List of lighthouses in Russia

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This is a list of current and historic lighthouses and lightvessels in Russia. On saltwater, Russia has had lighthouses on the Black Sea, on the Baltic Sea in the Kaliningrad Oblast exclave,[1] on the Gulf of Finland approaching St. Petersburg, on the Arctic Ocean (including a series of nuclear-powered ones), and on the Pacific Ocean. It has had lighthouses on freshwater of Lake Ladoga, on the Volga and Don Rivers,[2] on the Caspian Sea,[3] on Lake Baikal, in Siberia on the great Ob and Yenisey Rivers, and elsewhere.[4]

Lighthouses[edit]

Notable Russian lighthouses include:

Name Image Water body Region Location Year built Notes
Anapa Lighthouse Anapa Lighthouse 2007 1842x2815.jpg Eastern Black Sea Krasnodar Krai Anapa 1955 An older lighthouse from 1909 was destroyed in 1943 during World War II.[5]
Bryusa Lighthouse Slavzyanka Byusse Lighthouse.jpg Pacific Ocean Primorsky Krai 10 km east of Slavyanka 1913[6]
Doob Point Lighthouse 5472 Doob Lighthouse.jpg Eastern Black Sea Krasnodar Krai Novorossiysk Bay 1879[5]
Gelendzhik Lighthouse Gelendzhik Lighthouse IMG 8681 1725.jpg Eastern Black Sea Krasnodar Krai Gelendzhik Bay This lighthouse is located 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) south of Gelendzhik.[5]
Kabotazhnaya Gavan Rear Light Kronstadt Lighthouse IMG 7302 1280.jpg Gulf of Finland St. Petersburg Kronstadt The tower serves as rear light in a range of leading lights for the Kronstadt naval station.[7]
Lesnoy Mole Rear Range Light Lesnoy Mole Range Rear lighthouse.jpg Gulf of Finland St. Petersburg St. Petersburg
59°52′40.2″N 30°12′58.96″E / 59.877833°N 30.2163778°E / 59.877833; 30.2163778 (Lesnoy Mole Rear Range Light)
At a height of 73 metres (239 ft) it is the fourth tallest "traditional lighthouse" in the world, the tallest in Russia, and the tallest leading light in the world.[8]
Osinovetsky Light Ладожское озеро.Маяк Осиновец.jpg Lake Ladoga Leningrad Oblast Kokorevo
60°7′7.6″N 31°4′49.6″E / 60.118778°N 31.080444°E / 60.118778; 31.080444 (Osinovetsky Light)
1905[9] At a height of 70 metres (230 ft) it is the eighth tallest "traditional" lighthouse in the world.[8] It is a slightly shorter twin of Storozhenskiy Light.
Sommers P522somer.jpg Eastern Gulf of Finland Leningrad Oblast Sommers skerry, Gulf of Vyborg
60°12′N 27°39′E / 60.200°N 27.650°E / 60.200; 27.650 (Sommers)
1945 The first lighthouse on this islet was built in 1808 and another one was erected in 1866. The latter lighthouse was destroyed by Finnish forces at the onset of the Winter War of 1939-40 and the personnel were evacuated.[10] After the 1944 peace treaty between Finland and the Soviet Union, the island of Sommers was given to the Soviets, who also constructed a new truss lighthouse.
Storozhenskiy Light Storozhno lighthouse.JPG Lake Ladoga Leningrad Oblast Storozhno
60°31′38.92″N 32°37′18.01″E / 60.5274778°N 32.6216694°E / 60.5274778; 32.6216694 (Storozhenskiy Light)
1907[11] At a height of 71 metres (233 ft) it is among the tallest lightouses in the world,[8] and the fourth tallest stone lighthouse.[12] It is a twin of the slightly shorter Osinovetsky Light.
Sudzhukskiy Lighthouse Sudjukskiy.jpg Eastern Black Sea Krasnodar Krai Western entrance to Novorossiysk Bay[5]
Svyatoy Nos Святоносский маяк.jpg White Sea Kola Peninsula Svyatoy Nos, Murmansk Oblast 1863 This is Russia's oldest active lighthouse in the Arctic. The first steam-powered fog horn in Russia was installed at this site in 1872. The lighthouse was declared a national historic monument in 2002.[13]
Tolbukhin Lighthouse Tolbukhin lighthouse 001.jpg Gulf of Finland Leningrad Oblast 7 kilometres (4.3 mi) northwest off Kotlin Island 1810 Designed by Andreyan Zakharov, this is the oldest active lighthouse in north-western Russia.[7]
Utrish Lighthouse Utrish lighthouse.jpg Eastern Black Sea Krasnodar Krai Utrish island southeast of Anapa The station was established in 1911. The first lighthouse may date back to the 1920s but is apparently out of use and deteriorating. Another lighthouse has been installed on a nearby and hosts a memorial for fishermen killed in World War II.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lighthouses of Russia: Kaliningrad
  2. ^ Lighthouses of Russia: Volga and Don Waterways
  3. ^ Lighthouses of Russia: Caspian Sea
  4. ^ The Lighthouse Directory
  5. ^ a b c d e Rowlett, Russ (26 August 2014). "Lighthouses of Russia: Eastern Black Sea". The Lighthouse Directory. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved 28 August 2014. 
  6. ^ Rowlett, Russ (27 January 2014). "Lighthouses of Russia: Vladivostok Area". The Lighthouse Directory. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved 28 August 2014. 
  7. ^ a b Rowlett, Russ (2 April 2014). "Lighthouses of Russia: St. Petersburg Area". The Lighthouse Directory. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved 28 August 2014. 
  8. ^ a b c Rowlett, Russ. "The Tallest Lighthouses". The Lighthouse Directory. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
  9. ^ 1910 according to "The Tallest Lighthouses".
  10. ^ Rowlett, Russ (26 March 2014). "Lighthouses of Russia: Ingria". The Lighthouse Directory. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved 27 August 2014. 
  11. ^ 1911 according to "Storozhenskiy Light - Lighthouse Explorer Database - Lighthouses at Lighthouse Depot". lighthousedepot.com. Retrieved 9 August 2010.  and according to "The Tallest Lighthouses".
  12. ^ Rowlett, Russ (10 April 2014). "Lighthouses of Russia: Lake Ladoga". The Lighthouse Directory. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved 27 August 2014. 
  13. ^ Rowlett, Russ (24 August 2013). "Lighthouses of Russia: Kola Peninsula". The Lighthouse Directory. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved 27 August 2014. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Lighthouses in Russia at Wikimedia Commons