List of memorials to Robert E. Lee

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Robert E. Lee, a statue given to the National Statuary Hall by Virginia in 1909

The following is a partial list of monuments and memorials to Robert E. Lee, who served as General in Chief of the Armies of the Confederate States in 1865. At the end is a listing of monuments and memorials to Lee that have been removed or renamed.

Buildings[edit]

Holidays and events[edit]

Military facilities[edit]

Monuments and sculptures[edit]

Parks[edit]

Roads[edit]

Schools[edit]

Settlements[edit]

Ships[edit]

Universities and colleges[edit]

U.S. counties[edit]

Vehicles[edit]

Removed and renamed monuments and memorials to Lee, by state[edit]

Former Robert E. Lee Suite in the Hereford University Center, Arlington State College

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "R. E. Lee Memorial Church About Us". R. E. Lee Memorial Church. Retrieved 19 September 2017. Established in the mid-nineteenth century as Grace Church, and renamed after his death to honor Robert E. Lee who served as Senior Warden, our church has almost 500 communicants and an average Sunday attendance of about 225.
  2. ^ a b Paulsen, David (19 September 2017). "Lee church changes name: Confederate general dropped to return to 'Grace'". Episcopal News Service. Retrieved 25 September 2017. After two years of tense debate in the congregation, the vestry voted, 7-5, on Sept. 18 to change the church's name to its previous Grace Episcopal Church.
  3. ^ Carola, Chris (August 17, 2017). "2 NY lawmakers: Strip Robert E. Lee's name from West Point". The Washington Post. Retrieved August 28, 2017.
  4. ^ "Gen. Robert E. Lee, C.S.A. Historical Marker". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  5. ^ "Gen. Robert E. Lee Historical Marker". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  6. ^ "Gen. Robert E. Lee Historical Marker". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  7. ^ "General Robert E. Lee Historical Marker". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  8. ^ "General Robert E. Lee Historical Marker". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  9. ^ "Lee Highway Historical Marker". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 19 September 2017. Erected in honor of Robert E. Lee by William Watts Chapter Roanoke, VA Southern Cross Chapter Salem, VA Roanoke Chapter Roanoke, VA The United Daughters of the Confederacy 1928
  10. ^ "Paris Texas Historical Monuments: Confederate Monument, Culbertson Fountain, World War I Memorial". TexasEscapes.com. Retrieved 19 September 2017. The familiar figure of the generic Confederate soldier stands above the busts of four champions of "The Lost Cause." Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson and Texas' own Albert Sidney Johnston.
  11. ^ a b Carbone, Christopher. "Which Confederate statues were removed? A running list". Fox News. Retrieved 20 September 2017. Busts of Lee and Jackson were removed overnight on Aug. 17, from the Hall of Fame for Great Americans at Bronx Community College. Prior to its removal, Bronx Borough president Ruben Diaz Jr. had said "there is nothing great about two men who committed treason against the United States to fight to keep the institution of slavery intact."
  12. ^ "Robert E. Lee Historical Marker". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  13. ^ Ed Richter (28 June 2018). "Confederate marker back on display in Franklin". Journal News | Local News for Hamilton, Middletown. Cox Media Group. Retrieved 15 July 2018.
  14. ^ a b c ""Robert E. Lee / Dixie Highway Monuments"". 4 June 2014. Retrieved 15 July 2018.
  15. ^ "Robert E. Lee Historical Maker". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  16. ^ "Robert E. Lee Historical Marker". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  17. ^ "Robert E. Lee Historical Marker". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  18. ^ "Robert E. Lee Historical Marker". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  19. ^ "General Robert E. Lee Historical Marker". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  20. ^ "FPAN - Destination: Civil War - - Bradfordville". Florida Public Archaeology Network. Florida Public Archaeology Network. Retrieved 15 July 2018.
  21. ^ "Robert E. Lee Bridge Historical Marker". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  22. ^ "Robert E. Lee Memorial Highway Historical Marker". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  23. ^ "In Memory of Robert E. Lee". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  24. ^ "Robert E. Lee and Thomas. J. "Stonewall" Jackson Monument Historical Marker". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 18 September 2017. The parting of General Lee and Stonewall Jackson on the eve of Chancellorsville.
  25. ^ Ballentine, Claire; Moorthy, Neelesh (August 15, 2017). "Tracing the history of Duke Chapel's Robert E. Lee statue". The Duke Chronicle. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  26. ^ a b Roll, Nick (August 18, 2017). "Robert E. Lee Statue Vandalized at Duke". Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  27. ^ a b "Statue defaced as U.S. Confederate monument protests grow". Reuters.com. 18 August 2017. Retrieved 20 August 2017 – via Reuters.
  28. ^ a b "Duke University Removes Robert E. Lee Statue From Chapel Entrance". Npr.org. Retrieved 20 August 2017.
  29. ^ "Monument to Gen. Robert E. Lee - Antietam National Battlefield (U.S. National Park Service)". www.nps.gov. Retrieved 20 August 2017.
  30. ^ "Gen. Robert E. Lee, CSA Historical Marker". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  31. ^ a b Haurwitz, Ralph (20 August 2017). "UT removes Confederate statues from South Mall". Austin American-Statesman. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  32. ^ a b Weber, Andrew (12 August 2017). "The Long, Controversial History of UT's Confederate Statues". KUT 90.5. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  33. ^ "Robert E. Lee Historical Marker". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  34. ^ a b "Robert E. Lee Tree Historical Marker". The Historical Marker Database. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  35. ^ a b Spivack, Caroline. "Robert E. Lee Memorial Removed From Tree at Fort Hamilton Church". dnainfo. DNAInfo. Archived from the original on 16 August 2017. Retrieved 18 September 2017. Church officials Wednesday removed a memorial to Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee that was first mounted to a tree outside St. Johns Episcopal Church in Fort Hamilton more than 100 years ago.
  36. ^ a b Perl, Larry (September 28, 2015). "Baltimore County renaming Robert E. Lee Park as Lake Roland". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved October 3, 2015.
  37. ^ Jaeger, Max. "Cuomo orders Confederate busts removed from CUNY Hall of Fame". New York Post. Retrieved 27 August 2017.
  38. ^ Dorsey, Jake. "Lee Blvd. sign honors Confederate general. A Richland man wants it removed". Tri-City Herald. Retrieved 2017-09-18.
  39. ^ a b Bryan, Susannah. "Hollywood's Confederate street signs finally coming down". Sun-Sentinel.com. Retrieved 2018-04-24.
  40. ^ a b Powell, Jacqulyn; Bien, Calily (April 26, 2019). "Robert E. Lee Road in Austin renamed after first black U.S. treasurer". KXAN. Nexstar Broadcasting. Retrieved April 27, 2019 – via KXAN.com.
  41. ^ a b Maddox, Will (20 September 2017). "Lee Elementary already has a new name picked out. Here's how they got there". Lakewood/East Dallas Advocate Magazine. Retrieved 22 September 2017.
  42. ^ a b Smith, Corbett (13 June 2018). "See ya, Stonewall: Dallas ISD begins to remove Confederate leaders' names from 4 schools". DallasNews.com. The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved 25 February 2019.
  43. ^ a b Meyer, Madison (January 9, 2018). "Robert E. Lee Elementary changed to Lee Elementary". ifiberone.com. Retrieved January 9, 2018.
  44. ^ a b Epstein, Jennifer Rice (July 19, 2016). "Long Beach to Rename Three Schools". The Grunion. Long Beach, California. Retrieved August 16, 2017.
  45. ^ a b Magee, Maureen (May 23, 2016). "Robert E. Lee school name changed". The San Diego Union-Tribune. Retrieved August 16, 2017.
  46. ^ Martin, Annie. "Lee Middle School will become College Park Middle". orlandosentinel.com.
  47. ^ Doreen, Stewart (October 14, 2020). "Board selects Legacy HS as school's new name". Midland Reporter-Telegram.
  48. ^ Stewart, Caleb. "Staunton School Board votes on new name for R.E. Lee High School". Archived from the original on 2018-11-13. Retrieved 2018-11-13.
  49. ^ Miles, Vernon (28 August 2019). "New Logos for Newly Renamed Washington-Liberty High School". Arlnow.com. Local News Now.
  50. ^ Krakow, Kenneth K. (1975). Georgia Place-Names: Their History and Origins (PDF). Macon, GA: Winship Press. p. 187. ISBN 0-915430-00-2.
  51. ^ Boorstein, Michelle (2017-09-06). "Washington National Cathedral to remove stained glass windows honoring Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2017-09-11.
  52. ^ Smith, Bill; DeLuca, Dan (March 12, 2019). "Robert E. Lee bust toppled in Fort Myers; police call it apparent act of vandalism". Fort Myers News-Press.
  53. ^ "Robert E. Lee Bust". Artswfl.com.
  54. ^ Smith, Bill (May 21, 2018). "Fort Myers City Council takes no action on Robert E. Lee monuments". Fort Myers News-Press.
  55. ^ Smith, Bill (May 15, 2018). "Supporters, foes of Robert E. Lee monument clash in downtown Fort Myers". Fort Myers News-Press.
  56. ^ Bluestein, Greg (September 23, 2016). "Confederate holidays booted from state calendar". Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
  57. ^ "Confederate Memorial Day is still celebrated in these states". USA Today. Retrieved 2017-10-10.
  58. ^ Roll, Nick (August 28, 2017). "Confederate Round-Up". Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved August 28, 2017.