List of monarchs who were Freemasons

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King Christian X of Denmark in Masonic regalia.

This is a list of monarchs who were Freemasons, and lists individual monarchs chronologically under the countries they ruled, monarchs who ruled more than one country are listed under the one they are most known for, or the dominant nation in a personal union (i.e. Christian X listed under Denmark and not Iceland). Those, listed below were members of a Freemason Lodge at sometime during their lives. Some, like Alexander I of Russia, would later outlaw Freemasonry in their territories, while others would continue supporting the organization for the rest of their lives.

Andorra[edit]

Afghanistan[edit]

Baden[edit]

Bau[edit]

Bavaria[edit]

Belgium[edit]

Bikaner[edit]

Brandenburg-Ansbach[edit]

Brandenburg-Bayreuth[edit]

Brazil[edit]

Breslau[edit]

Brunswick[edit]

Carnatic[edit]

Cooch Behar[edit]

Courland[edit]

et Protector Ordinis in Saxonia[15]

Denmark[edit]

Egypt[edit]

Greece[edit]

Gwalior[edit]

Germany[edit]

Hanover[edit]

  • Ernst August - Grandmaster of the Grandlodge of Hanover
  • Georg V - Protector of Freemasonry in Hanover, Grandmaster of the Grandlodge of Hanover

Hawaii[edit]

Hesse-Darmstadt[edit]

Holland[edit]

  • Lodewijk I - Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Orient of France (1805).

Holy Roman Empire[edit]

Jaipur[edit]

Johor[edit]

Jordan[edit]

Mascara[edit]

Mecklenburg-Schwerin[edit]

Mecklenburg-Strelitz[edit]

  • Adolph Friedrich IV
  • Karl II - Patron of the united Lodges of the dominions of the Electorate of Brunswick, Duchy of Mecklenburg, Principalities of Münster-Waldeck and Hildesheim

Mexico[edit]

Moldavia[edit]

Montenegro[edit]

Mysore[edit]

Naples[edit]

Netherlands[edit]

Norway[edit]

Ottoman Empire[edit]

Pataudi[edit]

Patiala[edit]

Perak[edit]

Poland[edit]

Stanisław II August

Prussia[edit]

Rampur[edit]

Reuss-Lobenstein[edit]

Romania[edit]

Russia[edit]

Sarawak[edit]

Saxe-Coburg-Gotha[edit]

Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg[edit]

Saxe-Meiningen[edit]

Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach[edit]

Serbia[edit]

Sikh Empire[edit]

Spain[edit]

  • José I - Grand Master of the Grand Orient of France (1805).[38]

Sweden[edit]

  • Adolf Fredrik - Master of a Stockholm lodge.
  • Gustaf III - Vicar of Solomon.[39]
  • Karl XIII - Grandmaster of the Swedish Order of Freemasons, and Army Master of the Order of Strict Observance.
  • Karl XIV Johan - Grandmaster of the Swedish Order of Freemasons, and of the Norwegian Order of Freemasons.
  • Oscar I - Grandmaster of the Swedish Order of Freemasons, and of the Norwegian Order of Freemasons.
  • Karl XV - Grandmaster of the Swedish Order of Freemasons, and of the Norwegian Order of Freemasons.
  • Oscar II - Grandmaster of the Swedish Order of Freemasons, and of the Norwegian Order of Freemasons.
  • Gustaf V - Grandmaster of the Swedish Order of Freemasons.
  • Gustaf VI Adolf - Grandmaster of the Swedish Order of Freemasons.

United Kingdom[edit]

Wallachia[edit]

Westphalia[edit]

  • Jérôme I - Grand Master of the Grand Orient of Westphalia.

Wurttemberg[edit]

Yugoslavia[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Daniel Ligou. Dictionnaire de la Franc-Maçonnerie. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 2006.
  2. ^ a b Marc de Jode, Monique Cara and Jean-Marc Cara (eds.). Dictionnaire universelle de la Franc-Maçonnerie. Larousse, 2011.
  3. ^ Initiated in ""L'Amitiée Lodge"" on may 21st of 1883 (Histoire de la Franc-maçonnerie en France - Faucher and Ricker 1967)
  4. ^ Dictionnaire de la Franc-Maçonnerie (Daniel Ligou, Presses Universitaires de France, 2006)
  5. ^ Ce que la France doit aux francs-maçons (Laurent KUPFERMAN,Emmanuel PIERRA, ed. Grund, 2012)
  6. ^ Dictionnaire de la Franc-Maçonnerie, page 363 (Daniel Ligou, Presses Universitaires de France, 2006)
  7. ^ Dictionnaire universelle de la Franc-Maçonnerie, page 245 (Marc de Jode, Monique Cara and Jean-Marc Cara, ed. Larousse , 2011)
  8. ^ Histoire de la Franc-Maçonnerie française (Pierre Chevallier, ed. Fayard, 1975)
  9. ^ http://nationalheritagemuseum.typepad.com/library_and_archives/2008/10/amir-habibullah.html
  10. ^ McMahon, Henry A (1939). An Account of the Entry of H. M. Habibullah Khan Amir of Afghanistan into Freemasonry. London, UK: Favil Press, Ltd.
  11. ^ a b c d http://www.masonindia.in/index.php/some-very-well-known-indian-freemasons/
  12. ^ Denslow, William R (1957). 10,000 Famous Freemasons. Columbia, Missouri, USA: Missouri Lodge of Research.
  13. ^ a b http://www.masonindia.in/index.php/freemasonry-comes-to-india/
  14. ^ a b http://shillonglodge61.org/famous%20indian%20masons.htm
  15. ^ a b c d e f Speth, George William. Royal Freemasons. Masonic Publishing Company, 1885, pp. 24-29.
  16. ^ Tarik Sabry, Layal Ftouni. Arab Subcultures: Transformations in Theory and Practice. London: I.B.Tauris, 2016.
  17. ^ a b http://www.dglbombay.org/famous-indian-masons/
  18. ^ http://phoenixmasonry.org/kamehameha.htm
  19. ^ "The New Palace". The Pacific Commercial Advertiser. Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands. January 3, 1880. Retrieved January 16, 2017 – via Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
  20. ^ http://mdmasons.org/about-md-masons/famous-masons/
  21. ^ Audrey Carpenter, John Theophilus Desaguliers: A Natural Philosopher, Engineer and Freemason in Newtonian England, (London : Continuum, 2011), ISBN 978-1-4411-2778-5, p. 47
  22. ^ Maclolm Davies, The masonic muse : songs, music, and musicians associated with Dutch freemasonry, 1730–1806. (Utrecht : Koninklijke Vereniging voor Nederlandse Muziekgeschiedenis, 1995), ISBN 90-6375-199-0, pp. 22–23
  23. ^ "In Mozart's Vienna, Freemasonry had flourished under the Habsburgs mainly due to the influence of Francis Stephen, Duke of Lorraine, who, himself, was a Freemason." Wolfgang Amedeus Mozart – Master Mason Archived 13 November 2007 at the Wayback Machine..
  24. ^ http://www.mastermason.com/toowoombalodge132/Famous%20Masons.html
  25. ^ Thomas C. Wright, Latin America since Independence: Two Centuries of Continuity and Change, Rowman & Littlefield 2017, p. 77.
  26. ^ a b c d e http://www.masonicforum.ro/no-55/ruslan-sevcenco-the-history-of-masonry-in-moldova-1733-1812/
  27. ^ a b http://www.lodge.rs/en/known_masons/
  28. ^ http://masonicpaedia.org/showarticle.asp?id=14
  29. ^ https://www.vrijmetselarij.nl/Vrijmetselarij/Historie-Nederland
  30. ^ http://162.243.49.51/web/03_turkiye.html#5 Archived 13 April 2014 at the Wayback Machine.
  31. ^ http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica/templars/knights_templars04.htm
  32. ^ Arthur Edward Waite (2013). A New Encyclopedia of Freemasonry, Volume I. Cosimo, Inc. pp. 287–8.
  33. ^ James Van Horn Melton (2001). The Rise of the Public in Enlightenment Europe. Cambridge University Press. p. 267.
  34. ^ Long, S. (1995, December 8). Hush-hush world of the Freemasons. The Straits Times, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
  35. ^ a b http://www.skirret.com/papers/freemasonry_in_yugoslavia.html
  36. ^ a b https://www.uvls.org.rs/famous_fm.html
  37. ^ http://www.freemasonrytoday.com/features/the-life-of-a-british-maharaja
  38. ^ Ross, Michael. The Reluctant King: Joseph Bonaparte, King of the two Sicilies and Spain. London, Mason/Charter, 1977, pp. 34-35.
  39. ^ Denslow, Wm. R. (1958). 10,000 Famous Freemasons. St. Louis, Mo: Missouri Lodge of Research
  40. ^ a b c d e http://www.grandlodgescotland.com/masonic-subjects/famous-freemasons
  41. ^ "Penelea Filitti, p. 61."

See also[edit]