List of fictional scientists and engineers

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In addition to the archetypical mad scientist, western culture depicts scientists and engineers who go above and beyond the regular demands of their professions to use their skills and knowledge for the betterment of others, often at great personal risk. In this list of fictional scientists and engineers, an annotated alphabetical overview is given of some of the best-known beings in this category.

In literature[edit]

In films[edit]

Individual scientist/engineers[edit]

Mad scientists[edit]

In television[edit]

Individual scientist/engineers[edit]

Mad scientists[edit]

In television animation[edit]

Mad scientists[edit]

In animated movies[edit]

In comics and graphic novels[edit]

DC Comics[edit]

Mad scientists[edit]

Marvel Comics[edit]

  • Dr. Bruce Banner, a.k.a. The Incredible Hulk (Hulk) – scientist who developed the "Gamma Bomb" for the US government; an accident at the site of a test led to his becoming the Hulk; for a long period after, while in the form of Bruce Banner, he looked for scientific ways to rid himself of the transformation
  • Forge (X-Men) – mutant engineering genius
  • Peter Parker, a.k.a. Spider-Man (Spider-Man) – superhero with great knowledge of advanced sciences; now teaches at the high school he formerly attended
  • Reed Richards, a.k.a. Mister Fantastic (Fantastic Four) – scientist and inventor, regarded as one of the most intelligent people on Earth, leader of the Fantastic Four
  • Ted Sallis – duplicator of the serum that created Captain America; transformed into The Man-Thing;although he had serious problems with his personal ethics when it came to women and girls, he abandoned Operation Sulfer on moral grounds, and elected to remain as Man-Thing rather than allow innocents to be killed by the demon Thog
  • Tony Stark, a.k.a. Iron Man (Iron Man) – an industrialist and mechanical engineer of incredible ingenuity and inventive genius, whose technology to fight crime keeps him alive as well; he suffers from alcoholism
  • Victor and Janet Stein (Runaways) – founding members of the Pride; parents of Chase Stein
  • Victor Von Doom, a.k.a. Doctor Doom (Doctor Doom) – evil scientist, engineer, genius, conqueror; like Mister Fantastic, he is regarded as one of the most intelligent people on Earth, even though he is a villain
  • Professor Charles Francis Xavier, a.k.a. Professor X (X-Men) – the founder, mentor, and sometime leader of the X-Men

Mad scientists[edit]

Other[edit]

In anime and manga[edit]

Individual scientist/engineers[edit]

Mad scientists[edit]

In video games[edit]

Scientists[edit]

  • Albert Wesker (Resident Evil) – microbiologist working for the pharmaceutical enterprise Umbrella and co-creator of the T-virus; he was killed in the first Resident Evil game by Tyrant T-002, a powerful biological weapon, and was resurrected with super-human powers after self-injecting the T-virus
  • Catherine Elizabeth Halsey, MD, PhD (Halo Series) - scientist of the Office of Naval Intelligence, best known as the creator of the SPARTAN-II Program and Mjolnir Powered Assault Armor
  • Dr. Alphys (Undertale) – a stout Lizard monster, and Asgore's royal scientist; extremely timid; the creator of the robot Mettaton and the Amalgamates; has a crush on Undyne, captain of the Royal Guard
  • Dr. Andonuts (EarthBound) – one of the Chosen Four
  • Cave Johnson (Portal 2) – the eccentric former owner of Aperture Science, and creator of the portal gun
  • Ciel (Mega Man Zero) – a young human scientist who awakens Zero in order to save the world[1]
  • Daro'Xen vas Moreh (first appeared in Mass Effect 2) – a quarian admiral and scientist who believes that the geth, a synthetic race created by the quarians, who subsequently rebelled and drove their masters from their homeworld, should be controlled by the quarians once again; Admiral Xen also performed surgery on her childhood toys, much to the quarian squadmate Tali'Zorah's disgust
  • Professor E. Gadd (Nintendo games)
  • Dr. Gordon Freeman, Ph.D. (Half-Life) – a theoretical physicist who fights a one-man battle against invading aliens, US Marines and Combine forces with a crowbar and other weapons; his associates are Drs. Isaac Kleiner, Eli Vance, Judith Mossman and Arne Magnusson
  • Dr. Krieger (Far Cry) – a renowned scientist and creator/controller of the Trigens in the first Far Cry game
  • Dr. Light (Mega Man) – creator of the revolutionary robot Mega Man
  • Love Lab scientists (Rhythm Heaven) – a male and female scientist pass ingredients to each other to make love potions to the rhythm of the music
  • Lucrecia Crescent (Final Fantasy VII) - Shinra scientist and lover of Vincent Valentine
  • Dr. Gast (Final Fantasy VII) - Former head of the Shinra Company's science department; has a much stronger moral compass than his successor
  • Grimoire Valentine (Final Fantasy VII) - Shinra scientist and father of Vincent Valentine
  • Hojo (Final Fantasy VII) - Head of the Shinra Company's science department; a sociopathic, amoral bioengineer whose experiments drive the game's plot forward
  • The Medic (Team Fortress 2) – one of nine playable classes who is able to heal other characters and make them invincible (Übercharge them) for a limited time with his Medigun
  • Mei (Overwatch) – one of the heroes in the game and comic series
  • Mordin Solus (first appeared in Mass Effect 2) – a member of fictional alien species known as salarians (who have fast metabolisms, talk fast, walk fast and think fast); a brilliant biologist and a tech specialist
  • Dr. Otto Wolfgang Ort-Meyer (Hitman) – creator of Agent 47 and other clone assassins
  • Rikako Asakura (Touhou Project) – titled "Scientist Searching for Dreams", she is one of the few people in Gensokyo to value using science over magic. While she still uses magic in order to enhance her science at times, she tries to refrain from using magic due to a natural distaste of it.
  • Tobias Planck (Pirate Galaxy) – named after Max Planck, he is a theoretical physicist and field scientist with a parietal lobe 15% larger than average
  • Dr. W.D. Gaster (Undertale) – the former royal scientist; only appears a few times while the player visits the CORE; speaks in the Wingdings font
  • William Birkin (Resident Evil 2) – microbiologist working for the pharmaceutical enterprise Umbrella Corporation; creator of the G-virus; he was wounded and injected himself with his G-virus, mutating him into a monster
  • Dr. Zed (Borderlands) – a "Doctor" from the –Borderlands– series

Mad scientists[edit]

  • Dr. Ivo "Eggman" Robotnik (Sonic the Hedgehog franchise) – roboticist who is after chaos emeralds
  • Dr. "Mundo" Edmundo (League of Legends) – a sociopath medical doctor who only specializes in one field: the study of the pain response and how to inflict pain;his experiments have caused him to take on a monstrous form reminiscent of Frankenstein's Monster and a deceptively dimwitted speech pattern; out of all the scientists in the game, Dr. Mundo stands out as the only one who is a danger to both himself and others, evident in his self experiments
  • Dr. Muto (video game of the same name)
  • Doctor Neo Cortex (Crash Bandicoot) – an evil doctor with an oversized head, who has plans using Power Crystals
  • Doctor Nitrus Brio (Crash Bandicoot) a timid and meek scientist who assisted Doctor Neo Cortex in the first game, often using beakers of chemicals.
  • Doctor N. Gin (Crash Bandicoot) a masochistic scientist who assists Neo Cortex in the second game onward.
  • Doctor Ivo Robotnik (Sonic games) – a mad scientist and engineer, who invents various kinds of aircraft, robots and vehicles in various sizes (most Sonic games); he imprisoned animals in the inside of working robotic shells (Sonic 1Sonic Adventure 2), and experimented with kinds of mutations (Sonic Unleashed)
  • Dr. Wily (Mega Man) - the primary antagonist of the original Mega Man series.

Engineers[edit]

Other[edit]

Teams of scientists/engineers[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tracy, Tim (2002-10-01). "Mega Man Zero Review". GameSpot. Retrieved 2017-10-13. 
  2. ^ "He Has Finally Done It—World of Final Fantasy's Cid Is A Robot - Siliconera". Siliconera. 2016-03-18. Retrieved 2017-10-13. 
  3. ^ Farokhmanesh, Megan (2015-03-20). "The changing looks of Final Fantasy's Cid: fashion experts weigh in". Polygon. Retrieved 2017-10-13. 
  4. ^ Bramwell, Tom (2007-09-12). "Meet the TF2 Engineer". Eurogamer. Retrieved 2017-10-13. 
  5. ^ Schiesel, Seth (2011-02-01). "Dead Space 2 Revives Isaac Clarke - Review". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2017-10-13. 
  6. ^ "Dead Space 3's Isaac Clarke as 'the reluctant participant'". Engadget. Retrieved 2017-10-13. 
  7. ^ Hwang, Kaiser (2003-03-03). "Metal Gear Solid 2: Substance". IGN. Retrieved 2017-10-13. 
  8. ^ "BlizzCon 2008: Starcraft II lore panel". Engadget. Retrieved 2017-10-13. 
  9. ^ "PS2 RPG HD Collections We'd Like To See". Game Informer. Retrieved 2017-10-13. 
  10. ^ Parkin, Simon (2005-11-20). "Xenosaga Episode II: Jenseits von Gut und Bose". Eurogamer. Retrieved 2017-10-13. 
  11. ^ Williams, Mike (2017-05-22). "Overwatch - How to Play Torbjorn". USgamer. Retrieved 2017-10-13. 

External links[edit]