List of largest cats

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This list of largest cats shows 10 Felidae species, ordered by maximum reported weight and size of wild individuals on record. The list does not contain cat hybrids.

Rank Common name Scientific name Maximum weight (kg) Image Head-to-body length (m) Shoulder height (m) Native range by continent(s)
1 Tiger Panthera tigris 388.7 (unverified)[1][2] Amur tiger.jpg 3.90[3] 1.27 Asia
2 Lion Panthera leo 313 (in the wild;[4][5] disputed)[6] Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania (2288742082).jpg 3.64 1.35 Asia, Africa
3 Jaguar Panthera onca 160[7][8] Panthera onca.jpg 2.1 1.0 North and South America
4 Cougar Puma concolor 125.2[9] Puma concolor.jpg 2.8[9] 1.0 North and South America
5 Leopard Panthera pardus 96.5[8] African leopard, Panthera pardus pardus, near Lake Panic, Kruger National Park, South Africa (19448654130).jpg 2.2[10] 0.9 Asia, Africa
6 Snow leopard Panthera uncia 75[11][12] Schneeleopard Koeln.jpg 2.5[11][12] 0.75 Asia
7 Cheetah Acinonyx jubatus 72[13] Cheetah.jpg 2.1[7] 1.0 Africa, Asia
8 Eurasian lynx Lynx lynx 45[14][failed verification] Lynx lynx2.jpg 1.5[7][15] 0.75 Asia, Europe
9 Sunda clouded leopard Neofelis diardi 27 Borneo clouded leopard.jpg 1.3 0.65 Asia
10 Clouded leopard Neofelis nebulosa 23 Clouded Leopard Neofelis nebulosa by Dr Raju Kasambe DSC 7497 (28).JPG 1.08 0.7 Asia

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kitchener, A.; Yamaguchi, N. (2009). "What is a Tiger? Biogeography, Morphology, and Taxonomy". In Tilson, R.; Nyhus, P. J. (eds.). Tigers of the World: The Science, Politics and Conservation of Panthera tigris. Academic Press. pp. 53–84. ISBN 978-0-08-094751-8.
  2. ^ Brakefield, Tom (1993). "Tiger: Phantom stripes". Big Cats: Kingdom of Might. Voyageur Press. p. 32−47. ISBN 978-0-89658-329-0.
  3. ^ Close [23] Mazák, V. (1981). "Panthera tigris" (PDF). Mammalian Species. 152 (152): 1–8. doi:10.2307/3504004. JSTOR 3504004. Archived from the original (PDF) on 9 March 2012.
  4. ^ Wood, G. L. (1976). The Guinness Book of Animal Facts and Feats. Guinness Superlatives. ISBN 978-0-900424-60-1.
  5. ^ Wood, G. L. (1983). The Guinness Book of Animal Facts and Feats. Sterling Publishing. ISBN 978-0-85112-235-9.
  6. ^ "East African Business Digest", University Press of Africa, with contributions from the Kenya National Chamber of Commerce & Industry, 1963, retrieved 2018-03-18
  7. ^ a b c Nowak, Ronald M. (1999). "Carnivora, Felidae". Walker's Mammals of the World. Vol. 2. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 797–836. ISBN 0-8018-5789-9.
  8. ^ a b Burnie, David; Wilson, Don E. (2001). Animal: The Definitive Visual Guide to the World's Wildlife. New York City: Dorling Kindersley. ISBN 0-7894-7764-5.
  9. ^ a b Hornocker, Maurice (2010). Cougar: Ecology and Conservation. University of Chicago Press. ISBN 978-0-2263-5344-9.
  10. ^ Brain, C. K. (1983). The Hunter or the Hunted: An Introduction to African Cave Taphonomy. University of Chicago Press. ISBN 978-0-226-07090-2.
  11. ^ a b Boitani, Luigi (1984). Guide to Mammals. Simon & Schuster / Touchstone Books. ISBN 978-0-671-42805-1.
  12. ^ a b Hemmer, H. (1972). "Uncia uncia". Mammalian Species. 20 (20): 1–5. doi:10.2307/3503882. JSTOR 3503882.
  13. ^ Estes, R. D. (2004). The Behavior Guide to African Mammals: Including Hoofed Mammals, Carnivores, Primates (4th ed.). Berkeley: University of California Press. pp. 377–383. ISBN 978-0-520-08085-0.
  14. ^ "San Diego Zoo's Animal Bytes: Lynx". SanDiegoZoo.org. San Diego Zoo Global. Missing or empty |url= (help)
  15. ^ Page, Amanda; Kirkpatrick, Win; Massam, Marion (January 2008). Risk Assessment for Australia – Eurasian Lynx (Lynx lynx). Government of Western Australia: Department of Agriculture and Food. pp. 1–18.