List of monastic houses in Somerset

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
List of monastic houses in Somerset is located in Somerset
Athelney Abbey
Athelney Abbey
Bablew Priory
Bablew Priory
Banwell Monastery (alleged site)
Banwell Monastery (alleged site)
Banwell Monastery (poss. site)
Banwell Monastery (poss. site)
Banwell Monastery (poss. site)
Banwell Monastery (poss. site)
Barlinch Priory
Barlinch Priory
Barrow Gurney Nunnery
Barrow Gurney Nunnery
Bath Abbey
Bath Abbey
Brent purported Cell (very approx. loc.)
Brent purported Cell (very approx. loc.)
Bridgwater Greyfriars
Bridgwater Greyfriars
Bruton Abbey
Bruton Abbey
Buckland Priory
Buckland Priory
Burtle Priory
Burtle Priory
Cannington Nunnery
Cannington Nunnery
Clevedon Friary
Clevedon Friary
Cleeve Abbey
Cleeve Abbey
Downside Abbey
Downside Abbey
Dunster Priory
Dunster Priory
Glastonbury Abbey
Glastonbury Abbey
Green Ore 'Cell'
Green Ore 'Cell'
Hinton Charterhouse
Hinton Charterhouse
Illchester Friary
Illchester Friary
Illchester Nunnery
Illchester Nunnery
Keynsham Abbey
Keynsham Abbey
Kilve Chantry
Kilve Chantry
Montacute Priory
Montacute Priory
Muchelney Abbey
Muchelney Abbey
Stavordale Priory
Stavordale Priory
Stogursey Priory
Stogursey Priory
Taunton Priory
Taunton Priory
Templecombe Preceptory
Templecombe Preceptory
Yenston Priory, (poss. loc.)
Yenston Priory, (poss. loc.)
Yenston Priory (poss. loc.)
Yenston Priory (poss. loc.)
Locations of monastic houses in Somerset

The following is a list of monastic houses in Somerset, England.

In this article alien houses are included, as are smaller establishments such as cells and notable monastic granges (particularly those with resident monks), and also camerae of the military orders of monks (Templars and Hospitallers). The numerous monastic hospitals per se are not included here unless at some time the foundation had, or was purported to have the status or function of an abbey, priory, friary or preceptory/commandery.

The name of the county is given where there is reference to an establishment in another county. Where the county has changed since the foundation's dissolution the modern county is given in parentheses, and in instances where the referenced foundation ceased to exist before the unification of England, the kingdom is given, followed by the modern county in parentheses.

The geographical co-ordinates provided are sourced from the details provided by Historic England PastScape [1] and Ordnance Survey publications.

A Monastic Glossary follows the listing, which provides links to articles on the particular monastic orders as well as other terms which appear in the listing.

Abbreviations and key[edit]

The sites listed are ruins unless indicated thus:
* indicates current monastic function
+ indicates current non-monastic ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure)
^ indicates current non-ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure) or redundant intact structure
$ indicates remains limited to earthworks etc.
# indicates no identifiable trace of the monastic foundation remains
~ indicates exact site of monastic foundation unknown
identification ambiguous or confused

Locations with names in italics indicate probable duplication (misidentification with another location)
or non-existent foundations (either erroneous reference or proposed foundation never implemented)
or ecclesiastical establishments with a monastic appellation but lacking monastic connection.

Trusteeship denoted as follows:
EH English Heritage
LT Landmark Trust
NT National Trust

Alphabetical listing of establishments[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance[note 1] Formal Name or Dedication[note 2]
& Alternative Names[note 3]
Online References[note 4] & Location[note 5]
Athelney Abbey # Stone obelisk surrounded by railings set in green fields and trees possible early hermitage or monastery founded c.878?;
Benedictine? monks
founded c.888 by King Alfred (possibly enlarging pre-existing establishment);
Benedictine monks
(re)founded c.960;
dissolved 8 February 1539; granted to John Clayton 1544/5;
now on private land, the site of church is marked by a monument erected 1801
The Abbey of Saint Peter, Saint Paul and Saint Athelwine, Athelney [1][2][3][4]

Athelney
51°03′35″N 2°56′02″W / 51.059753°N 2.933878°W / 51.059753; -2.933878 (Athelney Abbey)
Bablew Grange Cluniac monks
grange and chapel[note 6] dependent on Montacute
Bablew Priory [5]
Tintinhull
50°58′22″N 2°43′15″W / 50.9727°N 2.7207°W / 50.9727; -2.7207 (Bablew Priory)
Banwell Monastery Saxon monastery
granted to Asser by Alfred c.888;
St Andrew's Church, Banwell, possibly on site (alternative possible sites)
[6]

51°19′42″N 2°51′44″W / 51.3281983°N 2.8622335°W / 51.3281983; -2.8622335 (Banwell Monastery (alleged site)) (alleged)
51°19′19″N 2°51′58″W / 51.3220536°N 2.8661066°W / 51.3220536; -2.8661066 (Banwell Monastery (possible site)) (possible)
51°19′41″N 2°51′48″W / 51.3281111°N 2.8632313°W / 51.3281111; -2.8632313 (Banwell Monastery (possible site)) (possible)
Barlynch Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
founded between 1154 and 1189 (between 1174(?) and 1220), reputedly by William de Say;
dissolved before July 1537; granted to Sir John Wallop 1538/9;
remains now on site of Barlynch Farm;
now in ownership of Working for Wildlife
The Priory Church of Saint Nicholas, Barlinch
____________________
Barlinch Priory
[7][8][9][10]

Brompton Regis
51°03′00″N 3°31′47″W / 51.050134°N 3.5295886°W / 51.050134; -3.5295886 (Barlinch Priory)
Barrow Gurney Nunnery Benedictine nuns
founded c.1200 by ___ Gurney, Lord of Stoke Hamden;
dissolved 1536; granted to William Clerke 1544/5;
incorporated into Barrow Court
The Blessed Virgin Mary and St Edmund, King and Martyr
____________________
Minchin Barrow Priory;
Minchinbarrow Priory
Bearwe Priory;
Borrow Gurney Priory
[11][12][13]

Barrow Gurney
51°24′21″N 2°40′19″W / 51.405947°N 2.672061°W / 51.405947; -2.672061 (Barrow Gurney Nunnery)
Bath Abbey + Large floodlight stone building with tower Saxon nuns
founded c.676, reputedly by King Osric, who granted land to Bertana, abbess;
destroyed and rebuilt several times;
monks
refounded before 758;
secular? 775;
Benedictine? monks
refounded 963/4;
episcopal diocesan cathedral 1090;
dissolved 1539; granted to Humphrey Colles 1542/3;
conventual church now in parochial use
The Abbey Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, Bath [14][15][16][17][18]

Bath, Somerset
51°22′53″N 2°21′30″W / 51.381253°N 2.358458°W / 51.381253; -2.358458 (Bath Abbey)
Bedminster Monastery Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in Bristol
Brent Cell Benedictine monks
purported cell dependent on Glastonbury
East Brent Cell 51°15′45″N 2°56′30″W / 51.2625728°N 2.9415357°W / 51.2625728; -2.9415357 ((purported) Brent Cell (very approx. loc.)) (very approx)
Bridgwater Greyfriars Franciscan Friars (under the Custody of Bristol)
founded c.1245 by William Bruer (Briwere);
church consecrated 1445 (after rebuilt/extended);
dissolved 13 September 1538
Bridge Water Friary [19][20][21][22]
[23][24]

Bridgwater
51°07′33″N 3°00′25″W / 51.125828°N 3.006872°W / 51.125828; -3.006872 (Bridgwater Greyfriars)
Bristol Austin Friars Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in Bristol
Bristol Eremites Friars Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in Bristol
Bristol Preceptory Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in Bristol
Bruton Abbey BrutonAbbey.jpg Benedictine monks
abbey(?) founded c.1005 by Algar, Earl of Cornwall;
dissolved before 1086(?);
Augustinian Canons Regular
refounded 1127-1135 by William de Mohun
raised to abbey status 1511;
dissolved 1 April 1539; granted to Maurice Berkely 1545/6
[25][26]

Bruton
51°06′31″N 2°27′02″W / 51.108478°N 2.450619°W / 51.108478; -2.450619 (Bruton Abbey)
Buckland Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
founded c.1166 by William de Arlegh (Erlegh), Lord of Durston;
dissolved c.1180;
Knights Hospitaller preceptory
refounded c.1180; dissolved 1433
together with priory of Sisters of St John of Jerusalem (see immediately below);
refounded c.1180; dissolved after 1500;
Augustinian Canons Regular
priory or hospital;
refounded after 1500;
dissolved 10 February 1539; granted to Alexander Popham and William Halley 1544/5;
site now occupied by Buckland Farm
John the Baptist
____________________
Minchin Buckland Preceptory
Buckland Sororum
[27][28][29]
[30][31]

Durston
51°03′07″N 3°00′23″W / 51.051956°N 3.006481°W / 51.051956; -3.006481 (Buckland Priory)
Buckland Sisters of St John Priory Sisters of St John of Jerusalem
transferred from Carbrooke, Clanfield, Gosford, Hampton, Hogshaw, Shingay, Standon and Swingfield;
refounded c.1180;
together with Knights Hospitaller Preceptory on the site of former Augustinian Canons Regular priory (see immediately above);
dissolved after 1500;
Augustinian Canons Regular priory or hospital founded on site (see immediately above);
site now occupied by Buckland Farm
St Mary and St Nicholas
Burtle Priory hermitage, endowed by William son of Godfrey of Eddington 1199;
Augustinian Canons Regular
priory cell dependent on Glastonbury 1267;
refounded before 1270;
independent from 1275;
dissolved 1536; granted to John and James Bisse 1553/4:
parochial church of St Philip and St James Church built on the site
The Holy Trinity, the Blessed Virgin Mary and St Stephen
____________________
Burtle Moor Priory;
St Stephens Chapel, Sprauellissmede;
Byrkley Priory;
Burcle Priory;
Bercle Priory;
Brademers Priory
[9][26][32][33]

Burtle
51°11′08″N 2°52′27″W / 51.18566°N 2.8742°W / 51.18566; -2.8742 (Burtle Priory)
Cannington Priory CanningtonPriory.JPG Benedictine nuns — from Dorset
founded c.1138 by Robert de Courcey;
transferred to Colwich, Staffordshire;
converted into a mansion;
reverted to nunnery;
dissolved 1536; granted to Edward Rogers 1538/9;
remains incorporated into Cannington Court, built on site
Canyngton Nunnery [34][35][36]
[37][38]

Cannington, Somerset
51°09′01″N 3°03′41″W / 51.150386°N 3.061522°W / 51.150386; -3.061522 (Cannington Nunnery)
Charterhouse on Mendip Carthusian monks
grange (purported cell) dependent on Witham;
granted Robert May 1544/5
Cheddar Monastery reference to community 978; called a minster
Chewstoke Cell cell(?)
founded (?) by Elizabeth de Sancta Cruce;
dissolved before 1500(?)
Holy Cross [39][40]
Clevedon Friary * Franciscan Friars Minor
extant
Friary and Parish of the Immaculate Conception [41]

51°26′39″N 2°51′35″W / 51.444295°N 2.8597444°W / 51.444295; -2.8597444 (Clevedon Friary)
Cleeve Abbey Long red brick building with grey roof. Cistercian monks — from Revesby
founded between 1186 and 1191, land granted by William de Roumare (Romara), Earl of Lincoln (building apparently begun by 1198 - 24 or 25 June 1198;
dissolved 1536; granted to Thomas, Earl of Sussex 1541/2; (EH[note 7])
Vallis Florida;
Clyve Abbey;
Cliff Abbey
[42][43][44]
[45][46][47][48][49]

Washford/Old Cleeve
51°09′19″N 3°21′53″W / 51.155333°N 3.364781°W / 51.155333; -3.364781 (Cleeve Abbey)
Dodlinch Priory ~ Augustinian Canons Regular — Victorine
possibly initially dependent on Bristol;
associated with the Victorine abbey at Bristol;
founded c.1210 by William de Courtney;
transferred to new site at Woodspring ?before 1226;
dissolved 1230
Dodelyng Priory [50][51]

Downside Abbey *[note 8] Ornate building with central tower. To the right is a stone building with green roof and to the left a new building with large glass windows. Benedictine monks
(community founded at Douai 1607);
transferred from Douai
founded 1814
The Abbey Church of Saint Gregory the Great, Downside, Stratton-on-Fosse [52][53]

Stratton-on-the-Fosse
51°15′14″N 2°29′37″W / 51.253975°N 2.493594°W / 51.253975; -2.493594 (Downside Abbey)
Dunster Priory +[note 9] DunsterPriory.JPG Benedictine monks
dependent on Bath;
founded c.1100 (after 1090) by William de Mohun;
dissolved 1539; granted to Humphrey Colles 1542/3;
church in parochial use as the Priory Church of St George
Priory Church of St George [54][55][56][57]
[58][59][60]

Dunster
51°10′56″N 3°26′45″W / 51.182239°N 3.445697°W / 51.182239; -3.445697 (Dunster Priory)
Frome Monastery Saxon (Benedictine?) monks — purportedly from Malmesbury;
founded after 675 by St Aldhelm;
dissolved before 690?
Glastonbury Abbey GlastonburyAbbey Somerset.JPG Saxon monks
founded c.6th century(?);
Benedictine? monks
founded c.705;
secular 9th century?
Benedictine monks
(re)founded(?) c.960;
dissolved 15 November 1539; granted to Edward, Duke of Somerset 1547/8;
granted to Sir Peter Carew 1558/9;
ruins purchased by the Bath and Wells Diocesan Trust 1908;
now in ownership of the Church of England with public access
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary, Glastonbury [61][62][63][64]
[65][66][67][68]

Glastonbury
51°08′45″N 2°42′50″W / 51.145831°N 2.714022°W / 51.145831; -2.714022 (Glastonbury Abbey)
Green Ore Cell(?) Bendictine monks
'cell of Glaston';
probable grange of Hinton Charterhouse
Green Oare [69]

51°14′55″N 2°36′27″W / 51.2485224°N 2.6074773°W / 51.2485224; -2.6074773 (Green Ore 'Cell')
Haselbury Priory hermitage to 1154;
Augustinian Canons Regular
William fitz Walter began house — apparently not completed; possibly destroyed in the contests of the barons
Hinton Priory HintonCharterhouse.JPG Carthusian monks
(community founded 1222 at Hatherop, Gloucestershire 1222);
transferred here May 1232;
dissolved 1539;
now in private ownership without public access
Hinton Charterhouse [70][71][72]

Hinton Charterhouse
51°19′53″N 2°19′11″W / 51.3313356°N 2.3195931°W / 51.3313356; -2.3195931 (Hinton Charterhouse)
Ilchester Blackfriars # Dominican Friars
founded between 1221 and 1260;
dissolved 1538;
demolished early 19th century
[73][74][75]

Ilchester
51°00′02″N 2°41′05″W / 51.000467°N 2.684781°W / 51.000467; -2.684781 (Illchester Friary)
Ilchester Nunnery hospital founded c.1217-1220 by William Dennis (Dacus);
Augustinian Canonesses
refounded before 1281;
dissolved before 1463
Whitehall Hospital of the Holy Trinity
____________________
Blanchesale Hospital;
Whitehall Hospital
[76][77][78]
[79][80][81]

Ilchester
51°00′09″N 2°40′58″W / 51.002503°N 2.682886°W / 51.002503; -2.682886 (Illchester Nunnery)
Ilminster possible Saxon minster; land granted to Muchelney by King Ine; no record of community
Keynsham Abbey Low stone walls in grass, surrounded by trees with a house in the dissolvedtance. Augustinian Canons Regular
founded c.1170 by William, Earl of Gloucester
dissolved 1539; granted to Thomas Bridges, Esq 1552/3
[82][83][84][85][86]

Keynsham
51°24′47″N 2°29′48″W / 51.413117°N 2.496744°W / 51.413117; -2.496744 (Keynsham Abbey)
Kilve Chantry Stone wall with window of ruined building. founded 1329 by Simon de Furneaux;
dissolved late 14th century
damaged by fire in 1848
[9][87][88][89][90]
[91][92]

Kilve
51°11′21″N 3°13′22″W / 51.189278°N 3.222686°W / 51.189278; -3.222686 (Kilve Chantry)
Langley Priory uncertain order and foundation
house of St Mary, brothers or canons, short-lived establishment 12th century
Martock Priory granted to Humphry Colles 1542/3
Moorlynch Cell Benedictine monks
cell dependent on Glastonbury
Montacute Priory Cluniac monks
founded between c.1078 and 1102 by William, Count of Mortain
dissolved 1539; granted to Robert, Earl of Leicester 1573/4;
remains now part of Abbey Farmhouse
Montecute;
Mons Acutus
[93][94][95][96]

Montacute
50°56′59″N 2°43′10″W / 50.949767°N 2.719553°W / 50.949767; -2.719553 (Montacute Priory)
Muchelney Abbey Stone building with square tower. In the foreground are low walls of the ruins amongst the grass. Benedictine? monks
founded before 693 traditionally by King Ine;
destroyed in raids by the Danes(?)c.878
secular collegiate?
founded 939 by King Athelstan;
Benedictine monks
founded c.950 (959);
dissolved 3 January 1538; granted to Edward, Earl of Hertford 1537/8;
(EH[note 10])
Michelney Abbey [97][98][99]

Muchelney
51°01′00″N 2°49′13″W / 51.016544°N 2.820378°W / 51.016544; -2.820378 (Muchelney Abbey)
Pennard Minster Saxon minster
Pitminster possible Saxon minster
Potbury Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
possible priory dependent on Bristol — no record of cell
Regil Grange Cistercian monks
grange? dependent on Flaxley;
founded before 1200(?)
Stavordale Priory Stavordale Priory.JPG Augustinian Canons Regular — Vitorine
founded before 1243 by a member of the Lovel family;
merged with Taunton 1533;
granted to John, Earl of Oxford 1544/5;
conventual church converted into a private house, renovated and extended in 1905
Slaverdale Priory [100][101][102][103]

Charlton Musgrove
51°05′11″N 2°22′34″W / 51.086261°N 2.376161°W / 51.086261; -2.376161 (Stavordale Priory)
Steep Holme Cell Augustinian Canons Regular
cell dependent on Studley, Oxfordshire;
founded before 1260;
dissolved before 1300
Stogursey Priory StogurseyPriory.JPG Benedictine monks
alien house: dependent on Lonlay 1183;
founded 1100-7: church granted by William de Falaise and his wife Geva;
founded c.1204
granted to Eton College 1440; last prior left 1442
Priory of St. Andrews of the Ards
____________________
Stoke Courcy Priory
[89][104][105][106]
[107][108]

Stogursey
51°10′52″N 3°08′27″W / 51.181111°N 3.140917°W / 51.181111; -3.140917 (Stogursey Priory)
Taunton Priory #[note 11] Somerset cricket museum.jpg secular collegiate
founded before 904;
Augustinian Canons Regular
founded c.1120 (c.1115) by William Giffard, Bishop of Winchester;
dissolved 1539; granted to Mathew Colehurst 1544/5;
part of remains now called 'Priory Barn';
converted into a cricket museum
The Priory Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, Taunton [109][110][111][112]

Taunton
51°01′05″N 3°05′54″W / 51.018083°N 3.098203°W / 51.018083; -3.098203 (Taunton Priory)
Taunton Whitefriars Carmelite Friars
licence granted 1341; revoked 1343; house never established
[113]
Templecombe Preceptory Knights Templar
granted by Serlo FitzOdo in 1185.
founded c.1185
dissolved 1308-12;
Knights Hospitaller
granted 1312
dissolved 1539; granted to Richard Andrews and Leonard Chamberlayne
Combe Templariorum;
Temple Comb Preceptory
[114][115][116][117]

Templecombe
50°59′59″N 2°24′55″W / 50.999803°N 2.415361°W / 50.999803; -2.415361 (Templecombe Preceptory)
Witham Friary +[note 12] WithamFriaryLayBrosChurch.jpg Carthusian monks
founded 1178/9 (1180/1);
dissolved 1539; granted to Ralph Hopton 1544/5;
church now in parochial use
The Friary Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Witham

The Parish Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Saint John Baptist and All Saints, Witham Friary (former lay brothers' church)
____________________
Witham Abbey
Witham Charterhouse;
Selwood Friary
[118][119][120]
[121][122][123]

Witham Friary
51°10′02″N 2°21′55″W / 51.167222°N 2.365378°W / 51.167222; -2.365378 (Witham Friary)
Woodspring Priory ^[note 13] WoodspringPriory.JPG Augustinian Canons Regular — Victorine
(community founded at Dodlinch c.1210);
transferred here before 1226;
dissolved 1539; granted to William and John Lacy 1559/60;
currently in use as an exhibuiltion centre for artwork;
(LT[note 14])
The Priory Church of the honour of the Holy Trinity, Saint Mary the Virgin and Saint Thomas the Martyr of Canterbury, Worspring
____________________
Worspring Priory
[124]

Weston-super-Mare
51°23′26″N 2°56′42″W / 51.390578°N 2.944908°W / 51.390578; -2.944908 (Woodspring Priory)
Worminster Saxon minster Wormester
Wyrall Nunnery alleged early nunnery[note 15] St Peter
____________________
Wyrall Hill Nunnery
Yenston Priory #[note 16] Benedictine monks
alien house: cell or grange(?) dependent on St Sever;
founded before c.1090 (before 1100) by Hugh d'Avranches, 1st Earl of Chester (Hugh Abrincis);
mentioned in the reign of Edward I;
doubtful it ever had status of priory;
granted to Eton College c.1468; exchanged for other lands; held by Sir Thomas Bell by 1548;
house possibly built on site 16th century;
adjacent fields called 'Priory Plot' and 'Priors' possibly associated with the grange
[51][125][126]

Henstridge
50°59′19″N 2°24′39″W / 50.988692°N 2.410748°W / 50.988692; -2.410748 (Yenston Priory)
or
50°59′15″N 2°24′52″W / 50.9876287°N 2.4145246°W / 50.9876287; -2.4145246 (Yenston Priory)

Glossary[edit]


edit this box

Map link to lists of monastic houses in England by county[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Communities & Provenance shows the status and communities existing at each establishment, together with such dates as have been established as well as the fate of the establishment after dissolution, and the current status of the site.
  2. ^ Formal Name or Dedication: shows the formal name of the establishment or the person in whose name the church is dedicated.
  3. ^ Alternative Names: some of the establishments have had alternative names over the course of time. In order to assist in text-searching such alternatives in name or spelling have been provided.
  4. ^ Online References: presents links to online references to the particular establishment in addition to the general printed and online references given at the foot of this article. Establishments for which online references have not been specified are referred to within the printed references listed.
  5. ^ Location: provides a link to the geographical position of the site of the foundation where established. Where the location has been established the location is pinpointed (dependent on the available resolution of the map data), otherwise the general location is given in italic.
  6. ^ Bablew: given as priory by Tanner, Notitia Monastica
  7. ^ The current trustee of this site is English Heritage
  8. ^ This site has a current monastic function.
  9. ^ This site has a current non-monastic ecclesiastic function.
  10. ^ The current trustee of this site is English Heritage
  11. ^ There is no identifiable trace of the monastic foundation remains at this site.
  12. ^ This site has a current non-monastic ecclesiastic function.
  13. ^ This site has a current non-ecclesiastic function.
  14. ^ The current trustee of this site is the Landmark Trust
  15. ^ Wyrall Nunnery, considered legendary by W. Dugdale, Monasticon Anglicanum, Volume 4, p.1623
  16. ^ No identifiable trace of the monastic foundation remains at this site.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Athelney Abbey". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  2. ^ William Page (editor) (1911). "Houses of Benedictine monks: The abbey of Athelney". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  3. ^ Adkins, Lesley; Roy Adkins (1992). A field Guide to Somerset Archaeology. Stanbridge: Dovecote Press. pp. 21–22. ISBN 0-946159-94-7. 
  4. ^ "King Alfred's Monument with railings". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 9 February 2007. 
  5. ^ "Bablew Grange". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  6. ^ "Banwell Court". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  7. ^ "Barlinch Priory". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  8. ^ William Page (editor) (1911). "Houses of Augustinian canons: The priory of Barlynch". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  9. ^ a b c Bush, Robin (1994). Somerset: The complete guide. Wimborne, Dorset: Dovecote Press. ISBN 1-874336-26-1. [page needed]
  10. ^ "Barlich Farmhouse". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 12 July 2009. 
  11. ^ "Barrow Court". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  12. ^ William Page (editor) (1911). "Houses of Benedictine nuns: The priory of Barrow Gurney". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  13. ^ "Barrow Gurney". GenUKI. Retrieved 5 January 2008. 
  14. ^ "Abbey Church of St Peter and St Paul". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  15. ^ Diana E. Greenway (2001). "Bishops". Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1066-1300: volume 7: Bath and Wells. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  16. ^ "Bath Abbey". Robert Poliquin's Music and Musicians. Quebec University. Retrieved 18 September 2007. 
  17. ^ "Bath Abbey". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 25 September 2007. 
  18. ^ "Bath Abbey". Sacred destinations. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  19. ^ "Bridgwater Greyfriars". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  20. ^ William Page (editor) (1911). "Friaries: The Franciscans at Bridgwater". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  21. ^ "Franciscan Friary and later mansion, Bridgwater". Somerset County Council. Retrieved 4 September 2009. 
  22. ^ "Friarn Meadow, Bridgwater, Somerset". Wessex Archaeology. 30 April 2008. Retrieved 6 January 2010. 
  23. ^ "Bridgwater Friary, Somerset". Wessex Archaeology. Retrieved 6 January 2010. 
  24. ^ "Medieval decorated tile from Friarn Meadow, Bridgwater". Cattermoles Consultants. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  25. ^ "Bruton Abbey". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  26. ^ a b William Page (editor) (1911). "Houses of Augustinian canons: The priories of Bruton and Burtle Moor". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  27. ^ "Buckland Priory". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  28. ^ R W Dunning, C R Elrington (Editors), A P Baggs, M C Siraut (1992). "Durston". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 6: Andersfield, Cannington, and North Petherton Hundreds (Bridgwater and neighbouring parishes). Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  29. ^ "Lodge Farmhouse". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 8 January 2009. 
  30. ^ "Notes on Buckland Priory". Vagg.org. Retrieved 6 January 2010. 
  31. ^ "Mynchin Buckland Priory, Durston". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 6 January 2010. 
  32. ^ "Burtle Priory". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  33. ^ "About St Philip & St James Church". Burtle Village. Retrieved 6 January 2010. 
  34. ^ "Cannington Priory". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  35. ^ William Page (editor) (1911). "Houses of Benedictine nuns: The priory of Cannington". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  36. ^ "Priory History". Cannington Online. Retrieved 13 January 2008. 
  37. ^ "Cannington Court". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 January 2008. 
  38. ^ "Church of St Mary". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 January 2008. 
  39. ^ Ross, Lesley (2004). Before the Lake. Harptree History Society. pp. 20–21. ISBN 0954883209. 
  40. ^ Gilchrist, Roberta (1997). Gender and Material Culture: The Archaeology of Religious Women. Psychology Press. pp. 183–185. ISBN 9780415156561. 
  41. ^ Clevedon
  42. ^ "Cleeve Abbey". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  43. ^ Harrison, Steve (2000). Cleeve Abbey Colour Handbook. English Heritage. ISBN 978-1-85074-760-4. [page needed]
  44. ^ William Page (editor) (1911). "House of Cistercian monks: The abbey of Cleeve". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  45. ^ Platt, Colin (1984). The Abbeys and Priories of Medieval England. Secker & Warburg. ISBN 978-0-436-37557-6. [page needed]
  46. ^ Robinson, David; Janet Burton; Nicola Coldestroyedeam; Glyn Coppack; Richard Fawcett (1988). The Cistercian Abbeys of Britain. Batsford Ltd. ISBN 978-0-7134-8392-5. [page needed]
  47. ^ Leete-Hodge, Lornie (1985). Curiosities of Somerset. Bodmin: Bossiney Books. p. 43. ISBN 0-906456-98-3. 
  48. ^ "Cleeve Abbey, Washford". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 13 July 2008. 
  49. ^ James, Montagu Rhodes (1926). Abbeys. The Ballantyne Press. pp. 124–126. 
  50. ^ "Woodspring Priory". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  51. ^ a b William Page (editor) (1911). "Houses of Augustinian canons: The priory of Worspring". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  52. ^ "Downside Abbey Church". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  53. ^ "Abbey Church of St Gregory The Great, Downside Abbey and School". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 24 March 2007. 
  54. ^ "Dunster Priory". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  55. ^ William Page (editor) (1911). "Houses of Benedictine monks: The priory of Dunster". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  56. ^ "Priory Church of St George". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 28 September 2007. 
  57. ^ "Benedictine Priory, Dunster". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 7 January 2010. 
  58. ^ "History of Dunster Church & Priory". Dunster Tithe Barn. Retrieved 7 January 2010. 
  59. ^ Poyntz Wright, Peter (1981). The Parish Church Towers of Somerset, Their construction, craftsmanship and chronology 1350 - 1550. Avebury Publishing Company. ISBN 0-86127-502-0. [page needed]
  60. ^ "Dunster Tithe Barn". Everything Exmoor. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  61. ^ "Glastonbury Abbey". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  62. ^ William Page (editor) (1911). "Houses of Benedictine monks: The abbey of Glastonbury". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  63. ^ "Glastonbury Abbey". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2006. 
  64. ^ Carley, James P (1996). Glastonbury Abbey: The Holy House at the Head of the Moors Adventurous. New York: St. Martin's Press. ISBN 0-906362-23-7. 
  65. ^ Abrams, Lesley; James Carley (1991). The Archaeology and History of Glastonbury Abbey: Essays in Honour of the ninetieth birthday of C.A.Ralegh Radford. Boydell Press. ISBN 978-0-85115-284-4. 
  66. ^ Carley, James P. (2001). Glastonbury Abbey and the Arthurian Tradition. Arthurian Studies. D.S.Brewer. ISBN 978-0-85991-572-4. 
  67. ^ Rouse, Robert Allen; Cory James Rushton (2005). The Medieval Quest for Arthur. The History Press Ltd. ISBN 978-0-7524-3343-1. 
  68. ^ Rahtz, Philip; Lorna Watts (2003). Glastonbury: Myth and Archaeology (2 ed.). The History Press LTD. pp. 85–126. ISBN 978-0-7524-2548-1. 
  69. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MONUMENT NO. 1301521
  70. ^ "Hinton Priory". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  71. ^ William Page (editor) (1911). "Houses of Carthusian monks: The priory of Hinton". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  72. ^ "The chapter house". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 November 2006. 
  73. ^ "Ilchester Blackfriars". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  74. ^ R. W. Dunning (editor), A. P. Baggs, R. J. E. Bush, Margaret Tomlinson (1974). "Parishes: Ilchester". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 3. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  75. ^ "Dominican friary, West Street, Ilchester". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 4 September 2009. 
  76. ^ "Whitehall Hospital". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  77. ^ "Augustinian nunnery, High Street, Ilchester". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 4 September 2009. 
  78. ^ Page, William (1911). "Hospitals: Ilchester and Langport',". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. British History Online. Retrieved 9 January 2010. 
  79. ^ James Stevens-Cox, A History of Ilchester, the ancient county town of Somerset nos. 1-6, 8 & 9 (1958), p. 129
  80. ^ Power, Eileen (1988). Medieval English Nunneries, c. 1275 to 1535. Biblo & Tannen Booksellers & Publishers Incorporat. p. 233. ISBN 978-0-8196-0140-7. 
  81. ^ "Chapel, Whitehall hospital and nunnery, High Street, Ilchester". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 9 January 2010. 
  82. ^ "Keynsham Abbey". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  83. ^ William Page (editor) (1911). "Houses of Augustinian canons: The abbey of Keynsham". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  84. ^ "Keynsham Abbey". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 18 July 2007. 
  85. ^ Barrett, J.H. (1969). "A Fipple Flute or Pipe from the Site of Keynsham Abbey". The Galpin Society Journal 22: 47–50. doi:10.2307/841627. JSTOR 841627. 
  86. ^ "Keynsham". builtton families. Retrieved 19 July 2009. 
  87. ^ "Kilve Chantry". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  88. ^ "Remains of Chantry, abutting East side of Chantry Cottage". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 7 October 2007. 
  89. ^ a b Waite, Vincent (1964). Portrait of the Quantocks. London: Robert Hale. pp. 67–70. ISBN 0-7091-1158-4. 
  90. ^ "Remains of Chantry, abutting East side of Chantry Cottage, Sea Lane (West side), Kilve". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 7 January 2010. 
  91. ^ "Kilve chantry, Kilve". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 7 January 2010. 
  92. ^ "Remains of Chantry at Kilve, Sea Lane, Kilve, West Somerset, Somerset". Buildings at Risk Register. English Heritage. Retrieved 7 January 2010. 
  93. ^ "Montacute Priory". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  94. ^ William Page (editor) (1911). "House of Cluniac monks: The priory of Montacute". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  95. ^ "Montacute Priory". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 12 July 2009. 
  96. ^ "Abbey Farmhouse". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 July 2009. 
  97. ^ "Muchelney Abbey". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  98. ^ William Page (editor) (1911). "Houses of Benedictine monks: The abbey of Muchelney". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  99. ^ "The Abbot's House, Muchelney Abbey". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 25 September 2007. 
  100. ^ "Stavordale Priory". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 June 2009. 
  101. ^ Page, William (1911). "The Priory of Stavordale". Houses of Augustinian Canons. British History Online. pp. 139–141. Retrieved 11 June 2009. 
  102. ^ Bush, Robin (1994). Somerset: The complete guide. Wimborne, Dorset: Dovecote Press. p. 62. ISBN 1-874336-26-1. 
  103. ^ "Stavordale Priory". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 8 December 2008. 
  104. ^ "Church of St Andrew". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  105. ^ William Page (editor) (1911). "Alien house: The priory of Stogursey". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  106. ^ Gathercole, Clare. "Stogursey" (PDF). Somerset Urban Archaeological Survey. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 2 February 2010. 
  107. ^ Kerr, William (1989). "Black Abbe, the archbishops of Armagh and the Church of Derryaghy". Lisburn Historical Society Journals 7. 
  108. ^ "Church of St. Andrew". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 12 July 2008. 
  109. ^ "Taunton Priory". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  110. ^ William Page (editor) (1911). "Houses of Augustinian canons: The priory of Taunton". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  111. ^ Thomas Hugo (1860). The History of Taunton Priory in the County of Somerset. J. R. Smith, London. ISBN 978-1-4373-7535-0. 
  112. ^ Clare Gathercole (2002). "English Heritage Extensive Urban Survey, An archaeological assessment of Taunton" (PDF). Somerset County Council. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  113. ^ William Page (editor) (1911). "Friaries: The Carmelites at Taunton". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  114. ^ "Templecombe Templars Preceptory". Pastscape English Heritage Archive. English Heritage. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  115. ^ William Page (editor) (1911). "House of Knights Templar: The preceptory of Templecombe". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  116. ^ Grand Priory of Knights Templar in England and Wales
  117. ^ "1996 - 03 - Templecombe, Somerset". Unofficial Time Team Site. Retrieved 28 January 2008. 
  118. ^ "Witham Friary Somerset". A Vision of Britain through time. Retrieved 2 September 2007. 
  119. ^ Reid, Robert Douglas (1979). Some buildings of Mendip. The Mendip Society. pp. 16–17. ISBN 0-905459-16-4. 
  120. ^ Samuel Lewis (editor) (1848). "Witham Fiary (St Mary)". A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  121. ^ "Land adjoining Gramarye, Witham Friary, Somerset." (PDF). Context One Archaeological Services. Archived from the original (PDF) on 20 August 2007. Retrieved 2 September 2007. 
  122. ^ "Purchasing Power of British Pounds from 1264 to 2006". Measuring worth.com. Retrieved 2 September 2007. 
  123. ^ "Local History — Witham Friary". Somerset Larders.com. Retrieved 2 September 2007. 
  124. ^ "Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 19 October 2007. 
  125. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MONUMENT NO. 202479
  126. ^ "Benedictine priory, Yenston". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 26 September 2010. 
  • Binns, Alison (1989) Studies in the History of Medieval Religion 1: Dedications of Monastic Houses in England and Wales 1066-1216, Boydell
  • Cobbett, William (1868) List of Abbeys, Priories, Nunneries, Hospitals, And Other Religious Foundations in England and Wales and in Ireland, Confiscated, Seized On, or Alienated by the Protestant "Reformation" Sovereigns and Parliaments
  • Knowles, David & Hadcock, R. Neville (1971) Medieval Religious Houses England & Wales. Longman
  • Morris, Richard (1979) Cathedrals and Abbeys of England and Wales, J. M. Dent & Sons Ltd.
  • Thorold, Henry (1986) Collins Guide to Cathedrals, Abbeys and Priories of England and Wales, Collins
  • Thorold, Henry (1993) Collins Guide to the Ruined Abbeys of England, Wales and Scotland, Collins
  • Wright, Geoffrey N., (2004) Discovering Abbeys and Priories, Shire Publications Ltd.
  • English Cathedrals and Abbeys, Illustrated, Odhams Press Ltd.
  • Map of Monastic Britain, South Sheet, Ordnance Survey, 2nd edition, 1954