List of multiplanetary systems

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Number of extrasolar planet discoveries per year through 2021. Colors indicate method of detection.

From the total of 3,794 stars known to have exoplanets (as of August 1, 2022), there are a total of 829 known multiplanetary systems,[1] or stars with at least three confirmed planets, beyond the Solar System. The stars with the most confirmed planets are Sol (the Solar System's star, also referred to as the Sun) and Kepler-90 with 8 confirmed planets each, followed by TRAPPIST-1 with 7 planets. The star with the most candidate planets is Tau Ceti, with a maximum of 10 planets – 4 confirmed and 6 candidates.[2]

The 829 multiplanetary systems are listed below according to the star's distance from Earth. Proxima Centauri, the closest star to the Solar System, has three planets (b, c and d). The nearest system with four or more confirmed planets is Tau Ceti, with four known. The farthest confirmed multiplanetary system is OGLE-2012-BLG-0026L, at 13,300 ly away.[citation needed]

The table below contains information about the coordinates, spectral and physical properties, and number of confirmed planets. The two most important stellar properties are mass and metallicity because they determine how these planetary systems form. Systems with higher mass and metallicity tend to have more planets and more massive planets.[citation needed] However, although low metallicity stars tend to have fewer massive planets, particularly hot-Jupiters, they also tend to have a larger number of close in planets, orbiting at less than 1 AU.[3]

Multiplanetary systems[edit]

Color indicates number of planets
2 (x) 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
{{Multiplanetary systems list | Star = Proxima Centauri | Constellation = Centaurus | Right ascension = 14h 29m 42.94853s | Declination = −62° 40′ 46.1631″ | Apparent magnitude = 10.43 to 11.11[4] | Distance = 4.244 | Spectral type = M5.5Ve | Mass = 0.1221 | Radius = 0.1542 | Temperature = 3042 | Metallicity = 0.21 | Age = 4.85 | Confirmed planets = 3 |Unconfirmed planets = | Notes = Closest star to the Sun and closest star to the Sun with a multiplanetary system. Planet b is potentially habitable.[5] Planet c unconfirmed by RV data, but nonetheless undisputed by astrometry.[5]
Star
Constellation
Right
ascension

Declination
Apparent
magnitude

Distance (ly)
Spectral
type

Mass
(M)
Temperature (K)
Age
(Gyr)
Confirmed
(unconfirmed)
planets
Notes
Sun - - −26.74 1.6 × 10−5 G2V 1 5778 4.572 8 (1) Pluto was considered as the ninth planet from its discovery in 1930 to 2006, but is now considered to be a dwarf planet instead, along with Ceres, Haumea, Makemake and Eris. The hypothesised Planet Nine remains unconfirmed.
Lalande 21185 Ursa Major 11h 03m 20.1940s +35° 58′ 11.5682″ 7.520 8.3044±0.0007 M2V 0.39 3601±51 8.047 2 (1) -
Lacaille 9352 Piscis Austrinus 23h 05m 52.04s −35° 51′ 11.05″ 7.34 10.721 M0.5V 0.486 3688±86 4.57 2 (1) The unconfirmed planet d is potentially habitable.[6]
Luyten's Star Canis Minor 07h 27m 24.4991s 05° 13′ 32.827″ 9.872 11.20 M3.5V 0.26 3150 unknown 2 (2) Stellar activity level and rotational rate suggest an age higher than 8 billion years.[7] Planet b is potentially habitable.[8]
YZ Ceti Cetus 01h 12m 30.64s −16° 59′ 56.3″ 12.07 11.74 M4.5V 0.13 3056 4 3 (1) Flare star.[9]
Tau Ceti Cetus 01h 44m 05.13s −15° 56′ 22.4″ 3.49 11.905 G8V 0.783 5344 5.8 4 (4) Were planets b, c, d, and "i" confirmed, would have a total of 8 planets. Planet f is potentially habitable.[10][11] The habitability of Tau Ceti e is disputed.[12][13][10] Closest system to the Sun with exactly four confirmed planets, and closest G-type star to the Sun with confirmed exoplanets.[14] If PxP-4 and 5 were confirmed, there would be a total of 10 planets.[2]
Gliese 1061 Horologium 03h 35m 59.69s −44° 30′ 45.3″ 13.03 12.04 M5.5V 0.113 2953 unknown 3 Planets c and d are potentially habitable.[15]
Wolf 1061 Ophiuchus 16h 30m 18.0584s −12° 39′ 45.325″ 10.07 14.050 ± 0.002 M3.5V 0.294 3342 unknown 3 Planet c is potentially habitable.[16][17][18]
L 1159-16 Aries 02h 00m 12.959s 13° 03′ 07.01″ 12.298 14.584 ± 0.007 M4.5V 0.15 3158 4.8 2 (1) -
Gliese 876 Aquarius 22h 53m 16.73s −14° 15′ 49.3″ 10.17 15.25 M4V 0.334 3348 4.893 4 Planet b is a gas giant which orbits in the habitable zone.[19]
82 G. Eridani Eridanus 03h 19m 55.65s −43° 04′ 11.2″ 4.254 19.71 G8V 0.7 5401 5.76 3 (3) This star also has a dust disk[20] with a semi-major axis at approximately 19 AU.[21]
Gliese 581 Libra 15h 19m 26.83s −07° 43′ 20.2″ 10.56 20.56 M3V 0.311 3484 4.326 3 (2) The unconfirmed planets d and g are potentially habitable.[22]
Gliese 667 C Scorpius 17h 18m 57.16s −34° 59′ 23.14″ 10.20 21 M1.5V 0.31 3700 2 2 (1) Triple star system - all exoplanets orbit around Star C. Planet c is potentially habitable, and there are more unconfirmed planets.[23][24][25]
HD 219134 Cassiopeia 23h 13m 14.74s 57° 10′ 03.5″ 5.57 21 K3Vvar 0.794 4699 12.66 6 Closest star to the Sun with exactly six[26] exoplanets, and closest K-type main sequence star to the Sun with a multiplanetary system. One of the oldest stars with a multiplanetary system, although it is still more metal-rich than the Sun. No planet is in the habitable zone.[27]
61 Virginis Virgo 13h 18m 24.31s −18° 18′ 40.3″ 4.74 28 G5V 0.954 5531 8.96 2 (1) Planet d remains unconfirmed,[28] and a 2021 study found that it was likely a false positive.[29] 61 Virginis also has a debris disk.
Gliese 433 Hydra 11h 35m 26.9485s −25° 10′ 08.9″ 9.79 29.8±0.1 M1.5V 0.48 3550±100 unknown 3 An infrared excess around this star suggests a circumstellar disk.[30]
Gliese 357 Hydra 09h 36m 01.6373s −21° 39′ 38.878″ 10.906 30.776 M2.5V 0.362 3488 unknown 3 Planet d is a potentially habitable Super-Earth.[31][32][33][34]
L 98-59 Volans 08h 18m 07.62s −68° 18′ 46.8″ 11.69 34.6 M3V 0.312 3412 unknown 4 (1) The unconfirmed planet f orbits in the habitable zone.[35]
TRAPPIST-1 Aquarius 23h 06m 29.283s −05° 02′ 28.59″ 18.80 39.5 M8V 0.089 2550 7.6 7 Planets d, e, f and g are potentially habitable. Only star known with exactly seven confirmed planets. All seven terrestrial planets lie within only 0.07 AU of the star.
55 Cancri Cancer 08h 52m 35.81s +28° 19′ 50.9″ 5.95 40 K0IV-V 1.026 5217 7.4 5 All five known planets orbit around star A (none are circumbinary or orbit around star B). Closest system with exactly five confirmed planets.
Gliese 180 Eridanus 04h 53m 49.9798s −17° 46′ 24.294″ 10.894 40.3 M2V[36] or M3V[37] 0.39 3562 unknown 3 The habitability of planets b and c is disputed.[38][39]
HD 69830 Puppis 08h 18m 23.95s −12° 37′ 55.8″ 5.95 41 K0V 0.856 5385 7.446 3 A debris disk exterior to the three exoplanets was detected by the Spitzer Space Telescope in 2005.[40]
HD 40307 Pictor 05h 54m 04.24s −60° 01′ 24.5″ 7.17 42 K2.5V 0.752 4977 1.198 4 (2) The existence of planets e and g are disputed.[41] If confirmed, planet g is potentially habitable.[42]
Upsilon Andromedae Andromeda 01h 36m 47.84s +41° 24′ 19.7″ 4.09 44 F8V 1.27 6107 3.781 4 Nearest F-type main sequence star with a multiplanetary system. Second-brightest star in the night sky with a multiplanetary system after Tau Ceti. All exoplanets orbit around star A in the binary system.
47 Ursae Majoris Ursa Major 10h 59m 27.97s +40° 25′ 48.9″ 5.10 46 G0V 1.029 5892 7.434 3 Planet b was discovered in 1996 and was one of the first exoplanets to be discovered.[43] The planet was the first long-period extrasolar planet discovered. The other planets were discovered later.[44]
Nu2 Lupi Lupus 15h 21m 49.57s −48° 19′ 01.1″ 5.65 47 G2V 0.906 5664 10.36 3 One of the oldest stars in the solar neighbourhood.[45][46][47]
LHS 1140 Draco 00h 44m 59.31s −15° 16′ 16.7″ 14.18 48.9 M4.5V[48] 0.179 3216±39 5 2 (1) Planet b is a potentially habitable Super-Earth.[49]
Gliese 163 Dorado 04h 09m 16s −53° 22′ 25″ 11.8 49 M3.5V 0.4 unknown 3 5 Planet c is possibly a potentially habitable Super-Earth but is probably too hot or massive.[50][51]
Mu Arae Ara 17h 44m 08.70s −51° 50′ 02.6″ 5.15 51 G3IV-V 1.077 5704 6.413 4 Planet b orbits in the circumstellar habitable zone. However, it is a gas giant, so it itself is uninhabitable although a large moon orbiting around it may be habitable.
Gliese 676 A Ara 17h 30m 11.2042s −51° 38′ 13.116″ 9.59 53 M0V 0.71 unknown unknown 4 -
HD 7924 Cassiopeia 01h 21m 59.12s +76° 42′ 37.0″ 7.19 55 K0V 0.832 5177 unknown 3 These planets may be potentially habitable Super-Earths.[52]
Pi Mensae Mensa 05h 37m 09.8851s −80° 28′ 08.8313″ 5.65 59.62±0.07 G0V 1.11 6013 3.4 3 Outer planet is likely a brown dwarf.[53]
Gliese 3293 Eridanus 04h 28m 35.72s −25° 10′ 08.9″ 11.96 59 M2.5V 0.42 3466±49 unknown 4 Planets b and d orbit in the habitable zone.[54]
Gliese 221 Orion 05h 53m 0s −05° 59′ 41″ 9.69 66 K7V or M0V[55] 0.7 4324 4.4 2 (1) The existence of planet b was disputed in 2022.[56]
HD 142 Phoenix 00h 06m 19.0s −49° 04′ 30″ 5.70 67 G1 IV 1.1 6180 5.93 3 -
HD 215152 Aquarius 22h 43m 21s −06° 24′ 03″ 8.13 70 G8IV 1.019 5646 7.32 4 A debris disk candidate as it has an infrared excess.[57]
HD 164922 Hercules 18h 02m 30.86s +26° 18′ 46.8″ 7.01 72 G9V[58] 0.874 5293 13.4 4 Oldest star with a multiplanetary system. Despite its age, it is more metal-rich than the Sun.[58]
HD 39194 Mensa 05h 44m 32s −70° 08′ 37″ 8.08 86.2 K0V unknown 5205 unknown 3 -
HIP 57274 Ursa Major 11h 44m 41s +30° 57′ 33″ 8.96 85 K5V 0.73 4640 7.87 3 -
HD 181433 Pavo 19h 25m 09.57s −66° 28′ 07.7″ 8.38 87 K5V 0.777 4962 8.974 3 -
HD 134606 Apus 15h 15m 15s −70° 31′ 11″ 6.85 87 G6IV unknown unknown unknown 3 -
HD 158259 Draco 17h 25m 24.0s +52° 47′ 26″ 6.46 89 G0 1.08 unknown unknown 5 (1) -
HD 82943 Hydra 09h 34m 50.74s −12° 07′ 46.4″ 6.54 90 F9V Fe+0.5[59] 1.175 5874 3.08 3 Planets b and c are in a 2:1 orbital resonance.[60] Planet b orbits in the habitable zone, but it and planet c are massive enough to be brown dwarfs. HD 82943 has an unusual lithium-6 abundance.[61]
Gliese 3138 Cetus 02h 09m 10.90s −16° 20′ 22.53″ 10.877 92.9 0.681 3717±49 unknown 3
GJ 9827 Pisces 23h 27m 04.84s −01° 17′ 10.59″ 10.10 96.8±0.2 K6V 0.593 4294±52 unknown 3 Also known as K2-135. Planet b is extremely dense, with at least half of its mass being iron.[62]
TOI 700 Dorado 06h 28m 22.97s −65° 34′ 43.01″ 13.10 101.61 M2V 0.416 3480 1.5 3 (1) Planet d is potentially habitable.[63][64][65]
HD 17926 Fornax 02h 51m 56.16s −30° 48′ 53.2″ 6.38 105 F6V 1.145 6201 unknown 3 -
HD 37124 Taurus 05h 37m 02.49s +20° 43′ 50.8″ 7.68 110 G4V 0.83 5606 3.327 3 Planet c orbits at the outer edge of the habitable zone.[66]
HD 20781 Fornax 03h 20m 03s −28° 47′ 02″ 8.44 115 G9.5V 0.7 5256±29 unknown 2 (2) Located in binary star system.[67][68]
Kepler-444 Lyra 19h 19m 01s 41° 38′ 05″ 9.0 117 K0V 0.758 5040 11.23 5 Nearest multiplanetary system where the planets were discovered by the Kepler space telescope.
HD 141399 Boötes 15h 46m 54.0s +46° 59′ 11″ 7.2 118 K0V 1.07 5600 unknown 4 Planet c orbits in the habitable zone.[69]
Kepler-42 Cygnus 19h 28m 53s +44° 37′ 10″ 16.12 126 M5V[70] 0.13 3068 unknown 3 -
HD 31527 Lepus 04h 55m 38s −23° 14′ 31″ 7.48 126 G0V unknown unknown unknown 3 -
HD 10180 Hydrus 01h 37m 53.58s −60° 30′ 41.5″ 7.33 127 G1V 1.055 5911 4.335 6 (3) Has three unconfirmed candidates. If these candidate exoplanets were confirmed, HD 10180 would have the largest planetary system of any star.[71]
HR 8799 Pegasus 23h 07m 28.72s +21° 08′ 03.3″ 5.96 129 A5V 1.472 7429 0.064 4 Only A-type main sequence star with a multiplanetary system, and hottest and most massive single main sequence star with a multiplanetary system. All four planets are massive super-Jupiters.
HD 27894 Reticulum 04h 20m 47.05s −59° 24′ 39.0″ 9.42 138 K2V 0.8 4875 3.9 3 -
HD 93385 Vela 10h 46m 15.1160s −41° 27′ 51.7261″ 7.486 141.6 G2V 1.07 5823 4.13 3
K2-3 Leo 11h 29m 20.3918s −01° 27′ 17.280″ 12.168 143.9±0.4 M0V 0.601 3835±70 1 3 The outermost planet orbits in the habitable zone.[72]
HD 34445 Orion 05h 17m 41.0s +07° 21′ 12″ 7.31 152 G0V 1.07 5836 8.5 1 (5) Some planets were not detected or inferred to be false positives in a later study.[73]
HD 204313 Capricornus 21h 28m 12.21s –21° 43′ 34.5″ 7.99 154 G5V 1.045 5767 3.38 2 (1) -
HD 3167 Pisces 00h 34m 57.5s +04° 22′ 53″ 8.97 154.4 K0V 0.86 5261 7.8 3 -
HIP 34269 Puppis 07h 06m 13.98s −47° 35′ 13.87″ 10.59 154.81 0.74 4440±100 unknown 4
HD 133131 Libra 15h 03m 35.80651s −27° 50′ 27.5520″ 8.4 168 G2V+G2V[74] 0.95 5799±19 6 3 2 planets around primary, and 1 planet around secondary star.[74]
HIP 14810 Aries 03h 11m 14.23s +21° 05′ 50.5″ 8.51 174 G5V 0.989 5485 5.271 3 -
HD 191939 Draco 20h 08m 05.75s +66° 51′ 2.1″ 8.971 175 G9V 0.81 5348 8.7 5 (1) There may also be another substellar companion.[75]
HD 125612 Virgo 14h 20m 53.51s −17° 28′ 53.5″ 8.33 177 G3V 1.099 5897 2.15 3 -
HD 109271 Virgo 12h 33m 36.0s −11° 37′ 19″ 8.05 202 G5 1.047 5783 7.3 2 (1) -
HD 38677 Orion 05h 47m 06.0s −10° 37′ 49″″ 8.0 202 F8V 1.21 6196.0 2.01 4 -
TOI-178 Sculptor 00h 29m 12.30s 30° 27′ 13.46″ 11.95 205.16 K7V[76] 0.65 4316±70 7.1 6 The planets are in an orbital resonance.[76]
HD 74156 Hydra 08h 42m 25.12s +04° 34′ 41.2″ 7.61 210 G0IV 1.236 6039 7.375 2 (1) -
HD 108236 Centaurus 12h 26m 17.89s −51° 21′ 46.21″ 9.24 211 G3V 0.97 5730 5.8 5 -
Kepler-37 Lyra 18h 58m 23.1s 44° 31′ 05″ 9.77 215 G 0.803 5417 6 4 -
K2-72 Aquarius 22h 18m 29.2548s −09° 36′ 44.3824″ 15.04 217 M2V 0.27 3497 unknown 4 2 planets in habitable zone
Kepler-138 Lyra 19h 21m 32.0s +43° 17′ 35″ 13.5 218.5 M1V 0.57 3871 unknown 3
LP 358-499 Taurus 04h 40m 35.64s +25° 00′ 36.05″ 13.996 245.3 0.46 3655±80 unknown 4 Also known as K2-133
K2-384 Cetus 01h 21m 59.86s 00° 45′ 04.41″ 16.12 270 M?V 0.33 3623±138 unknown 5
TOI-561 Sextans 09h 52m 44.44s +06° 12′ 57.97″ 10.252 279 0.785 5455 5 4 -
Kepler-445 Cygnus 19h 54m 57.0s +46° 29′ 55″ 18 294 0.18 3157 unknown 3 -
TOI-763 Centaurus 12h 57m 52.45s −39° 45′ 27.71″ 10.156 311 0.917 5444 6.2 2 (1) -
K2-229 Virgo 12h 27m 29.5848s −06° 43′ 18.7660″ 10.985 335 K2V 0.837 5185 5.4 3
Kepler-102 Lyra 18h 45m 55.9s +47° 12′ 29″ 11.492 340 K3V[77] 0.81 4809 1.41 5
V1298 Tauri Taurus 04h 05m 19.5912s +20° 09′ 25.5635″ 10.31 354 K0-1.5[78] 1.101 4970 0.023 4 This star is a young T Tauri variable.[79]
K2-302 Aquarius 22h 20m 22.7764s −09° 30′ 34.2934″ 11.98 359.3 unknown 3297±73 unknown 3
TOI-125 Hydrus 01h 34m 22.73s −66° 40′ 32.95″ 11.02 363 0.859 5320 unknown 3 (2)
HIP 41378 Cancer 08h 26m 28.0s +10° 04′ 49″ 8.9 378 F8 1.15 6199 unknown 5 (2) Planet f has an unusually low density, and might have rings or an extended atmosphere.[80][81] More planets are still suspected.[82]
Kepler-446 Lyra 18h 49m 00.0s +44° 55′ 16″ 16.5 391 M4V 0.22 3359 unknown 3 -
HD 33142 Lepus 05h 07m 35.54s −13° 59′ 11.34″ 7.96 394.3 1.52 5025+24
−16
unknown 3 Giant host star
Kepler-68 Cygnus 19h 24m 07.76s +49° 02′ 25.0″ 8.588 440 G1V 1.079 5793 6.3 3 (1) Planet d, the outermost confirmed planet, is a Jupiter-sized planet which orbits in the habitable zone.[83] Radial velocity measurements discovered an additional signal, which could be a fourth planet or a stellar companion.[84]
HD 28109 Hydrus 04h 20m 57.13s −68° 06′ 09.51″ 9.38 457 1.26 6120±50 unknown 3
COROT-7 Monoceros 06h 43m 49.47s −01° 03′ 46.9″ 11.73 489 K0V 0.93 5275 1.5 2 (1) -
XO-2 Lynx 07h 48m 07.4814s +50° 13′ 03.2578″ 11.18 496±3 K0V+K0V unknown unknown 6.3 4 Binary with each star orbited by two planets.[85][86]
Kepler-411 Cygnus 19h 10m 25.3s +49° 31′ 24″ 12.5 499.4 0.83 4974 unknown 4
K2-381 Sagittarius 19h 12m 06.46s −21° 00′ 27.51″ 13.01 505 K2 0.754 4473±138 unknown 3
K2-32 Ophiuchus 16h 49m 42.2602s −19° 32′ 34.151″ 12.31 510 G9V 0.856 5275 7.9 4 The planets are likely in a 1:2:5:7 orbital resonance.[87]
TOI-1246 Draco 16h 44m 27.96s 70° 25′ 46.70″ 11.6 558 1.12 5217±50 unknown 4
EPIC 251319382 Cancer 09 21 46.8434h +18° 28′ 10.34710″ 11.12 577 G2V 0.98 5791 unknown 3
Kepler-398 Lyra 19h 25m 52.5s +40° 20′ 38″ 578 K5V 0.72 4493 unknown 3
Kepler-186 Cygnus 19h 54m 36.6s +43° 57′ 18″ 15.29[88] 579.23[89] M1V[90] 0.478 3788 unknown 5 Planet f is the first Earth-size exoplanet discovered that orbits in the habitable zone.[91]
K2-37 Scorpius 16h 13m 48.2445s −24° 47′ 13.4279″ 12.52 590 G3V 0.9 5413 unknown 3
K2-58 Aquarius 22h 15m 17.2364s −14° 02′ 59.3151″ 12.13 596 K2V 0.89 5038 unknown 3
K2-138 Aquarius 23h 15m 47.77s −10° 50′ 58.91″ 12.21 597±55 K1V 0.93 5378±60 2.3 6 Planet g was not fully verified, or could be two long-period planets instead.[92]
K2-38 Scorpius 16h 00m 08.06s −23° 11′ 21.33″ 11.34 630 G3V 1.03 5731±66 unknown 2 (1) Dust disk in system
WASP-47 Aquarius 22h 04m 49.0s −12° 01′ 08″ 11.9 652 G9V 1.084 5400 unknown 4 One planet is a gas giant which orbits in the habitable zone.[93][94] WASP-47 is the only planetary system known to have both planets near the hot Jupiter and another planet much further out.[95]
K2-368 Aquarius 22h 10m 32.58s −11° 09′ 58.02″ 13.54 674 K3 0.746 4663±138 unknown 3 (1)
HAT-P-13 Ursa Major 08h 39m 31.81s +47° 21′ 07.3″ 10.62 698 G4 1.22 5638 5 2 (1) -
Kepler-19 Cygnus 19h 21m 41s +37° 51′ 06″ 15.178 717 G 0.936 5541 1.9 3 System consists of a thick-envelope Super-Earth and two Neptune-mass planets.[96]
Kepler-296 Lyra 19h 06m 09.6s +49° 26′ 14.4″ 12.6 737.113 K7V + M1V[97] unknown 4249 unknown 5 All planets orbit around the primary star.[98] Planets e and f are potentially habitable.[98]
Kepler-454 Lyra 19h 09m 55.0s +38° 13′ 44″ 11.57 753 G 1.028 5687 5.25 3
Kepler-25 Lyra 19h 06m 33.0s +39° 29′ 16″ 11 799 F[99] 1.22 6190 unknown 3 Two planets were discovered by transit-timing variations,[100] and the third planet was discovered by follow-up radial velocity measurements.[101]
Kepler-114 Cygnus 19h 36m 29.0s +48° 20′ 58″ 13.7 846 K 0.71 4450 unknown 3
Kepler-54 Cygnus 19h 39m 06.0s +43° 03′ 23″ 16.3 886 M 0.52 3705 unknown 3
Kepler-20 Lyra 19h 10m 47.524s 42° 20′ 19.30″ 12.51 950 G8V 0.912 5466 8.8 6 Planets e and f were the first Earth-sized planets to be discovered.[102]
K2-19 Virgo 11h 39m 50.4804s +00° 36′ 12.8773″ 13.002 976 K0V[103] or G9V[104] 0.918 5250±70 8 3 -
PSR B1257+12 Virgo 13h 00m 03.58s +12° 40′ 56.5″ 24.31 980 pulsar 1.444 28856 0.797 3 Only pulsar with a multiplanetary system, and first exoplanets and multiplanetary system to be confirmed.[105][106] Star with dimmest apparent magnitude to have a multiplanetary system.
Kepler-62 Lyra 18h 52m 51.060s +45° 20′ 59.507″ 13.75[107] 990 K2V[107] 0.69 4925 7 5 Planets e and f orbit in the habitable zone.[107][108]
Kepler-48 Cygnus 19h 56m 33.41s +40° 56′ 56.47″ 13.04 1000 K 0.88 5190 unknown 4
Kepler-100 Lyra 19h 25m 32.6s +41° 59′ 24″ 1011 G1IV 1.109 5825 6.5 3
Kepler-49 Cygnus 19h 29m 11.0s +40° 35′ 30″ 15.5 1015 K 0.55 3974 unknown 4
Kepler-65 Lyra 19h 14m 45.3s +41° 09′ 04.2″ 11.018 1019 F6IV 1.199 6211 unknown 4 -
Kepler-52 Draco 19h 06m 57.0s +49° 58′ 33″ 15.5 1049 K 0.58 4075 unknown 3
K2-268 Cancer 08h 54m 50.2862s +11° 50′ 53.7745″ 13.85 1079 unknown unknown unknown 5
K2-183 Cancer 08h 20m 01.7184s 14° 01′ 10.0711″ 12.85 1083 unknown 5482±50 unknown 3
K2-187 Cancer 08h 50m 05.6682s 23° 11′ 33.3712″ 12.864 1090 G?V 0.967 5438±63 unknown 4
Kepler-1542 Lyra 19h 02m 54.8s +42° 39′ 16″ 1096 G5V 0.94 5564 unknown 4 -
Kepler-26 Lyra 18h 59m 46s +46° 34′ 00″ 16 1100 M0V 0.65 4500 unknown 4 Transiting exoplanets[109] which are low-density planets below the size of Neptune.[110][111]
Kepler-81 Cygnus 19h 34m 32.9s +42° 49′ 30″ 15.56 1136 K?V 0.648 4391 unknown 3
Kepler-132 Lyra 18h 52m 56.6s +41° 20′ 35″ 1140 F9 0.98 6003 unknown 4
Kepler-80 Cygnus 19h 44m 27.0s +39° 58′ 44″ 14.804 1218 M0V[112] 0.73 4250 unknown 6 Red dwarf star with six confirmed planets.[113][114] Five of them are in an orbital resonance.[115][114]
Kepler-159 Cygnus 19h 48m 16.8s +40° 52′ 08″ 1219 K 0.63 4625 unknown 2 (1) Star has a very low metallicity.
K2-299 Aquarius 22h 05m 06.5342s −14° 07′ 18.0135″ 13.12 1220 unknown 5724±72 unknown 3
Kepler-88 Lyra 19h 24m 35.5431s +40° 40′ 09.8098″ 13.5 1243 G8IV 1.022 5513±67 2.45 3
Kepler-174 Lyra 19h 09m 45.4s +43° 49:56′ 1269 K unknown 4880 unknown 3 Planet d may orbit in the habitable zone.
Kepler-32 Cygnus 19h 51m 22.0s +46° 34′ 27″ 16 1301.1 M1V 0.58 3900 unknown 3 (2) -
Kepler-83 Lyra 18h 48m 55.8s +43° 39′ 56″ 16.51 1306 K7V 0.664 4164 unknown 3
Kepler-271 Lyra 18h 52m 00.7s +44° 17′ 03″ 1319 G7V 0.9 5524 unknown 3 Metal-poor star
Kepler-169 19h 03m 60.0s +40° 55:10′ 12.186 1326 K2V 0.86 4997 unknown 5
Kepler-451 Cygnus 19h 38m 32.61s 46° 03′ 59.1″ 1340 sdB+M 0.6 29564 6 3 Three circumbinary planets orbit around the Kepler-451 binary pair.[116]
Kepler-304 Cygnus 19h 37m 46.0s +40° 33′ 27″ 1418 K 0.8 4731 unknown 4
Kepler-18 Cygnus 19h 52m 19.06s +44° 44′ 46.76″ 13.549 1430 G7V 0.97 5345 10 3
Kepler-106 Cygnus 20h 03m 27.4s +44° 20′ 15″ 12.882 1449 G1V 1 5858 4.83 4
Kepler-92 Lyra 19h 16m 21.0s +41° 33′ 47″ 11.6 1463 G1IV 1.209 5871 5.52 3
Kepler-450 Cygnus 19h 41m 56.8s +51° 00′ 49″ 11.684 1487 F 1.19 6152 unknown 3
Kepler-89 Cygnus 19h 49m 20.0s +41° 53′ 28″ 12.4 1580 F8V 1.25 6116 3.9 4 Farthest F-type main sequence star from the Sun with a multiplanetary system. One study found hints of additional planets orbiting Kepler-89.[117]
Kepler-1388 Lyra 18h 53m 20.6s +47° 10′ 28″ 1604 0.63 4098 unknown 4 -
K2-282 Pisces 00h 53m 43.6833s 07° 59′ 43.1397″ 14.04 1638 G?V 0.94 5499±109 unknown 3
Kepler-107 Cygnus 19h 48m 06.8s +48° 12′ 31″ 12.7 1714 G2V[118] 1.238 5851 4.29 4 -
Kepler-1047 Cygnus 19h 14m 35.1s +50° 47′ 20″ 1846 G2V 1.08 5754 unknown 3 -
Kepler-55 Lyra 19h 00m 40.0s +44° 01′ 35″ 16.3 1888 K 0.62 4362 unknown 5 Planet c may orbit in the inner habitable zone.
Kepler-166 Cygnus 19h 32m 38.4s +48° 52′ 52″ 1968 G 0.88 5413 unknown 3
Kepler-11 Cygnus 19h 48m 27.62s +41° 54′ 32.9″ 13.69 2150 ±20 G6V[119] 0.954 5681 7.834 6 Farthest star from the Sun with exactly six exoplanets. First system discovered with six transiting planets.[119] The planets have low densities.[120]
Kepler-1254 Draco 19h 34m 59.3s +45° 06′ 26″ 2205 0.78 4985 unknown 3 -
Kepler-289 Cygnus 19h 49m 51.7s +42° 52′ 58″ 12.9 2283 G0V 1.08 5990 0.65 3 -
Kepler-85 Cygnus 19h 23m 54.0s +45° 17′ 25″ 15.0 2495 G 0.92 5666 unknown 4
Kepler-157 Lyra 19h 24m 23.3s +38° 52′ 32″ 2523 G2V 1.02 5774 unknown 3
Kepler-342 Cygnus 19h 24m 23.3s +38° 52′ 32″ 2549 F 1.13 6175 unknown 4
Kepler-148 Cygnus 19h 19m 08.7s +46° 51′ 32″ 2580 K?V 0.86 5272 unknown 3
Kepler-51 Cygnus 19h 45m 55.0s +49° 56′ 16″ 15.0 2610 G?V 1 5803 unknown 3 Super-puff planets with some of the lowest densities known.[121]
Kepler-403 Cygnus 19h 19m 41.1s +46° 44′ 40″ 2741 F9IV-V 1.25 6090 unknown 3
Kepler-9 Lyra 19h 02m 17.76s +38° 24′ 03.2″ 13.91 2754 G2V 0.998 5722 3.008 3 First multiplanetary system to discovered by the Kepler Space Telescope.[122][123]
Kepler-23 Cygnus 19h 36m 52.0s +49° 28′ 45″ 14 2790 G5V 1.11 5760 unknown 3 -
Kepler-46 Cygnus 19h 17m 05.0s +42° 36′ 15″ 15.3 2795 K?V 0.902 5155 9.9 3 -
Kepler-305 Cygnus 19h 56m 53.83s +40° 20′ 35.46″ 15.812 2833 K 0.85 4918 unknown 3 (1)
Kepler-90 Draco 18h 57m 44.0s +49° 18′ 19″ 14.0 2840 ± 40 G0V 1.13 5930 2 8 All eight exoplanets are more massive than Earth and are within 1.1 AU of the parent star. Only star apart from the Sun with at least eight planets.[124] A Hill stability test shows that the system is stable.[125] Planet h orbits in the habitable zone.
Kepler-150 Lyra 19h 12m 56.2s +40° 31′ 15″ 2906 G?V 0.97 5560 unknown 5 Planet f orbits in the habitable zone.
Kepler-82 Cygnus 19h 31m 29.61s +42° 57′ 58.09″ 15.158 2949 G?V 0.91 5512 unknown 4
Kepler-154 Cygnus 19h 19m 07.3s +49° 53′ 48″ 2985 G3V 0.98 5690 unknown 5
Kepler-56 Cygnus 19h 35m 02.0s +41° 52′ 19″ 13 3060 K?III 1.32 4840 3.5 3
Kepler-350 Lyra 19h 01m 41.0s +39° 42′ 22″ 13.8 3121 F 1.03 6215 unknown 3
Kepler-603 Cygnus 19h 37m 07.4s +42° 17′ 27″ 3134 G2V 1.01 5808 unknown 3 -
Kepler-401 Cygnus 19h 20m 19.9s +50° 51′ 49″ 3149 F8V 1.17 6117 unknown 3
Kepler-58 Cygnus 19h 45m 26.0s +39° 06′ 55″ 15.3 3161 G1V 1.04 5843 unknown 3
Kepler-79 Cygnus 20h 02m 04.11s +44° 22′ 53.69″ 13.914 3329 F 1.17 6187 unknown 4
Kepler-60 Cygnus 19h 15m 50.70s +42° 15′ 54.04″ 13.959 3343 G 1.04 5915 unknown 3
Kepler-122 19h 24m 26.9s +39° 56′ 57″ 3351 F 1.08 6050 unknown 4
Kepler-279 Lyra 19h 09m 34.0s +42° 11′ 42″ 13.7 3383 F 1.1 6562 unknown 3
Kepler-255 Cygnus 19h 44m 15.4s +45° 58′ 37″ 3433 G6V 0.9 5573 unknown 3
Kepler-47 Cygnus 19h 41m 11.5s +46° 55′ 13.69″ 15.178 3442 G
M
1.043 5636(A)
(B is unknown)
4.5 3 Circumbinary planets, with one of the planets orbiting in the habitable zone.[126][127][128]
Kepler-292 19h 43m 03.84s +43° 25′ 27.4″ 13.97 3446 K0V 0.85 5299 unknown 5
Kepler-27 Cygnus 19h 28m 56.82s +41° 05′ 9.15″ 15.855 3500 G5V 0.65 5400 unknown 2 (1)
Kepler-351 Lyra 19h 05m 48.6s +42° 39′ 28″ 3535 G?V 0.89 5643 unknown 3
Kepler-276 Cygnus 19h 34m 16s +39° 02′ 11″ 15.368 3734 G?V 1.1 5812 unknown 3
Kepler-70 Cygnus 19h 45m 25s 41° 05′ 34″ 14.87 3849 sdB 0.496 27730 unknown 2 (1) Later research did not indicate that these planets existed.[129][130] Kepler-70 is a subdwarf B star, and was a red giant 20 million years ago.[131] Planets b and c have the closest orbits to each other of any two exoplanets, and planet b is the hottest known exoplanet, with a temperature of 7288 K.[131]
Kepler-24 Lyra 19h 21m 39.18s +38° 20′ 37.51″ 14.925 3910 G1V 1.03 5800 unknown 4 -
Kepler-87 Cygnus 19h 51m 40.0s +46° 57′ 54″ 15 4021 G4IV 1.1 5600 7.5 2 (1) Farthest system from the Sun with an unconfirmed exoplanet candidate.
Kepler-33 Lyra 19h 16m 18.61s +46° 00′ 18.8″ 13.988 4090 G1IV 1.164 5849 4.27 5
Kepler-282 Lyra 18h 58m 43.0s +44° 47′ 51″ 15.2 4363 G?V 0.97 5876 unknown 4
Kepler-758 Cygnus 19h 32m 20.3s +41° 08′ 08″ 4413 1.16 6228 unknown 4 Farthest system from the Sun with exactly four confirmed exoplanets.
Kepler-53 Lyra 19h 21m 51.0s +40° 33′ 45″ 16 4455 G?V 0.98 5858 unknown 3
Kepler-30 Lyra 19h 01m 08.07s +38° 56′ 50.21″ 15.403 4560 G6V 0.99 5498 unknown 3
Kepler-84 Cygnus 19h 53m 00.49s +40° 29′ 45.87″ 14.764 4700 G3IV 1 5755 unknown 5
Kepler-31 Cygnus 19h 36m 06.0s +45° 51′ 11″ 15.5 5429 F 1.21 6340 unknown 3 The three planets are in an orbital resonance.[132]
Kepler-238 Lyra 19h 11m 35s +40° 38′ 16″ 15.084 5867 G5IV 1.06 5614 unknown 5 One of the farthest systems from the Sun with a multiplanetary system, and the farthest system where exoplanets were discovered by the Kepler space telescope.
Kepler-245 Cygnus 19h 26m 33.4s +42° 26′ 11″ 0.8 5100 unknown 4
Kepler-218 Cygnus 19h 41m 39.1s +46° 15′ 59″ unknown 5502 unknown 3
Kepler-217 Cygnus 19h 32m 09.1s +46° 16′ 39″ unknown 6171 unknown 3
Kepler-192 Lyra 19h 11m 40.3s +45° 35′ 34″ unknown 5479 unknown 3
Kepler-191 Cygnus 19h 24m 44.0s +45° 19′ 23″ 0.85 5282 unknown 3
Kepler-176 Cygnus 19h 38m 40.3s +43° 51′ 12″ unknown 5232 unknown 4
Kepler-167 Cygnus 19h 30m 38.0s +38° 20′ 43″ 0.76 4796 unknown 4
Kepler-431 Lyra 18h 44m 26.9s +43° 13′ 40″ 1.071 6004 unknown 3
Kepler-338 Lyra 18h 51m 54.9s +40° 47′ 04″ 1.1 5923 unknown 4
Kepler-197 Cygnus 19h 40m 54.3s +50° 33′ 32″ unknown 6004 unknown 4
Kepler-247 Lyra 19h 14m 34.2s +43° 02′ 21″ 0.884 5094 unknown 3
Kepler-104 Lyra 19h 10m 25.1s +42° 10′ 00″ 0.81 5711 unknown 3 -
Kepler-126 Cygnus 19h 17m 23.4s +44° 12′ 31″ unknown 6239 unknown 3 -
Kepler-127 Lyra 19h 00m 45.6s +46° 01′ 41″ unknown 6106 unknown 3 -
Kepler-130 Lyra 19h 13m 48.2s +40° 14′ 43″ 1 5884 unknown 3 -
Kepler-164 Lyra 19h 11m 07.4s +47° 37′ 48″ 1.11 5888 unknown 3 -
Kepler-171 Cygnus 19h 47m 05.3s +41° 45′ 20″ unknown 5642 unknown 3 -
Kepler-172 Lyra 19h 47m 05.3s +41° 45′ 20″ 0.86 5526 unknown 4 -
Kepler-149 Lyra 19h 03m 24.9s +38° 23′ 03″ unknown 5381 unknown 3
Kepler-148 Cygnus 19h 19m 08.7s +46° 51′ 32″ unknown 5272 unknown 3
Kepler-142 Cygnus 19h 40m 28.5s +48° 28′ 53″ 0.99 5790 unknown 3
Kepler-124 Draco 19h 07m 00.7s +49° 03′ 54″ unknown 4984 unknown 3
Kepler-402 Lyra 19h 13m 28.9s +43° 21′ 17″ unknown 6090 unknown 4
Kepler-399 Cygnus 19h 58m 00.4s +40° 40′ 15″ unknown 5502 unknown 3
Kepler-374 Cygnus 19h 36m 33.1s +42° 22′ 14″ 0.84 5977 unknown 3
Kepler-372 Cygnus 19h 25m 01.5s +49° 15′ 32″ 1.15 6509 unknown 3
Kepler-363 Lyra 18h 52m 46.1s +41° 18′ 19″ 1.23 5593 unknown 3
Kepler-359 Cygnus 19h 33m 10.5s +42° 11′ 47″ 1.07 6248 unknown 3
Kepler-357 Cygnus 19h 24m 58.3s +44° 00′ 31″ 0.78 5036 unknown 3
Kepler-354 Lyra 19h 03m 00.4s +41° 20′ 08″ 0.65 4648 unknown 3
Kepler-206 Lyra 19h 26m 32.3s +41° 50′ 02″ 0.94 5764 unknown 3
Kepler-203 Cygnus 19h 01m 23.3s +41° 45′ 43″ 0.98 5821 unknown 3
Kepler-194 Cygnus 19h 27m 53.1s +47° 51′ 51″ unknown 6089 unknown 3
Kepler-184 Lyra 19h 27m 48.5s +43° 04′ 29″ unknown 5788 unknown 3
Kepler-178 Lyra 19h 08m 24.3s +46° 53′ 47″ unknown 5676 unknown 3
Kepler-336 Lyra 19h 20m 57.0s +41° 19′ 53″ 0.89 5867 unknown 3
Kepler-334 Lyra 19h 08m 33.8s +47° 06′ 55″ 1 5828 unknown 3
Kepler-332 Lyra 19h 06m 39.1s +47° 24′ 49″ 0.8 4955 unknown 3
Kepler-331 Lyra 19h 27m 20.2s +39° 18′ 26″ 0.51 4347 unknown 3
Kepler-327 Cygnus 19h 30m 34.2s 44° 05′ 16″ 0.55 3799 unknown 3
Kepler-326 Cygnus 19h 37m 18.1s +46° 00′ 08″ 0.98 5105 unknown 3
Kepler-325 Cygnus 19h 19m 20.5s +49° 49′ 32″ 0.87 5752 unknown 3
EPIC 201085153 Virgo 12h 00m 29.4845s −7° 7′ 48″ 17.33 unknown 3945±386 unknown 2 (1)
K2-136 [ru] Taurus 04h 29m 38.99s +22° 52′ 57.80″ 11.2 173 K5V 0.71 4364±70 0.7 3
K2-148 Cetus 00h 58m 04.28s −00° 11′ 35.36″ 13.05 407 K7V 0.65 4079±70 unknown 3
  • Need to be added: TOI 1130, EPIC 249893012

Stars orbited by both planets and brown dwarfs[edit]

Stars orbited by objects on both sides of the 13 Jupiter mass dividing line.

Planetary system statistics[edit]

Planets
per star
Number
of stars
Star list
8 2
7 1
6 7
5 22
4 63
3 161
2 + unconfirmed 23

See also[edit]


References[edit]

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