List of international rugby union tries by Jonah Lomu

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Jonah Lomu playing for the Cardiff Blues in 2006

Jonah Lomu was an international rugby union winger who played for New Zealand between 1994 and 2002.[1] He scored a total of 37 tries in 63 international appearances, which make him the sixth highest try scorer for New Zealand and the eighteenth highest on the all-time list.[2][3] Lomu held alone the record for the most tries scored in the Rugby World Cup (15 in 11 matches at the 1995 and 1999 tournaments), until South Africa's Bryan Habana equalled his tally at the 2015 tournament.[4]

Lomu made his debut for New Zealand in June 1994 against France.[1] He scored his first international try in his third appearance, scoring twice against Ireland in New Zealand's opening game of the 1995 Rugby World Cup.[1] This was followed with a try against Scotland in the quarter-finals and four tries against England in the semi-finals—the most Lomu would score in a single match. He was, however, unable to score a try in the final, as South Africa beat New Zealand to win the trophy.[5] Lomu played 13 times against South Africa during his career, but failed to score a try against them.[1] The only other "Tier 1" national team against which Lomu did not score a try was Wales.[1] Lomu finished 1995 with 12 international tries, his highest tally in a single year.[6]

After two tries in 1996, including one in the inaugural Tri Nations Series, Lomu was unable to score in three appearances during 1997. At the 1999 Rugby World Cup, he scored in each of New Zealand's group stage matches against Tonga, England and Italy. He followed this with a try against Scotland in the quarter-finals and two tries in the semi-finals, as New Zealand lost to France. Lomu's tally of eight tries in this tournament is a World Cup record, although it has since been equalled by Habana in the 2007 tournament and Lomu's countryman Julian Savea in the 2015 tournament.[7]

Lomu scored four tries in 2000, including a hat-trick against Scotland at Carisbrook and a try against Australia in the Tri Nations. This was followed by five tries in 2001, once again with a try against Australia in the Tri Nations. Lomu's final international tries came in November 2002, when he scored twice against England at Twickenham. Two weeks later, he made his last international appearance against Wales at the Millennium Stadium.[8] Lomu retired from professional rugby in 2007 due to a chronic kidney disorder.[9]

International tries[edit]

In the Score column, New Zealand's score is given first.
International tries scored by Jonah Lomu
Try Date Opposing team Score Competition Venue Location Ref.
1 27 May 1995  Ireland 43–19 Rugby World Cup Ellis Park Johannesburg [10]
2
3 11 June 1995  Scotland 48–30 Rugby World Cup Loftus Versfeld Pretoria [11]
4 18 June 1995  England 45–29 Rugby World Cup Newlands Cape Town [12]
5
6
7
8 22 July 1995  Australia 28–16 Bledisloe Cup Eden Park Auckland [13]
9 29 July 1995  Australia 34–23 Bledisloe Cup Sydney Football Stadium Sydney [14]
10 28 October 1995  Italy 70–6 Test match Stadio Renato Dall'Ara Bologna [12]
11
12 18 November 1995  France 37–12 Test match Parc des Princes Paris [15]
13 15 June 1996  Scotland 62–31 Test match Carisbrook Dunedin [16]
14 6 July 1996  Australia 43–6 Tri Nations Athletic Park Wellington [17]
15 20 June 1998  England 64–22 Test match Carisbrook Dunedin [18]
16 1 August 1998  Australia 23–27 Tri Nations Lancaster Park Christchurch [19]
17 18 June 1999  Samoa 71–13 Test match North Harbour Stadium North Shore City [20]
18 3 October 1999  Tonga 45–9 Rugby World Cup Ashton Gate Bristol [21]
19
20 9 October 1999  England 30–16 Rugby World Cup Twickenham London [22]
21 14 October 1999  Italy 101–3 Rugby World Cup Galpharm Stadium Huddersfield [23]
22
23 24 October 1999  Scotland 30–18 Rugby World Cup Murrayfield Edinburgh [24]
24 31 October 1999  France 43–31 Rugby World Cup Twickenham London [25]
25
26 24 June 2000  Scotland 69–20 Test match Carisbrook Dunedin [12]
27
28
29 15 July 2000  Australia 39–35 Tri Nations Stadium Australia Sydney [12]
30 30 June 2001  France 37–12 Dave Gallaher Trophy WestpacTrust Stadium Wellington [26]
31 11 August 2001  Australia 15–23 Tri Nations Carisbrook Dunedin [27]
32 17 November 2001  Ireland 40–29 Test match Lansdowne Road Dublin [28]
33 24 November 2001  Scotland 37–6 Test match Murrayfield Edinburgh [29]
34 1 December 2001  Argentina 24–20 Test match El Monumental Buenos Aires [30]
35 8 June 2002  Italy 64–10 Test match Waikato Stadium Hamilton [31]
36 9 November 2002  England 28–31 Test match Twickenham London [12]
37 9 November 2002  England 28–31 Test match Twickenham London [12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Statsguru / Players & Officials / Jonah Lomu". ESPNScrum. Retrieved 29 January 2016. 
  2. ^ "Statsguru / Test matches / Player records / New Zealand / Total tries scored". ESPNScrum. Retrieved 29 January 2016. 
  3. ^ "Statsguru / Test matches / Player records / Total tries scored". ESPNScrum. Retrieved 29 January 2016. 
  4. ^ "Statsguru / Test matches /Player records / Rugby World Cup / Total tries scored". ESPNScrum. Retrieved 29 January 2016. 
  5. ^ "1995: Party time for SA". BBC Sport. Retrieved 2 February 2016. 
  6. ^ "Statsguru / Player analysis / Jonah Lomu / Test matches". ESPNScrum. Retrieved 29 January 2016. 
  7. ^ "Statsguru / Test matches / Player records / Tournament/tour totals / Rugby World Cup / Total tries scored". ESPNScrum. Retrieved 29 January 2016. 
  8. ^ "Statsguru / Player analysis / Jonah Lomu / Test matches / Match by match list". ESPNScrum. Retrieved 29 January 2016. 
  9. ^ de Menezes, Jack (13 August 2013). "New Zealand rugby legend Jonah Lomu reveals he nearly died just hours after the featuring in the 2011 World Cup opening ceremony". The Independent. Retrieved 17 January 2016. 
  10. ^ Krol, Charlotte (18 November 2015). "Jonah Lomu's Rugby World Cup tries". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  11. ^ "Jonah Lomu: a giant of rugby who brushed aside Scotland". BBC Sport. 18 November 2015. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  12. ^ a b c d e f "Jonah Lomu's most memorable matches for New Zealand". Sky Sports. 15 November 2015. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  13. ^ Borthwick, Ian (23 July 1995). "'Brain explosions' cost Australia the game and a player". The Independent. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  14. ^ "All Blacks Ride Lomu To Victory". The Moscow Times. 1 August 1995. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  15. ^ "France (5) 12–37 (20) New Zealand (FT)". ESPNScrum. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  16. ^ "New Zealand (31) 62–31 (19) Scotland (FT)". ESPNScrum. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  17. ^ Leggat, David (4 August 2000). "Rugby: All Blacks close to perfection". The New Zealand Herald. ISSN 1170-0777. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  18. ^ Brookes, Del (18 November 2015). "How England's best rugby union players failed to stop Jonah Lomu". BBC Newsbeat. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  19. ^ Hart, John (2 August 1998). "Rugby Union: Blacks coach's dark times". The Independent. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  20. ^ Gray, Wynne (30 June 2000). "Nine-try romp just what All Black doctor ordered". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  21. ^ "Rusty All Blacks pushed by Tonga". BBC News. 3 October 1999. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  22. ^ "All Black destroyer sinks England". BBC News. 9 October 1999. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  23. ^ "Ton-up All Blacks rout Italy". BBC News. 14 October 1999. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  24. ^ "All Blacks end it for gutsy Scots". BBC News. 24 October 1999. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  25. ^ "1999: France 43–31 N Zealand". BBC Sport. 24 September 2003. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  26. ^ Palmer, Martin (1 July 2001). "All Blacks mostly Brown". The Guardian. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  27. ^ "Wallabies back on track". BBC Sport. 10 August 2001. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  28. ^ Kitson, Robert (19 November 2001). "Lomu and the boys put down a marker". The Guardian. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  29. ^ Malin, Ian (26 November 2001). "Long white cloud rains on Laney's tartan parade". The Guardian. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  30. ^ "All Blacks scrape past Pumas". BBC Sport. 2 December 2001. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  31. ^ "Cullen sparks Italian rout". BBC Sport. 8 June 2002. Retrieved 2 January 2016.