List of household surveys in the United States

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This is a list of surveys of households in the United States.

10,000+ participants[edit]

Survey Conducted by Main target Number of people Data collection started Ongoing, or year data collection ended Main topics
United States Census United States Census Bureau All persons dwelling in U.S. residential structures, and many homeless 309 million people in 2010[1] 1790 Ongoing Age, sex and race of household members.[2]
American Community Survey United States Census Bureau[3] 3.5 million households[3] 1994 Ongoing Ancestry, educational attainment, income, language proficiency, migration, disability, employment, and housing characteristics
American Housing Survey United States Census Bureau[4] Household members at least 16 years old[4] 186,000[3] 1973[4] Ongoing Housing conditions and costs[4]
American Time Use Survey Bureau of Labor Statistics[3] 25,000[3] The kinds of activities people engage in and the time they spend involved in these activities[5]
Current Population Survey Bureau of Labor Statistics[6] Civilian noninstitutional population 16 years and older.[6] 60,000 households[6] 1940 Ongoing monthly Labor force, employment, unemployment, persons not in the labor force, hours of work, earnings[6]
National Survey of Family Growth National Center for Health Statistics division of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention[7] Men and women 15–44 years of age[7] 22,682[7] 1973[7] Ongoing[7] Trends related to fertility, family structure, and demographics.[7]
Panel Study of Income Dynamics University of Michigan[8] Nationally representative individuals[8] 18,000+[8] 1968[8] Ongoing[8] Including employment, income, wealth, expenditures, health, education, marriage, childbearing and philanthropy[8]
National Crime Victimization Survey Bureau of Justice Statistics[9] Nationally representative sample[9] 160,000[9] 1973[9] Ongoing[9] Factors associated with becoming a victim of various crimes.[9]
National Health Interview Survey National Center for Health Statistics[3] Nationally representative sample[10] 87,000[10] 1957[10] Ongoing[10] Health status and utilization
National Longitudinal Survey Bureau of Labor Statistics[11] People born 1957-1964 and 1980-1984[12] 50,000+[12] 1966[12] Ongoing Education, employment, household, parents and children, family process, partnerships, fertility, health, attitudes, expectations, non-cognitive tests, activities, crime & substance use
National Survey of College Graduates United States Census Bureau[3] Recipients of a bachelor's degree or higher[13] 100,000[14] Occupation, work activities, salary, the relationship of degree field and occupation, and demographic information.[13]
National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation United States Fish and Wildlife Service[3] 60,000[3]
Survey of Income and Program Participation United States Census Bureau[3] 37,000 households Economic well-being, family dynamics, education, assets, health insurance, childcare, and food security.[15]
Telephone Point-of-Purchase Survey Bureau of Labor Statistics[3] 175,000[3] Where Americans are spending their money[16]

1,000 to 9,999 participants[edit]

Survey Conducted by Main target Number of people Data collection started Ongoing, or year data collection ended Main topics
American Family Survey Deseret News and The Center for the Study of Elections and Democracy at Brigham Young University[17] Nationally representative sample[17] 3,000 participants[17] 2015[17] 2015[17] Attitudes, practices & policy opinions of marriage and family[17]
Survey of Household Economics and Decisionmaking Federal Reserve Board of Governors[18] around 6,000 respondents[18] 2013[18] Ongoing[18] Well-being of American households, potential risks to their financial stability [18]
Youth Volunteering and Civic Engagement Survey Corporation for National and Community Service[3] 8,000 participants[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mark Memmott (2010-12-21). "U.S. Population: Nearly 309 Million, Census Says". National Public Radio.
  2. ^ "2010 bilingual questionnaire" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. 2009-05-28.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "List of Surveys Collected by the Census Bureau". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-09-24.
  4. ^ a b c d "American Housing Survey (AHS)". census.gov. Retrieved 2016-09-16. Last Revised: February 11, 2014
  5. ^ "American Time Use Survey (ATUS) Series". ICPSR, part of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. Retrieved 2016-09-24.
  6. ^ a b c d "Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey". Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved 2016-09-16. Last Modified Date: October 8, 2015
  7. ^ a b c d e f "National Survey of Family Growth". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 2016-09-13.
  8. ^ a b c d e f "PSID - Studies". University of Michigan, Institute for Social Research. Retrieved 2016-09-13.
  9. ^ a b c d e f "Data Collection: National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS)". Bureau of Justice Statistics. Retrieved 2016-09-24.
  10. ^ a b c d "NHIS - About the National Health Interview Survey". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 2016-09-24. September 12, 2016
  11. ^ "National Longitudinal Surveys". Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved 2016-09-13.
  12. ^ a b c "National Longitudinal Surveys - Cohorts". Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved 2016-09-13.
  13. ^ a b "National Survey of College Graduates". National Science Foundation. Retrieved 2016-09-24. Page last Updated: June 04, 2013
  14. ^ John Finamore and Beethika Khan (2015-04-06). "Characteristics of the College-Educated Population and the Science and Engineering Workforce in the United States". National Science Foundation. Retrieved 2016-09-24.
  15. ^ "Survey of Income and Program Participation". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-09-24.
  16. ^ "Telephone Point of Purchase Survey (TPOPS) Respondents". Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved 2016-09-24. Last modified: November 2, 2012
  17. ^ a b c d e f "Summary Report: Marriage And Family—Attitudes, Practices & Policy Opinions" (PDF). Deseret News. 2015. Retrieved 2016-09-24. Homepage
  18. ^ a b c d e "Survey of Household Economics and Decisionmaking". Federal Reserve Board of Governors. Retrieved 2016-09-24.