanitarium, the Bronx.
  • Westchester Square Medical Center, 2475 St. Raymond Avenue, the Bronx. Opened in about 1930 as Westchester Square Hospital, closed in 2013, currently houses an emergency room, operating rooms, and offices for Montefiore Medical Center.[330][331]
  • Western Dispensary for Women and Children
  • Whitestone Hospital, 166th Street at 12th Avenue, Whitestone, Queens. Replaced by garden apartments.
  • Wickersham Hospital, 133 East 58th Street, Manhattan.
  • Willard Parker Hospital, East River and between East 15th and 16th Streets, Manhattan. Named after Dr. Willard Parker. Opened in 1885, closed in 1955 or early 1956.[332][333]
  • Williamsburg General Hospital, 757 Bushwick Avenue, Brooklyn. Opened as Brooklyn Throat Hospital on April 26, 1889, renamed in 1898. Now apartments.[206]
  • Williamsburg Maternity Hospital, Brooklyn.
  • Woman's Hospital in New York, 141 West 109th Street, Manhattan. Founded in 1855, now part of Mount Sinai St. Luke's Hospital.
  • Women's Infirmary and Dispensary, Manhattan.
  • Woodlawn Sanitarium, the Bronx.
  • Woodstock Hospital, the Bronx.
  • York Hospital, 119 East 74th Street, Manhattan.
  • Yorkville Hospital, 246 East 82nd Street, Manhattan.
  • Zion Hospital, 2140 Cropsey Avenue, Brooklyn. See Maimonides Medical Center, in the section on hospitals in Brooklyn above.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Richmond, Rev. J.F. (1872). New York and Its Institutions (1609-1873). New York, N.Y.: E.B. Treat. p. 480. 
  2. ^ Standing Committee on Hospitals (January 1, 1908). New Hospitals Needed in Greater New York - Recommendations by the Standing Committee on Hospitals of the State Charities Aid Association with a Report on Present Conditions and Future Needs. Albany, N.Y.: State Charities Aid Association of New York. pp. 79–82. Retrieved 4 October 2015. 
  3. ^ The Medical Directory of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut, 1909: volume 11. New York, N.Y.: Medical Society of the State of New York. 1909. pp. 705–724. Retrieved 28 September 2015. 
  4. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York, 137th Session, 1914 (vol. 23, no. 57, part 3 ed.). Albany, N.Y. 1914. pp. 226–229, 281–299, 369, 476–512, 616–620, 648–649. Retrieved 28 September 2015. 
  5. ^ Walsh, James J. (1919). History of Medicine in New York - Three Centuries of Medical Progress. New York, N.Y.: National Americana Society. Retrieved 4 October 2015. 
  6. ^ "Approved Hospitals in This Area". New York Times. October 17, 1939. p. 22. Retrieved 7 October 2015. 
  7. ^ "Hospitals in New York State- Profiles". health.ny.gov. New York State Department of Health. Retrieved 7 October 2015. 
  8. ^ Directory of Activities of Public and Private Welfare Agencies (2 (revised January 1, 1921) ed.). City of New York Department of Public Welfare. September 29, 1920. Retrieved 11 October 2015. 
  9. ^ "62 Hospitals Win City Endorsement - Ony 7 Others in Proprietary Group Fail to Meet New Set of Standards - They, Too, Will Comply - Failure to Do So Would Mean Loss of Their Licenses, Dr. Goldwater Says". New York Times. September 30, 1936. p. 21. Retrieved 16 October 2015. 
  10. ^ "Hospitals Approved by Surgeons". New York Times. February 1, 1946. p. 17. Retrieved 17 October 2015. 
  11. ^ Richmond (1872), pp. 386-388.
  12. ^ Carlisle, Robert J. (1893). An Account of Bellevue Hospital with a Catalogue of the Medical and Surgical Staff from 1736 to 1894. New York: Society of the Alumni of Bellevue Hospital. Retrieved 4 October 2015. 
  13. ^ "Hospital to Open July 6 - Central and Neurological Unit on Welfare Island to Close". New York Times. June 25, 1939. p. 38. Retrieved 7 October 2015. 
  14. ^ "City Shifts Women to Coler Hospital - $20,000,000 Unit for Aged and Ill on Welfare Island Gets First Patients, 42 to 95". New York Times. July 15, 1952. p. 27. Retrieved 7 October 2015. 
  15. ^ Berdy, Judy; Roosevelt Island Historical Society (2003). Images of America - Roosevelt Island. Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia Publishing. pp. 83 and 101. ISBN 0-7385-1238-9. 
  16. ^ "Mental Hospital Opening Uptown - 232-Bed Private Center on East 76th Is Designed for All-Round Care". New York Times. March 22, 1959. p. 60. Retrieved 20 October 2015. 
  17. ^ a b Rice, Mitchell F.; Jones Jr., Woodrow (1994). Public Policy and the Black Hospital - From Slavery to Segregation to Integration. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press. p. 59. ISBN 0-313-26309-4. Retrieved 9 October 2015. 
  18. ^ "Harlem Hospital Center - History". nyc.gov. New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation. Retrieved 9 October 2015. 
  19. ^ Richmond (1872), pp. 403-407.
  20. ^ "Open New Hospital For The Crippled - Building in East Forty-second Street One of the Finest of Its Kind in the Country". New York Times. December 17, 1912. p. 9. Retrieved 15 October 2015. 
  21. ^ Walsh (1919), pp. 828-830.
  22. ^ "Gifts to Hospital Total $5,700,000 - Special Surgery Announces Them as It Dedicates New $6,000,000 Building". New York Times. September 30, 1955. p. 15. Retrieved 15 October 2015. 
  23. ^ "HSS Celebrates 150 Years - Timeline". hss.edu. Hospital for Special Surgery. Retrieved 15 October 2015. 
  24. ^ a b Richmond (1872), pp. 379-381.
  25. ^ a b "The German Hospital - History of One of the Noblest Charities of the City". New York Times. February 10, 1895. p. 12. Retrieved 27 September 2015. 
  26. ^ a b Walsh (1919), pp. 766-770.
  27. ^ a b "Lenox Hill Hospital - History". northshorelij.com. North Shore - L.I.J. Health System. Retrieved 27 September 2015. 
  28. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 488.
  29. ^ a b Richmond (1872), pp. 557-561.
  30. ^ "Under State Care". New York Times. February 28, 1896. p. 4. Retrieved 22 October 2015. 
  31. ^ "At State Hospital, Quiet and Gloom". New York Times. p. 43. Retrieved 22 October 2015. 
  32. ^ "Wards Island Park". nycgovparks. New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. Retrieved 21 October 2015. 
  33. ^ "Administrator of Veterans' Affairs - Annual Report For Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1954" (PDF). va.gov. United States Veterans' Administration. Retrieved 12 October 2015. 
  34. ^ "Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center - History and Milestones". mkscc.org. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Retrieved 5 October 2015. 
  35. ^ "Metropolitan Hospital Center - History". nyc.gov. New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation. Retrieved 4 October 2015. 
  36. ^ Richmond (1872), pp. 382-386.
  37. ^ "New Hospital Dedicated - Jewish Maternity Will Receive Patients on February 15". New York Times. January 25, 1909. p. 9. Retrieved 9 October 2015. 
  38. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 484.
  39. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1911), p. 477.
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