List of places of worship in Rother

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Ancient parish churches serving small villages—such as All Saints Church at Mountfield—characterise the district of Rother.

The district of Rother, one of six local government districts in the English county of East Sussex, has more than 120 current and former places of worship. As of 2015, 87 active churches and chapels serve the mostly rural area, and a further 38 former places of worship still stand but are no longer in religious use. The district's main urban centres—the Victorian seaside resort of Bexhill-on-Sea and the ancient inland towns of Battle and Rye—have many churches, some of considerable age. Others serve villages and hamlets scattered across the Wealden hills and marshes of the district. Even small settlements have parish churches serving the Church of England, the country's state religion. Roman Catholicism is less well established than in neighbouring West Sussex, but Protestant Nonconformist denominations have been prominent for centuries. Methodism was especially popular in the area: many chapels were built in the 18th and 19th centuries, although some have since closed. The majority of the population is Christian, and a Buddhist centre in Bexhill-on-Sea is the only non-Christian place of worship.

Dozens of buildings have been awarded listed status by English Heritage in recognition of their architectural and historical interest. These range from the Saxon-era parish churches in villages such as Beckley and Guestling to the Mediterranean-style Romanesque Revival St Anthony of Padua Church in Rye, built in the 1920s. Likewise, chapels as simple as the cottage-like former Bethel Chapel in Robertsbridge and as elaborate as the "rich and fruity" neighbouring United Reformed Church have been listed.

Various administrative areas operated by the Church of England, the Roman Catholic Church, the United Reformed Church, Baptists and Methodists cover churches in the district which are part of their denomination. These areas include dioceses, archdeaconries, networks and circuits.

Overview of the district and its places of worship[edit]

The district of Rother covers the eastern part of East Sussex and surrounds the Borough of Hastings.
One of Rother's smaller and more unusual churches is this converted Lifesaving Rocket Apparatus Station at Pett Level, now known as St Nicholas' Church.
Protestant Nonconformism has a long history in Rye, where Baptist congregations have occupied five different buildings. The Bethel chapel of 1858, still in use, is one.

Rother district occupies about 200 square miles (520 km2) of the eastern part of the county of East Sussex.[1] It is one of five districts and boroughs in the county; it shares its western boundary with the district of Wealden, and surrounds the borough of Hastings to the south.[2] The neighbouring county of Kent forms the northern and eastern border. The district is named after the River Rother, which enters the English Channel at Rye.[1] Approximately 90,000 people live in the district, of whom about half are residents of the largest town and administrative centre, Bexhill-on-Sea. The only other towns, both with ancient origins, are Rye and Battle. The rest of the district is mostly undulating High Wealden countryside punctuated with small, historic villages.[1]

Sussex—the Kingdom of the South Saxons—was one of the last parts of England to be Christianised. It was isolated from other parts of the country because of the thick forest that covered it. When St Wilfrid and his missionaries brought Christianity to the area in the 7th century, they arrived by sea.[3] The new religion quickly spread; the longest established churches in the present Rother area are apparently St Peter's Church in Bexhill's old town and All Saints Church at Icklesham, both founded in 772 (but no 8th-century fabric remains at either location).[4][5] Many more churches were built in the Saxon era, but most were either superseded by larger Norman buildings between the 11th and 13th centuries—as at Sedlescombe[6] and Whatlington[5]—or substantially added to, as at Icklesham.[7] Many places also gained their first church during this period, and the size and opulence of some (such as Ticehurst[8] and Salehurst)[9] reflect the area's iron-industry wealth at the time.[8] Nevertheless, some parishes were initially very large: for example, both Bodiam and Etchingham were served from Salehurst parish church until their own churches were built in the 14th century.[10][11]

By the 19th century, few villages lacked an Anglican church, and attention turned to restoring and reconstructing ancient buildings—although places such as Hurst Green,[12] Netherfield,[13] Staplecross[14] and Telham[15] did receive churches of their own, often built as chapels of ease to distant parish churches. Some ancient churches still retain most of their medieval fabric and appearance, but churches such as Dallington,[16] Northiam[17] and Sedlescombe[18] were so comprehensively rebuilt in the mid-19th century that they now have a largely Victorian appearance. (Wholesale restoration of churches in the then-fashionable Gothic Revival style was a common and much criticised practice during the Victorian era.)[19] In the 20th century, Anglican churches continued to be provided as residential development spread along the English Channel coast east of Hastings. Building styles varied: at Winchelsea Beach, old-fashioned brick, timber and tile-hanging were used in 1962;[20] at Fairlight Cove, a square wooden box-like structure, intended to be both temporary and portable, has stood since 1970;[21] in Camber, the 1956 replacement for a bombed-out chapel of ease is in an old-fashioned early-20th-century style;[22][23] and at Cliff End on Pett Level an unusual building was purchased and reused. The Admiralty installed a Lifesaving Rocket Apparatus Station on the beach; in 1935 it was converted into the tiny St Nicholas' Church.[24]

After the English Reformation, Roman Catholic worship was illegal in England for nearly 250 years until 1791,[25] and it grew slowly thereafter in comparison to West Sussex, where many large estates were owned by gentry who secretly kept the faith over many generations.[26] Ill-feeling towards Catholics apparently persisted well into the 19th century in Battle, where the 1886 Church of Our Lady Immaculate and St Michael was set well back from the street (in the garden of its presbytery) and does not have an ecclesiastical appearance.[27] In the early 20th century, bolder architectural statements were made with the Gothic Revival church at Bexhill-on-Sea and the elaborate Italian Romanesque-style church at Rye, both of which are listed buildings.[28][29] Most of the other Roman Catholic churches in Rother district are simple mid-20th-century buildings, sometimes with distinguishing architectural features such as a modernistic portico-style entrance at Sidley,[30] dalle de verre glass at Burwash[31] and a Mediterranean-style blank-arcaded tower at Little Common.[32]

Many Protestant Nonconformist denominations are represented by churches and chapels in the district—most prominently Methodism, whose chapels are found in many villages, although many have closed (Methodist worship has been in decline nationwide since the early 20th century).[33] John Wesley himself was a frequent visitor to the area, and the church he founded at Rye in 1789 was the administrative base of a vast Circuit covering much of Sussex and Kent.[34] His last ever outdoor sermon was preached beneath a tree near Winchelsea Methodist Chapel.[35][36] Rye was a hotbed of Nonconformist worship: a religious census in 1676 found 300 Nonconformists in the town, more than ten times as many as in the much larger parish of Salehurst, which had the next highest number.[37] In 1847, chapels existed for Methodists, Presbyterians, Independents, Baptists, Quakers and Unitarians;[38] Congregationalists, the Salvation Army and Jehovah's Witnesses also set up places of worship in the town later; and the Baptists split into several groups and have occupied five buildings over the years—all of which still stand.[39]

Religious affiliation[edit]

According to the 2001 United Kingdom Census, 85,428 people lived in Rother. Of these, 76.5% identified themselves as Christian, 0.64% were Muslim, 0.15% were Jewish, 0.18% were Buddhist, 0.14% were Hindu, 0.03% were Sikh, 0.35% followed another religion, 13.91% claimed no religious affiliation and 8.1% did not state their religion. The proportion of Christians was higher than the 72.8% in England as a whole. Most other religions had much lower proportions of followers than in England overall—the corresponding national percentages were 3.1% for Islam, 1.11% for Hinduism, 0.67% for Sikhism, 0.52% for Judaism—but the proportion identifying with the "any other religion" category was higher than the national figure of 0.29%. Rother also had a lower proportion of people with no religious affiliation than average for England (14.59%).[40]

Administration[edit]

All Anglican churches in Rother district are part of the Diocese of Chichester, whose cathedral is at Chichester,[41] and the Lewes and Hastings Archdeaconry—one of three subdivisions which make up the next highest level of administration.[42] In turn, this archdeaconry is divided into eight deaneries.[42] The churches at Flimwell, Stonegate and Ticehurst are in the Rural Deanery of Rotherfield.[43] The Rural Deanery of Rye covers 23 churches in the district: Beckley, Bodiam, Brede, Camber, East Guldeford, Ewhurst Green, Fairlight, Fairlight Cove, Guestling, Icklesham, Iden, Northiam, Peasmarsh, Pett, Pett Level, Playden, Rye, Rye Harbour, Staplecross, Udimore, Westfield, Winchelsea and Winchelsea Beach.[44] Those at Brightling, Burwash, Burwash Common, Dallington, Etchingham, Hurst Green, Mountfield, Netherfield, Robertsbridge and Salehurst are part of the Rural Deanery of Dallington.[45] The Rural Deanery of Battle and Bexhill administers the churches at Ashburnham, Battle, Catsfield, Crowhurst, Penhurst, Sedlescombe, Telham and Whatlington, the six churches in Bexhill-on-Sea and those in the suburbs of Little Common and Sidley.[46]

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Arundel and Brighton, whose cathedral is at Arundel,[47] administers the district's six Roman Catholic churches. The churches at Battle, Bexhill-on-Sea, Little Common, Northiam (Horn's Cross), Rye and Sidley are all part of St Leonards-on-Sea Deanery.[48] Those at Little Common and Sidley are served as Mass Centres from St Mary Magdalene's Church in Bexhill-on-Sea.[49]

The Hastings, Bexhill and Rye Methodist Circuit, a 13-church administrative area, covers eight Methodist churches in Rother—at Battle, Bexhill-on-Sea (Christchurch, Little Common and Sackville Road), Brede (Trinity), Pett, Rye and Winchelsea.[50]

The four United Reformed Churches in the district, at Ashburnham, Bexhill-on-Sea, Robertsbridge and Sedlescombe, are part of the West Kent and East Sussex Synod Area of the Church. This is a group of 32 churches within the Southern Synod region.[51]

Of the five extant Baptist churches in the district, four are administratively part of the East Sussex Network of the South Eastern Baptist Association: the churches at Battle, Rye and Sidley, and Beulah Baptist Church in Bexhill-on-Sea.[52] The Bethel Strict Baptist Chapel at Rye is affiliated with the Gospel Standard movement.[53]

Listed status[edit]

English Heritage has awarded listed status to more than 50 current and former church buildings in Rother. A building is defined as "listed" when it is placed on a statutory register of buildings of "special architectural or historic interest" in accordance with the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990.[54] The Department for Culture, Media and Sport, a Government department, is responsible for this; English Heritage, a non-departmental public body, acts as an agency of the department to administer the process and advise the department on relevant issues.[55] There are three grades of listing status. Grade I, the highest, is defined as being of "exceptional interest"; Grade II* is used for "particularly important buildings of more than special interest"; and Grade II, the lowest, is used for buildings of "special interest".[56] As of February 2001, there were 40 Grade I-listed buildings, 75 with Grade II* status and 1,991 Grade II-listed buildings in Rother.[57]

Open places of worship[edit]

Name Image Location Denomination/
Affiliation
Grade Notes Refs
St Peter's Church St Peter's Church, Ashburnham (Geograph Image 2280261 84d8424e).jpg Ashburnham
50°54′21″N 0°24′06″E / 50.9057°N 0.4016°E / 50.9057; 0.4016 (St Peter's Church, Ashburnham)
Anglican I The Earls of Ashburnham built Ashburnham Place and this church on their estate in the 15th century. Only the castellated Perpendicular Gothic tower survives from that era: the 1st Baron Ashburnham's wholesale rebuilding of 1665, in sandstone to harmonise with the other buildings, gave the church its present appearance. [58][59]
[60][61]
[62]
St Mary the Virgin Church St Mary the Virgin Church, Battle (NHLE Code 1231477).JPG Battle
50°54′54″N 0°29′19″E / 50.9151°N 0.4885°E / 50.9151; 0.4885 (St Mary the Virgin Church, Battle)
Anglican I Founded by an abbot from the adjacent abbey early in the 12th century, Battle's large church was extensively rebuilt in the next three centuries in the Decorated and Perpendicular Gothic styles. The main feature of the "really splendid church" is its long five-bay nave. [63][64]
[65][66]
[67][68]
Zion Chapel Battle Baptist Church (Zion Chapel), Battle (NHLE Code 1352856).JPG Battle
50°55′06″N 0°29′03″E / 50.9183°N 0.4843°E / 50.9183; 0.4843 (Zion Chapel, Battle)
Baptist II The town's first Baptist chapel (Vidler's Chapel) was built in 1798. Some members seceded in 1820 and founded their own chapel next door; it survives, unlike its predecessor. A stuccoed Neoclassical three-window façade, with a pediment, buttresses and gabled porch, contrasts with the red-brick side walls. [69][70]
[71][72]
[73][74]
[75]
[76]
[77]
Battle Methodist Church Battle Methodist Church, Battle (NHLE Code 1278731).JPG Battle
50°54′41″N 0°29′32″E / 50.9114°N 0.4922°E / 50.9114; 0.4922 (Battle Methodist Church, Battle)
Methodist II Erected in 1826, this stucco-clad building has changed little since, except for the addition of a porch in 1887. There is a central pediment flanked and topped by decorative finials, and the windows are set in pointed arches. The church is in the Hastings, Bexhill and Rye Methodist Circuit. [73][78]
[69][79]
[80]
[81]
Church of Our Lady Immaculate and St Michael Church of Our Lady Immaculate and St Michael, Battle.JPG Battle
50°55′06″N 0°29′03″E / 50.9182°N 0.4841°E / 50.9182; 0.4841 (Church of Our Lady Immaculate and St Michael, Battle)
Roman Catholic Battle's Roman Catholic church was founded in 1882 by the 5th Earl of Ashburnham and built in 1886, probably to the Earl's own design. It hides behind the priest's house and is attached to a terrace of cottages. The red-brick building is Romanesque Revival/Italianate in style. [27][70]
[82]
Little Church of St Francis Battle
50°54′57″N 0°29′03″E / 50.9158°N 0.4842°E / 50.9158; 0.4842 (Little Church of St Francis, Battle)
Spiritualist [83][84]
All Saints Church All Saints Church, Beckley (NHLE Code 1044150).JPG Beckley
50°59′01″N 0°37′26″E / 50.9835°N 0.6239°E / 50.9835; 0.6239 (All Saints Church, Beckley)
Anglican I The "dominant" tower is partly 11th-century and has herringbone masonry typical of the Norman era. Aisles were built in the 13th and 14th centuries, and a south-side chapel was among many additions during the Victorian era. The nave roof has dormer windows. [85][86]
[87][88]
[89][90]
St Peter's Church St Peter's Church, Bexhill (NHLE Code 1352817).jpg Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′46″N 0°28′44″E / 50.8460°N 0.4789°E / 50.8460; 0.4789 (St Peter's Church, Bexhill-on-Sea)
Anglican II* King Offa's charter records the founding of a 40-by-20-foot (12.2 m × 6.1 m) church on this site on 15 August 772. The only remaining 8th-century feature is a preserved reliquary lid; the low, stocky tower of the late 11th century is the oldest part. Victorian restoration replaced the 13th-century chancel and added two bays to the nave. [91][92]
[93][94]
[4][95]
St Barnabas' Church St Barnabas' Church, Bexhill (NHLE Code 1044250).jpg Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′22″N 0°28′39″E / 50.8394°N 0.4775°E / 50.8394; 0.4775 (St Barnabas Church, Bexhill-on-Sea)
Anglican II Arthur Blomfield designed this large Early English Gothic Revival flint church in 1890–91. Side aisles were added 17 years later, and Leslie Moore built a Lady chapel on the south side in 1939. The interior is brick-built. The land was donated by the 7th Earl de la Warr. [78][96]
[97][98]
[99]
St Michael and All Angels Church St Michael and All Angels Church, Pebsham, Bexhill.JPG Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′49″N 0°29′48″E / 50.8470°N 0.4966°E / 50.8470; 0.4966 (St Michael and All Angels Church, Bexhill-on-Sea)
Anglican This brick-built church, with a "pretty" tile-hung pyramidal spire, has served the Pebsham area in the east of the town since its consecration in October 1933. The foundation stone of John B. Mendham's Decorated Gothic Revival church was laid in 1929. The congregation funded and built a church hall in 1961. [97][98]
[100]
St Stephen's Church St Stephen's Church, Bexhill.JPG Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′59″N 0°27′42″E / 50.8496°N 0.4618°E / 50.8496; 0.4618 (St Stephen's Church, Bexhill-on-Sea)
Anglican The "Church on the Down" was designed by prolific local architect Henry Ward in 1898 and opened in 1900. It succeeded a mission hut at the foot of the hill, erected in 1885 by the incumbent at St Peter's Church. The tower, which lacks its planned spire, is Perpendicular Gothic Revival, but the rest of the brick building is Early English. [97][98]
[101][102]
Christchurch Methodist Church Christchurch Methodist Church, Bexhill.JPG Bexhill-on-Sea
50°51′06″N 0°28′32″E / 50.8517°N 0.4755°E / 50.8517; 0.4755 (Christchurch Methodist Church, Bexhill-on-Sea)
Methodist Also known as Springfield Road Methodist Church, this superseded a small chapel at Haddocks Hill (1873–1920). The land was bought to prevent a pub being built on the site. Henry Harper designed the church in 1906, and services commenced in March 1907. It is Perpendicular Gothic Revival in style, of red-brick with decorative pinnacles and gables. [102][103]
[104][105]
[106]
Sackville Road Methodist Church Sackville Road Methodist Church, Bexhill.jpg Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′22″N 0°28′12″E / 50.8395°N 0.4701°E / 50.8395; 0.4701 (Sackville Road Methodist Church, Bexhill-on-Sea)
Methodist Christchurch was originally a Primitive Methodist church; the Sackville Road building, completed in 1896, served Wesleyan Methodists. The adjacent Parkhurst Hall, finished in 1892, served as a temporary chapel until the red-brick Gothic Revival church, designed by W.W. Pocock, was opened in July 1896. [102][103]
[107][108]
[109]
Living Word Church Living Word Church, Bexhill.JPG Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′39″N 0°27′40″E / 50.8442°N 0.4612°E / 50.8442; 0.4612 (Living Word Church, Bexhill-on-Sea)
Assemblies of God A place of worship has stood here since 1898, but the present brick and roughcast building (replacing the original corrugated iron structure) dates from 1949 and 1957. Under the name Hamilton Halls and Bexhill Christian Assembly, it was registered in 1935 and used by Plymouth Brethren for many years, but is now an Assemblies of God Pentecostal church. [110][111]
[112][113]
Beulah Baptist Church Beulah Baptist Church, Bexhill.JPG Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′31″N 0°28′26″E / 50.8420°N 0.4740°E / 50.8420; 0.4740 (Beulah Baptist Church, Bexhill-on-Sea)
Baptist The Baptist cause came late to Bexhill: attempts by the church in Hastings to establish a congregation faltered in the 1870s, and only when Charles Spurgeon's widow became involved was progress made. She bought land on Clifford Road, commissioned Resta Moore to design a church and brought in the first pastor, who served for 30 years. Moore's Early English red-brick building of 1896–97 has a corner tower. [102][103]
[114][115]
Maitreya Buddhist Centre Maitreya Buddhist Centre, Bexhill.JPG Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′27″N 0°28′39″E / 50.8408°N 0.4774°E / 50.8408; 0.4774 (Maitreya Buddhist Centre, Bexhill-on-Sea)
Buddhist This venue opened in December 2005 in the centre of Bexhill, and offers meditation, courses relating to Buddhism and worship facilities. It follows the Kadampa tradition. [116][117]
St Paul's Free Church St Paul's Free Church, Bexhill.JPG Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′21″N 0°27′48″E / 50.8393°N 0.4632°E / 50.8393; 0.4632 (St Paul's Free Church, Bexhill-on-Sea)
Evangelical Now home to a Reformed Protestant Evangelical congregation, but originally associated with the Free Church of England, this church reopened in April 1963 after work was carried out to enlarge and improve the original timber church of 1924 and its attached hall. R. Burstow of St Leonards-on-Sea was the architect. [110][118]
[119][120]
Kingdom Hall Jehovah's Witnesses Kingdom Hall, Bexhill.JPG Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′27″N 0°28′04″E / 50.8408°N 0.4677°E / 50.8408; 0.4677 (Kingdom Hall, Bexhill-on-Sea)
Jehovah's Witnesses The town's original Kingdom Hall occupied part of a building in Station Road and was licensed for marriages between September 1956 and July 1982. From that month a new single-storey rendered building on Terminus Road (registered in April 1983) replaced it. This was in turn replaced by the present building on the same site in 2010. It serves the Little Common and Pebsham Congregations. [121][122]
[123][124]
[125]
Friends Meeting House Friends Meeting House, Bexhill.jpg Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′19″N 0°28′24″E / 50.8385°N 0.4732°E / 50.8385; 0.4732 (Friends Meeting House, Bexhill-on-Sea)
Quaker The catalyst for the founding of a Friends meeting house in Bexhill was a bus strike in 1957 which prevented local Quakers travelling to Eastbourne or Hastings. A house was used for worship at first, but in 1965 the congregation acquired land at 15A Albert Road (previously the site of a Plymouth Brethren meeting room) and the brick meeting house was completed in November of that year. [118][126]
[127][128]
St Mary Magdalene's Church St Mary Magdalene's RC Church, Bexhill (NHLE Code 1352844).JPG Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′29″N 0°28′41″E / 50.8414°N 0.4780°E / 50.8414; 0.4780 (St Mary Magdalene's Church, Bexhill-on-Sea)
Roman Catholic II Arthur Young's design for Bexhill's Roman Catholic church, completed in 1907, uses Decorated and Perpendicular Gothic themes. The castellated tower is prominent, and the large stone building has side aisles and transepts. Contemporary reports described it as "practically a copy of Alfriston Church". A small chapel had been opened on the site in July 1893. [78][97]
[98][129]
[28][130]
[131]
Bexhill Christian Spiritualist Church Bexhill Christian Spiritualist Church, Bexhill.JPG Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′32″N 0°28′07″E / 50.8421°N 0.4686°E / 50.8421; 0.4686 (Bexhill Christian Spiritualist Church, Bexhill-on-Sea)
Spiritualist This congregation has moved to Victoria Road in Bexhill-on-Sea; originally it occupied part of a building in Station Road. These premises were registered for the solemnisation of marriages between June 1975 and January 1985. [132][133]
St George's Church St George's United Reformed Church, Bexhill.jpg Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′25″N 0°29′03″E / 50.8403°N 0.4842°E / 50.8403; 0.4842 (St George's Church, Bexhill-on-Sea)
United Reformed This was originally a Presbyterian church; the cause was associated with St Columba's Church in St Leonards-on-Sea. Some members of its congregation moved to Bexhill and started meeting at a building in Station Road. The 8th Earl de la Warr provided land on Cantelupe Road, and G.H. Gray's Perpendicular Gothic Revival flint and stone church opened in 1901. [102][134]
[135][136]
[137]
St Giles' Church St Giles' Church, Bodiam (NHLE Code 1352896).JPG Bodiam
51°00′27″N 0°32′21″E / 51.0074°N 0.5392°E / 51.0074; 0.5392 (St Giles' Church, Bodiam)
Anglican II* This mostly 14th-century church is almost hidden in a wooded area north of the village and its castle. Richard Cromwell Carpenter undertook a thorough restoration in 1845–46, but the original Early English chancel and Perpendicular Gothic tower remain. Prominent exterior features include a steep catslide aisle roof and a 19th-century porch. [138][139]
[10][140]
[141][142]
St George's Church St George's Church, Brede (NHLE Code 1232070).JPG Brede
50°56′06″N 0°35′47″E / 50.9349°N 0.5964°E / 50.9349; 0.5964 (St George's Church, Brede)
Anglican I Monks from Fécamp Abbey in Normandy founded a church on this site in 1180, but little 12th-century fabric remains: over the next 300 years north and south aisles, a new chancel and a battlemented tower were added, and the present appearance is entirely Perpendicular Gothic. The intricate tracery of the east window has continental European influences. [143][144]
[145][146]
[147][148]
St Thomas a Becket's Church St Thomas a Becket's Church, Brightling (NHLE Code 1352914).JPG Brightling
50°57′50″N 0°23′46″E / 50.9639°N 0.3961°E / 50.9639; 0.3961 (St Thomas a Becket's Church, Brightling)
Anglican I This 13th-century church is famous for the gigantic pyramid in its churchyard: it houses the remains of the eccentric Squire of Brightling "Mad Jack" Fuller. The church is an Early English structure with a short castellated tower, Decorated Gothic windows and a mid-18th century gabled porch. [149][150]
[151][152]
[153]
Trinity Methodist Church Trinity Methodist Church, Broad Oak, Brede (NHLE Code 1044106).JPG Broad Oak, Brede
50°56′55″N 0°36′06″E / 50.9487°N 0.6016°E / 50.9487; 0.6016 (Trinity Methodist Church, Broad Oak, Brede)
Methodist II This Early English-style chapel, built in 1855 for a Wesleyan Methodist congregation, replaced an earlier place of worship opened in 1833. It is surrounded by a burial ground with gravestones dating back to 1845. The façade has a gable and pointed-arched windows and is stuccoed. The roof has slate tiles. [34][154]
[155][156]
[157][158]
St Bartholomew's Church Parish Church of St Bartholomew, Burwash - geograph.org.uk - 455188.jpg Burwash
50°59′52″N 0°23′19″E / 50.9977°N 0.3887°E / 50.9977; 0.3887 (St Bartholomew's Church, Burwash)
Anglican II The thick-walled tower survives from the original church, built in 1090. Most of the structure was reconstructed in 1856: the chancel was completely renewed, although its 13th-century arch survives. In the south aisle, a 14th-century cast-iron memorial slab is the oldest in England; Burwash was a centre of the Wealden iron industry. [159][160]
[161][162]
[163]
Church of Christ the King Church of Christ the King, High Street, Burwash (June 2015) (2).JPG Burwash
50°59′51″N 0°22′53″E / 50.9975°N 0.3814°E / 50.9975; 0.3814 (Church of Christ the King, Burwash)
Roman Catholic A Roman Catholic church dedicated to St Joseph stood outside the village from 1887 until 1989; in about 1968, the small brick and concrete Church of Christ the King was built in a more central position. The "modest" structure has an apsidal sanctuary and dalle de verre windows designed at Buckfast Abbey. [31][164]
[165]
St Philip's Church Burwash Common
50°59′20″N 0°20′06″E / 50.9889°N 0.3350°E / 50.9889; 0.3350 (St Philip's Church, Burwash Common)
Anglican Described as "a serious job" by Nikolaus Pevsner, this stone church dates from 1867 and was designed by the partnership of William Slater and Richard Herbert Carpenter. It was their only newly built church, but they were prolific church restorers. There are lancet windows, a bellcote and a vaulted apse. [164][166]
[167]
St Thomas the Apostle's Church Camber Church (Geograph Image 2433813 e18bd1a9).jpg Camber
50°56′12″N 0°47′41″E / 50.9366°N 0.7948°E / 50.9366; 0.7948 (St Thomas the Apostle's Church, Camber)
Anglican In 1944, a flying bomb demolished the chapel of ease to East Guldeford church which had served the small seaside resort of Camber since 1906. The new church, a "nice and neat", early-20th-century style brick building with weatherboarding and tile-hanging, was designed by L. Keir Hett. Many fittings were retrieved from the old church. [22][168]
[23]
St Laurence's Church St Laurence's Church Catsfield East Sussex by Nick MacNeill.jpg Catsfield
50°53′38″N 0°27′23″E / 50.8939°N 0.4565°E / 50.8939; 0.4565 (St Laurence's Church, Catsfield)
Anglican II* Catsfield's "humble" and ancient Anglican church, outside the village next to the manor house, contrasts with the centrally-placed former Methodist church, whose huge spire dominates the village. St Laurence's nave is 10th- and 11th-century, with early Norman herringbone masonry, but the north aisle is an 1845 addition by Richard Cromwell Carpenter. [169][170]
[171][172]
[173]
St Nicholas' Church St Nicholas' Church, Cliff End, Pett Level.JPG Cliff End, Pett
50°53′22″N 0°41′13″E / 50.8894°N 0.6869°E / 50.8894; 0.6869 (St Nicholas' Church, Cliff End, Pett)
Anglican This tiny building was erected by the Admiralty at this coastal location as a Lifesaving Rocket Apparatus Station—a safety device intended to rescue shipwrecked sailors. It was bought by the Diocese of Chichester and opened as a church on 26 April 1935. The whitewashed structure has a timber porch dating from 1959. [24][174]
St Augustine's Church St Augustine's Church, Bexhill.JPG Cooden, Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′14″N 0°27′21″E / 50.8373°N 0.4558°E / 50.8373; 0.4558 (St Augustine's Church, Cooden, Bexhill-on-Sea)
Anglican William H. Randoll Blacking's red-brick, Free-style Gothic Revival church was extended between 1960 and 1963 by H. Hubbard Ford and consecrated in May 1963. It occupies a spacious site surrounded by houses built for retired clergy, erected in 1957. John Skelton provided a sculpture of St Augustine which stands in a niche above the door. [97][98]
[175]
St George's Church St George's Church, Crowhurst (NHLE Code 1233292).JPG Crowhurst
50°53′02″N 0°29′49″E / 50.8838°N 0.4969°E / 50.8838; 0.4969 (St George's Church, Crowhurst)
Anglican I William Milford Teulon, brother of the better-known architect Samuel Sanders Teulon, redesigned the church in a 13th-/14th-century Gothic style in 1856, but the short, substantial 15th-century tower and its Perpendicular Gothic window remain. A yew tree in the churchyard is apparently the oldest and largest in Sussex. [16][176]
[177][178]
[179][180]
Crowhurst Chapel Crowhurst Chapel, Crowhurst.JPG Crowhurst
50°52′43″N 0°29′57″E / 50.8787°N 0.4993°E / 50.8787; 0.4993 (Crowhurst Chapel, Crowhurst)
Pentecostal This red-brick gabled chapel was built in 1884 for a Wesleyan Methodist congregation. It was still in use by Methodists until 1990, but in September 1991 it was re-registered for a Pentecostal group called the Crowhurst Chapel Fellowship. [16][181]
[182][183]
[184]
St Giles' Church St Giles' Church, Dallington (NHLE Code 1233384).JPG Dallington
50°56′50″N 0°21′31″E / 50.9471°N 0.3586°E / 50.9471; 0.3586 (St Giles' Church, Dallington)
Anglican II* The original dedication was to St Margaret; the change apparently came in the 17th century. As at Crowhurst, a mid-19th-century Gothic Revival nave and chancel has been matched to a 15th-century Perpendicular Gothic tower. The original building, of which nothing survives, was 13th-century. The stone spire is one of three in Sussex. [16][185]
[186][187]
[188][189]
St Mary's Church St Mary's Church, East Guldeford (Geograph Image 1901762 604e95c7).jpg East Guldeford
50°57′39″N 0°45′24″E / 50.9609°N 0.7567°E / 50.9609; 0.7567 (St Mary's Church, East Guldeford)
Anglican II* A church of unusual design—more in common with Kentish churches than those of Sussex, and with a double hipped roof giving a "hunchback appearance"—this was founded in 1499 and consecrated six years later. There is no chancel arch: an elaborate roof beam marks the division between nave and chancel instead. The windows have an early-19th-century appearance. [190][191]
[192][193]
[194][195]
Church of the Assumption and St Nicolas Church of the Assumption and St Nicholas, Etchingham (NHLE Code 1276456).JPG Etchingham
51°00′35″N 0°26′29″E / 51.0096°N 0.4413°E / 51.0096; 0.4413 (Church of the Assumption and St Nicolas, Etchingham)
Anglican I Largely unaltered since the 1360s, when it was built in the Decorated style to a French architect's design, Etchingham's "large and proud" parish church has a central tower and a tall interior. The nave is short and has a high clerestory; the chancel is somewhat longer and has windows with elaborate tracery. [196][197]
[198][199]
[200]
St James's Church St James's Church, Ewhurst Green (NHLE Code 1233841).JPG Ewhurst Green
50°59′33″N 0°33′26″E / 50.9925°N 0.5572°E / 50.9925; 0.5572 (St James's Church, Ewhurst Green)
Anglican I The ironstone tower, with an "ungainly" two-pitched, sugarloaf-shaped spire which looks twisted from some angles, is 12th-century, but most other parts of this ridge-top church are two centuries newer. The nave was made higher at that time, and the 14th-century king post roof survives. [201][202]
[203][204]
[205][206]
St Andrew's Church St Andrew's Church, Fairlight (NHLE Code 1233949).JPG Fairlight
50°52′37″N 0°38′33″E / 50.8769°N 0.6425°E / 50.8769; 0.6425 (St Andrew's Church, Fairlight)
Anglican II London-based architect Thomas Little's only Sussex church, built in 1845, replaced a smaller building on the same site. The tall square buttressed tower, whose top is 618 feet (188 m) above sea level in this clifftop village, is a landmark for ships. The church is Early English Gothic Revival in style with paired lancet windows in the chancel. [207][208]
[209][210]
[211]
St Peter's Church St Peter's Church, Fairlight Cove.JPG Fairlight Cove
50°52′40″N 0°39′47″E / 50.8779°N 0.6630°E / 50.8779; 0.6630 (St Peter's Church, Fairlight Cove)
Anglican Serving the seaside village of Fairlight Cove, this modest timber-built square structure was erected in 1970 at the request of residents and the Sussex Churches Campaign. A cross on the roof identifies its ecclesiastical purpose. [21]
St Augustine of Canterbury's Church St Augustine of Canterbury's Church, Flimwell (NHLE Code 1222404).JPG Flimwell
51°03′05″N 0°27′33″E / 51.0514°N 0.4592°E / 51.0514; 0.4592 (St Augustine of Canterbury's Church, Flimwell)
Anglican II Decimus Burton's stone church of 1839 was extended in 1879, when the chancel was added. The Perpendicular Gothic Revival building has a spire-topped tower at one end, lancet windows in the nave, 19th-century tiled murals and a hammerbeam roof. [212][213]
[214][215]
Beckley Full Gospel Mission Beckley Full Gospel Mission, Four Oaks, Beckley.JPG Four Oaks, Beckley
50°59′02″N 0°39′06″E / 50.9838°N 0.6516°E / 50.9838; 0.6516 (Beckley Full Gospel Mission, Four Oaks, Beckley)
Assemblies of God This building houses as Assemblies of God Pentecostal congregation and holds several services a week. [216][217]
St Laurence's Church Guestling Church - geograph.org.uk - 1362875.jpg Guestling Green
50°54′00″N 0°38′15″E / 50.9000°N 0.6375°E / 50.9000; 0.6375 (St Laurence's Church, Guestling Green)
Anglican I This isolated church took shape between the 11th and 14th centuries, but the interior had to be restored in 1890 because of fire damage. An entrance porch was added to the tower around this time. Aisles were added to the nave in the 12th and 14th centuries; the older north aisle has a contemporary side-chapel with intricately carved arches. [218][219]
[220][221]
[222][223]
St Theresa of Lisieux Church St Teresa's Catholic Church - geograph.org.uk - 354591.jpg Horns Cross, Northiam
50°57′57″N 0°35′46″E / 50.9657°N 0.5961°E / 50.9657; 0.5961 (St Theresa of Lisieux Church, Horns Cross, Northiam)
Roman Catholic Writer and Roman Catholic convert Sheila Kaye-Smith, who lived here, gave the land for the church, which was built in the Vernacular style in 1935. It has flat-arched windows and a red-brick porch. Inside is a "delightful carved stone relief" by Joseph Cribb of The Guild of St Joseph and St Dominic. [224][225]
[226]
Holy Trinity Church Holy Trinity Church, Hurst Green.JPG Hurst Green
51°01′13″N 0°28′09″E / 51.0202°N 0.4691°E / 51.0202; 0.4691 (Holy Trinity Church, Hurst Green)
Anglican This red-brick church lacks a tower or steeple; instead there is a two-stage bellcote at the west end of the roof. The Early English Gothic Revival building by Lacy W. Ridge also has some stone dressings, one transept and lancet windows. [12][227]
All Saints Church All Saints Church, Icklesham (NHLE Code 1276241).JPG Icklesham
50°55′02″N 0°40′26″E / 50.9171°N 0.6739°E / 50.9171; 0.6739 (All Saints Church, Icklesham)
Anglican I A large, "surprisingly grand", "interesting" and ancient church at the edge of a long village, All Saints has Saxon origins and retains much early Norman fabric. Alongside the long chancel is a substantial chapel dedicated to St Nicholas. Samuel Sanders Teulon undertook light restoration in the 19th century. [228][229]
[7][230]
[231][232]
All Saints Church All Saints Church, Iden (Geograph Image 1926192 8ab9a00c).jpg Iden
50°58′53″N 0°43′39″E / 50.9813°N 0.7275°E / 50.9813; 0.7275 (All Saints Church, Iden)
Anglican I Extensions to the Norman church took place between the 13th and 15th centuries, giving the building a Perpendicular Gothic appearance. The original south aisle has been lost, but the blocked arcade remains; a former priest's door, also blocked, is traceable on the outside wall. The prominent tower has a stair-turret and a single window from the Norman era. [233][234]
[235][236]
[237][238]
St Mark's Church St Mark's Church, Little Common, Bexhill.JPG Little Common, Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′45″N 0°26′14″E / 50.8458°N 0.4372°E / 50.8458; 0.4372 (St Mark's Church, Little Common, Bexhill-on-Sea)
Anglican A Martello tower at Bulverhythe was demolished in 1842, and rubble from it was used to build St Mark's Church on a site given by the owner of Battle Abbey. Henry Woodyer added the chancel in 1857 and a south aisle in 1883; another was built on the north side in 1962. The stone building has lancet windows. [78][97]
[239][240]
Little Common Methodist Church Little Common Methodist Church, Little Common, Bexhill.JPG Little Common, Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′40″N 0°26′05″E / 50.8444°N 0.4348°E / 50.8444; 0.4348 (Little Common Methodist Church, Little Common, Bexhill-on-Sea)
Methodist Turf Chapel (1837)—the original Methodist chapel in this area of Bexhill—and another chapel on Chandler Road were sold to fund the purchase of a new site for a larger church in 1915. After a hiatus caused by World War I, construction started in 1926 and the new church opened in July of that year. C.F. Callow's red-brick building was augmented by a church hall in 1953 and an extension in 1964. [239][241]
[242][243]
St Martha's Church St Martha's Church, Little Common, Bexhill.JPG Little Common, Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′36″N 0°26′03″E / 50.8433°N 0.4342°E / 50.8433; 0.4342 (St Martha's Church, Little Common, Bexhill-on-Sea)
Roman Catholic Founded in 1939 and finished in 1940, Little Common's Roman Catholic church is a red-brick structure whose distinctive west-end façade combines a Mediterranean-style Romanesque Revival tower with a low timber cap-style spire in the Sussex Vernacular style. Local architect Marshall Wood was responsible. [239][244]
[32][245]
All Saints Church All Saints Church, Mountfield (NHLE Code 1275863).JPG Mountfield
50°57′21″N 0°28′07″E / 50.9558°N 0.4686°E / 50.9558; 0.4686 (All Saints Church, Mountfield)
Anglican II* Dominated by a sturdy, heavily buttressed tower with a low-set broach spire, this Early English church retains some Norman-era fabric: there has been a church on this site since the 12th century. Some medieval wall paintings survive, although badly faded. The timber entrance porch on the south side was added in the 14th century. A lychgate was erected in 1912. [246][247]
[248][249]
[250]
St John's Church St John's Church, Netherfield (NHLE Code 1278194).JPG Netherfield
50°56′25″N 0°27′05″E / 50.9404°N 0.4513°E / 50.9404; 0.4513 (St John's Church, Netherfield)
Anglican II* Samuel Sanders Teulon designed this church in 1859 to serve the hamlet of Netherfield in Battle parish. It is an Early English Gothic Revival stone building "without any of Teulon's perversities": the architect was a controversial and idiosyncratic exponent of the Gothic Revival style. He also designed the pulpit and reredos—the latter a "spiky" and distinctive piece. [13][251]
[252][253]
St Mary's Church St Mary's Church, Northiam TN31 - geograph.org.uk - 61320.jpg Northiam
50°59′28″N 0°36′23″E / 50.9910°N 0.6063°E / 50.9910; 0.6063 (St Mary's Church, Northiam)
Anglican II* Surrounded by ancient walls and cottages, this church is somewhat hidden behind its tall spire-topped tower, which is the oldest surviving part and retains Norman (and possibly Saxon) work. The rest of the church was rebuilt in 1836, and in 1845–46 a large chapel-cum-mausoleum was added by Sydney Smirke for the Frewen family. [224][254]
[255][256]
[257][258]
[259]
St Peter and St Paul's Church St Peter and St Paul's Church, Peasmarsh (NHLE Code 1217124).JPG Peasmarsh
50°57′41″N 0°41′10″E / 50.9615°N 0.6862°E / 50.9615; 0.6862 (St Peter and St Paul's Church, Peasmarsh)
Anglican I Standing about a mile from its village—leading to claims that the settlement moved away from its original position for reasons such as the Black Death or the marshiness of the surrounding land—this Norman church had aisles added in the Early English style later. The Transitional Norman tower dates from 1170. [260][261]
[262][263]
[264][265]
St Michael's Church Penshurst Church from West - geograph.org.uk - 1318841.jpg Penhurst
50°55′25″N 0°24′33″E / 50.9236°N 0.4093°E / 50.9236; 0.4093 (St Michael's Church, Penhurst)
Anglican I Only modest restoration has taken place at this isolated church, part of a centuries-old group with the neighbouring manor house and farm. The tower, with a large window and a pyramidal cap, is Perpendicular Gothic. The interior fittings are of high quality; some date back to the 15th century. [266][267]
[268][269]
[270]
St Mary and St Peter's Church St Mary and St Peter's Church, Pett.JPG Pett
50°53′40″N 0°39′42″E / 50.8944°N 0.6616°E / 50.8944; 0.6616 (St Mary and St Peter's Church, Pett)
Anglican Benjamin Ferrey's Decorated Gothic Revival stone church of 1864 replaced an older building on the site. The building, which cost £2,000, was dismissed as "dull" by Nikolaus Pevsner, who also commented on the "curious" treatment of the tower: its shape gradually changes from square to octagonal. [271][272]
[273]
Pett Methodist Chapel Pett Methodist Chapel (NHLE Code 1217586).JPG Pett
50°53′41″N 0°39′27″E / 50.8947°N 0.6576°E / 50.8947; 0.6576 (Pett Methodist Chapel, Pett)
Methodist II Built as the Mount Calvary Bible Christian Chapel in 1848, this red-brick building still serves Methodists as part of the Hastings, Bexhill and Rye Methodist Circuit. It sits in a small graveyard, reduced in size by an extension built in 1956. The façade has a porch, three bays and a gable. [34][271]
[274][275]
[276][277]
St Michael's Church St Michael's Church, Playden (NHLE Code 1217674).JPG Playden
50°57′45″N 0°43′59″E / 50.9625°N 0.7331°E / 50.9625; 0.7331 (St Michael's Church, Playden)
Anglican I Dominated by its axial tower (placed between the nave and chancel) with a very tall, "elegant" broach spire—a later addition—this church is almost exclusively early-13th-century. The spire requires intricate internal timber framing to support it; similarly, distinctive triangular buttresses provide structural support to the aisles. [278][279]
[280][281]
[282][283]
Ashburnham Chapel Ashburnham Chapel at Ponts Green - geograph.org.uk - 290611.jpg Ponts Green, Ashburnham
50°55′00″N 0°23′16″E / 50.9166°N 0.3879°E / 50.9166; 0.3879 (Ashburnham Chapel, Ponts Green)
United Reformed This red-brick building dates from 1866. When the former Congregational chapel between Dallington and Ashburnham was closed, it was converted into a chapel for that denomination. It is now a United Reformed church. [16][284]
[285]
Robertsbridge Mission Room Robertsbridge Mission Room, Robertsbridge.JPG Robertsbridge
50°59′09″N 0°28′31″E / 50.9857°N 0.4754°E / 50.9857; 0.4754 (Robertsbridge Mission Room, Robertsbridge)
Anglican Robertsbridge, the largest village in Salehurst parish, lacked its own Anglican place of worship until 1904, when this "featureless brick building" was erected. Its exterior is now painted with whitewash. Construction cost £1,420. [286][287]
Robertsbridge United Reformed Church Robertsbridge United Reformed Church, Robertsbridge (NHLE Code 1221451).JPG Robertsbridge
50°59′08″N 0°28′29″E / 50.9856°N 0.4747°E / 50.9856; 0.4747 (Robertsbridge United Reformed Church, Robertsbridge)
United Reformed II "Rich and fruity", "truly horrible", "most dissolute" and "very Victorian" are among the descriptions of Thomas Elworthy's chapel of 1881, which stands out among ancient timber-framed buildings in the village centre. When some Congregationalists seceded from the local Wesleyan Methodist chapel, Rev. Charles New of Robertson Street Chapel in Hastings founded this chapel for them; the two churches maintained links for many years. [288][289]
[290][291]
[292][293]
[294]
St Mary's Church St Mary's Church, Rye (NHLE Code 1190069).JPG Rye
50°57′00″N 0°44′03″E / 50.9501°N 0.7342°E / 50.9501; 0.7342 (St Mary's Church, Rye)
Anglican I This large cruciform building, founded by monks from Fécamp Abbey, has considerable Norman work dating from its main period of construction (1150–1180). Side chapels were added in the 13th century. French raiders caused much damage in 1377, and other changes were made in the 17th century and the 1880s. [295][296]
[297][298]
[299][300]
[301]
Bethel Strict Baptist Chapel Bethel Strict Baptist Chapel, Rye.JPG Rye
50°57′18″N 0°44′09″E / 50.9551°N 0.7359°E / 50.9551; 0.7359 (Bethel Strict Baptist Chapel, Rye)
Baptist This distinctive Neoclassical building—stuccoed, with the name bethel inscribed above the porch—retains the appearance it had in 1858, when it was built. Charlotte Smith, the wife of a former Mayor of Rye, founded it after experiencing a spiritual conversion. [53][302]
[303][304]
[305][306]
Rye Baptist Church Rye Baptist Church.JPG Rye
50°57′07″N 0°43′56″E / 50.9519°N 0.7321°E / 50.9519; 0.7321 (Rye Baptist Church, Rye)
Baptist Baptists who formerly worshipped at the former chapel on Mermaid Street and the Independent Chapel on Landgate moved to this new Perpendicular Gothic Revival building on Cinque Ports Street. It is mostly stone-built, and was founded on 25 May 1909. [302][307]
[308][309]
Kingdom Hall Jehovah's Witnesses Kingdom Hall, Rye (Geograph Image 1964227 54569046).jpg Rye
50°56′50″N 0°44′07″E / 50.9471°N 0.7353°E / 50.9471; 0.7353 (Kingdom Hall, Rye)
Jehovah's Witnesses Jehovah's Witnesses of the Rye Congregation first worshipped in Rye in the 1950s. They moved their meeting place from Eagle Road to its present site on Rye Harbour Road in the 1970s, and later built a new Kingdom Hall on the same site. Congregations typically exceed 100. [310][311]
[312][313]
Rye Methodist Church Rye Methodist Church.JPG Rye
50°56′59″N 0°44′06″E / 50.9498°N 0.7349°E / 50.9498; 0.7349 (Rye Methodist Church, Rye)
Methodist John Wesley founded Rye's first Methodist chapel in 1789. Altered in 1814 and again in 1852 (in Renaissance Revival style), it was destroyed by World War II bombs. The adjacent Sunday School of 1901 survived and was converted into a new church, which opened in August 1954. [314][315]
[316][317]
[318]
St Anthony of Padua's Church St Anthony of Padua's Church, Rye (NHLE Code 1393687).JPG Rye
50°56′57″N 0°43′58″E / 50.9492°N 0.7329°E / 50.9492; 0.7329 (St Anthony of Padua's Church, Rye)
Roman Catholic II St Walburga's Church, a red-brick church of 1900, was rededicated and redesigned in 1927–29 by John B. Mendham as an "unusual ... self-conscious essay in early Lombardic Romanesque". The lower stage of the façade is an arched loggia, and there is a gable and bell-tower above. An octagonal dome at the rear is visible from the east. The church is served by members of the adjacent Friary. [29][302]
[319][320]
[321]
Church of the Holy Spirit Church of the Holy Spirit, Rye Harbour (Geograph Image 2216677 fba8f395).jpg Rye Harbour
50°56′20″N 0°45′24″E / 50.9388°N 0.7568°E / 50.9388; 0.7568 (Church of the Holy Spirit, Rye Harbour)
Anglican II Gothic Revival architect Samuel Sanders Teulon designed this church in 1848–49 and was responsible for some of its interior fittings. C. Spooner extended it in 1912. It is Early English in style, with an apsidal end, lancet windows and an octagonal tower with a porch in the base. The Mary Stanford Lifeboat disaster of 1928 is commemorated by a memorial. [302][322]
[323][324]
St Mary the Virgin Church St Mary the Virgin Church, Salehurst (Geograph Image 2366571 3456e22f).jpg Salehurst
50°59′28″N 0°29′28″E / 50.9910°N 0.4912°E / 50.9910; 0.4912 (St Mary's Church, Salehurst)
Anglican I The size of this church in relation to the modest hamlet it serves reflects its founding by the monks of nearby Robertsbridge Abbey and the enormous parish it originally served: places as distant as Bodiam and Etchingham were apparently within Salehurst's control. The building dates from about 1250, although there is a mid-14th-century timber-framed porch. The tall tower is supported by buttresses. [325][326]
[9][327]
[328]
St John the Baptist's Church St John the Baptist's Church, Sedlescombe (NHLE Code 1275087).JPG Sedlescombe
50°56′29″N 0°31′41″E / 50.9413°N 0.5281°E / 50.9413; 0.5281 (St John the Baptist's Church, Sedlescombe)
Anglican II The present building may be the third on the site, at the north end of the village: a timber Saxon church is believed to have existed before the Norman building which was almost totally replaced between the 15th and 19th centuries (extensive restoration took place between 1866 and 1874). [18][329]
[6][330]
[331]
Sedlescombe United Reformed Church Sedlescombe United Reformed Church.JPG Sedlescombe
50°55′40″N 0°32′12″E / 50.9277°N 0.5368°E / 50.9277; 0.5368 (Sedlescombe United Reformed Church, Sedlescombe)
United Reformed Attributed to local architect Henry Ward and built in 1879 as a Congregational chapel, this was founded by Rev. Charles New of the Robertson Street church in Hastings—the first of several he established in the surrounding villages. John Catt built the red-brick and terracotta chapel, which has a large rose window. [332][333]
[334][335]
All Saints Church All Saints Church, Sidley, Bexhill.JPG Sidley
50°51′23″N 0°28′04″E / 50.8565°N 0.4679°E / 50.8565; 0.4679 (All Saints Church, Sidley)
Anglican Both T.E.C. and G.E.S. Streatfield contributed to Sidley's parish church: the former designed the nave, which opened for worship in October 1909, and the latter added the chancel and stocky tower between 1927 and 1930. The style is Gothic Revival with Arts and Crafts elements. It replaced a tin tabernacle of 1885. [78][97]
[336][337]
Sidley Baptist Church Sidley Baptist Church, Sidley, Bexhill.JPG Sidley
50°51′26″N 0°28′15″E / 50.8573°N 0.4708°E / 50.8573; 0.4708 (Sidley Baptist Church, Sidley)
Baptist The present building dates from 1956, but Beulah Baptist Church founded a chapel in Sidley in 1907 in a former Methodist chapel. A new tin tabernacle called Haddon Hall superseded this in 1913. W. Howell Lewis's new church, next to the 1913 building, opened in February 1957. [338][339]
Our Lady of the Rosary Church Our Lady of the Rosary RC Church, Sidley, Bexhill.JPG Sidley
50°51′32″N 0°27′45″E / 50.8589°N 0.4625°E / 50.8589; 0.4625 (Our Lady of the Rosary Church, Sidley)
Roman Catholic Fr Geoffrey Smith, a local priest, and architect Alex Watson designed this brown-brick church in the 1950s to serve the growing Sidley suburb. The land was donated by a wealthy resident. A large gable at the front, resembling a broken pediment, is held on four equally spaced piers. It opened in 1954. [97][336]
[30][244]
[340]
St Mark's Church St Mark's Church, Staplecross.JPG Staplecross
50°58′27″N 0°32′23″E / 50.9743°N 0.5397°E / 50.9743; 0.5397 (St Mark's Church, Staplecross)
Anglican An "unpretentious mission church" to St James's Church at Ewhurst Green, this red-brick building was opened on 24 May 1894. The land had been donated by Thomas Chester Daws in 1873, but work did not begin until 1891. It has lancet windows and a bellcote with a bell installed in 2009. [14][341]
[342]
St Peter's Church St Peter's Church, Stonegate (Geograph Image 2483951 2c2018fd).jpg Stonegate
51°01′49″N 0°22′29″E / 51.0303°N 0.3748°E / 51.0303; 0.3748 (St Peter's Church, Stonegate)
Anglican II George Courthorpe founded the village's original church in 1838; this now forms the chancel of the present building, an Early English Gothic Revival design with Arts and Crafts elements and a large, distinctive tower with weatherboarding, timber framing, a small spire and a clock. G.E.S. Streatfield executed the design in 1904. [15][343]
[344][345]
Church of the Ascension Telham Church - geograph.org.uk - 167043.jpg Telham
50°54′03″N 0°31′08″E / 50.9008°N 0.5188°E / 50.9008; 0.5188 (Church of the Ascension, Telham)
Anglican Within the parish of Battle, this Anglican church was built alongside the Battle–Hastings road in the hamlet of Telham in 1876. It is a red-brick Gothic Revival structure in the Early English style, with a miniature spire on the roof. [70]
St Mary's Church St Mary's Church, Ticehurst (NHLE Code 1222324).JPG Ticehurst
51°02′43″N 0°24′28″E / 51.0454°N 0.4078°E / 51.0454; 0.4078 (St Mary's Church, Ticehurst)
Anglican II* Ticehurst was a centre of the Wealden iron industry by the 14th century, when this large, prominently situated church was built. It is set in an extensive churchyard with gravestones dating back to the 17th century. The spire-topped tower has a large internal arch, and various medieval fittings survive inside. [346][347]
[8][348]
[349][350]
St Mary's Church St Mary's Church, Udimore (NHLE Code 1274500).JPG Udimore
50°56′24″N 0°39′03″E / 50.9400°N 0.6509°E / 50.9400; 0.6509 (St Mary's Church, Udimore)
Anglican I The nave of this isolated church, serving a tiny hamlet, is Norman; parts may be 11th-century. It originally had two bays, but a third was added slightly later at the west end. A south aisle was also built later, but it has now disappeared, leaving traces of its arcade on the wall. The tower is low and heavily buttressed. [351][352]
[353][354]
[355][356]
St John the Baptist's Church St John the Baptist's Church, Westfield (NHLE Code 1238182).JPG Westfield
50°54′29″N 0°34′22″E / 50.9080°N 0.5729°E / 50.9080; 0.5729 (St John the Baptist's Church, Westfield)
Anglican I "Beautifully proportioned" despite the large number of buttresses supporting the nave and tower walls, this 12th-century church stands at the southern entrance to the large village of Westfield. Lancet windows were added to the chancel in the 13th century, and Victorian architect Charles Edward Davis built a north aisle in 1860. [357][358]
[359][360]
[361][362]
Sanctuary of Christ the Holy Redeemer Sanctuary of Christ the Holy Redeemer, Westfield.JPG Westfield
50°55′09″N 0°34′40″E / 50.9193°N 0.5778°E / 50.9193; 0.5778 (Sanctuary of Christ the Holy Redeemer, Westfield)
Non-denominational As well as offering two public services each week, this venue offers counselling, healing, a large baptistery with free-flowing water, guest accommodation and a rehabilitation room. [363][364]
St Mary Magdalen's Church P5100058.JPG Whatlington
50°56′12″N 0°30′15″E / 50.9366°N 0.5043°E / 50.9366; 0.5043 (St Mary Magdalen's Church, Whatlington)
Anglican II* This small, "odd-looking" Early English church had a spire-topped tower and apse-ended vestry added in 1862, replacing the original tower at the west end. The rest of the building is mostly 13th-century; a Saxon church on the site may have been destroyed when the Battle of Hastings took place nearby. A fire in July 2010 wrecked the building. [365][366]
[5][367]
[368][369]
St Thomas the Martyr's Church St Thomas the Martyr's Church, Winchelsea (NHLE Code 1276072).JPG Winchelsea
50°55′27″N 0°42′33″E / 50.9242°N 0.7092°E / 50.9242; 0.7092 (St Thomas the Martyr's Church, Winchelsea)
Anglican I Built in the 13th century on a gigantic scale, the church was "the finest example of the Decorated style in Sussex"; but in the 1360s it was partly destroyed by invaders from France, and the present building consists of the original chancel only. A large tower, possibly intended as a watch-tower, was demolished in 1790. The large windows have modern stained glass. [370][371]
[372]
[373][374]
[375][376]
St Richard's Church St Richards Church, Pett Level Road, Winchelsea Beach - geograph.org.uk - 1195190.jpg Winchelsea Beach
50°54′56″N 0°43′26″E / 50.9155°N 0.7240°E / 50.9155; 0.7240 (St Richard's Church, Winchelsea Beach)
Anglican Phyllis Biddle, a former missionary, funded this new church in the seaside resort of Winchelsea Beach. It was built in 1962, mostly of red brick; other architectural features include elm weatherboarding, a tower with panelled piers and a Rhenish helm cap, and a tiled roof. [20][377]

Closed or disused places of worship[edit]

Name Image Location Denomination/
Affiliation
Grade Notes Refs
Ashburnham Congregational Mission Chapel Former Congregational Chapel, Ashburnham (NHLE Code 1044242).JPG Ashburnham
50°55′56″N 0°22′24″E / 50.9321°N 0.3734°E / 50.9321; 0.3734 (Ashburnham Congregational Chapel (former), Ashburnham)
Congregational II Standing on a remote lane between Dallington and Ashburnham, this Vernacular two-storey cottage-style building dates from about 1849. It has red and grey brickwork, a three-window range and a hipped roof of slate. A side wall has two arched windows. It became a house after its closure in 1964 and subsequent deregistration as a place of worship. [70][378]
[379][380]
Battle Congregational Church Former Congregational Chapel, Battle.JPG Battle
50°55′01″N 0°29′03″E / 50.9170°N 0.4843°E / 50.9170; 0.4843 (Battle Congregational Church (former), Battle)
Congregational Standing on the High Street and now in commercial use, this Renaissance Revival-style building was designed by 1881 by prolific local architect Thomas Elworthy. It was one of several Nonconformist chapels in Battle in the 19th century. The walls are of red brick with some terracotta. [69][78]
Kingdom Hall Jehovah's Witnesses Kingdom Hall, Battle.JPG Battle
50°54′58″N 0°29′09″E / 50.9160°N 0.4858°E / 50.9160; 0.4858 (Kingdom Hall, Battle)
Jehovah's Witnesses This Kingdom Hall occupied part of a building to the rear of Battle High Street. It was used by the Battle Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses, but they now share a Kingdom Hall at Bexhill-on-Sea with the Bexhill Congregation. [381][123]
Beckley Methodist Chapel Former Methodist Chapel, Beckley (NHLE Code 1231768).JPG Beckley
50°59′07″N 0°38′12″E / 50.9852°N 0.6368°E / 50.9852; 0.6368 (Beckley Methodist Chapel (former), Beckley)
Methodist II A Wesleyan chapel existed here in 1814, according to census records, but this red-brick building dates from 1840. It has a gabled porch and lancet windows, and the interior was galleried. It was still open in 1999, but the former congregation has now joined Trinity Methodist Church at Broad Oak. [73][78]
[34][157]
[382][383]
Mission Church of the Good Shepherd Former Good Shepherd Mission Hall, Bexhill.jpg Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′45″N 0°28′07″E / 50.8459°N 0.4686°E / 50.8459; 0.4686 (Mission Church of the Good Shepherd (former), Bexhill-on-Sea)
Anglican The Malet Memorial Hall (1912–13, commemorating Edward Malet) occupied the ground floor of this building; upstairs was the small mission church, which replaced a hut nearby. It has Tudor Revival elements. It opened in 1913 and survived until after 1971. [78][98]
[384]
St Andrew's Church St Andrew's Church, Bexhill.jpg Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′24″N 0°28′06″E / 50.8401°N 0.4682°E / 50.8401; 0.4682 (St Andrew's Church, Bexhill-on-Sea)
Anglican Always a chapel of ease—originally to St Barnabas' Church, then within the Bexhill Team Ministry—this cobbled flint and stone church was built in 1899–1900 to Joseph Wall's design. Extensions were built in 1912, 1955 and 1971. The arcaded interior is of red brick. Financial problems led to its closure after a final service on 8 January 2012. [78][98]
[385][386]
Belle Hill Methodist Chapel Former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Bexhill.jpg Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′47″N 0°28′18″E / 50.8464°N 0.4718°E / 50.8464; 0.4718 (Belle Hill Methodist Chapel (former), Bexhill-on-Sea)
Methodist This Classical-style arch-windowed building, with stuccoed walls and an entrance porch, was erected in 1825 for the town's first Wesleyan Methodists. Ministers travelled from Hastings. It closed in 1938, its congregation joined Christchurch Methodist Church, and a nursery school was later opened in the premises. [102][387]
[388][389]
London Road Citadel Former London Road Citadel (Salvation Army), Bexhill.JPG Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′39″N 0°28′09″E / 50.8443°N 0.4692°E / 50.8443; 0.4692 (London Road Citadel (former), Bexhill-on-Sea)
Salvation Army The Salvation Army founded a corps in Bexhill in 1892. For the next 22 years, they worshipped in various buildings and sometimes outdoors, but in 1914 they built a permanent place of worship on London Road. Former Mayor Viscount Hyde laid the first stone. The last service was held on 24 September 2006. [118][390]
[391][392]
St John's Church Former St John's United Reformed Church, Bexhill.jpg Bexhill-on-Sea
50°50′31″N 0°28′10″E / 50.8419°N 0.4694°E / 50.8419; 0.4694 (St John's Church (former), Bexhill-on-Sea)
United Reformed Henry Ward designed this red-brick and stone Perpendicular Gothic Revival church in 1897. It closed in 2007 and worshippers moved to St George's Church. Demolition was threatened, but in 2009 the building was saved, with the intention of converting it into a youth centre. [102][118]
[393][394]
[395]
Providence Strict Baptist Chapel Burwash
50°59′49″N 0°23′07″E / 50.9970°N 0.3853°E / 50.9970; 0.3853 (Providence Strict Baptist Chapel (former), Burwash)
Baptist Founded in 1829 and completed the following year, this red-brick building was used for Strict Baptist worship until 1944, after which it was converted into a house. Members of an earlier, long-closed Baptist chapel in the village founded the chapel at Shover's Green. [164][396]
[397]
Catsfield Methodist Church Former Methodist Church, Catsfield - geograph.org.uk - 1008732.jpg Catsfield
50°53′49″N 0°27′05″E / 50.8970°N 0.4515°E / 50.8970; 0.4515 (Catsfield Methodist Church (former), Catsfield)
Methodist II Henry Blackman's distinctive Early English/Perpendicular Gothic Revival church of 1912 has a "disproportionately tall" spire on top of its tower, which also has an elaborately vaulted porch in its lower stage. Blackman paid for its construction himself at a cost of £4,000; the church is a memorial to his parents. Falling congregations made it unviable in the 1990s, and it was converted for residential use around the end of that decade. [168][169]
[398][399]
[400]
Bethlehem Strict Baptist Chapel Former Bethlehem Strict Baptist Chapel, Dallington.JPG Dallington
50°57′01″N 0°22′55″E / 50.9504°N 0.3820°E / 50.9504; 0.3820 (Bethlehem Strict Baptist Chapel (former), Dallington)
Baptist This small weatherboarded and timber-framed chapel, which closed after 1988 and is now in residential use, is outside the village on the BattleHeathfield road. The roof has slate tiles. The cause was founded in a house in 1851. [16][396]
[401][402]
[403]
Dallington Calvinistic Methodist Chapel Former Methodist Chapel, Dallington.JPG Dallington
50°57′04″N 0°21′12″E / 50.9512°N 0.3532°E / 50.9512; 0.3532 (Dallington Calvinistic Methodist Chapel (former), Dallington)
Methodist Also on the Battle–Heathfield road, at Carrick's Hill in the west of the parish, the "Chapel in the Valley" was in use until 1989, when it was sold for residential conversion. It is a wooden structure with bargeboards. [16][404]
[405]
Etchingham Methodist Chapel Former Methodist Chapel, Etchingham.JPG Etchingham
51°00′32″N 0°26′15″E / 51.0088°N 0.4376°E / 51.0088; 0.4376 (Etchingham Methodist Chapel (former), Etchingham)
Methodist This has been altered substantially since its conversion into a house, but for most of the 20th century it served Methodists in Etchingham village. The red-brick chapel was completed in 1900, registered for marriages in 1904 and deregistered in 1970. [406][407]
Ewhurst Congregational Chapel Former Congregational Chapel, Ewhurst Green (NHLE Code 1233844).JPG Ewhurst Green
50°59′34″N 0°33′21″E / 50.9928°N 0.5558°E / 50.9928; 0.5558 (Ewhurst Congregational Chapel (former), Ewhurst Green)
Congregational II Now a pair of cottages, this building was constructed in the 18th century as a single house. In 1895, half the building became a chapel. The walls are a combination of brick and ashlar. There is a three-window range; a new window and some buttresses were inserted in place of the chapel's door. [207][408]
Providence Strict Baptist Chapel Former Providence Strict Baptist Chapel, Flimwell.JPG Flimwell
51°03′18″N 0°26′24″E / 51.0550°N 0.4401°E / 51.0550; 0.4401 (Providence Strict Baptist Chapel (former), Flimwell)
Baptist The first chapel in this village was an 1820s weatherboarded structure attached to a shop. The present chapel, closed in the 1970s, dates from 1902 and has a three-lancet window façade with a porch below and a date-stone above. The first service was held on 11 November 1902. [213][409]
[410][411]
[412]
Guestling Gospel Hall Former Gospel Hall, Guestling.JPG Guestling
50°53′32″N 0°38′09″E / 50.8921°N 0.6358°E / 50.8921; 0.6358 (Guestling Gospel Hall (former), Guestling)
Plymouth Brethren This was latterly known as Guestling Chapel. Under this name, the building on Chapel Lane in Guestling was deregistered as a place of worship in March 1995. [413]
Hollingrove Congregational Chapel Former Congregational Chapel, Hollingrove.JPG Hollingrove
50°57′45″N 0°24′26″E / 50.9625°N 0.4073°E / 50.9625; 0.4073 (Hollingrove Congregational Chapel (former), Hollingrove)
Congregational This chapel was erected on a site next to a thatch-roofed cottage (subsequently demolished) in the hamlet of Hollingrove in Brightling parish. By the 1980s it had been sold and converted into a house. [414]
Church of Our Lady Help of Christians Former RC Church of Our Lady Help of Christians, Hurst Green.JPG Hurst Green
51°01′03″N 0°28′03″E / 51.0175°N 0.4676°E / 51.0175; 0.4676 (Church of Our Lady Help of Christians (former), Hurst Green)
Roman Catholic Francis Pollen, who later designed the church at Worth Abbey, was commissioned in 1959 to provide this church. The site was donated by Lord Longford. The Modernist polygonal building was closed in 2008 after suffering structural defects. Villagers have attempted to turn the empty church into a shop or community facility. [415][416]
[417][418]
Iden Methodist Church Iden
50°58′54″N 0°43′53″E / 50.9817°N 0.7314°E / 50.9817; 0.7314 (Former Iden Methodist Church, Iden)
Methodist The village's first Wesleyan Methodist chapel was destroyed by bombing in World War II. This new chapel stood in a more central location, and was used until the 1960s. [12][419]
Mountfield Methodist Chapel Former Methodist Chapel, Mountfield.JPG Mountfield
50°57′05″N 0°28′45″E / 50.9513°N 0.4793°E / 50.9513; 0.4793 (Mountfield Methodist Chapel (former), Mountfield)
Methodist Built in 1894, registered for marriages in 1930 and open for worship until 1970, this Free-style red-brick chapel is distinguished by its crow-stepped gable. The façade has a porch and some stonework. After its closure it was sold for residential conversion. [13][420]
[421]
Northiam Wesleyan Chapel Former Methodist Chapel, Northiam.JPG Northiam
50°59′39″N 0°35′59″E / 50.9943°N 0.5997°E / 50.9943; 0.5997 (Northiam Wesleyan Chapel (former), Northiam)
Methodist The façade of this 1814 chapel has been completely changed since its conversion to a combined commercial and residential building in 1974: its arched windows and doorway have been lost. The pediment and its oval date-stone survive, though. The side walls are partly tile-hung. [224][274]
Northiam Unitarian Chapel Former Unitarian Chapel, Northiam (NHLE Code 1235024).JPG Northiam
50°59′45″N 0°35′51″E / 50.9957°N 0.5976°E / 50.9957; 0.5976 (Northiam Unitarian Chapel (former), Northiam)
Unitarian II William Vidler, founder of a Baptist chapel at Battle, extended his influence to Northiam in 1795 when a timber-framed structure was turned into a chapel. It collapsed 15 years later, and the present building (closed in the early 21st century) was erected on the site. The mansard-roofed red-brick building has lancet windows and an arched entrance. It became Unitarian early in the 19th century. [224][274]
[422]
Peasmarsh Methodist Chapel Former Methodist Chapel, Peasmarsh.JPG Peasmarsh
50°58′25″N 0°41′16″E / 50.9736°N 0.6879°E / 50.9736; 0.6879 (Peasmarsh Methodist Chapel (former), Peasmarsh)
Methodist A chapel of 1842 was replaced in 1900 by this Early English Gothic Revival building of red brick with some stonework. [271]
Bethel Strict Baptist Chapel Former Bethel Strict Baptist Chapel, Robertsbridge (NHLE Code 1221399).JPG Robertsbridge
50°59′10″N 0°28′29″E / 50.9861°N 0.4748°E / 50.9861; 0.4748 (Bethel Strict Baptist Chapel (former), Robertsbridge)
Baptist II Nearly hidden from the High Street by other buildings, this "quaint old chapel" was founded by James Weller—a "somewhat remarkable man" who preached at chapels in Smarden (Kent) and Burwash before founding this place of worship in 1842. The first service was in January 1843. It became aligned to the Gospel Standard movement, but closed around 1999. There are large windows with tracery and a small porch. [291][423]
[288][289]
[303][424]
Robertsbridge Wesleyan Chapel Former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Robertsbridge.JPG Robertsbridge
50°59′09″N 0°28′34″E / 50.9857°N 0.4760°E / 50.9857; 0.4760 (Robertsbridge Wesleyan Chapel (former), Robertsbridge)
Methodist John Wesley preached in Robertsbridge regularly in the late 18th century, and by 1812 a permanent chapel was in place. Extensions were built in 1842 and 1874—the latter added a Sunday School to the stuccoed building. Worshippers joined the nearby Congregational church in 1960, and the old chapel was converted into flats. The chapel was licensed for marriages between 1843 and 1959. [288][425]
[426]
Congregational Independent Chapel Former Congregational Independent Chapel, Rye (NHLE Code 1262432).JPG Rye
50°56′58″N 0°43′57″E / 50.9494°N 0.7326°E / 50.9494; 0.7326 (Congregational Independent Chapel (former), Rye)
Congregational II Founded in 1817 on Watchbell Street, this was used by Independent Baptists who later joined the church in Cinque Ports Street. The three-bay façade has red brickwork, round-headed windows and a canopied entrance. It fell out of use by 1902, when Henry James owned it. It has been in residential use for more than a century. [307][314]
[315][427]
[428][429]
Rye Congregational Church Former Congregational Chapel, Rye.JPG Rye
50°57′08″N 0°44′04″E / 50.9521°N 0.7344°E / 50.9521; 0.7344 (Rye Congregational Church (former), Rye)
Congregational In 1882, this chapel was built for Rye's Congregational community. In 1973 it was sold and became Rye Community Centre; worshippers joined the town's Methodist church. The Early English-style building has red brickwork and terracotta. [307][314]
[430]
Augustianian Friary Chapel Former Augustinian Priory Chapel, Rye (NHLE Code 1352789).JPG Rye
50°57′06″N 0°44′04″E / 50.9518°N 0.7345°E / 50.9518; 0.7345 (Augustianian Friary Chapel (former), Rye)
Pre-Reformation II This chapel to a vanished former friary stands on Conduit Hill and dates from about 1380. Between the early 1890s and 1903, the Salvation Army used it as a place of worship; after that they moved to a newly built citadel at Rope Walk, and the 14th-century stone building passed into commercial use. New windows were inserted in 1906. [307][431]
Carmelite Chapel Former Carmelite Chapel, Rye (NHLE Code 1044296).JPG Rye
50°56′58″N 0°44′02″E / 50.9495°N 0.7339°E / 50.9495; 0.7339 (Carmelite Chapel (former), Rye)
Pre-Reformation II Now in residential use and known as The Old Stone House, this was the chapel of the Order of Friars Repentant of Jesus Christ, established in 1263. This Order soon declined, and the chapel went out of use in the 14th century after Rye was attacked by French invaders. The building was altered in 1869, but some 13th- and 14th-century windows survive. [432][433]
Rye Particular Baptist Chapel Former Particular Baptist Chapel, Rye (NHLE Code 1251942).JPG Rye
50°56′59″N 0°43′52″E / 50.9498°N 0.7312°E / 50.9498; 0.7312 (Rye Particular Baptist Chapel (former), Rye)
Baptist II Quakers established a meeting house on Mermaid Street in the 1700s, but by 1753 the crumbling building had been sold to Strict Baptists. They demolished it and erected the present building, which was in use as a chapel until 1910. The slate and tile roof has dormers, and the red-brick façade has three shallow-arched sash windows. [289][303]
[302][434]
[435][436]
[437]
Independent Chapel Former Independent Chapel, Rye.JPG Rye
50°57′16″N 0°44′09″E / 50.9544°N 0.7358°E / 50.9544; 0.7358 (Independent Chapel (former), Rye)
Independent This small chapel was established on Landgate in 1844. It closed in the early 1900s when the congregation, who had adopted Baptist views, joined the newly built church on Cinque Ports Street. [302]
Rye Citadel Former Salvation Army Hall, Rye.JPG Rye
50°57′10″N 0°44′00″E / 50.9528°N 0.7334°E / 50.9528; 0.7334 (Rye Citadel (former), Rye)
Salvation Army After using the former Augustinian Friary chapel on Conduit Hill for a few years, Rye's Salvation Army congregation built a citadel on Rope Walk in 1903. The building has been converted into a shop. [307]
Rye Harbour Mission Hall Rye Harbour
50°56′19″N 0°45′38″E / 50.9385°N 0.7606°E / 50.9385; 0.7606 (Former Rye Harbour Mission Hall, Rye Harbour)
Methodist This chapel was in the Hastings, Bexhill and Rye Methodist Circuit. It was open for most of the 20th century. [438]
Sedlescombe Congregational Chapel Former Congregational Chapel, Sedlescombe.JPG Sedlescombe
50°55′39″N 0°32′12″E / 50.9274°N 0.5368°E / 50.9274; 0.5368 (Sedlescombe Congregational Chapel (former), Sedlescombe)
Congregational The 1879 Congregational chapel had only been open for about five years when a disagreement in the congregation resulted in a secession led by a Mr Tuppenney. They built a Vernacular-style brick chapel next door. It closed in 1907 when the earlier divisions were overcome, and was converted into the village police station and, later, two houses. [332][333]
Sedlescombe Wesleyan Chapel Former Methodist Chapel, Sedlescombe.jpg Sedlescombe
50°55′57″N 0°32′06″E / 50.9326°N 0.5351°E / 50.9326; 0.5351 (Sedlescombe Wesleyan Chapel (former), Sedlescombe)
Methodist This was used for worship between 1812 and 1924, and has subsequently had many uses and much alteration: a shop, a wartime cinema, an engineering workshop and now a house. Farmer Henry Freeland founded it during Methodism's 19th-century heyday. Originally the red-brick building had lancet windows. [332][439]
Three Oaks Methodist Church Former Methodist Chapel, Three Oaks.JPG Three Oaks
50°54′10″N 0°37′02″E / 50.9028°N 0.6173°E / 50.9028; 0.6173 (Three Oaks Methodist Church (former), Three Oaks)
Methodist Now a house, this church was still in use in 1999, when it was part of a group of mostly rural churches administered from Rye. It was registered for marriages in July 1968. [34][440]
[441]
Ticehurst Methodist Church Former Methodist Chapel, Ticehurst.JPG Ticehurst
51°02′44″N 0°24′44″E / 51.0456°N 0.4122°E / 51.0456; 0.4122 (Ticehurst Methodist Church (former), Ticehurst)
Methodist A.W. Pocock's Decorated Gothic Revival chapel, with gabled side windows, a large rose window and stone-dressed red brickwork (now painted), was built in 1897. Earlier Methodist chapels in the village dated from 1821 and 1840; the latter had a cottage and a school attached. It was used for worship until the mid-20th century, and is now residential. [15][442]
Udimore Methodist Chapel Former Methodist Chapel, Udimore.JPG Udimore
50°56′18″N 0°40′00″E / 50.9382°N 0.6668°E / 50.9382; 0.6668 (Udimore Methodist Chapel (former), Udimore)
Methodist This building's exterior has been altered since its closure in 1960. H. and C. Coleman built it in 1882; it originally had a stuccoed façade topped with finials. Another Methodist chapel stood at Cock Marling, elsewhere in Udimore parish, between 1863 and 1907. [443]
Beulah Methodist Chapel Former Methodist Chapel, Westfield.JPG Westfield
50°54′42″N 0°34′34″E / 50.9118°N 0.5760°E / 50.9118; 0.5760 (Beulah Methodist Chapel (former), Westfield)
Methodist Closed after 1999 and converted into a house, this brick chapel dates from 1851. The entrance porch was a much later addition, but the bargeboards and flat-arched windows are original. [34][444]
[445]
Winchelsea Methodist Chapel Winchelsea Methodist Chapel (NHLE Code 1234564).JPG Winchelsea
50°55′28″N 0°42′25″E / 50.9244°N 0.7070°E / 50.9244; 0.7070 (Winchelsea Methodist Chapel (former), Winchelsea)
Methodist II A plain brick building of 1785, built onto an older house, this chapel has connections with John Wesley, who preached here in 1789 and 1790. The mansard roof is tiled. Original fittings such as the pulpit and gallery survive. Occasional services are still held, and the Methodist Church still owns the building. [377][446]
[35][447]
[448][449]
Grey Friars Monastery Church The remains of The Friary, Winchelsea (Geograph Image 1850346 c778a765).jpg Winchelsea
50°55′18″N 0°42′38″E / 50.9218°N 0.7105°E / 50.9218; 0.7105 (Grey Friars Monastery Church (former), Winchelsea)
Pre-Reformation I Only a stair-turret, the chancel walls and chancel arch of this 14th-century church still stand. They are Decorated Gothic in style, probably date from the 1310s and have been described by Nikolaus Pevsner as "one of the most impressive [sets of Franciscan remains] there are" in England. The ruins stand in the garden of a private house built in 1819. The Franciscans came to Winchelsea in 1224; the monastery and church were ruined during the Dissolution of the Monasteries. [450][451]
[452]
Whatlington Methodist Church Former Methodist Chapel, Whatlington (NHLE Code 1238389).JPG Woodman's Green, Whatlington
50°56′48″N 0°30′30″E / 50.9468°N 0.5082°E / 50.9468; 0.5082 (Whatlington Methodist Church (former), Woodmans Green, Whatlington)
Methodist II This distinctive Gothic Revival chapel has a tall tower topped with a spire. The walls are stuccoed, and all windows have pointed arches. Schoolrooms were also provided when it was built in 1872. It became a workshop and premises after its closure in about 1936, although during World War II it was also used to hold evacuees. [377][453]
[454][455]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Where's Rother". Rother District Council. 2011. Retrieved 14 August 2011. 
  2. ^ "Contact details for your District or Borough Council". East Sussex County Council. 2011. Retrieved 14 August 2011. 
  3. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 7.
  4. ^ a b Coppin 2001, p. 79.
  5. ^ a b c Coppin 2001, p. 86.
  6. ^ a b Coppin 2001, p. 115.
  7. ^ a b Coppin 2001, p. 110.
  8. ^ a b c Coppin 2001, p. 93.
  9. ^ a b Coppin 2001, p. 116.
  10. ^ a b Coppin 2001, p. 117.
  11. ^ Chantler 2010, p. 72.
  12. ^ a b c Elleray 2004, p. 36.
  13. ^ a b c Elleray 2004, p. 42.
  14. ^ a b Elleray 2004, p. 51.
  15. ^ a b c Elleray 2004, p. 52.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g Elleray 2004, p. 19.
  17. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 573.
  18. ^ a b Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 604.
  19. ^ Elleray 1981, p. 25.
  20. ^ a b Comber 1985, p. 53.
  21. ^ a b Comber 1985, p. 23.
  22. ^ a b Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 467.
  23. ^ a b Comber 1985, p. 15.
  24. ^ a b Comber 1985, p. 37.
  25. ^ "Designation Listing Selection Guide: Places of Worship" (PDF). English Heritage. April 2011. p. 6. Retrieved 14 August 2011. 
  26. ^ Elleray 1981, p. 29.
  27. ^ a b "Our Lady Immaculate & St Michael, Battle" (PDF). English Heritage Review of Diocesan Churches 2005. English Heritage. 2005. Retrieved 8 August 2011. 
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  29. ^ a b Historic England. "Details from listed building database (1393687)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 8 August 2011. 
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Bibliography[edit]