List of inner suburbs in the United States

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In the United States, inner suburbs (sometimes known as "first-ring" suburbs) are the older, more populous communities of a metropolitan area with histories that significantly predate those of their suburban or exurban counterparts. Most inner suburbs share a common border with the principal city of the metropolitan area and developed along railroad or streetcar lines radiating from the principal city (or at ferry termini, if at water borders).

Albany, New York[edit]

Atlanta[edit]

Baltimore[edit]

Boston[edit]

Chicago[edit]

Cincinnati[edit]

Ohio side[edit]

Northern Kentucky side[edit]

Cleveland[edit]

Dayton, Ohio[edit]

Detroit[edit]

Dallas[edit]

Dallas[edit]

Fort Worth[edit]

Houston[edit]

Indianapolis[edit]

Kansas City, Missouri[edit]

Missouri side[edit]

Kansas side[edit]

Las Vegas[edit]

Los Angeles[edit]

Memphis[edit]

Minneapolis-St. Paul[edit]

Minneapolis[edit]

St. Paul[edit]

New Orleans[edit]

New York City/Tri-State Area[edit]

New York[edit]

New Jersey[edit]

Philadelphia[edit]

Pennsylvania side[edit]

New Jersey side[edit]

Phoenix[edit]

Pittsburgh[edit]

San Francisco Bay Area[edit]

San Francisco[edit]

Oakland[edit]

San Jose[edit]

South Florida[edit]

Miami–Miami Beach[edit]

Fort Lauderdale–Pompano Beach–Hollywood[edit]

St. Louis[edit]

Tampa Bay Area[edit]

Hillsborough County (Tampa)[edit]

Pinellas County (St. Petersburg-Clearwater)[edit]

Washington, D.C.[edit]

Maryland[edit]

Virginia[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Roseville could be considered an inner suburb of Minneapolis as it borders both cities, but primarily borders St. Paul.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sorry Boston, Google Fiber goes to Kansas". Boston.com. 2011-03-30. Retrieved 2012-05-28.