List of introduced species

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A complete list of introduced species for even quite small areas of the world would be dauntingly long. Humans have introduced more different species to new environments than any single document can hope to record. This list is generally for established species with truly wild populations—not kept domestically—that have been seen numerous times, and have breeding populations. While most introduced species can cause negative impact to new environments they reach, some can have positive impact, just for conservation purpose.

Contents

Australia[edit]

Mammals[edit]

Birds[edit]

Fish[edit]

Reptiles[edit]

Amphibians[edit]

Arthropods[edit]

Molluscs[edit]

Echinoderms[edit]

Worms[edit]

Plants[edit]

Around 15% of Australia's flora is made up of introduced species.[3] The following is a non-inclusive list of some of the more significant plant species.

British Isles and other European islands[edit]

Further information can be found at the GB Non-native Species Secretariat, which has a free tool kit of resources on non-native species, including a photo gallery, ID sheets, risk assessments, projects database, case studies and resources for local action groups.

Mammals[edit]

Birds[edit]

Fish[edit]

Amphibians[edit]

Reptiles[edit]

Crustaceans[edit]

Insects[edit]

Butterflies and moths[edit]

Ants[edit]

Coleoptera (beetles)[edit]

Arachnids[edit]

Molluscs[edit]

Worms[edit]

Other Animals[edit]

Plants[edit]

Hawaiian Islands[edit]

Mammals[edit]

Birds[edit]

Primary source for this list is Robert L. Pyle and Peter Pyle, The Birds of the Hawaiian Islands[6] unless otherwise stated

Reptiles[edit]


Amphibians[edit]

Primary source for this list is Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database[8] unless otherwise stated.

Fish[edit]

Primary source for this list is Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database[8] unless otherwise stated.

Arthropods[edit]

Plants[edit]

Other species[edit]

New Zealand[edit]

Mammals[edit]

Birds[edit]

Reptiles[edit]

Amphibians[edit]

Fish[edit]

Insects[edit]

Arachnids[edit]

Other Animals[edit]

Plants[edit]

Up to 26,000 plants have been introduced into New Zealand. This list is a few of the more common and more invasive species.

United States and Canada[edit]

Mammals[edit]

Birds[edit]

Reptiles[edit]

Amphibians[edit]

Primary source for this list is Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database[8] unless otherwise stated.

Fish[edit]

Primary source for this list is Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database[8] unless otherwise stated.

Crustaceans[edit]

Primary source for this list is Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database[8] unless otherwise stated.

Mollusks[edit]

Marine[8]

Freshwater[8]

Terrestrial

Worms[edit]

Insects[edit]

[315]

Beetles and relatives[edit]

[316]

Crickets[edit]

Flies and allies[edit]

[325]

Termites[edit]

Sawflies[edit]

Aphids, whiteflies, and scale insects[edit]

Ants[edit]

Bees[edit]

[366]

Wasps[edit]

Moths and butterflies[edit]

[368]

Other insects[edit]

Arachnids[edit]

Jellyfishes[edit]

Other animals[edit]

Plants[edit]

This is a non-exhaustive list of some of the more significant plant species

Oomycetes[edit]

Central America, Caribbean islands and Mexico[edit]

Mammals[edit]

Birds[edit]

Reptiles[edit]

Amphibians[edit]

Fish[edit]

Insects[edit]

Arachnids[edit]

Worms[edit]

Crustaceans[edit]

Mollusks[edit]

South America[edit]

Mammals[edit]

Birds[edit]

Amphibians[edit]

Fish[edit]

Insects[edit]

Arachnids[edit]

Crustaceans[edit]

Mollusks[edit]

Continental Europe[edit]

Mammals[edit]

Birds[edit]

Reptiles[edit]

Amphibians[edit]

Fish[edit]

Crustaceans[edit]

Insects[edit]

Molluscs[edit]

Other Animals[edit]

Asia excluding Japan[edit]

Mammals[edit]

Birds[edit]

Reptiles[edit]

Amphibians[edit]

Fish[edit]

Insects[edit]

Other arthropods[edit]

Molluscs[edit]

Other Animals[edit]

Japan[edit]

Mammals[edit]

Birds[edit]

Reptiles[edit]

Amphibians[edit]

Fish[edit]

Insects[edit]

Other Arthropods[edit]

Molluscs[edit]

Other Animals[edit]

Africa[edit]

Mammals[edit]

Birds[edit]

Reptiles[edit]

Amphibians[edit]

Fish[edit]

Crustaceans[edit]

Insects[edit]

Molluscs[edit]

Worms[edit]

Other Animals[edit]

Plants[edit]

Oceania and remote islands[edit]

Mammals[edit]

Birds[edit]

Reptiles[edit]

Amphibians[edit]

Fish[edit]

Insects[edit]

Molluscs[edit]

Worms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Norris, Andrew; Tim Low; Iain Gordon; Glen Saunders; Steven Lapidge; Keryn Lapidge; Tony Peacock; Roger Pech (June 2005). Review of the management of feral animals and their impact on biodiversity in the Rangelands: A resource to aid NRM planning (PDF) (Technical report). Pest Animal Control CRC, Canberra. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Webb, A.; Maughan, M. (2007). "Oreochromis mossambicus - Mozambique tilapia" (PDF). TropWATER. James Cook University. Retrieved 26 December 2016. 
  3. ^ Murray Fagg (6 December 2007). "Environmental Weeds in Australia". Australian National Botanic Gardens. Australian Government Director of National Parks. Retrieved 2 December 2016. 
  4. ^ "British Isles Exotic and Introduced Mammals". World of European Exotic and Introduced Species. 
  5. ^ The virile crayfish, Orconectes virilis (Hagen, 1870) (Crustacea: Decapoda: Cambaridae), identified in the UK. Ahern, Daniel, et al. 2008. Aquatic Invasions 3(1):102-104. Retrieved on 2008-12-03.
  6. ^ Pyle, Robert L.; Pyle, Peter (31 December 2009). "The Birds of the Hawaiian Islands: Occurrence, History, Distribution, and Status". B.P. Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI, U.S.A. Retrieved 3 December 2016. 
  7. ^ BirdLife International (2014). "Phasianus versicolor". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2015.3. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 20 September 2015. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w "NAS - Nonindigenous Aquatic Species". U.S. Geological Survey. 20 June 2016. Retrieved 6 December 2016. 
  9. ^ a b c d Messing, Russell (September 1999). "Managing Fruit Flies on Farms in Hawaii" (PDF). College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources. University of Hawaii. Retrieved 3 December 2016. 
  10. ^ "Chuckor". Ornithological Society of New Zealand Checklist of Recognised Bird Names. Retrieved 24 September 2016. 
  11. ^ a b "New Zealand Birds". Ornithological Society of New Zealand Checklist of Recognised Bird Names. Retrieved 24 September 2016. 
  12. ^ "Bobwhite quail". Ornithological Society of New Zealand Checklist of Recognised Bird Names. Retrieved 24 September 2016. 
  13. ^ a b c d e John L Long (2003). Introduced Mammals of the World. pp. 361–380. ISBN 0 643 06714 0. 
  14. ^ Pranty, W. 2004. Florida’s exotic avifauna: a preliminary checklist. - Birding, August 2004: 362:372.
  15. ^ a b "California's Invaders". California Department of Fish and Wildlife. 2017-09-10. 
  16. ^ S.O. MacDonald. "Pacific Chorus Frog" (PDF). The Amphibians and Reptiles of Alaska. A Field Handbook. Retrieved 3 September 2014. 
  17. ^ Weber, Claude; Covain, Raphaël; Fisch-Muller, Sonia (2012). "Identity of Hypostomus plecostomus (Linnaeus, 1758), with an overview of Hypostomus species from the Guianas (Teleostei: Siluriformes: Loricariidae)" (PDF). Cybium. 36 (1): 195–227. [permanent dead link]
  18. ^ Fleshler, David (11 November 2017). "Nasty little yellow ant establishes first U.S. colonies in Fort Lauderdale". Sun-Sentinel. Retrieved 2017-11-16. 
  19. ^ a b c d Raffaele, Herbert A.; Wiley, James; Garrido, Orlando H.; Keith, Allan; Raffaele, Janis I. (23 April 2010). Birds of the West Indies. Princeton University Press. 
  20. ^ a b "European Exotic and Introduced Mammals". World of European Exotic and Introduced Species. 
  21. ^ "Bay barnacle (Balanus improvisus)" (PDF). Främmande arter i svenska hav. Retrieved April 18, 2010. 
  22. ^ Holdich, D. and Black, J. 2007. The spiny-cheek crayfish, Orconectes limosus (Rafinesque, 1817) (Crustacea: Decapoda: Cambaridae), digs into the UK[permanent dead link]. Aquatic Invasions 2(1):1–16.
  23. ^ Invasive Alien Species Fact Sheet: Paralithodes camtschaticus. North European and Baltic Network on Invasive Alien Species. Retrieved on 2009-04-10.
  24. ^ Procambarus clarkii alien range. Global Invasive Species Database. Retrieved on 2009-04-10.
  25. ^ Harmonia axyridis alien range. Global Invasive Species Database. Retrieved on 2009-04-10.
  26. ^ Invasive Alien Species in Northern Ireland: Leptinotarsa decemlineata Archived 2011-05-19 at the Wayback Machine.. National Museums Northern Ireland. Retrieved on 2009-04-10.
  27. ^ Morais, P.; et al. (2009). "The Asian clam Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) in the Guadiana River Basin (southwestern Iberian Peninsula): Setting the record straight" (PDF). Aquatic Invasions. REABIC. 4 (4): 681–684. doi:10.3391/ai.2009.4.4.14. 
  28. ^ a b Popa, O.; Popa, L. O. (2006). "Sinanodonta woodiana (Lea, 1834), Corbicula fluminea (O. F. Müller, 1774), Dreissena bugensis (Andrusov, 1897) (Mollusca: Bivalvia): Alien invasive species in Romanian fauna" (PDF). Travaux du Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle "Grigore Antipa". 49: 7–12. 
  29. ^ 100 of the worst invasive species in Europe
  30. ^ Styela clava alien range. Global Invasive Species Database. Retrieved on 2009-04-10.
  31. ^ Russell Mittermeier; et al. (2006). Lemurs of Madagascar (2nd ed.). pp. 272–274. ISBN 1-881173-88-7. 
  32. ^ a b South Africa: Reptiles. Global Invasive Species Database. ISSG.
  33. ^ a b c d e f Herbert, David G (2010). The introduced terrestrial Mollusca of South Africa (PDF). Pretoria: South African National Biodiversity Institute. ISBN 978-1-919976-56-3. 
  34. ^ South Africa: Molluscs. Global Invasive Species Database. ISSG.
  35. ^ Ciona intestinalis (tunicate). Global Invasive Species Database. ISSG.
  • DAISIE (eds.). 2009. Handbook of Alien Species in Europe. Springer, Dordrecht. 399 p. ISBN 978-1-4020-8279-5
  • Macdonald, D. and P. Barrett (1993) Collins Field Guide: Mammals of Britain & Europe. HarperCollins, London.
  • Svensson, L., P.J. Grant, K. Mullarney and D. Zetterström (1999) Collins Bird Guide. HarperCollins, London. (ISBN 0-00-219728-6)

External links[edit]