List of hospitals in Queens

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This is a list of hospitals in Queens, New York City, sorted by hospital name, with addresses and a brief description of their formation and development. Hospital names were obtained from these sources.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10] A list of hospitals in New York State is also available.

Hospitals[edit]

A-L[edit]

66th Avenue entrance of Long Island Jewish Forest Hills
  • Cohen Children's Medical Center - 270-05 76th Avenue, New Hyde Park (on the border of Queens and Nassau Counties - in Glen Oaks, Queens and Lake Success, Nassau County, with a New Hyde Park mailing address).
  • Creedmoor Psychiatric Center, 79-25 Winchester Boulevard, Queens Village, Queens.
  • Elmhurst Hospital Center, 79-01 Broadway, Elmhurst, Queens. Opened as Elmhurst General Hospital on March 18, 1957.[11]
  • The Floating Hospital, 41-40 27th Street, Long Island City, Queens. Founded in 1872 or 1873.[12]
  • Flushing Hospital Medical Center, 4500 Parsons Boulevard, Flushing, Queens. Founded as Flushing Hospital in 1884, opened in 1888.[13]
  • Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, Van Wyck Expressway at 89th Avenue, Jamaica, Queens. Opened at Fulton (now Jamaica) Avenue and Canal (now 169th) Street on July 28, 1891, incorporated February 20, 1892, moved to the east side of New York Avenue just north of South Street on June 18, 1898, moved to Van Wyck Boulevard on August 16, 1924.[14][15][16]
  • Long Island Jewish Forest Hills, 102-01 66th Road, Forest Hills, Queens. Opened as Forest Hills General Hospital on August 13, 1953, closed in November 1963 and re-opened in 1964 as LaGuardia Hospital. Sold in 1996 and renamed Forest Hills Hospital, currently part of Northwell Health.[17][18]
  • Long Island Jewish Medical Center, 270-05 76th Avenue, New Hyde Park (on the border of Queens and Nassau Counties - in Glen Oaks, Queens and Lake Success, Nassau County, with a New Hyde Park mailing address).

M-Z[edit]

  • Mount Sinai Queens, 25-10 30th Avenue, Astoria Queens. Formerly called Astoria General Hospital, opened on Flushing Avenue on November 1, 1892, moved to Crescent Street on May 4, 1896, gradually expanded to 30th Avenue, renamed Western Queens Community Hospital, acquired by Mount Sinai Hospital and renamed Mount Sinai Queens on June 24, 1999.[19][20][21]
The former Booth Memorial Hospital in Flushing, now New York Presbyterian-Queens.
  • NewYork–Presbyterian/Queens, 56-45 Main Street, at Booth Memorial Avenue, Flushing, Queens. Founded by the Salvation Army as the Rescue Home for Women on East 123rd Street in Manhattan in 1892, moved to 316 East 15th Street and renamed Red Cross Medical Station no. 1 in 1917, renamed for William Booth as Booth Memorial Hospital on March 13, 1919, moved to its current address in Queens on February 5, 1957, renamed New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens when it affiliated with New York Hospital in 1993, renamed NewYork-Presbyterian/Queens upon the merger of New York and Presbyterian Hospitals in 1997.[22][23][24][25]
  • Queens Hospital Center, 82-68 164th Street, Jamaica, Queens. Opened as Queens General Hospital on October 30, 1935, renamed upon its merger with Queensboro Hospital and Hospital for Tuberculosis on June 6, 1952, moved to its current location from across 164th Street in 2001.[26][27]
  • St. John's Episcopal Hospital South Shore, 327 Beach 19th Street, Far Rockaway, Queens. Opened as St. Joseph's Hospital on June 25, 1905, became the South Shore Division of Long Island Jewish Hospital in January 1973, renamed St. John's Episcopal Hospital South Shore on July 1, 1976.[28][29][30]
  • St. Mary's Children's Hospital, 29-01 216th Street, Bayside, Queens. Founded in Manhattan in 1870, moved to Queens in 1951.[31]
  • Zucker Hillside Hospital, 75-59 263rd Street, Glen Oaks, Queens. Founded as Hastings Hillside Hospital in Hastings-on Hudson in June 1926. Moved and opened at its current address as Hillside Hospital on October 19, 1941. Renamed Zucker Hillside Hospital in honor of Donald and Barbara Zucker, who made a substantial donation in 1999.[32][33]

Closed hospitals[edit]

Includes former names of hospitals

A-G[edit]

  • Astoria General Hospital, 25-10 30th Avenue, Astoria, Queens.[34] See Mount Sinai Queens Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Queens above.
  • Astoria Sanitarium, 30-15 Crescent Street, Astoria.[35] Also known as Daly's Astoria Sanitarium.[36] Purchased from Dr. Daly in 1949, renamed Astoria General Hospital. Affiliated with Mount Sinai in 1993.
  • Booth Memorial Hospital, Flushing, Queens. See New York-Presbyterian/Queens Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Queens above.[37]
  • Boulevard Hospital, 46-04 31st Avenue, Astoria, Queens.[38] Now private medical offices.
  • Deepdale General Hospital, 55-15 Little Neck Parkway, Little Neck, Queens. Built in 1959. Renamed Little Neck Hospital in 1991, closed in 1996. Now senior housing.[39]
  • Doctor's Hospital of Queens, 104-20 Van Wyck Expressway, Jamaica, Queens.[40]

H-K[edit]

  • Grant General Hospital, Willett's Point, Queens.[41]
  • Hillcrest General Hospital, 158-40 79th Ave, Flushing, Queens, now a chemical drug dependency facility called Cornerstone Medical Arts Center.
  • Hillside Hospital. Founded as Hastings Hillside Hospital in Hastings-on Hudson in June 1926. Moved and opened at its current address as Hillside Hospital on October 19, 1941. Renamed Zucker Hillside Hospital in honor of Donald and Barbara Zucker, who made a substantial donation in 1999. [42] (not to be confused with Hillside Sanitarium)
  • Hillside Sanitarium, 175-10 88th Avenue, Jamaica, Queens. Opened on Jan 4, 1926,[43] closed August 15, 1931.[44]
  • Holliswood Hospital, 87-37 Palermo Street, Hollis, Queens. Closed August 12, 2013. Founded as Terrace Heights Hospital (1949-1986) .[45][46]
  • Horace Harding Hospital, 90-02 Queens Boulevard, Elmhurst, Queens. Renamed St. John's Hospital, closed in March 2009.
  • Howard Beach General Hospital, 155-55 Cross Bay Boulevard, Queens. 225-beds Opened in 1962. Decades later became a facility for developmentally disabled. Converted to senior apartments in 2012.
  • Interfaith Hospital of Queens, 175-10 88th Avenue, Jamaica. 60-beds. Opened 1963. Closed 1973.
  • Irwin Sanitarium. In 1970s, listed in WP:RS as Irwin Nursing Home, 109-43 Farmers Blvd, Hollis/St. Albans, Queens.[47][48]
  • Kew Gardens General Hospital, 80-02 Kew Gardens Road, Queens. Founded in 1941 in a former hotel. Closed in 1987, replaced by 12-story office tower.

L-N[edit]

P-Q[edit]

Parkway Hospital
  • Parkway Hospital, 70-35 113th Street, Forest Hills, Queens. Opened May 31, 1963, closed in late 2008. In 2016 plans were announced for 70 senior and up to 220 market-rate apartments.[56]
  • Parsons Hospital, 35-06 Parsons Boulevard, Flushing, Queens. Merged with Flushing Hospital.[57]
  • Peninsula Hospital, 51-15 Beach Channel Drive, Far Rockaway, Queens. Opened as Rockaway Beach Hospital at 152 Beach 85th Street in Far Rockaway, Queens, on April 30, 1911, renamed Peninsula Hospital and moved to 51-15 Beach Channel Drive on June 12, 1960, closed in April 2012. Since 2014, an extended care and rehabilitation center.[58][59][60]
Peninsula
  • Physicians Hospital, 34-01 73rd Street, Jackson Heights, Queens. Opened 1935, closed 1990. Renamed Jackson Heights Hospital, closed 1996. Junior High School 230 was built on site in 1998.
  • Queens General Hospital, Jamaica, Queens. Opened on October 30, 1935, renamed Queens Hospital Center upon its merger with Queensboro and Triboro Hospitals on June 6, 1952.[26]
  • Queens Memorial Hospital, Queens.
  • Queens Village Sanitarium, Queens.
  • Queensboro Hospital, Flushing Avenue and Lotts Lane, Queens. Opened in 1916, became the Queensboro Pavilion of Queens Hospital Center upon its merger with Queens General and Triboro Hospitals on June 6, 1952.[26]

R-S[edit]

River Crest Sanitarium:
postcard image

T-Z[edit]

Triboro Hospital overlooking the surrounding neighborhood

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Richmond, Rev. J.F. (1872). New York and Its Institutions (1609-1873). New York, N.Y.: E.B. Treat. p. 480.
  2. ^ Standing Committee on Hospitals (January 1, 1908). New Hospitals Needed in Greater New York - Recommendations by the Standing Committee on Hospitals of the State Charities Aid Association with a Report on Present Conditions and Future Needs. Albany, N.Y.: State Charities Aid Association of New York. pp. 79–82. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  3. ^ The Medical Directory of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut, 1909: volume 11. New York, N.Y.: Medical Society of the State of New York. 1909. pp. 705–724. Retrieved September 28, 2015.
  4. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York, 137th Session, 1914 (vol. 23, no. 57, part 3 ed.). Albany, N.Y. 1914. pp. 226–229, 281–299, 369, 476–512, 616–620, 648–649. Retrieved September 28, 2015.
  5. ^ Walsh, James J. (1919). History of Medicine in New York - Three Centuries of Medical Progress. New York, N.Y.: National Americana Society. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  6. ^ "Approved Hospitals in This Area". New York Times. October 17, 1939. p. 22. Retrieved October 7, 2015.
  7. ^ "Hospitals in New York State - Profiles". health.ny.gov. New York State Department of Health. Retrieved October 7, 2015.
  8. ^ Directory of Activities of Public and Private Welfare Agencies (2 (revised January 1, 1921) ed.). City of New York Department of Public Welfare. September 29, 1920. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  9. ^ "62 Hospitals Win City Endorsement - Ony 7 Others in Proprietary Group Fail to Meet New Set of Standards - They, Too, Will Comply - Failure to Do So Would Mean Loss of Their Licenses, Dr. Goldwater Says". New York Times. September 30, 1936. p. 21. Retrieved October 16, 2015.
  10. ^ "Hospitals Approved by Surgeons". New York Times. February 1, 1946. p. 17. Retrieved October 17, 2015.
  11. ^ "New Queens Hospital Ready - $26,000,000 Elmhurst General to Open to Patients Monday". New York Times. March 15, 1957. p. 17. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  12. ^ Cardwell, Diane (September 1, 2003). "Long-Lived Floating Hospital Is Still Going, Just Not Floating". New York Times. Retrieved April 18, 2014.
  13. ^ "Will Celebrates Its Birthday - Flushing's Two Hundred And Fiftieth Anniversary - Preparations for the Festivities - Will be Held in September and Will Last for Three Days At Least - Good Government of the Village". New York Times. June 10, 1894. p. 20. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  14. ^ "New Jamaica Hospital Dedicated". New York Times. June 18, 1898. p. 19. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  15. ^ "New Jamaica Hospital Opens Today". New York Times. August 16, 1924. p. 4. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  16. ^ Riley, Francis Gerald (1942). The Jamaica Hospital: A History of the Institution, 1892-1942. Jamaica Hospital Medical Board. ISBN 978-1-25826-895-4.
  17. ^ "New Forest Hills Hospital Opens". New York Times. August 13, 1953. p. 27. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  18. ^ "U.S. Deters Sale of Idle Hospital". New York Times. February 2, 1964. p. 60. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  19. ^ "PERSPECTIVES; In Jackson Heights, a New Building". The New York Times. February 6, 1994.
  20. ^ Niss, Barbara J. "Mount Sinai: The Evolution of a Mission". mssm.edu. Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  21. ^ "Astoria's New Hospital - A Handsome Building with All Modern Improvements". New York Times. April 29, 1896. p. 3. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  22. ^ "Booth Memorial Fills New Want - Red Cross and Salvation Army Work Together in Hospital to be Opened for Soldiers, Sailors, and Families". New York Times. March 9, 1919. p. Section 3, p. 4. Retrieved October 17, 2015.
  23. ^ "Salvation Army Praised - Speakers Pay High Tribute at Booth Hospital Dedication". New York Times. March 14, 1919. p. 6. Retrieved October 17, 2015.
  24. ^ "Hospital Is Dedicated - Mayor Attends Ceremony of Salvation Army in Queens". New York Times. February 6, 1957. p. 25. Retrieved October 17, 2015.
  25. ^ "NewYork-Presbyterian Queens - Our History". nyhq.org. New York-Presbyterian Queens Hospital. Archived from the original on September 24, 2015. Retrieved October 17, 2015.
  26. ^ a b c d Abadjian, Nick (February 22, 2000). "The Rebirth Of Queens Hospital Center". Queens Tribune. Archived from the original on February 4, 2017. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  27. ^ "Queens Hospital Fete Set". New York Times. November 6, 1960. p. 107. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  28. ^ a b "Far Rockaway's New Hospital Opens". New York Times. June 26, 1905. p. 9. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  29. ^ a b Vecsey, George (June 14, 1975). "Lawrence, L.I., Bitterly Divided Over Plans For Hospital". New York Times. p. 29. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  30. ^ a b "Rockaway Hospital To Be Taken Over By Episcopal Group". New York Times. June 15, 1976. p. 79. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  31. ^ "Our History". st.maryskids.org. St. Mary's Healthcare System for Children. Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  32. ^ "Jewish Sanatorium To Extend Its Work - Hastings Hillside Hospital for the Mentally III Plans Appeal for Funds - Was Opened Last June - Facilities Now Inadequate, Says Head of Mental Health Society - Free Service to the Poor". New York Times. December 4, 1927. p. 3, section 2. Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  33. ^ "Hillside Hospital Welcomed To City - $700,000 Institution Formerly in Westchester Opened on Site in Queens". New York Times. October 20, 1941. p. 11. Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  34. ^ "DR. JOSEPH J. DRAGO, PHYSICIAN IN QUEENS". The New York Times. March 5, 1976. former president of the board of directors of Astoria General Hospital
  35. ^ "JOHN W. DELANEY". The New York Times. March 24, 1938.
  36. ^ "He Insists she Knows Nothings About Slaying". The New York Daily News. September 12, 1928.
  37. ^ Joseph P. Fried (October 1, 1992). "Hospitals In 2 Boroughs Join Efforts". The New York Times.
  38. ^ "State to Request Private Hospital be Closed Down". The New York Times. July 13, 1985.
  39. ^ Charlie Leduff (May 18, 1997). "Resisting a Development Among the Lilacs". The New York Times. which closed Dec. 3
  40. ^ "Cornell Alumni News: Doctors Hospital of Queens, 104-26. Van Wyck Boulevard, Jamaica" (PDF).
  41. ^ "General News". The New York Times. January 15, 1865. officers connected with the Grant General Hospital, at Willet's Point
  42. ^ "Zucker Hillside Hospital, Treatment Center, Glen Oaks, NY". Psychology Today. June 27, 2020.
  43. ^ Hillside Sanitarium (January 5, 1926). "50 Doctors attend Opening Dinner at Hillside Sanitarium". Long Island Daily Press, Page 3.
  44. ^ "City's Order Closes Hillside Sanitarium - Fay Refuses Further Permits to Queens Private Hospital, Turned Down by Welfare Board". New York Times. August 16, 1931. p. 23. Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  45. ^ a b "Hospital in Queens Accredited". New York Times. September 30, 1957. p. 28. Retrieved November 10, 2015.
  46. ^ a b Corso, Phil. "Holliswood Hospital Shuts Its Doors". timesledger.com. Times Ledger. Retrieved November 10, 2015.
  47. ^ John L. Hess (October 11, 1974). "2 Nursing Homes Censured by State". The New York Times. At Irwin, 91 patients were crowded into space where the legal maximum was 70.
  48. ^ "State Pressing Its Efforts to Close 62 Nursing Homes". The New York Times. January 16, 1975.
  49. ^ "Deaths: GRAY, ARTHUR A., M.D." The New York Times. November 23, 2004. at Forest Hills Hospital dates back to 1976, when it was known as LaGuardia Hospital.
  50. ^ Norimitsu Onishi (November 10, 1996). "Neighbors Mourn Loss Of Hospital In Queens: Health Care Shift In Jackson Heights". The New York Times.
  51. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), pp. 617-618.
  52. ^ a b Hartocollis, Anemona (March 16, 2009). "240 Laid Off at Hospital That Serves Central Brooklyn". New York Times. p. A22. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  53. ^ "Where to Find Medical Records for Closed Hospitals in New York State" (PDF).
  54. ^ Fowle, Farnsworth. "Two TB Hospitals Added to Closings". New York Times. p. 53. Retrieved October 9, 2015.
  55. ^ "City Loses Appeal to Sell Land Around Old Neponsit Hospital". New York Times. July 10, 1956. p. 33. Retrieved October 9, 2015.
  56. ^ "New Hospital for Queens". New York Times. April 26, 1963. p. 33. Retrieved September 22, 2016.
  57. ^ Ronald Sullivan (December 18, 1987). "Deaths Increase Among Patients With Medicare". The New York Times.
  58. ^ a b "Open Rockaway Hospital - Institution Built by the Public Is Turned Over to the City with a Ceremony". New York Times. May 1, 1911. p. 6. Retrieved October 25, 2015.
  59. ^ a b "Hospital To Be Dedicated". New York Times. June 11, 1960. p. 11. Retrieved October 25, 2015.
  60. ^ a b Maslin Nir, Sarah (May 20, 2012). "Down to One Hospital, Rockaway Braces for Summer Crowds". New York Times. p. A19.
  61. ^ Walsh, Kevin (October 22, 2015). "Ditmars Boulevard Queens -- Businesses & Architecture". Brownstoner Magazine.
  62. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 619.
  63. ^ "Hospital care". Scarsdale Inquirer. HRVH Historical Newspapers (HRVH.org). November 17, 1944. p. 11. Queens: • Springfield Sanitarium
  64. ^ "Mrs. Isidor Shniper". New York Times. February 19, 1949. p. 17. Retrieved September 26, 2016.
  65. ^ "Mayor Dedicates $3,923,404 Hospital - Declares in Exercises That Tuberculosis Could be Ended in 25 Years". New York Times. January 24, 1941. p. 19. Retrieved October 17, 2015.
  66. ^ "Strikes, Spreading, Painters Report - Walkout Called on Many Out-of-Town Jobs of New York Decorating Contractors - Housing Delay Is Denied - Little Inconvenience Seen by Realty Men - Picket Stabbed at Union Offices". New York Times. August 28, 1937. p. 3. Retrieved December 15, 2015.
  67. ^ "2 Nursing Homes in State And 2 Hospitals Draw Fines". The New York Times. April 27, 1976.

External links[edit]