Minimum wage in China

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Map of hourly minimum wages across China, 2014[1]
   ¥9.00–¥9.99
   ¥10.00–¥10.99
   ¥11.00–¥11.99
   ¥12.00–¥12.99
   ¥13.00–¥13.99
   ¥14.00–¥14.99
   ¥16.00–¥16.99
   ¥17.00

As different parts of China have very different standards of living, China does not set one minimum wage for the entire nation. Instead, the task of setting minimum wages is delegated to the local governments. Each province, municipality, or region sets its own minimum wage in accordance with its own local conditions. According to the country's Employment Promotion Plan minimum wages are supposed to increase in accordance with local living standards by at least 13 percent through 2015 and be no less than 40 percent of the average local wages. Minimum wages under such policies increased by an average 12.6 percent rate between 2008-2012.[1][2]

By June 2014, wages have been hiked in a total of eleven areas for the year: Beijing, Chongqing, Gansu, Guangdong (Shenzhen), Qinghai, Shaanxi, Shandong, Shanxi, Shanghai, Tianjin and Yunnan. If this trend continues through the rest of 2014, some 26 regions are on track to see increases to their minimum wage.[1]

Minimum wage levels by jurisdiction[edit]

The table below lists monthly and hourly minimum wages by province and wage districts. Provinces are divided into different wage districts: Guizhou, for instance, is divided up into Class A, B, and C, which each have their own minimum monthly and hourly wage. Note: these figures do not take into account deductions, such as pensions or social insurance.[1]

Minimum Wages Across China[1]
Region Districts Monthly Minimum Wages (RMB¥)[3] Hourly Minimum Wages (RMB¥)[4] Comments
Anhui A
B
C
D
1260
1040
930
860
13
11
10
9
Beijing 1720 18.7
Chongqing A
B
1250
1150
12.5
11.5
Fujian A
B
C
D
1500
1350
1230
1130
16
14.3
13
12
Gansu A
B
C
D
1470
1420
1370
1320
15.5
15

14.4
13.9

Guangdong
A
B
C
D
2030*
1895
1510
1350
1210
18.5*
18.3
14.4
13.3
12
*Shenzhen independently sets its own minimum wage.
Guangxi A
B
C
D
1400
1210
1085
1000
13.5
11.5
10.5
9.5
Guizhou A
B
C
1600
1500
1400
17

16 15

Hainan A
B
C
1270
1170
1120
11.2
10.3
9.9
Hebei A
B
C
D
1480
1420
1310
1210
15
14
13
12
Heilongjiang A
B
C
D
1160
1050
900
850
11
9
8.5
8
Henan A
B
C
1600
1450
1300
15
13.5
12
Hubei A
B
C
1300
1020
900
14
11
9.5
Hunan A
B
C
D
1390
1250
1130
1030
13.5
11.9
11.4
10.7
Inner Mongolia A
B
C
D
1640
1540
1440
1340
13.3
12.5
11.7
10.9
Jiangsu A
B
C
1630
1460
1270
14.5
12.5
11
Jiangxi A
B
C
D
1530
1430
1340
1180
15.3
14.3
13.4
11.8
Jilin A
B
C
1320
1220
1120
11.5
10.5
9.5
Liaoning A
B
C
1300
1050
900
13
9.8
8.6
Ningxia A
B
C
1480
1390
1320
14
11.5
12
Qinghai A
B
C
1270
1260
1250
12.9
12.8
12.7
Shaanxi A
B
C
D
1480
1370
1260
1190
14.8
13.7
12.6
11.9
Shandong A
B
C
1600
1450
1300
16
14.5
13
Shanghai 2020 18
Shanxi A
B
C
D
1480
1370
1260
1190
14.8
13.7

12.6
11.9

Sichuan A
B
C
1500
1380
1260
15.7
14.4
13.2
Tianjin 1850 18.5
Tibet 1400 13
Xinjiang A
B
C
D
1670
1470
1390
1310
16.7
14.7
13.9
13.1
Yunnan A
B
C
1570
1400
1180
14
13
12
Zhejiang A
B
C
D
1860
1660
1530
1380
17
15.2
13.8
12.5

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Rainy Yao, Edoardo Rosettani (26 May 2015). "A Complete Guide to Minimum Wage Levels Across China 2015". China Briefing. Retrieved 15 January 2016. 
  2. ^ "China promises rise in minimum wage to close income gap". BBC. 6 February 2013. Retrieved 11 August 2014. 
  3. ^ "中华人民共和国人力资源和社会保障部". www.mohrss.gov.cn. Retrieved 2016-01-18. 
  4. ^ "中华人民共和国人力资源和社会保障部". www.mohrss.gov.cn. Retrieved 2016-01-18.