List of newspapers in Germany

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The number of national daily newspapers in Germany was 598 in 1950, whereas it was 375 in 1965.[1] Below is a list of newspapers in Germany, sorted according to printed run as of 2015, as listed at ivw.de which tracks circulations of all publications in Germany.

National subscription papers[edit]

Daily national subscription papers[edit]

No. Newspaper Abbrv. Circulation (January, 2018) Frequency Political alignment Publisher/Parent Company
1 Süddeutsche Zeitung SZ 361,507[2] Monday - Saturday centre-left[3]/ left-liberal[4] or "critical-liberal"[5] Südwestdeutsche Medien Holding (Gruppe Württembergischer Verleger (Neue Pressegesellschaft mbh & Co. KG (Eberhard Ebner))), Medien Union (Dieter Schaub)
2 Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung FAZ 254,263[6] Monday - Friday centre-right[7]/ moderately conservative[8] to liberal[9] Fazit-Stiftung
3 Die Welt 165,686[10] Monday - Friday centre-right[11]/ conservative[3] to liberal[12] Axel Springer AG (Axel Springer Gesellschaft für Publizistik GmbH & Co. (Friede Springer))
4 Handelsblatt 130,864[13] Monday - Friday economically liberal[14][15] Georg von Holtzbrinck Publishing Group (Monika Schoeller, Stefan von Holtzbrinck)
5 Der Tagesspiegel 113,716[16] Monday - Sunday liberal[17][18] Georg von Holtzbrinck Publishing Group (Monika Schoeller, Stefan von Holtzbrinck)
6 Die Tageszeitung taz 51,873[19] Monday - Saturday left-wing,[20] green[17] taz, die tageszeitung Verlagsgenossenschaft eG
7 Neues Deutschland ND 25,158[21] Monday - Saturday left-wing, socialist Neues Deutschland Druckerei und Verlags GmbH and The Left Party
8 Junge Welt jW c. 19,000 far-left, Marxist Verlag 8. Mai

Weekly national subscription papers[edit]

No. Newspaper Abbrv. Circulation Frequency Political alignment Publisher/Parent Company
4/2015 Change
1 Die Zeit 511,806[22] Increase0.2%[22] weekly centrist[23]/ liberal[7] or left-liberal[8][24] Georg von Holtzbrinck Publishing Group (Monika Schoeller, Stefan von Holtzbrinck)
2 Junge Freiheit JF 25,868[25] Increase16.5%[21] weekly right-wing,[18][26] conservative[18] Junge Freiheit Verlag GmbH & Co (Dieter Stein)
3 Der Freitag 19,708 weekly left-wing,[27] left-liberal[28] Jakob Augstein
4 Preußische Allgemeine Zeitung PAZ 18,000 weekly right-wing, "Prussian conservative" Landsmannschaft Ostpreußen
5 Jungle World JW c. 11,585 weekly far-left, undogmatic Jungle World Verlags GmbH

National news magazines[edit]

  • Der Spiegel (weekly (Saturday) left-liberal[8] — 830,349 copies)
  • Stern (weekly (Thursday) left-liberal — 734,859 copies)
  • Focus (weekly (Saturday) liberal-conservative[8] — 500,480 copies)
  • Wirtschaftswoche (weekly (Friday) economically-liberal — 131,229 copies)
  • Cicero (monthly liberal-conservative — 83,718 copies)
  • konkret (monthly far-left — 42,398 copies)

Regional or local subscription papers in Germany (not exhaustive)[edit]

Boulevard papers ("tabloid" style)[edit]

A Bild kiosk

Boulevardzeitungen (sometimes translated as "popular papers"[7]) is a style of newspapers, characterised by big, colourful headlines, pictures and sensationalist stories, comparable to the English term "red top" or "tabloid", but independent from the paper format (the most widespread boulevard paper actually has a Broadsheet format). Also called Kaufzeitungen or Straßenverkaufszeitungen ("street sale papers"), as they can only be bought day by day at kiosks or from street vendors and are not usually delivered to subscribers (Munich's Abendzeitung being a notable exception).

National boulevard papers[edit]

  • Bild (2,086,125 copies)
also called "Bildzeitung"; with several regional editions like Bild Hamburg or Bild Köln. The Bild can be compared to tabloids, but the page size is bigger (broadsheet).
Bild has a Sunday sister newspaper (which is a tabloid both in terms of style and paper format), Bild am Sonntag (1,118,497 copies), edited by a separate desk.

Regional or local boulevard papers[edit]

Non-German-language newspapers[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pippa Norris (Fall 2000). "Chapter 4 The Decline of Newspapers?". A Virtuous Circle: Political Communications in Post-Industrial Societies (PDF). New York: Cambridge University Press. Retrieved 6 October 2013. 
  2. ^ "Süddeutsche Zeitung (Mon–Sat)" (in German). IVW. Retrieved 24 June 2018. 
  3. ^ a b Hans J. Kleinsteuber; Barbara Thomass (2007). The German Media Landscape. European Media Governance: National and Regional Dimensions. Intellect Books. p. 112. 
  4. ^ Lutz Hachmeister. "Süddeutsche Zeitung". Institut für Medien- und Kommunikationspolitik. 
  5. ^ Irene Preisinger (2002). Information zwischen Interpretation und Kritik: Das Berufsverständnis politischer Journalisten in Frankreich und Deutschland. Westdeutscher Verlag. pp. 122–123. 
  6. ^ "Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (Mon–Fri)" (in German). IVW. Retrieved 24 June 2018. 
  7. ^ a b c Davide Brocchi (6 December 2008). "Die Presse in Deutschland". cultura21. 
  8. ^ a b c d Marcus Maurer; Carsten Reinemann (2007). Medieninhalte: Eine Einführung. Springer-Verlag. p. 130. 
  9. ^ Irene Preisinger (2002). Information zwischen Interpretation und Kritik: Das Berufsverständnis politischer Journalisten in Frankreich und Deutschland. Westdeutscher Verlag. pp. 123–124. 
  10. ^ "Die Welt (Mon–Fri)" (in German). IVW. Retrieved 24 June 2018. 
  11. ^ "The press in Germany", by BBC News 31 October 2006; Retrieved 13 March 2017.
  12. ^ Irene Preisinger (2002). Information zwischen Interpretation und Kritik: Das Berufsverständnis politischer Journalisten in Frankreich und Deutschland. Westdeutscher Verlag. p. 124. 
  13. ^ "Handelsblatt (Mon–Fri)" (in German). IVW. Retrieved 24 June 2018. 
  14. ^ Danyal Bayaz (2014). ‚Heuschrecken‘ zwischen Rendite, Reportage und Regulierung: Die Bedeutung von Private Equity in Ökonomie und Öffentlichkeit. Springer VS. p. 366. 
  15. ^ http://www.eurotopics.net/de/home/medienindex/media_articles/?frommedia=2794
  16. ^ "Der Tagesspiegel (Mon–Sun)" (in German). IVW. Retrieved 24 June 2018. 
  17. ^ a b Annikki Koskensalo; John Smeds; Angel Huguet; Rudolf De Cillia (2012). Language: Competence-Change-Contact. LIT Verlag Münster. p. 90. 
  18. ^ a b c University of Warwick - Warwick German Studies Web, Retrieved 14 March 2017.
  19. ^ "die tageszeitung (Mon–Sat)" (in German). IVW. Retrieved 24 June 2018. 
  20. ^ Steffi Boothroyd (1998). The Media Landscape. Modern Germany: Politics, Society and Culture. Routledge. p. 138. 
  21. ^ a b "Neues Deutschland (Mon–Sat)" (in German). IVW. Retrieved 24 June 2018. 
  22. ^ a b "Süddeutsche Zeitung (Mon–Sat)" (in German). IVW. Retrieved 25 March 2016. 
  23. ^ Eckhard Bernstein (2004). Culture and Customs of Germany. Greenwood Press. p. 120. 
  24. ^ Hans-Ulrich Wehler (2008). Deutsche Gesellschaftsgeschichte Bd. 5: Bundesrepublik und DDR 1949-1990. C.H.Beck. p. 401. 
  25. ^ "Junge Freiheit" (in German). IVW. Retrieved 25 March 2016. 
  26. ^ The Economist- "German conservatives", Retrieved 14 March 2017.
  27. ^ "Zum Kauf des "Freitag" durch Jakob Augstein", (german) Retrieved 14 March 2017.
  28. ^ "Verleger und Geschäftsführer des Freitag", (german) Retrieved 14 March 2017.

Further reading[edit]

  • British Museum (1885), "Berlin", Periodical Publications, Catalogue of Printed Books, London 
  • Olson, Kenneth E. The History Makers: The Press of Europe from hits Beginnings through 1965 (1967) pp 99-134
  • Collins, Ross F., and E. M. Palmegiano, eds. The Rise of Western Journalism 1815-1914: Essays on the Press in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain and the United States (2007)
  • Ross, Corey. Mass Communications, Society, and Politics from the Empire to the Third Reich (Oxford University press 2010) 448pp
  • Esser, Frank, and Michael Brüggemann. "The strategic crisis of German newspapers." in David AL Levy and Rasmus Kleis Nielsen, eds. Changing Business of Journalism and its Implication for Democracy (Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, University of Oxford, 2010) pp: 39-54.
  • Thode, Ernest, ed. Historic German Newspapers Online (2014)

External links[edit]