List of places of worship in the Borough of Guildford

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
The borough of Guildford, centred on the town of that name, has many churches ancient and modern. An example of the latter is Guildford United Reformed Church, which dates from 1965.
Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX

As of 2018, the Borough of Guildford has more than 100 current and former places of worship. Of those standing, 83 are in use by various Christian denominations and (in the case of Guildford Synagogue) Jews, 21 have been converted to secular uses. Guildford is one of 11 local government districts in the English county of Surrey—a significantly net-reduced county following reforms of 1889 and 1965 immediately south of London which features the Surrey Hills AONB, market towns, ancient villages, green spaces and 20th-century suburbs. The ancient and important town of Guildford, which gives the borough its name, is also the county town.[1]

The latest census (2011) show that the majority of residents are Christian. The Church of England – the country's Established Church – has the most churches. The Catholic Church, Methodists, Baptists and the United Reformed Church have congregations, some of which share buildings with other denominations. Quakers have convened in Guildford since the 17th century; the Congregational movement had a large following in the area; and Brethren have a few surviving meeting places around Guildford town.

English Heritage has awarded listed status to 38 current and four former places of worship in the district. A building is defined as "listed" when it is placed on a statutory register of buildings of "special architectural or historic interest" in accordance with the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990.[2] The Department for Culture, Media and Sport, a Government department, is responsible for this; English Heritage, a non-departmental public body, acts as an agency of the department to administer the process and advise the department on relevant issues.[3] There are three grades of listing status. Grade I, the highest, is defined as being of "exceptional interest"; Grade II* is used for "particularly important buildings of more than special interest"; and Grade II, the lowest, is used for buildings of "special interest".[4] As of February 2001, there were 30 Grade I-listed buildings, 40 with Grade II* status and 975 Grade II-listed buildings in Guildford borough.[5]

Overview of the borough and its places of worship[edit]

Guildford borough is in the west of Surrey.

Guildford is the second largest local government district in the county of Surrey, and the most populous: there were approximately 134,400 residents in 2007[6] and 137,183 at the time of the United Kingdom Census 2011.[7] The borough covers about 104 square miles (270 km2) of land in the centre and west of the county. The market town of Guildford accounts for about half the population, and there is one other large urban centre: the towns of Ash and Tongham and their surrounding estates have about 18,000 residents. The rest of the borough is largely rural, characterised by Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty associated with the North Downs interspersed with ancient, affluent villages.[6]

The present borough of Guildford is dominated by the town of Guildford itself. The ancient county town of Surrey is situated at the point where the River Wey cuts through the North Downs. Several transport routes also converge at this point, such as the Harrow Way (an ancient trackway), the old London–Portsmouth Road and various railway lines.[1] The town has been important for centuries. It was an ancient borough, the site of a Dominican friary (demolished) and a castle (extant), and a royal charter and a market were first recorded in the 13th century.[1][8] Alongside these, there were three ancient parish churches—all of which survive. St Mary's retains its 11th-century tower and was extended in the 12th and 13th centuries. Holy Trinity and St Nicholas' have both been rebuilt but still have some 13th-century features. The latter also has a private chapel, the Loseley Chapel, commemorating occupants of the nearby Loseley Park manor house.[8] The town expanded over time, especially from the 19th century when the railways arrived, and the neighbouring village of Stoke (with its 14th-century church, St John the Evangelist's) became part of the urban area. Particularly in the Victorian era, many more Anglican churches were provided as the population grew: Christ Church (1868), St Saviour (1899), Emmanuel (1904),[9] and one each in the suburban villages of Burpham (St Luke's, 1859)[10] and Merrow (St John the Evangelist's, a 12th-century church completely rebuilt in 1842).[11][note 1] As Guildford grew still further in the 20th century, churches were opened in the Onslow Village, Westborough and Wood Street Village areas and on the Park Barn and Bellfields housing estates.[12] A second church in Burpham was one of several inexpensive buildings designed for Anglican congregations in Surrey by David Evelyn Nye in the 1960s. "Bright, cheerful and well suited to modern needs", they were operationally flexible and architecturally distinctive. Within the borough, the churches at Wood Street and Bellfields were also designed by Nye.[13]

Ancient rural churches include the 12th-century St Martha-on-the-Hill, seen here from the lower ground of Albury.

Guildford town is surrounded by ancient villages, both in the countryside and on the main road and rail routes into it. Although ribbon development has turned some into low-density suburbs, many retain their centuries-old parish churches. For example, East and West Horsley and East and West Clandon form "a suburban chain from Guildford to Leatherhead",[14] but the Clandons have well-preserved Norman and 13th-century churches, and the Horsleys' churches have a Saxon tower and 11th- and 12th-century fabric respectively.[15] Southeast of here, but more isolated and very popular with tourists,[16] the cluster of villages around the River Tillingbourne at the west end of the Vale of Holmesdale supports a range of Anglican churches. The landmark St Martha's Church, a ruined 12th-century church rebuilt in 1848, stands on St Martha's Hill north of Chilworth.[17] St James's Church at Shere, "second to none in Surrey for beauty and antiquarian interest", is principally 11th- and 12th-century,[16] and Albury's original parish church in Albury Park may predate the Norman conquest of England. The centre of population moved, though, and a new church was built in 1842.[18] Holmbury St Mary and Peaslake both have 19th-century churches as well: formerly chapels of ease to Shere, the architecturally impressive buildings date from 1879 and 1889 respectively.[16] Nearby, a 19th-century barn in the even more isolated hamlet of Farley Green was converted into a church after being presented to the parish of Albury. Elsewhere in the borough, medieval churches (restored to various degrees in the Victorian era) survive in the villages of Compton, Effingham, Ockham, Pirbright, Puttenham, Ripley, Seale, Send, Shalford, Wanborough, Wisley and Worplesdon. Ash and Tongham, now part of the Blackwater Valley conurbation, also retain their old parish churches.[15]

Ian Nairn said Effingham's Roman Catholic church "looks more medieval than the [Anglican] parish church",[19] but it dates from 1913.

Roman Catholic worship was outlawed for many years until the end of the 18th century, although some owners of country estates covertly kept the faith. The Guildford Catholic Mission began in 1857 when the priest from St Edward's Church, Sutton Park[note 2] began to celebrate Mass above a shop. In 1860 St Joseph's Church was built; it was replaced by a larger church on a different site in 1984. The west of Guildford is served by St Mary's Catholic Church, which dates from 1964 but whose origins lie in a Mass centre opened at Rydes Hill Preparatory School, a Catholic private school. The suburbs of Burpham and Merrow gained Catholic churches of their own in 1960 and 1973 respectively, although Burpham's closed in 2003 and St Pius X's Church at Merrow now serves both areas. The Church of the Holy Angels (1934) serves the Ash area,[20] and the "nicely composed and well detailed" Church of Our Lady of Sorrows opened in Effingham in 1913.[21] A small church served Catholics in the Gomshall area from the 1960s until 2007, although it remains in religious use as a Coptic Orthodox church. Most of the money was raised locally—especially by means of regular bingo games in nearby Shere, resulting in its nickname of "Bingo Chapel".[22]

West Horsley Methodist Church is one of many 19th-century Nonconformist chapels in the borough.

Protestant Nonconformism was strong in the area in the 19th century, and many chapels associated with Nonconformist denominations survive—although not all remain in religious use. An Independent chapel was built in 1802 in the centre of Guildford; it later became associated with the Congregational movement, and after a large new Congregational church opened in 1863 it became a Sunday school before being converted into a restaurant.[23] Guildford Congregational Church on North Street was demolished and replaced by the present United Reformed Church[note 3] building nearby in 1965. A Congregational chapel was founded in Gomshall in 1825 and is still used by the United Reformed Church.[24] Elsewhere, there were Congregational chapels or mission halls at Compton (1876), Normandy (Willey Green) (1825), Holmbury St Mary (Felday Chapel; 1825), Pirbright (1868) and Rydes Hill (1862).[25] All have closed, but the 1822 chapel at Worplesdon[26] remains in use as a United Reformed Church[27] and in 1985 the former telephone exchange at Normandy was converted into a chapel to replace the building at Willey Green.[28] Westborough[29] and Bellfields in Guildford also have United Reformed congregations, the latter as part of St Peter's Shared Church which is also used by Anglicans.[30]

Baptists established fewer churches but can trace their local origins back further. Charcoal Barn Chapel at Tunsgate, now demolished, is the parent of four congregations in Guildford town. The present Chertsey Street Baptist Church met at the old chapel (converted from a barn in the 1680s) until 1953 and is its direct successor. Next came Guildford Baptist Church—founded in 1837 and now occupying its third building, the Millmead Centre; then Bethel Strict Baptist Chapel, founded in 1879 by Calvinist seceders; and in 1992, Guildford Park Church—a declining Evangelical church reinvigorated by a church plant from Chertsey Street.[31][32] Elsewhere, the Grade II-listed Ebenezer Strict Baptist Chapel at Ripley has been open since 1812,[33] and a newly established group (New Life Baptist Church) owns a combined church and community centre in Stoughton.[34]

Methodist chapels were built in several villages in the 19th century—Ash Vale, Burpham (for a Primitive Methodist congregation), Ripley, Shalford, Effingham and West Horsley—but only the last two named are still in use as of 2018, along with a chapel built in 1895 in the Guildford suburb of Stoughton.[9] Guildford town centre's old Methodist chapel stood alongside its Congregational equivalent on North Street until the 1960s, when both were demolished; a new Methodist church was built, but in 2013 the congregation moved out and started worshipping at St Mary's Church as part of a formal partnership between the Anglican and Methodist Churches.[35]

Locally, flint was the commonest building material for ancient churches (chancel wall of St Martin's Church, East Horsley pictured).

Building materials for churches vary across the borough. Good quality stone has never been plentiful in Surrey, but the area around Guildford yielded sarsens and puddingstone:[36] these were sometimes used in the construction of churches, as at Worplesdon[37] and Ripley[38] respectively. Bargate stone was quarried on a small scale around Guildford town and Godalming,[39] and it was used to build churches at Burpham,[40] Compton,[41] Normandy,[42] Chilworth (St Martha-on-the-Hill),[43] and Shackleford,[44] as well as St Nicolas' Church, Guildford[45] and the tower at St Lawrence's Church, Seale.[46] "Irregular veins" of carrstone also occur locally in the Lower Greensand,[39] and it can be seen (albeit obscured by rendering) at Wisley church.[47] The "curious local building practice" of galleting—placing pieces of carrstone or flint into the mortar surrounding blocks of masonry—is in evidence at Pirbright.[39][48] Most common, though, was the use of flint. The prevalence of this hard stone around the North Downs made it "the obvious material to use" for medieval churchbuilders in Surrey. Flints were often laid roughly and were rarely knapped, so Surrey's flint churches lack the elegance of those in other counties.[49] Nonconformist chapels in the area are mostly brick-built with tiled roofs, in common with the rest of Surrey; although stone was sometimes used from the late 19th century,[50] as at Ward Street Chapel in Guildford.[51] David Evelyn Nye's 1960s churches used laminated wood extensively.[13]

Some of Guildford's religious buildings do not fit these general patterns. At Chilworth is a 1950s timber church.[52] A tin tabernacle survives in use at nearby Peasmarsh in Shalford parish, and back in Chilworth another (now the village hall) served as the original Anglican church. It was replaced by the former Greshambury Institute, an Arts and Crafts-style building used by workers at a printing firm.[52] Two 19th-century barns in the borough have also been converted into churches: at Farley Green in 1930,[53] and in East Horsley 25 years later.[54] Another conversion of a secular building took place in 1985, when the congregation of the Normandy United Reformed Church bought the village's redundant telephone exchange to replace their small chapel.[28]

Religious affiliation[edit]

According to the United Kingdom Census 2011, 137,183 people lived in the borough of Guildford. Of these, 60.23% identified themselves as Christian, 1.98% were Muslim, 0.95% were Hindu, 0.61% were Buddhist, 0.23% were Jewish, 0.15% were Sikh, 0.34% followed another religion, 27.78% claimed no religious affiliation and 7.73% did not state their religion. The proportions of Christians, Buddhists and people with no religious affiliation were higher than the respective percentages across England as a whole (59.38%, 0.45% and 24.74%). Hinduism, Judaism, Islam, Sikhism and other religions all had lower proportions of adherents.[7]

Administration[edit]

Anglican churches[edit]

All Anglican churches in the area are part of the Diocese of Guildford, as shown on the noticeboard at St Mary the Virgin's Church, Worplesdon.

The Diocese of Guildford administers all of the borough's Anglican churches. Its seat is Guildford Cathedral.[55] The 46 churches are grouped geographically into deaneries. The two Archdeaconries of Dorking and Surrey are an intermediate administrative level between the diocese and the deaneries: Dorking, Leatherhead and Woking deaneries are part of the Archdeaconry of Dorking and Aldershot, Cranleigh, Godalming and Guildford deaneries are in the Archdeaconry of Surrey.[56] Dorking Deanery is responsible for Holmbury St Mary's church. East Horsley, Effingham, Ockham and the two churches at West Horsley are covered by Leatherhead Deanery. Pirbright, Ripley, Send and Wisley come under Woking Deanery's control. The churches at Ash, Ash Vale and Tongham are in Aldershot Deanery. Cranleigh Deanery covers Albury, Chilworth, Farley Green, Peaslake and Shere. The churches at Compton, Puttenham, Seale, Shackleford, The Sands and Wanborough are part of Godalming Deanery. Guildford Deanery covers the borough's other churches: the village churches of East Clandon, Normandy, Peasmarsh, St Martha, Shalford, West Clandon and Worplesdon; those in Guildford's suburbs and housing estates (Bellfields, Onslow Village, Park Barn, Wood Street Village, Merrow, Stoughton, Westborough and the two in Burpham); and the town-centre churches of Christ Church, Holy Trinity, St John the Evangelist's, St Mary's, St Nicholas' and St Saviour's.[56]

Roman Catholic churches[edit]

Guildford borough has five Roman Catholic churches—in the Merrow and Rydes Hill areas of Guildford and in the town centre, at Ash and at Effingham. Effingham is administered by Epsom Deanery and the others come under Guildford Deanery; these are two of 13 deaneries in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Arundel and Brighton,[57] whose cathedral is at Arundel in West Sussex.[58]

Other denominations[edit]

Guildford Baptist Church and the New Life Baptist Church at Stoughton are part of the Guildford Network of the South Eastern Baptist Association.[59] Ebenezer Chapel in Ripley and Bethel Chapel in Guildford are Strict Baptist places of worship affiliated with the Gospel Standard movement.[60] Also in Guildford, Chertsey Street Baptist Church and Guildford Park Church maintain links with GraceNet UK, an association of Reformed Evangelical Christian churches and organisations.[61][62]

The 13-church Wey Valley Methodist Circuit administers Cranleigh, Merrow, Stoughton, West Horsley, Knaphill, Woking, Byfleet, Walton, Weybridge, and Addlestone Methodist churches and the shared Anglican/Methodist church of St Mary's in Guildford town centre, the united Anglican/Methodist church in Sheerwater, and the united URC/Methodist church in Godalming. The Wey Valley Circuit came into being in September 2016, bringing together the Guildford Circuit and the Woking and Walton Circuit.[63] The former Shalford Methodist Church was also part of this Circuit. Effingham Methodist Church is in the eight-church Dorking & Horsham Methodist Circuit.[64][65]

Guildford borough's United Reformed Church congregations are split between the Southern Synod and the Wessex Synod, two of that denomination's 13 synods in the United Kingdom.[66] The Southern Synod administers Gomshall United Reformed Church;[24] the Wessex Synod is responsible for Guildford (Portsmouth Road[67] and Westborough),[29] Normandy[68] and Worplesdon churches.[27] The Anglican/United Reformed shared church of St Peter's on the Bellfields estate in Guildford is also part of the Wessex Synod.[30]

Chilworth Free Church,[69] Horsley Evangelical Church[70] and Send Evangelical Church[71] are members of two Evangelical groups: the Fellowship of Independent Evangelical Churches (FIEC), a pastoral and administrative network of about 500 churches with an evangelical outlook,[72] and Affinity (formerly the British Evangelical Council), a network of conservative Evangelical congregations throughout Great Britain.[73] Guildford Park Church is also a member of Affinity.[74]

Current places of worship[edit]

Name Image Location Denomination/
Affiliation
Grade Notes Refs
St Peter and St Paul's Church St Peter and St Paul's Church, Church Lane, Albury (March 2014, from Southeast) (3).JPG Albury
51°13′05″N 0°29′51″W / 51.2181°N 0.4975°W / 51.2181; -0.4975 (St Peter and St Paul's Church, Albury)
Anglican II Henry Drummond of the Albury Park estate wanted a replica of the Romanesque Revival church at Thaon to replace the old church on the estate. William McIntosh Brooks designed the "odd" red-brick building in 1842, and Arthur Blomfield added the transepts and apse in 1868. The church is cruciform and has a prominent tower. [15][18]
[75][76]
Brethren's Meeting Hall Brethren Meeting Room, New Pond Road, Artington, near Guildford (April 2015) (5).JPG Artington
51°12′19″N 0°35′32″W / 51.2054°N 0.5921°W / 51.2054; -0.5921 (Brethren's Meeting Hall, Artington)
Plymouth Brethren This large meeting room was registered for marriages in August 2008. It was built on derelict land outside Artington to replace a smaller Brethren meeting room in the Stoughton area of Guildford, for which a replacement had been sought since 1985. Planning permission was granted in 2004. [77][78]
[79]
St Peter's Church St Peter's Church, Ash Church Road, Ash (May 2014) (2).jpg Ash
51°14′57″N 0°42′56″W / 51.2491°N 0.7155°W / 51.2491; -0.7155 (St Peter's Church, Ash)
Anglican II* Although heavily restored and extended in 1865, some 13th-century work remains, and the broach spire-topped tower is 15th-century. Other features include the "very good" south door, with "very delicate" carving attributed to masons associated with Chertsey Abbey, and an octagonal timber font of the 17th century. The bells date from 1798. [15][80]
[81][82]
Church of the Holy Angels Church of the Holy Angels, Ash Church Road, Ash (May 2014) (1).JPG Ash
51°14′55″N 0°43′01″W / 51.2486°N 0.7169°W / 51.2486; -0.7169 (Church of the Holy Angels, Ash)
Roman Catholic The Southwark Catholic Mission supported Ash's early Catholic community, which had its origins in Masses said at the homes of retired World War I soldiers from nearby Aldershot. A hall was used later, but in 1931 work started on a permanent church. Architect P.A. Byrne replicated the design he used for his church at Wimborne in Dorset, but omitted the tower to keep costs down. The church, originally dedicated to St Michael and All Angels (it was renamed in the 1970s), opened on 2 December 1934. [83][84]
St Mary's Church St Mary's Church, Wood Street, Ash Vale (May 2014) (3).JPG Ash Vale
51°15′53″N 0°43′18″W / 51.2648°N 0.7218°W / 51.2648; -0.7218 (St Mary's Church, Ash Vale)
Anglican The present church, which dates from 1906, is the successor to a tin tabernacle which was built in 1885 within the parish of Ash. [80][85]
Ash Vale Christian Assembly Ash Vale Christian Assembly, Frimley Road, Ash Vale (May 2014) (3).JPG Ash Vale
51°16′31″N 0°43′23″W / 51.2753°N 0.7230°W / 51.2753; -0.7230 (Ash Vale Christian Assembly, Ash Vale)
Open Brethren Under the name Ash Vale Evangelical Church, this was registered for marriages in October 1980. It was reported in October 2010 that the building was being demolished and rebuilt. [86][87]
[88]
St Peter's Shared Church St Peter's Church, Hazel Avenue, Bellfields, Guildford (April 2014) (2).JPG Bellfields, Guildford
51°15′33″N 0°34′31″W / 51.2592°N 0.5752°W / 51.2592; -0.5752 (St Peter's Church, Bellfields)
Anglican/United Reformed Church This was built in 1968 as an Anglican church to the design of the Guildford Diocesan Architect. Meanwhile, Stoke Hill Congregational Church had opened on the Bellfields estate: it was registered for marriages in September 1965. After it closed in 1980, the two churches joined as a single congregation. [23][89]
[90]
New Hope Centre New Hope Centre (Elim Pentecostal), Larch Avenue, Bellfields, Guildford (April 2014, from Southeast).JPG Bellfields, Guildford
51°15′18″N 0°34′48″W / 51.2550°N 0.5800°W / 51.2550; -0.5800 (New Hope Centre, Bellfields)
Elim Pentecostal This was built by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Southwark as Challoner Hall (named after Bishop Challoner), for which it served as a Mass centre from 22 December 1951 until 1993. It was still owned by the Catholic Church in 1996, but is now an Elim Pentecostal church. Services were also held in the adjacent Christ's College but were moved back into the church building from June 2014. [91][92]
[93][94]
[95]
St Luke's Church St Luke's Church, Burpham Lane, Burpham (May 2014) (4).JPG Burpham
51°15′44″N 0°32′59″W / 51.2623°N 0.5496°W / 51.2623; -0.5496 (St Luke's Church, Burpham)
Anglican II Henry Woodyer's Bargate stone-built church of 1859, originally a chapel of ease to Worplesdon, consists simply of a nave and chancel divided by a chancel arch, lancet windows and an ashlar bell-cot topped by a small, thin spire. The "well-proportioned and coherent interior" has no aisles or arcades. [10][40]
[96][97]
Church of the Holy Spirit Church of the Holy Spirit, New Inn Lane, Burpham (May 2014) (1).JPG Burpham
51°15′25″N 0°32′29″W / 51.2570°N 0.5413°W / 51.2570; -0.5413 (Church of the Holy Spirit, Burpham)
Anglican Burpham's second church was built in 1966 and serves a large area of postwar housing. Damage caused by an arson attack in May 2012 was repaired in 2013–14 in conjunction with a more general refurbishment and reordering. [97][98]
[99]
Christ Church Christ Church, Waterden Road, Guildford (April 2014, from Southwest).jpg Charlotteville, Guildford
51°14′21″N 0°33′42″W / 51.2391°N 0.5618°W / 51.2391; -0.5618 (Christ Church, Charlotteville)
Anglican II Ewan Christian designed this large church in 1868 to serve an estate of contemporary houses northeast of Guildford town centre. It was built as a chapel of ease to St John the Evangelist's Church. The style is Early English Gothic Revival. The prominent buttressed tower faces the road and rises in three stages to a parapet with battlements. The body of the church has an apsidal chancel and a nave with aisles. [9][100]
[101]
Addison Hall Addison Hall (Brethren Meeting Room), Addison Road, Guildford (April 2014, from Southwest).JPG Charlotteville, Guildford
51°14′10″N 0°33′46″W / 51.2361°N 0.5629°W / 51.2361; -0.5629 (Addison Hall, Charlotteville)
Plymouth Brethren This meeting room is on Addison Road in the southeast of the town. In 1963 it was recorded as being the "city room" (main place of worship for Brethren) in the Guildford area. [102][103]
St Thomas's Church St Thomas's Church, New Road, Chilworth (March 2014, from Southeast).JPG Chilworth
51°12′50″N 0°32′21″W / 51.2139°N 0.5391°W / 51.2139; -0.5391 (St Thomas's Church, Chilworth)
Anglican II This "extraordinary little building", a square pavilion of red brick with concrete roof tiles, was built in 1896 as the Greshambury Institute to the design of William Howard Seth-Smith III. It was later converted into a church to replace a tin tabernacle. A partly glazed gabled porch provides the entrance, and on the crest of the roof is a domed wooden lantern. [17][104]
[105][106]
[52]
Chilworth Free Church Chilworth Free Church, Brookswood, Chilworth (March 2014, from Northeast).JPG Chilworth
51°12′47″N 0°32′10″W / 51.2131°N 0.5360°W / 51.2131; -0.5360 (Chilworth Free Church, Chilworth)
Evangelical The church opened in its timber-built premises in 1954 and was registered for marriages ten years later. [52][107]
[108]
St Nicholas' Church St Nicholas' Church, The Street, Compton (May 2014) (1).JPG Compton
51°12′52″N 0°38′05″W / 51.2144°N 0.6348°W / 51.2144; -0.6348 (St Nicholas' Church, Compton)
Anglican I The site is pre-Saxons but the oldest fabric is now 11th-century. An "impressively plain" Bargate stone tower contrasts with the elaborate Romanesque 12th-century chancel. A possible anchorite cell, a 13th-century stained glass window and a Norman font are other uncommon features, but rarest of all is the two-storey double sanctuary. [15][41]
[109][110]
St Thomas of Canterbury's Church St Thomas of Canterbury's Church, The Street, East Clandon (May 2014) (1).JPG East Clandon
51°15′18″N 0°28′56″W / 51.2549°N 0.4822°W / 51.2549; -0.4822 (St Thomas of Canterbury's Church, East Clandon)
Anglican I In 1900 Thomas Graham Jackson added the north aisle and bell-tower in a complementary style to this "small and genuine" village church of the 12th and 13th centuries. The nave is the older part; the 13th-century chancel is a "rough" and early interpretation of the Early English Gothic style. A monument to Stuart Rendel, 1st Baron Rendel of nearby Hatchlands Park was designed by his grandson Harry. [15][111]
[112][113]
St Martin's Church St Martin's Church, Ockham Road South, East Horsley (May 2014) (3).JPG East Horsley
51°15′50″N 0°25′54″W / 51.2640°N 0.4317°W / 51.2640; -0.4317 (St Martin's Church, East Horsley)
Anglican II* A 13th-century church thoroughly restored in that style in 1869 by Henry Woodyer, the building retains its original tower and chancel arch. Part of the arcade of the nave is also an original 15th-century design. The Lovelace family mausoleum is in the churchyard. [15][114]
[115][116]
Horsley Evangelical Church Horsley Evangelical Church, Ockham Road North, East Horsley (May 2014) (3).JPG East Horsley
51°16′54″N 0°26′15″W / 51.2816°N 0.4374°W / 51.2816; -0.4374 (Horsley Evangelical Church, East Horsley)
Evangelical The church was founded in 1952 in a flint barn built in 1867 on Duncombe Farm, one of many buildings in the village erected to the design of the Lovelace family—major landowners in the area. As Horsley Independent Evangelical Church it was registered for marriages in February 1955. [117][118]
[54]
St Lawrence's Church St Lawrence's Church, Church Street, Effingham (May 2014) (2).JPG Effingham
51°16′16″N 0°23′54″W / 51.2712°N 0.3984°W / 51.2712; -0.3984 (St Lawrence's Church, Effingham)
Anglican II* Little ancient fabric remains in this 12th- and 13th-century church due to frequent restoration-particularly in 1888 by W.J. Shearburn (who designed the tower). The first rebuilding was as early as 1388, when William of Wykeham ordered work to be carried out following neglect by Merton Priory. Many of the windows date from the 15th century. [15][119]
[19][120]
Effingham Methodist Church Effingham Methodist Church, Chapel Hill, Effingham (May 2014) (3).JPG Effingham
51°16′17″N 0°23′59″W / 51.2713°N 0.3998°W / 51.2713; -0.3998 (Effingham Methodist Church, Effingham)
Methodist A house in this village was licensed for Nonconformist worship in 1844 by members of the Wesleyan chapel at Dorking. A permanent chapel, of flint and brick with a gabled slate roof, was built in 1854, a hall was added a century later, and the interior was reordered in 1993. The chapel has been registered for marriages since June 1886. [119][121]
[122][123]
[124]
Church of Our Lady of Sorrows Church of Our Lady of Sorrows, Lower Road, Effingham (May 2014) (6).JPG Effingham
51°16′25″N 0°23′56″W / 51.2735°N 0.3988°W / 51.2735; -0.3988 (Church of Our Lady of Sorrows, Effingham)
Roman Catholic Edward Bonner was the architect of Effingham's Catholic church, which was completed in 1913. Ian Nairn considered it more medieval in style than the genuinely 13th-century Anglican parish church. The symmetrical façade had a pyramid-capped tower flanked by aisles, and the walls are of flint. The now demolished St Alphege's Church at West Horsley was a daughter church and was served from here. [19][21]
[123][125]
St Michael's Church St Michael's, Farley Green - geograph.org.uk - 655972.jpg Farley Green
51°11′47″N 0°29′01″W / 51.1965°N 0.4835°W / 51.1965; -0.4835 (St Michael's Church, Farley Green)
Anglican Brook Farm was established in 1839 in this remote hamlet in Albury parish. A barn was built between 1840 and 1880 and was used for agricultural purposes until 1922. The subsequent owner of the land died in 1929 and his widow presented the barn to the parish so it could be converted into a chapel of ease in his memory. It opened in 1930. [15][53]
St Augustine's Coptic Orthodox Church St Augustine's Coptic Orthodox Church, Station Road, Gomshall (March 2014, from Southwest) (2).JPG Gomshall
51°13′09″N 0°26′37″W / 51.2193°N 0.4437°W / 51.2193; -0.4437 (St Augustine's Coptic Orthodox Church, Gomshall)
Coptic Orthodox In 2011 the Coptic Orthodox Church bought this former Roman Catholic chapel, which had been dedicated to St Mary of the Angels, and rededicated it to St Augustine. The church had been built in 1964 to replace a Nissen hut, and was known as the "Bingo Chapel" because residents of Gomshall and Shere raised much of the money at bingo evenings. It was part of the parish of Chilworth Friary Church (the Holy Ghost). [22][126]
Gomshall Chapel Gomshall Chapel (URC), Station Road, Gomshall (March 2014, from West) (1).JPG Gomshall
51°13′09″N 0°26′47″W / 51.2193°N 0.4464°W / 51.2193; -0.4464 (Gomshall Chapel, Gomshall)
United Reformed Church The chapel was opened in October 1820 by the Surrey Congregational Mission at a cost of £300, donated mostly by members of other churches. By 1869, the building had become "dilapidated and wretched", and as congregations grew it was improved and enlarged twice—in that year at a cost of £110, and again in 1887 for £524. It was registered for marriages in November 1888. Felday Chapel at Holmbury St Mary was founded as a daughter church in 1825. [16][127]
[128][129]
Guildford Cathedral Guildford Cathedral, Stag Hill, Guildford (Seen from Onslow Village) (May 2014) (1).JPG Guildford
51°14′28″N 0°35′24″W / 51.2411°N 0.5900°W / 51.2411; -0.5900 (Guildford Cathedral, Guildford)
Anglican II* Edward Maufe's "conservative", "undramatic Curvilinear Gothic"[note 4] cathedral was designed in 1932–33 but completed in stages between 1954 and 1966. It is a cruciform building of pale brick with a tower over the central crossing. The "noble and subtle" interior is spacious and plain. [106][130]
[131]
Holy Trinity Church Holy Trinity Church, High Street, Guildford (May 2014) (4).jpg Guildford
51°14′09″N 0°34′15″W / 51.2359°N 0.5707°W / 51.2359; -0.5707 (Holy Trinity Church, Guildford)
Anglican I This red-brick church of 1749–63 incorporates the Weston Chapel of 1540, which has chequerwork walls of alternating freestone and flint. The rebuilding, in a Palladian style by London architect James Horne, was prompted by the collapse of the original tower. Arthur Blomfield added the apsidal chancel in 1888. A large church on a prominent site, it is known as Guildford's "Upper Church". [8][106]
[132][133]
St John the Evangelist's Church St John the Evangelist's Church, Stoke Road, Guildford (April 2014, from North-Northwest) (2).jpg Guildford
51°14′49″N 0°34′16″W / 51.2470°N 0.5711°W / 51.2470; -0.5711 (St John the Evangelist's Church, Guildford)
Anglican II* T. Goodchild restored this 14th- and 15th-century church in 1858, and more work was undertaken in the late 20th century. Surviving original features include the tower and moulded tower arch, a 16th-century chapel on the north side, the arcade on the south side of the chancel and a "vigorous" five-light east window. The church is in the ancient parish of Stoke was owned by Lewes Priory. [9][15]
[134][135]
St Nicolas' Church St Nicholas' Church, Bury Street, Guildford (April 2014, from Northwest) (1).JPG Guildford
51°14′05″N 0°34′39″W / 51.2346°N 0.5774°W / 51.2346; -0.5774 (St Nicholas' Church, Guildford)
Anglican II* The present appearance date from Teulon and Christian's restoration of 1870–75, but the Loseley Chapel survives from the 15th century. It contains memorials to the More-Molyneuxs of Loseley Park. The style is 13th-century Gothic Revival, executed in Bargate stone. [8][106]
[45][136]
St Saviour's Church St Saviour's Church, Woodbridge Road, Guildford (April 2014, from West) (1).JPG Guildford
51°14′15″N 0°34′21″W / 51.2376°N 0.5726°W / 51.2376; -0.5726 (St Saviour's Church, Guildford)
Anglican II H.S. Legg and Sons designed this prominently sited town church in 1895 in the Perpendicular Gothic Revival style. The buttressed corner tower with tall spire dominates the building. Sandstone and ashlar are the main building materials. A church room served the area, which was in the parish of Stoke (St John the Evangelist's), from 1892; the next year a separate parish was formed. [9][45]
[137]
St Mary's Church St Mary's Church, Quarry Street, Guildford (April 2014) (1).JPG Guildford
51°14′05″N 0°34′29″W / 51.2346°N 0.5746°W / 51.2346; -0.5746 (St Mary's Church, Guildford)
Anglican/Methodist I T. Goodchild's restoration of 1862 did not eliminate the 11th- and 12th-century fabric of this ancient parish church. The tower is the oldest part; much of the building dates from the 1180s. The chancel had an apse until it was demolished in 1825. Guildford Methodist Church officially joined St Mary's on 1 September 2013, and the church is now a joint Anglican and Methodist congregation. [8][106]
[138][139]
[35][140]
Chertsey Street Baptist Church Chertsey Street Baptist Church, Chertsey Street, Guildford (April 2014).JPG Guildford
51°14′19″N 0°34′15″W / 51.2386°N 0.5708°W / 51.2386; -0.5708 (Chertsey Street Baptist Church, Guildford)
Baptist The congregation has occupied a former Primitive Methodist chapel since 1953 but can trace its origins back to the "Charcoal Barn Chapel" on Tunsgate, opened in the 1680s. Secessions in 1837 and 1879 resulted in new Baptist causes being founded in the town—respectively, the present Guildford Baptist Church and Bethel Strict Baptist Chapel. Another congregation was planted out of Chertsey Street in 1992 at the former Guildford Park Evangelical Church. [9][32]
[51][141]
[142]
Guildford Baptist Church Guildford Baptist Church, Millmead Centre, Bury Fields, Guildford (April 2014, from Southwest).JPG Guildford
51°14′00″N 0°34′37″W / 51.2332°N 0.5769°W / 51.2332; -0.5769 (Guildford Baptist Church, Guildford)
Baptist In 1824 or 1837[note 5] some members of Charcoal Barn Chapel seceded and began meeting in a room in Quarry Street. This was succeeded by Hepzibah Chapel at Barrack Field and then by Commercial Road Chapel, opened on 24 August 1862. Originally Strict Baptist, the cause moved towards General Baptist (open communion) beliefs. Urban renewal led to the compulsory purchase and demolition of the chapel, and the church moved to the new Millmead Centre in 1972. [32][143]
[144][145]
Kingdom Hall Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses, Sydenham Road, Guildford (April 2014, from Southeast).JPG Guildford
51°14′12″N 0°34′04″W / 51.2368°N 0.5679°W / 51.2368; -0.5679 (Kingdom Hall, Guildford)
Jehovah's Witnesses This building is set behind Guildford High Street and was registered for marriages in February 1967. It serves the Guildford, East and Guildford, West Congregations of Jehovah's Witnesses. [146][147]
Guildford Synagogue Guildford Synagogue, York Road, Guildford (April 2014, from Southwest).JPG Guildford
51°14′24″N 0°34′14″W / 51.2399°N 0.5705°W / 51.2399; -0.5705 (Guildford Synagogue, Guildford)
Jewish A medieval synagogue existed near Guildford High Street, but the present building was opened in 1979 by Chief Rabbi Immanuel Jakobovits. It replaced a succession of rented halls and rooms previously used by the modern-day community. It was registered for marriages in 1998. The tradition is Ashkenazi Orthodox. [148][149]
Friends Meeting House Quaker Meeting House, Ward Street, Guildford (April 2014, from West).JPG Guildford
51°14′14″N 0°34′19″W / 51.2373°N 0.5720°W / 51.2373; -0.5720 (Friends Meeting House, Guildford)
Quaker II Quakers first worshipped in Guildford in 1655, congregations numbered 400–500 by 1669 and a meeting house and burial ground existed by 1673. The present hipped-roofed red-brick building, rebuilt on the same site as the old meeting house when that became dilapidated, dates from 1805. The wide façade has arched sash windows and an off-centred porch (added in 1913). [51][106]
[1][150]
[151][152]
St Joseph's Church St Joseph's RC Church, Eastgate Gardens, Guildford (April 2014) (Front).JPG Guildford
51°14′21″N 0°34′05″W / 51.2393°N 0.5680°W / 51.2393; -0.5680 (St Joseph's Church, Guildford)
Roman Catholic The present church stands on the site of an old quarry and dates from 1984. It replaced the town's first permanent Catholic church on Chertsey Street, erected in 1860 on land bought eight years earlier and rebuilt by Ingress Bell in 1881. This needed expansion and refurbishment by the 1980s, and the site was sold for offices and a larger church built instead. Local architects Nye Saunders & Partners (job architect Richard Greening) designed the red-brick building. [9]
[153]
Salvation Army Citadel Salvation Army Citadel, Woodbridge Road, Guildford (April 2014, from Southeast) (3).JPG Guildford
51°14′25″N 0°34′35″W / 51.2403°N 0.5764°W / 51.2403; -0.5764 (Salvation Army Citadel, Guildford)
Salvation Army The present building on Woodbridge Road was registered for marriages in October 1978 and replaced a hall in Onslow Street which was registered between December 1911 and April 1972. [154][155]
[156]
Bethel Strict Baptist Chapel Bethel Strict Baptist Chapel, The Bars, Guildford (April 2014, from Northwest) (1).JPG Guildford
51°14′18″N 0°34′18″W / 51.2383°N 0.5718°W / 51.2383; -0.5718 (Bethel Strict Baptist Chapel, Guildford)
Strict Baptist When the old Baptist chapel in Commercial Road adopted General Baptist beliefs, some Strict Baptist members seceded and founded a new congregation. They met in a room, then Ward Street Hall, a tin tabernacle and finally the present chapel, which dates from 1910. [9][106]
[157][158]
Guildford United Reformed Church Guildford United Reformed Church, Portsmouth Road, Guildford (April 2014, from West).JPG Guildford
51°13′54″N 0°34′43″W / 51.2318°N 0.5787°W / 51.2318; -0.5787 (Guildford United Reformed Church, Guildford)
United Reformed Church Architects Barber, Bundy & Greenfield (job architect D. Bundy) designed Guildford's new octagonal Congregational church in 1965 to replace the former premises in the town centre. The building is lit by windows in the clerestory. It was registered for marriages in January 1965. [23][45]
[159][160]
Guildford Park Church Guildford Park Church (Evangelical), Guildford Park Road, Guildford (April 2014, from Southeast).JPG Guildford Park
51°14′16″N 0°35′04″W / 51.2378°N 0.5844°W / 51.2378; -0.5844 (Guildford Park Church, Guildford Park)
Evangelical This church had an independent Evangelical congregation but was going to be closed in 1992 until a church plant from Chertsey Street Baptist Church gave it new impetus. As congregations grew, the church was able to become independent again in 1999. [32][161]
St Mary the Virgin's Church St Mary the Virgin's Church, Horsham Road, Holmbury St Mary (March 2014, from North) (2).jpg Holmbury St Mary
51°11′18″N 0°24′47″W / 51.1883°N 0.4131°W / 51.1883; -0.4131 (St Mary the Virgin's Church, Holmbury St Mary)
Anglican I Built in Shere parish in 1879 to the Decorated Gothic Revival design of G.E. Street and enlarged in 1966, this stone and Sussex Marble. The site slopes steeply, and "clever adjustment" of the floor levels in the church allowed vestries to be placed beneath the north chapel. [15][16]
[162][163]
St Francis' Church St Francis, Littleton - geograph.org.uk - 1522414.jpg Littleton
51°13′06″N 0°35′42″W / 51.2182°N 0.5951°W / 51.2182; -0.5951 (St Francis' Church, Littleton)
Anglican II James More-Molyneux of nearby Loseley Park built this as a school in 1843. By the early 20th century it had been extended and licensed as a place of worship, served by curates from St Nicholas' Church in Guildford. The "very picturesque" building has a short tower with a spire. [15][164]
[165][166]
St John the Evangelist's Church St John the Evangelist's Church, Epsom Road, Merrow (April 2014, from South) (2).JPG Merrow
51°14′46″N 0°31′38″W / 51.2461°N 0.5273°W / 51.2461; -0.5273 (St John the Evangelist's Church, Merrow)
Anglican II From the ancient parish church only some fragments remain: a zigzag-moulded Norman arch above one doorway (c. 1150) and the arcade of the south aisle. R.C. Hussey rebuilt the church in 1842 and Arthur Blomfield extended it in 1881 by adding a north aisle. The walls are of flint, dressed with stone which was painted white in the 20th century. [11][15]
[167][168]
Merrow Methodist Church Merrow Methodist Church, Sheeplands Avenue, Merrow (April 2014, from Southwest) (4).JPG Merrow
51°14′52″N 0°31′58″W / 51.2478°N 0.5329°W / 51.2478; -0.5329 (Merrow Methodist Church, Merrow)
Methodist The church was opened in 1955 to serve the recently built Bushy Hill housing estate in Merrow. It was registered for marriages in January 1958. A new building opened alongside this original hall in 1968, and further alterations were made in the late 20th century. The church runs or hosts various community facilities such as a crèche and a Brownie pack. [169][170]
[171]
Church of St Pius X St Pius X RC Church, Horseshoe Lane East, Merrow (April 2014, from South) (2).JPG Merrow
51°14′42″N 0°32′19″W / 51.2450°N 0.5386°W / 51.2450; -0.5386 (Church of St Pius X, Merrow)
Roman Catholic Now serving both Merrow and Burpham after the latter's Catholic church was closed, this church has its origins in Masses celebrated at St Peter's Catholic School in Merrow (St Peter's Chapel was registered for marriages in 1969). Nearby was a convent, and in the grounds a permanent church was built. This was registered for marriages in February 1973, and a parish was constituted that year. [172]
[173][174]
St Mark's Church St Mark's Church, Guildford Road, Wyke, Normandy (May 2014) (6).JPG Normandy
51°15′18″N 0°40′52″W / 51.2549°N 0.6812°W / 51.2549; -0.6812 (St Mark's Church, Normandy)
Anglican II Henry Woodyer designed Normandy's church, originally in the parish of Ash, in 1847. The simple Bargate stone and ashlar building with a belfry at one end was his first new-build church. The aisleless nave and taller chancel are flanked by a vestry and side chapel. [15][80]
[42][82]
[175]
Emmanuel Church Emmanuel Church, Glaziers Lane, Normandy (May 2014) (2).JPG Normandy
51°14′58″N 0°40′03″W / 51.2495°N 0.6675°W / 51.2495; -0.6675 (Emmanuel Free Church, Normandy)
United Reformed Church This now houses the congregation of the former United Reformed chapel at Willey Green. Funds raised by its sale and by the local community allowed this redundant telephone exchange building to be bought in 1985 and converted into a church. Its present name was adopted in 1991. [28][176]
All Saints Church All Saints Church, Ockham, Surrey (Geograph Image 2689838 0ff703d1).jpg Ockham
51°17′53″N 0°28′18″W / 51.2980°N 0.4717°W / 51.2980; -0.4717 (All Saints Church, Ockham)
Anglican I Ockham's church is well-known for its large seven-light east window, seen only in one other British church. It is mostly a 13th-century building, but the tower is Perpendicular Gothic of about two centuries later. There are many 15th-century details elsewhere as well, including windows and panelled ceilings. [15][177]
[178][179]
All Saints Church All Saints Church, Vicarage Gate, Onslow Village, Guildford (May 2014) (5).JPG Onslow Village
51°14′07″N 0°35′45″W / 51.2353°N 0.5957°W / 51.2353; -0.5957 (All Saints Church, Onslow Village)
Anglican The first church in this suburb of Guildford was a tin tabernacle erected in the 1930s as daughter church of St Nicolas'. A church hall was built in the 1960s, the original building was demolished, and the present church (of modernist design with a parabolic roof) was finished in 1967. [180][181]
St Clare's Church St Clare, Park Barn - geograph.org.uk - 1522700.jpg Park Barn, Guildford
51°14′37″N 0°36′41″W / 51.2437°N 0.6115°W / 51.2437; -0.6115 (St Clare's Church, Park Barn)
Anglican This housing estate grew quickly in the 1960s, and the vicar of St Francis' Church in Westborough saw the opportunity to found a daughter church. Construction of St Clare's was carried out mostly by local residents. The churches are still part of a joint parish. [182]
St Mark's Church St Mark's Church, Walking Bottom, Peaslake (March 2014, from Southeast).JPG Peaslake
51°11′28″N 0°26′51″W / 51.1912°N 0.4475°W / 51.1912; -0.4475 (St Mark's Church, Peaslake)
Anglican II Ewan Christian design this plain chapel of ease to St James's Church in Shere in 1889. Consisting of a nave, a chancel with a large apse and a small timber belfry with a clock, it has an array of late-19th- and early-20th-century stained glass. The main material is Wealden sandstone. [15][16]
[183][184]
St Michael's Church St Michael's Church, Oakdene Road, Peasmarsh (May 2014) (1).JPG Peasmarsh
51°12′31″N 0°34′53″W / 51.2087°N 0.5815°W / 51.2087; -0.5815 (St Michael's Church, Peasmarsh)
Anglican Occasional services are held in this tin tabernacle in the hamlet of Peasmarsh, part of Shalford parish. Its existence was documented in the 1911 Victoria County History of Surrey. [185][186]
St Michael and All Angels Church St Michael and All Angels Church, Church Lane, Pirbright (May 2014) (9).JPG Pirbright
51°17′41″N 0°39′00″W / 51.2946°N 0.6499°W / 51.2946; -0.6499 (St Michael and All Angels Church, Pirbright)
Anglican II* This ancient church (granted to Newark Priory in 1240) was mostly rebuilt in 1784 in a "very pretty Georgian" style. The nave is of brick, but the main material is local stone which has been galleted. The battlemented tower has a thin spike-like spire. The chancel was altered in a Gothic Revival fashion in the 19th century. [15][48]
[187][188]
St John the Baptist's Church St John the Baptist's Church, The Street, Puttenham (May 2014) (4).jpg Puttenham
51°13′20″N 0°39′55″W / 51.2223°N 0.6653°W / 51.2223; -0.6653 (St John the Baptist's Church, Puttenham)
Anglican II* Henry Woodyer's restoration in 1861 added new details such as large dormers, but the interior retains its 12th-century appearance (the church dates from about 1160). Materials include sandstone, chalk, Bath stone and red and blue brickwork. The prominent west tower resembles that at nearby Worplesdon. [15][189]
[190][191]
St Mary Magdalen's Church St Mary Magdalen's Church, High Street, Ripley (May 2014) (5).JPG Ripley
51°17′57″N 0°29′37″W / 51.2991°N 0.4935°W / 51.2991; -0.4935 (St Mary Magdalen's Church, Ripley)
Anglican II* The chancel is c. 1160 and the east window was inserted about 70 years later, but the bulk of this puddingstone, flint and ashlar church dates from 1846 (built to the design of Benjamin Ferrey and 1869 (Thomas Graham Jackson). There is no tower or spire—only a bell-cot at the west end. The church was originally a chapel of ease to Send. [15][38]
[192][193]
Ebenezer Chapel Ebenezer Strict Baptist Chapel, Newark Lane, Ripley (May 2014) (3).JPG Ripley
51°19′45″N 0°24′36″W / 51.3291°N 0.4100°W / 51.3291; -0.4100 (Ebenezer Chapel, Ripley)
Strict Baptist II This small rendered brick chapel was built for Baptist pastor William Meryett from Woking in 1812. He ministered there until 1845. The sash windows and vaulted ceiling is original, but the fittings were donations from a Strict Baptist chapel in Aylesbury which closed in the 1950s. [33][192]
[194][195]
[196]
St Mary's Church St Mary's RC Church (Rydes Hill), Aldershot Road, Guildford (April 2014, from North).JPG Rydes Hill, Guildford
51°15′05″N 0°36′06″W / 51.2515°N 0.6018°W / 51.2515; -0.6018 (St Mary's Church, Rydes Hill)
Roman Catholic Rydes Hill Preparatory School was founded by a religious order in 1945. A room was used as a Mass centre for local people, served by the school chaplain, and by the 1950s the congregation exceeded 100. Work on a permanent church within the school grounds started in June 1963 and it opened on 27 June 1964. It was rebuilt in 1978 after structural problems. [197]
[198]
St Martha-on-the-Hill Church St Martha on the Hill, Chilworth - geograph.org.uk - 432885.jpg St Martha
51°13′29″N 0°31′44″W / 51.2247°N 0.5290°W / 51.2247; -0.5290 (St Martha-on-the-Hill Church, St Martha)
Anglican II Probably extant at the time of the Domesday survey, but ruinous by 1845, this "well-known landmark" high on the North Downs was rebuilt in a Norman style by Henry Woodyer in 1848–50. The cruciform building is of Bargate stone and sandstone and has a central tower. Originally there was a "very massive" tower at the west end. [15][17]
[43][105]
St Lawrence's Church St Lawrence's Church, Manor Fields, Seale (May 2014) (4).JPG Seale
51°13′24″N 0°43′01″W / 51.2232°N 0.7170°W / 51.2232; -0.7170 (St Lawrence's Church, Seale)
Anglican II Little of the ancient church remains following a lengthy rebuilding and restoration (1861–73) by J. Croft, although the timber porch on the south side is 14th- or 15th-century. The pyramid-capped tower is of Bargate stone, while the rest of the building is of sandstone and clunch. The altarpiece painting is attributed to Cima da Conegliano. [15][46]
[199]
St Mary the Virgin's Church St Mary the Virgin, Send - geograph.org.uk - 432876.jpg Send
51°16′45″N 0°32′27″W / 51.2791°N 0.5408°W / 51.2791; -0.5408 (St Mary the Virgin's Church, Send)
Anglican II* This small 13th-century church (the chancel dates from the 1240s) is distant from the village. Alterations were made to the nave in the 14th century; the tower is Perpendicular Gothic; and the "simple" wooden porch is 15th-century. Some windows from that period also survive, but the church was restored in 1847. [15][192]
[200][201]
St Mary's Church Room St Mary's Church Room, Send Road, Send (May 2014) (3).JPG Send
51°17′33″N 0°32′09″W / 51.2924°N 0.5358°W / 51.2924; -0.5358 (St Mary's Church Room , Send)
Anglican Although this building in the centre of Send is principally used by church and community groups, meetings and similar, Anglican services are held occasionally. [202]
Send Evangelical Church Send Evangelical Church, Broadmead Road, Send (May 2014) (1).JPG Send
51°17′45″N 0°32′30″W / 51.2957°N 0.5416°W / 51.2957; -0.5416 (Send Evangelical Church, Send)
Evangelical Guildford Congregational Church founded a mission in Old Woking in 1865. From 1870, open-air meetings took place in nearby Send; and in 1875 an "excellent chapel" was erected at a cost of £800. As Cartbridge Mission Chapel it was registered for marriages in January 1877. The building was subsequently extended, but the cause failed in the 1970s and the registration was cancelled in May 1973. East Horsley Evangelical Church bought the building and planted a new church there in May 1974. [192][203]
[204][205]
[206][207]
St Mary the Virgin's Church St Mary the Virgin's Church, Shackleford Road, Shackleford (May 2014) (6).JPG Shackleford
51°11′43″N 0°39′19″W / 51.1952°N 0.6552°W / 51.1952; -0.6552 (St Mary the Virgin's Church, Shackleford)
Anglican II This is an "above average" church designed by George Gilbert Scott in 1865 for this hamlet near Godalming. The Early English Gothic Revival building of Bargate stone has a tall central tower, north and south aisles with large arcades, and an apsidal chancel. [15][44]
[208][209]
St Mary the Virgin's Church St Mary the Virgin's Church, The Street, Shalford (May 2014) (3).jpg Shalford
51°13′15″N 0°34′15″W / 51.2208°N 0.5707°W / 51.2208; -0.5707 (St Mary the Virgin's Church, Shalford)
Anglican II Shalford's first church was medieval, but it was rebuilt in the Classical style in 1789–90. In 1847 it was replaced by a large, "ambitious but unsatisfactory" Early English Gothic Revival-style building by Benjamin Ferrey. The tall building has a large corner tower with a spire. [15][186]
[210][211]
St James's Church St James's Church, The Square, Shere (March 2014, from Southwest).JPG Shere
51°13′09″N 0°27′47″W / 51.2191°N 0.4630°W / 51.2191; -0.4630 (St James's Church, Shere)
Anglican I This 13th-century church, "second to none in Surrey for beauty and antiquarian interest", occupies a "charming setting" in this riverside village. The tall Norman tower has a prominent spire. Minimal restoration was carried out in 1895, so most of the original features remain. Some of the building material may have been reused from ruined Roman buildings nearby. [15][16]
[212][213]
Harry Edwards Spiritual Healing Sanctuary Harry Edwards Spiritual Healing Sanctuary, Burrows Lea, Shere (March 2014) (2).JPG Shere
51°12′26″N 0°27′27″W / 51.2072°N 0.4574°W / 51.2072; -0.4574 (Harry Edwards Spiritual Healing Sanctuary, Shere)
Spiritualist Harry Edwards founded this healing sanctuary in 1946 at Burrows Lea, a mansion in the countryside near Shere. The complex includes a chapel which is used for worship and which was registered for marriages in June 1973. The premises can be used for various events and are run by a charity. [214][215]
[216][217]
Emmanuel Church Emmanuel Church, Shepherds Lane, Stoughton, Guildford (April 2014, from Northwest).JPG Stoughton, Guildford
51°15′18″N 0°35′39″W / 51.2549°N 0.5942°W / 51.2549; -0.5942 (Emmanuel Church, Stoughton)
Anglican Stoughton's parish church dates from 1904 but was extended and extensively refurbished in the 1990s and 2000s. It was built of stone to a Decorated Gothic Revival design by W.G. Scott. Services are strongly evangelical in style. A brick building nearby served worshippers in the area before the church was built. [9][218]
New Life Baptist Church QE Park Centre (home of New Life Baptist Church), Queen Elizabeth Park, Guildford (April 2014, from North).JPG Stoughton, Guildford
51°15′38″N 0°35′19″W / 51.2606°N 0.5887°W / 51.2606; -0.5887 (New Life Baptist Church, Stoughton)
Baptist The church was founded in 1997 as a local congregation of Guildford Baptist Church members. It met in a school until acquiring the newly built Queen Elizabeth Park Centre in 2012, which it operates as a combined church and community centre. [34][219]
Stoughton Methodist Church Stoughton Methodist Church, Manor Road, Stoughton, Guildford (April 2014, from Southeast) (1).JPG Stoughton, Guildford
51°15′18″N 0°35′15″W / 51.2550°N 0.5875°W / 51.2550; -0.5875 (Stoughton Methodist Church, Stoughton)
Methodist The present stone-built church dates from 1895, but Wesleyan Methodists bought a plot of land in 1890 and erected a tin tabernacle the following year. After the new church was opened, this served as a church hall until a replacement was built in 1953. The new building was designed by the same architect as the Methodist chapel at nearby Shalford. [9][220]
[221]
Manor Road Evangelical Church Manor Road Evangelical Church, Manor Road, Stoughton, Guildford (April 2014, from East).JPG Stoughton, Guildford
51°15′15″N 0°35′14″W / 51.2543°N 0.5873°W / 51.2543; -0.5873 (Manor Road Evangelical Church, Stoughton)
Open Brethren This church was originally known as Manor Road Hall and was registered for marriages in February 1936. [86][222]
[223][224]
Church of the Good Shepherd Church of the Good Shepherd, The Sands, Seale - geograph.org.uk - 145779.jpg The Sands
51°12′40″N 0°44′20″W / 51.2112°N 0.7390°W / 51.2112; -0.7390 (Church of the Good Shepherd, The Sands)
Anglican This church dates from 1875 and is part of a four-church parish with the villages of Seale, Puttenham and Wanborough. [225]
St Paul's Church Tongham Church.JPG Tongham
51°13′58″N 0°43′50″W / 51.2327°N 0.7305°W / 51.2327; -0.7305 (St Paul's Church, Tongham)
Anglican II This small church dates from 1865 and was designed by Ewan Christian. It is distinguished by a round apse and a tall, steep tiled roof on which a thin flèche stands. The nave has lancet windows. Sandstone and ashlar are the principal materials. [226][227]
Tongham Christian Fellowship Tongham Christian Fellowship, Poyle Road, Tongham (May 2014) (3).JPG Tongham
51°14′01″N 0°43′34″W / 51.2336°N 0.7262°W / 51.2336; -0.7262 (Tongham Christian Fellowship, Tongham)
Evangelical This independent Evangelical church opened in 1929 and was originally registered for worship and (in March 1929) for marriages with the name Tongham Evangelical Free Church; its present name was given after it merged with the Normandy Christian Fellowship. [228][229]
[230]
St Bartholomew's Church Wanborough, Church.JPG Wanborough
51°13′54″N 0°39′45″W / 51.2317°N 0.6624°W / 51.2317; -0.6624 (St Bartholomew's Church, Wanborough)
Anglican I No more than a "tiny chapel" hidden in a farmyard, this 13th-century building (erected by monks from Waverley Abbey to replace an older church) was restored in 1862 from a ruinous condition, having been out of use for about 200 years. The walls combine flintwork, brickwork, clunch and sandstone. There is no tower or spire—simply a bell on one gable end. [15][231]
[232][233]
St Peter and St Paul's Church St Peter and St Paul's Church, The Street, West Clandon (May 2014) (1).JPG West Clandon
51°15′03″N 0°30′19″W / 51.2508°N 0.5052°W / 51.2508; -0.5052 (St Peter and St Paul's Church, West Clandon)
Anglican II* Restoration work of 1879 (by J.C. Boys) and 1913 (Thomas Graham Jackson) left some 12th- and 13th-century details in this flint-built church. The weatherboarded tower and shingled spire were rebuilt by Jackson. The nave (built c. 1180) is the oldest remaining section. [15][234]
[235][236]
St Mary's Church St Mary's Church, Epsom Road, West Horsley (May 2014) (7).JPG West Horsley
51°15′45″N 0°26′30″W / 51.2626°N 0.4416°W / 51.2626; -0.4416 (St Mary's Church, West Horsley)
Anglican I Nothing remains of the Domesday-era church: the tower, which is 12th-century, is the oldest part. Otherwise the present structure dates from the 13th and 16th centuries, when the south aisle and its adjacent chapel were built. There are many memorials inside, including one attributed to Grinling Gibbons. [15][237]
[238][239]
West Horsley Methodist Church West Horsley Methodist Church, The Street, West Horsley (May 2014) (3).JPG West Horsley
51°15′45″N 0°26′30″W / 51.2626°N 0.4416°W / 51.2626; -0.4416 (St Mary's Church, West Horsley)
Methodist The success of outdoor preaching in West Horsley by Wesleyan ministers in the late 19th century led to the construction of a chapel in 1876. It opened on Easter Monday that year. A Sunday School followed, and a new hall was built in 2011. [238][240]
[241]
St Francis' Church St Francis' Church, Beckingham Road, Westborough, Guildford (April 2014, from West-Southwest).JPG Westborough
51°14′51″N 0°35′41″W / 51.2475°N 0.5947°W / 51.2475; -0.5947 (St Francis' Church, Westborough)
Anglican A product of interwar residential expansion, this brick church was a chapel of ease to Emmanuel Church in Stoughton between its opening in 1933 and 1958, when it became parished. Construction cost £2,300, and an extension in 1957 (including the building of a church hall) cost another £13,000. The interior was reordered in 1994. St Clare's Church on the Park Barn estate was founded by the vicar of St Francis' in the 1960s. [182]
Westborough Church Westborough URC Church, Southway, Westborough, Guildford (April 2014, from East) (2).JPG Westborough
51°14′59″N 0°35′50″W / 51.2496°N 0.5971°W / 51.2496; -0.5971 (Westborough Church, Westborough)
United Reformed Church This opened as a Congregational church in 1932. It remains part of the United Reformed Church, the successor denomination to Congregationalism, but has a Charismatic character and functions as a cell church. [23][242]
[243]
Wisley Church Wisley Church, Wisley Lane, Wisley (June 2015) (5).JPG Wisley
51°19′33″N 0°29′05″W / 51.3258°N 0.4846°W / 51.3258; -0.4846 (Wisley Church, Wisley)
Anglican I The church has no dedication and remains largely as it was in the 12th century, although its carrstone walls have been rendered. A porch was added in the 17th century, and light restoration in 1872 included the construction of a vestry. There is also a timber bell-cot. [15][47]
[244][245]
St Alban's Church St Alban's Church, Wood Street Village, Guildford (April 2014, from South-Southeast) (2).JPG Wood Street Village
51°15′03″N 0°37′38″W / 51.2507°N 0.6271°W / 51.2507; -0.6271 (St Alban's Church, Wood Street Village)
Anglican This church was built in 1967 and is in the parish of Worplesdon. [246][247]
St Mary the Virgin's Church St Mary the Virgin's Church, Worplesdon Road, Worplesdon (May 2014) (1).JPG Worplesdon
51°16′23″N 0°36′24″W / 51.2730°N 0.6066°W / 51.2730; -0.6066 (St Mary the Virgin's Church, Worplesdon)
Anglican I Although "badly restored in 1866", this large church on an elevated side is principally 15th-century with a 13th-century north chapel. The main materials are sarsen and ironstone. The west tower, "the best Perpendicular Gothic tower in Surrey" according to Nikolaus Pevsner, dates from the 1480s. [10][15]
[37][248]
Worplesdon United Reformed Church Worplesdon United Reformed Church, Perry Hill, Worplesdon (May 2014) (2).JPG Worplesdon
51°16′46″N 0°36′48″W / 51.2794°N 0.6132°W / 51.2794; -0.6132 (Worplesdon United Reformed Church, Worplesdon)
United Reformed Church Perry Hill Congregational Chapel has been in continuous use (now as a United Reformed church) since it opened on 5 June 1822. Many of the early pastors were students at the Hackney Theological College. Construction of the chapel cost £380, some of which came from Congregationalists in Guildford. The brick building was modernised in 1896; the porch, side windows and timber-framed gable date from then. [10][27]
[249][250]
[251]

Former places of worship[edit]

Name Image Location Denomination/
Affiliation
Grade Notes Refs
Old St Peter and St Paul's Church Old St Peter and St Paul's Church, Albury Park, Albury (March 2014, from South).JPG Albury
51°13′12″N 0°28′44″W / 51.2200°N 0.4789°W / 51.2200; -0.4789 (Old St Peter and St Paul's Church, Albury)
Anglican I The ancient church on the Albury Park estate (of Saxon origin with additions between the 12th and 14th centuries) closed in 1842 when the new brick-built church opened in the village centre, and by 1911 it was "roofless and ... covered with masses of ivy". It has now been repaired and is open to visitors. [15][18]
[252][253]
Catholic Apostolic Church Former Catholic Apostolic Church, Albury Park, Albury (March 2014) (9).JPG Albury
51°13′22″N 0°28′59″W / 51.2227°N 0.4831°W / 51.2227; -0.4831 (Former Catholic Apostolic Church, Albury)
Catholic Apostolic II* Henry Drummond of Albury Park opened this church in 1840 when he became involved in the Irvingite (Catholic Apostolic) movement. It became the centre of that denomination, but closed in 1950. William Macintosh Brooks designed it in a "dashing" Perpendicular Gothic Revival style, possibly with Augustus Pugin's help. [18][254]
[255][256]
St Catherine's Chapel St Catherine's Hill, Guildford 2.jpg Artington
51°13′27″N 0°34′43″W / 51.2243°N 0.5787°W / 51.2243; -0.5787 (St Catherine's Chapel (ruined), Artington)
Pre-Reformation I Long since ruinous and roofless, this ancient chapel is "a simple rectangle of rubble sandstone" in the water meadows next to the River Wey. It was within the old parish of Artington. It was originally built "before 1308" and was reconstructed by the rector of St Nicholas' Church, Guildford in 1317. [106][257]
[164][258]
Ash Vale Methodist Church Former Methodist Church, Wharf Road, Ash Vale (May 2014) (3).JPG Ash Vale
51°15′32″N 0°43′07″W / 51.2589°N 0.7186°W / 51.2589; -0.7186 (Former Ash Vale Methodist Church, Ash Vale)
Methodist This was founded as a Wesleyan chapel on 3 July 1878 and remained in use for worship until 2008 (its registration for marriages, granted in February 1881, was cancelled in September of that year). After a period of disuse, in 2009 it became a community centre and café operated jointly by the Anglican and Methodist Churches. It is known simply as "Chapel". [80][259]
[260][261]
[262]
Mission Hall Former Mission Hall, Stoke Road, Bellfields, Guildford (April 2014, from West).JPG Bellfields, Guildford
51°15′09″N 0°34′15″W / 51.2525°N 0.5709°W / 51.2525; -0.5709 (Former Mission Hall, Bellfields)
Unknown This building is north of Guildford town centre on the road to Woking. Built in 1909 of brick, it was originally a mission hall but had passed out of religious use by the time it was refurbished and converted into an office in 1999–2000. [263]
Burpham Primitive Methodist Chapel Former Methodist Chapel, London Road, Burpham (May 2014) (1).JPG Burpham
51°15′12″N 0°33′03″W / 51.2534°N 0.5508°W / 51.2534; -0.5508 (Former Burpham Primitive Methodist Chapel, Burpham)
Methodist The building stood within the boundary of Worplesdon parish during its time as a Primitive Methodist chapel. It was in use in 1914, but maps from 1935 show it had passed out of religious use by then. [10][264]
[265]
Chilworth Mission Church Chilworth Village Hall (former Mission Church), New Road, Chilworth (March 2014).JPG Chilworth
51°12′49″N 0°32′15″W / 51.2135°N 0.5374°W / 51.2135; -0.5374 (Former Chilworth Mission Church, Chilworth)
Anglican This tin tabernacle was erected in the centre of Chilworth in 1896. It was linked with the parish church of Shalford, although it was in the parish of St Martha's. When St Thomas's Church opened the iron building became the village hall. [17][52]
Compton Congregational Church Former Congregational Chapel, Spiceall, Compton (May 2014) (1).JPG Compton
51°12′47″N 0°37′45″W / 51.2131°N 0.6292°W / 51.2131; -0.6292 (Former Compton Congregational Church, Compton)
Congregational Congregational services took place in a "rustic mission room" in this village from 1876. The building used to be a carpenter's workshop. It continued in religious use until the late 1960s. [23][266]
Independent (Congregational) Chapel Former Independent (Congregational) Chapel, Chapel Street, Guildford (April 2014).JPG Guildford
51°14′05″N 0°34′25″W / 51.2347°N 0.5737°W / 51.2347; -0.5737 (Former Independent (Congregational) Chapel, Guildford)
Congregational The first Nonconformist chapel in Guildford was erected in 1690. The wooden building fell out of use in the 18th century, but in 1801 it was demolished and a new chapel—a prefabricated building brought by river barge—was put up on the site for Congregationalists. The street it stood on took the name Chapel Street in 1823. When a new church was built nearby in 1863, the building became the Sunday School, but it passed into secular use in 1965 and is now a restaurant. [23][106]
[9][267]
[268]
Providence Chapel Former Providence Chapel, Castle Street, Guildford (April 2014, from Southeast).JPG Guildford
51°14′03″N 0°34′25″W / 51.2343°N 0.5736°W / 51.2343; -0.5736 (Former Providence Chapel, Guildford)
Independent Calvinistic This chapel on Castle Street near Guildford Castle was built in 1816 for a group of Calvinists, but it passed out of religious use in 1876 and had a variety of uses after that, included a hay warehouse and a sweet factory. [106]
Guildford Methodist Church Guildford Methodist Church, Woodbridge Road, Guildford (April 2014, from Southeast) (1).JPG Guildford
51°14′29″N 0°34′38″W / 51.2415°N 0.5772°W / 51.2415; -0.5772 (Former Guildford Methodist Church, Guildford)
Methodist Designed by A. Saunders in 1966 and distinguished by "a very thin fibreglass spire", this building replaced the Methodist chapel on North Street. It was registered for marriages in March 1966; but after many years of close partnership, the congregation joined St Mary's Anglican church. The last service was held on 1 September 2013, and the building was put up for sale. [35][140]
[45][269]
[270]
Ward Street Chapel Former Unitarian Chapel, Ward Street, Guildford (April 2014, from Northeast).JPG Guildford
51°14′15″N 0°34′21″W / 51.2376°N 0.5726°W / 51.2376; -0.5726 (Former Ward Street Chapel, Guildford)
Unitarian II The building was erected in 1877 for a congregation founded three years earlier and was recorded as a Unitarian chapel in 1911. It closed in 1972, and by 1984 it was an office called Cyrenian House—although two years later it was described as a "refuge" building. The pale rubble-work and ashlar building is High Victorian Gothic in style and has pointed-arched windows with inset quatrefoils and trefoils. [1][51]
[271][272]
[273]
Felday Chapel Former Felday Chapel, Horsham Road, Holmbury St Mary (March 2014, from South) (1).JPG Holmbury St Mary
51°11′24″N 0°24′46″W / 51.1901°N 0.4129°W / 51.1901; -0.4129 (Former Felday Chapel, Holmbury St Mary)
Congregational The success of the nearby Gomshall Chapel, opened by the Surrey Congregational Mission in 1820, led to the building of this chapel in Holmbury St Mary. It stood in the hamlet of Felday, one of two which became part of the parish of Holmbury St Mary when it was created in 1878. Felday Chapel opened on 25 October 1825. [16][195]
[274]
Normandy United Reformed Church Former Congregational Chapel, Willey Green, Normandy (May 2014) (2).JPG Normandy
51°15′29″N 0°39′19″W / 51.2580°N 0.6554°W / 51.2580; -0.6554 (Former Normandy United Reformed Church, Normandy)
United Reformed Church This low-set red-brick chapel, with flanking buttresses and a hipped roof, was built at Willey Green in Normandy parish with assistance from the Congregational chapel at Guildford. It opened on 4 October 1825 and was improved in 1951; but by 1975 it was no longer large enough so the building was sold and the church moved into the village's former telephone exchange. The old chapel was deregistered in February 1987. [28][275]
[276][277]
[278]
[279]
Providence Mission Chapel Former Congregational Chapel, Chapel Lane, Pirbright (May 2014) (2).JPG Pirbright
51°17′38″N 0°38′05″W / 51.2938°N 0.6347°W / 51.2938; -0.6347 (Former Providence Mission Chapel, Pirbright)
Congregational At first, a preacher from Frimley led services in a converted smithy in this village. With support from the Surrey Congregational Mission the cause became more successful, and in August 1868 "a neat and substantial chapel" and attached manse were built by Benjamin Smith. By 1906 the chapel, which had a capacity of 120 and was the only Nonconformist chapel in the Pirbright area, had become a joint Baptist and Congregational endeavour with the name Providence Mission Chapel. [187][280]
[281]
Ripley Methodist Chapel Former Methodist Chapel, High Street, Ripley (May 2014) (1).JPG Ripley
51°18′02″N 0°29′33″W / 51.3005°N 0.4926°W / 51.3005; -0.4926 (Former Ripley Methodist Chapel, Ripley)
Methodist The chapel was originally Wesleyan and was in use until the early 21st century. [192][282]
[283]
Congregational Mission Hall Former Congregational Mission Hall, Aldershot Road, Guildford (April 2014, from North).JPG Rydes Hill, Guildford
51°15′08″N 0°36′32″W / 51.2523°N 0.6089°W / 51.2523; -0.6089 (Former Congregational Mission Hall, Rydes Hill)
Congregational Served from the Congregational church at Worplesdon (Perry Hill), in whose parish it was situated, this closed c. 1927. [10][23]
St William of York's Church Former St William of York's Church, Mays Corner, Send (May 2014) (3).JPG Send
51°17′20″N 0°31′31″W / 51.2889°N 0.5254°W / 51.2889; -0.5254 (Former St William of York's Church, Send)
Roman Catholic Originally this church had its own parish, but latterly it was served from St Dunstan's at Woking. Regular services stopped in mid-2006. The church dated from 1940 and was registered for marriages in July 1941; official deregistration came in November 2011. [284][285]
[286][287]
Shalford Methodist Church Former Methodist Chapel (1895), Kings Road, Shalford (May 2014) (2).JPG Shalford
51°12′47″N 0°33′53″W / 51.2131°N 0.5646°W / 51.2131; -0.5646 (Former Shalford Methodist Church, Shalford)
Methodist Built alongside the village's original Wesleyan chapel of 1843, this stone church superseded it when it opened in 1895. It was part of the Guildford Methodist Circuit. The building was refurbished in 2000, but a declining and ageing congregation forced the church to close with effect from 31 August 2012, five days after the final service was held. Its marriage registration was formally cancelled in February 2016. [186][288]
[289][290]
[291]
Shalford Wesleyan Chapel Former Wesleyan Chapel (1843), Kings Road, Shalford (May 2014) (1).JPG Shalford
51°12′47″N 0°33′53″W / 51.2131°N 0.5647°W / 51.2131; -0.5647 (Former Shalford Wesleyan Chapel, Shalford)
Methodist This building was the original Wesleyan chapel in the village. It was superseded by the much larger present chapel (closed in 2012) when that opened next door in 1895. [186][288]
St Mary's Church Centre St Mary's Church Centre (Wheelhouse), East Lane, West Horsley (May 2014) (3).JPG West Horsley
51°16′46″N 0°26′43″W / 51.2795°N 0.4454°W / 51.2795; -0.4454 (St Mary's Church Centre, West Horsley)
Anglican Built in 1963 as a church hall, this was also used for Anglican services within the parish of West Horsley but is now solely a community hall (called The Wheelhouse) and administrative centre. [292][293]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Tin tabernacles which served as chapels of ease to Holy Trinity and St Nicholas' existed by 1911 in the Addison Road and Guildford Park areas respectively,[8] but no longer survive.
  2. ^ This is in the grounds of Sutton Place, home of the Catholic Weston family. It is over the border in the adjacent Borough of Woking.
  3. ^ The United Reformed Church denomination was formed in 1972 when the Congregational Church, the English Presbyterian Church and some smaller groups merged.
  4. ^ i.e. Gothic of the late Decorated period.
  5. ^ The church's own history gives 1824 for the year "when a group of Calvinist Dissenters began to meet in a room in Quarry Street",[143] but Chambers (1952) and the Chertsey Street Baptist Chapel give 1837 as the year.[32][144]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. The borough of Guildford: Introduction and castle". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 547–560. Retrieved 22 May 2014.
  2. ^ "Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 (c. 9)". The UK Statute Law Database. Ministry of Justice. 24 May 1990. Archived from the original on 24 January 2013. Retrieved 24 July 2013.
  3. ^ "What English Heritage Does". English Heritage. 2012. Archived from the original on 24 January 2013. Retrieved 24 July 2013.
  4. ^ "Listed Buildings". English Heritage. 2012. Archived from the original on 24 January 2013. Retrieved 24 July 2013.
  5. ^ "Images of England — Statistics by County (Surrey)". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Archived from the original on 31 May 2013. Retrieved 15 July 2013.
  6. ^ a b "State of Guildford Borough Report" (PDF). Guildford Borough Council. 2011. Archived from the original on 30 May 2014. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  7. ^ a b "Area: Guildford (Local Authority) – Religion, 2011 (QS208EW)". 2011 UK Census statistics for Guildford. Office for National Statistics. 30 January 2013. Archived from the original on 30 May 2014. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  8. ^ a b c d e f Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. The borough of Guildford: Borough, manors, churches and charities". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 560–570. Retrieved 22 May 2014.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: Stoke juxta Guildford". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 371–373. Retrieved 22 May 2014.
  10. ^ a b c d e f Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: Worplesdon". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 390–395. Retrieved 22 May 2014.
  11. ^ a b Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: Merrow". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 357–359. Retrieved 22 May 2014.
  12. ^ "Find a church in your area: Guildford". A Church Near You website. Archbishops' Council. 2010. Archived from the original on 30 May 2014. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  13. ^ a b Blatch 1997, p. 55.
  14. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 202.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae "Village Churches". Guildford Borough Council. 2014. Archived from the original (PDF) on 14 March 2014. Retrieved 23 May 2014.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: Shere". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 111–121. Retrieved 22 May 2014.
  17. ^ a b c d Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: St Martha's or Chilworth". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 104–106. Retrieved 22 May 2014.
  18. ^ a b c d Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: Albury". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 72–77. Retrieved 22 May 2014.
  19. ^ a b c Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 207.
  20. ^ "History". Holy Angels Church. 2011. Archived from the original on 23 May 2014. Retrieved 23 May 2014.
  21. ^ a b "English Heritage Review of Diocesan Churches 2005 (Extract): Our Lady of Sorrows, Effingham" (PDF). English Heritage. 2005. Archived (PDF) from the original on 23 May 2014. Retrieved 23 May 2014.
  22. ^ a b Kitcat, Wayne (May 2011). "A potted history of St Mary of the Angels Gomshall" (PDF). St Joseph's Parish Magazine (Pentecost 2011). St Joseph's Roman Catholic Church, Dorking. pp. 25–26. Archived (PDF) from the original on 30 May 2014. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  23. ^ a b c d e f g "Guildford United Reformed Church: Celebrating 350 years of Witness 1662–2012". Guildford United Reformed Church. 2012. Archived from the original on 18 March 2014. Retrieved 23 May 2014.
  24. ^ a b "Southern Synod: Gomshall". The United Reformed Church. 2013. Archived from the original on 18 March 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  25. ^ Cleal & Crippen 1908, pp. 393, 396, 399, 419, 426.
  26. ^ Cleal & Crippen 1908, p. 426.
  27. ^ a b c "Wessex Synod: Worplesdon United Reformed". The United Reformed Church. 2013. Archived from the original on 18 March 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  28. ^ a b c d "Emmanuel Free Church". Normandy Historians. 2014. Archived from the original on 14 March 2014. Retrieved 23 May 2014.
  29. ^ a b "Wessex Synod: Westborough". The United Reformed Church. 2013. Archived from the original on 18 March 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  30. ^ a b "Wessex Synod: St Peters Shared Church". The United Reformed Church. 2013. Archived from the original on 18 March 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  31. ^ Chambers 1952, pp. 23–32.
  32. ^ a b c d e "A Brief History of the Church". Chertsey Street Baptist Church. 2014. Archived from the original on 14 March 2014. Retrieved 9 June 2014.
  33. ^ a b Historic England. "Ebenezer Baptist Chapel, Newark Lane (south side), Ripley  (Grade II) (1377857)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 23 May 2014.
  34. ^ a b "About Us". New Life Baptist Church. 2014. Archived from the original on 3 October 2014. Retrieved 3 October 2014.
  35. ^ a b c "What's Happening at St Mary's?" (PDF). Guildford Methodist Church at St Mary's. October 2013. Archived (PDF) from the original on 4 June 2014. Retrieved 4 June 2014.
  36. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 78.
  37. ^ a b Nairn & Pevsner 1971, pp. 539–540.
  38. ^ a b Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 443.
  39. ^ a b c Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 80.
  40. ^ a b Historic England. "Church of St Luke, Burpham Lane (west side), Burpham, Guildford  (Grade II) (1029301)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  41. ^ a b Historic England. "Church of St Nicholas, The Street (west side), Compton, Guildford  (Grade I) (1188621)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  42. ^ a b Historic England. "Church of St Mark, Westwood Lane, Normandy, Guildford  (Grade II) (1377692)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  43. ^ a b Historic England. "Church of St Martha on the Hill, St Martha's Hill, St Martha, Guildford  (Grade II) (1029553)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  44. ^ a b Historic England. "Church of St Mary, Shackleford Road, Shackleford, Guildford  (Grade II) (1029528)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  45. ^ a b c d e Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 274.
  46. ^ a b Historic England. "Church of St Laurence (sic), Manor Fields, Seale and Sands, Guildford  (Grade II) (1029603)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  47. ^ a b Historic England. "Church (Dedication Unknown), Wisley Road, Wisley, Guildford  (Grade I) (1294423)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  48. ^ a b Nairn & Pevsner 1971, pp. 413–414.
  49. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 81.
  50. ^ Stell 2002, p. 315.
  51. ^ a b c d Stell 2002, p. 325.
  52. ^ a b c d e "Chilworth". Exploring Surrey's Past. Surrey Heritage (part of Surrey County Council). 2012. Archived from the original on 30 May 2014. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  53. ^ a b "Farley Green: St Michael, Albury". A Church Near You website. Archbishops' Council. 2010. Archived from the original on 6 June 2014. Retrieved 6 June 2014.
  54. ^ a b "East Horsley, The Lovelace Buildings: Duncombe Farm". Exploring Surrey's Past. Surrey Heritage (part of Surrey County Council). 2012. Archived from the original on 30 May 2014. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  55. ^ "Guildford Cathedral". Guildford Diocesan Board of Finance. 2013. Archived from the original on 4 June 2013. Retrieved 3 June 2013.
  56. ^ a b "Parishes". Guildford Diocesan Board of Finance. 2013. Archived from the original on 4 June 2013. Retrieved 3 June 2013.
  57. ^ "Deaneries of the Diocese". Diocese of Arundel and Brighton website. DABNet. 2011. Archived from the original on 29 March 2013. Retrieved 29 March 2013.
  58. ^ "Arundel Cathedral Parish". Diocese of Arundel and Brighton website. DABNet. 2010. Archived from the original on 31 May 2013. Retrieved 1 June 2013.
  59. ^ "Networks". South Eastern Baptist Association website. Baptist Union of Great Britain. 2010. Archived from the original on 24 January 2013. Retrieved 12 July 2013.
  60. ^ "List of Chapels and Times of Services" (PDF). Gospel Standard Trust Publications. 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on 14 February 2013. Retrieved 12 July 2013.
  61. ^ "Welcome to GraceNet UK". GraceNet UK. 2012. Archived from the original on 14 February 2013. Retrieved 12 July 2013.
  62. ^ "GraceNet UK Regional Directory (South East)". GraceNet UK. 2012. Archived from the original on 14 February 2013. Retrieved 12 July 2013.
  63. ^ http://www.weyvalleycircuit.org.uk. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  64. ^ "The Circuit". Dorking Methodist Church. 2013. Archived from the original on 16 July 2013. Retrieved 12 July 2013.
  65. ^ "A brief history of the Chapel and Christianity in and about Effingham". Effingham Methodist Church. 2007. Archived from the original on 18 March 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  66. ^ "Church Directory". The United Reformed Church. 2013. Archived from the original on 31 May 2013. Retrieved 12 July 2013.
  67. ^ "Wessex Synod: Portsmouth Road". The United Reformed Church. 2013. Archived from the original on 18 March 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  68. ^ "Wessex Synod: Emmanuel Church (generally referred to as Normandy)". The United Reformed Church. 2013. Archived from the original on 18 March 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  69. ^ "Chilworth Free Church". Affinity. 2012. Archived from the original on 18 March 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  70. ^ "Horsley Evangelical Church". Affinity. 2012. Archived from the original on 18 March 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  71. ^ "Send Evangelical Church". Affinity. 2012. Archived from the original on 18 March 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  72. ^ "About Us". FIEC. 2012. Archived from the original on 24 January 2013. Retrieved 11 November 2012.
  73. ^ "Introducing Affinity". Affinity. 2012. Archived from the original on 18 March 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  74. ^ "Guildford Park Church". Affinity. 2012. Archived from the original on 18 March 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2014.
  75. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Peter and St Paul, Church Lane, Albury, Guildford  (Grade II) (1029561)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 May 2014.
  76. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, pp. 92–93.
  77. ^ "No. 58982". The London Gazette. 17 February 2009. p. 2778.
  78. ^ "Appeal Ref: APP/Y3615/A/03/1133431: The Former Artington Cold Store Site, New Pond Road, Peasmarsh, Guildford GU3 1JR" (PDF). Guildford Borough Council planning application 03/P/00744. Guildford Borough Council. 28 July 2004. Retrieved 27 May 2014. Erection of a place of worship with ancillary car park, landscaping, new vehicular access and off-site road widening (As amended by plans received 27/05/03). The former Artington Cold Store Site and adjoining land, New Pond Road, Artington, Guildford, GU3[dead link]
  79. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 82089; Name: Brethrens Meeting Hall At Old Artington Cold Store Site; Address: New Pond Road, Artington; Denomination: Christians Not Otherwise Designated). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  80. ^ a b c d Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: Ash". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 340–344. Retrieved 27 May 2014.
  81. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Peter, Ash Church Road, Ash, Guildford  (Grade II*) (1029647)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 May 2014.
  82. ^ a b Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 97.
  83. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 55725; Name: Church of the Holy Angels; Address: Ash Church Road, Ash; Denomination: Roman Catholics). Retrieved 27 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  84. ^ "History: A Mini History of Holy Angels Church, Ash". Holy Angels Church. 2011. Archived from the original on 23 May 2014. Retrieved 6 June 2014.
  85. ^ "Ash Vale: St Mary, Ash Vale". A Church Near You website. Archbishops' Council. 2010. Archived from the original on 27 May 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2014.
  86. ^ a b "UK Assemblies List – England". A list of Christian assemblies or independent churches (commonly known as the Christian Brethren) in the United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic. Andrew R. Abel. 2001. Archived from the original on 16 January 2013.
  87. ^ "Notices: General". Believer's Magazine. Kilmarnock: John Ritchie Ltd. October 2010. Archived from the original on 28 May 2013. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  88. ^ "No. 48354". The London Gazette (Supplement). 28 October 1980. p. 14944.
  89. ^ "Stoke Hill: St Peter, Bellfields". A Church Near You website. Archbishops' Council. 2010. Archived from the original on 30 May 2014. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  90. ^ "No. 48148". The London Gazette. 3 April 1980. p. 5215.
  91. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 80416; Name: New Hope Centre; Address: Larch Avenue, Bellfields, Guildford; Denomination: Elim Foursquare Gospel Alliance). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  92. ^ s.n. 1993, p. 21.
  93. ^ "Application Details: The Challoner Hall, Larch Avenue, Guildford". Guildford Borough Council planning application 96/P/00422. Guildford Borough Council. 14 October 1997. Archived from the original on 6 June 2014. Retrieved 6 June 2014. Outline application for six terraced houses comprising two x 3 bedroom and four x 2 bedroom two storey houses with assigned parking spaces, formation of new service road and car park with 6 spaces for existing Church. (As amended by plans received 14/10/97).
  94. ^ "Welcome". New Hope Centre, Guildford. 2014. Archived from the original on 6 June 2014. Retrieved 6 June 2014.
  95. ^ "Challoner Hall Mass centre". The Catholic Herald. Catholic Herald Ltd. 14 December 1951. p. 6. Archived from the original on 6 June 2014. Retrieved 6 June 2014.
  96. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 122.
  97. ^ a b "A brief history of the Church at Burpham". Burpham Church. 2014. Archived from the original on 6 June 2014. Retrieved 6 June 2014.
  98. ^ "The Church of the Holy Spirit, Burpham". A Church Near You website. Archbishops' Council. 2010. Archived from the original on 6 June 2014. Retrieved 6 June 2014.
  99. ^ "Church of the Holy Spirit". Burpham Church. 2014. Archived from the original on 6 June 2014. Retrieved 6 June 2014.
  100. ^ Historic England. "Christ Church, Waterden Road (east side), Guildford, Guildford  (Grade II) (1029198)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  101. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 290.
  102. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 55942; Name: Addison Hall; Address: Addison Road, Guildford; Denomination: Plymouth Brethren). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  103. ^ Trowbridge, W.H. (1998–2012) [1963]. "List of Meetings Great Britain and Ireland – 1963". MyBrethren.org website (History and Ministry of the early "Exclusive Brethren" (so-called) – their origin, progress and testimony 1827–1959 and onward). Hampton Wick: The Stow Hill Bible and Tract Depot. Archived from the original on 19 January 2013. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  104. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Thomas, New Road, Chilworth, Guildford  (Grade II) (1029497)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  105. ^ a b Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 155.
  106. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Guildford and surrounds Heritage Open Days: 12–15 September 2013" (PDF). Guildford Borough Council. 2013. Archived from the original on 14 March 2014. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  107. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 64358; Name: Chilworth Free Church Hall; Address: New Road, Chilworth; Denomination: Evangelical Free Church). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  108. ^ "No. 43408". The London Gazette. 14 August 1964. p. 6921.
  109. ^ Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: Compton". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 16–24. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  110. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, pp. 166–168.
  111. ^ Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: East Clandon". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 344–346. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  112. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Thomas of Canterbury, The Street, East Clandon, Guildford  (Grade I) (1029446)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  113. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 203.
  114. ^ Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: East Horsley". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 349–352. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  115. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Martin, Ockham Road South, East Horsley, Guildford  (Grade II*) (1377815)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  116. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, pp. 203–204.
  117. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 63324; Name: Horsley Independent Evangelical Church; Address: Demcombe Farm (sic), Ockham Road North, East Horsley; Denomination: Fellowship of Independent Evangelical Churches). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  118. ^ "No. 40410". The London Gazette. 18 February 1955. p. 1022.
  119. ^ a b Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: Effingham". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 321–326. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  120. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Lawrence, Church Street, Effingham, Guildford  (Grade II*) (1294793)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  121. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 5898; Name: The Methodist Church; Address: Chapel Hill, Effingham; Denomination: Methodist Church). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  122. ^ "No. 25598". The London Gazette. 18 June 1886. p. 2918.
  123. ^ a b Rogers, L.J. (2007). "A brief history of the Chapel and Christianity in and about Effingham". Effingham Methodist Church. Archived from the original on 1 May 2013. Retrieved 30 May 2014.
  124. ^ Stell 2002, p. 322.
  125. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 45892; Name: Catholic Church; Address: Effingham; Denomination: Roman Catholics). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  126. ^ Lonsdale, Fr Patrick (March 2010). "History of the Abbey & Monastery: The Franciscan Friary, Chilworth, 1892–2010". Chilworth Abbey. Archived from the original on 9 October 2015. Retrieved 9 October 2015.
  127. ^ Cleal & Crippen 1908, pp. 419–421.
  128. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 12014; Name: Gomshall Chapel; Address: Gomshall; Denomination: United Reformed Church). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  129. ^ "No. 25877". The London Gazette. 23 November 1888. p. 6684.
  130. ^ Historic England. "Cathedral Church of the Holy Spirit, Stag Hill (east side), Guildford, Guildford  (Grade II*) (1377883)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 June 2014.
  131. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, pp. 269–270.
  132. ^ Historic England. "Church of Holy Trinity, High Street (south side), Guildford, Guildford  (Grade I) (1029258)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 June 2014.
  133. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, pp. 270–272.
  134. ^ Historic England. "Church of St John the Evangelist, Stoke Road (east side), Guildford, Guildford  (Grade II*) (1294008)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 June 2014.
  135. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, pp. 272–273.
  136. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Nicholas (sic), High Street (south side), Guildford, Guildford  (Grade II*) (1029291)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 June 2014.
  137. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Saviour, Woodbridge Road (east side), Guildford, Guildford  (Grade II) (1377906)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 June 2014.
  138. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Mary, Quarry Street (west side), Guildford, Guildford  (Grade I) (1377918)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 June 2014.
  139. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, pp. 273–274.
  140. ^ a b "New Anglican–Methodist partnership in Guildford". Diocese of Guildford. 4 September 2013. Archived from the original on 14 March 2014. Retrieved 9 June 2014.
  141. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 64177; Name: Chertsey Street Baptist Church; Address: Guildford; Denomination: Strict Baptists). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  142. ^ "No. 40019". The London Gazette. 17 November 1953. p. 6180.
  143. ^ a b "The History of Guildford Baptist Church". Guildford Baptist Church. 2014. Archived from the original on 28 May 2013. Retrieved 9 June 2014.
  144. ^ a b Chambers 1952, pp. 28–30.
  145. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 72831; Name: Baptist Church (Millmead Centre); Address: Buryfields, Guildford; Denomination: Baptist). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  146. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 70815; Name: Kingdom Hall; Address: 236 High Street, Guildford; Denomination: Jehovah's Witnesses). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  147. ^ "No. 44245". The London Gazette. 9 February 1967. p. 1553.
  148. ^ "Guildford Synagogue". Jewish Communities & Records United Kingdom website. JCR-UK. 25 December 2011. Archived from the original on 9 June 2014. Retrieved 9 June 2014.
  149. ^ "Modern History". Jewish Guildford. 2014. Archived from the original on 9 June 2014. Retrieved 9 June 2014.
  150. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 4766; Name: Friends Meeting House; Address: North Street, Guildford; Denomination: Friends). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  151. ^ Historic England. "Friends Meeting House, Ward Street (east side), Guildford, Guildford  (Grade II) (1029195)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 June 2014.
  152. ^ Butler 1999, pp. 590–591.
  153. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 76669; Name: St Joseph's Roman Catholic Church; Address: Eastgate Gardens, Guildford; Denomination: Roman Catholics). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  154. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 75081; Name: Salvation Army Citadel; Address: Woodbridge Road, Guildford; Denomination: Salvation Army). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  155. ^ "No. 45653". The London Gazette. 24 April 1972. p. 4883.
  156. ^ "No. 47680". The London Gazette. 6 November 1978. p. 13262.
  157. ^ Chambers 1952, pp. 30–31.
  158. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 44588; Name: Bethel Strict Baptist Chapel; Address: The Bars, Guildford; Denomination: Strict Baptists). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  159. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 69916; Name: Guildford United Reformed Church; Address: Portsmouth Road, Guildford; Denomination: United Reformed Church). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  160. ^ "No. 43566". The London Gazette. 2 February 1965. p. 1180.
  161. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 79036; Name: Guildford Park Church; Address: Guildford Park Road, Guildford; Denomination: Independent Evangelical Church). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  162. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 315.
  163. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Mary, Horsham Road, Holmbury St Mary, Shere, Guildford  (Grade I) (1029485)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 11 June 2014.
  164. ^ a b Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: Artington". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 3–10. Retrieved 1 June 2014.
  165. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 351.
  166. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Francis, Littleton Lane, Artington, Guildford  (Grade II) (1188307)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 11 June 2014.
  167. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 359.
  168. ^ Historic England. "Church of St John the Evangelist, Epsom Road (south side), Merrow, Guildford  (Grade II) (1377847)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 11 June 2014.
  169. ^ "A brief history of Merrow Methodist Church". Merrow Methodist Church. 2013. Archived from the original on 28 May 2013. Retrieved 11 June 2014.
  170. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 64996; Name: Methodist Church; Address: Sheeplands Avenue, Merrow; Denomination: Methodist Church). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  171. ^ "No. 41293". The London Gazette (Supplement). 24 January 1958. p. 558.
  172. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 73339; Name: Church of St Pius X; Address: Horseshoe Lane East, Merrow; Denomination: Roman Catholics). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  173. ^ "No. 45919". The London Gazette. 1 March 1973. p. 2820.
  174. ^ "No. 44844". The London Gazette. 9 May 1969. p. 4957.
  175. ^ "St Mark's Church". Normandy Historians. 2014. Archived from the original on 14 March 2014. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  176. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 77288; Name: Normandy United Reformed Church; Address: Glaziers Lane, Normandy; Denomination: United Reformed Church). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  177. ^ Historic England. "Church of All Saints, Ockham Park, Ockham, Guildford  (Grade I) (1188424)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  178. ^ Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: Ockham". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 359–363. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  179. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, pp. 392–394.
  180. ^ "Guildford: All Saints', Onslow Village". A Church Near You website. Archbishops' Council. 2014. Archived from the original on 10 August 2014. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  181. ^ "Who We Are". All Saints Guildford. 2014. Archived from the original on 10 August 2014. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  182. ^ a b "History of our Church". Parish of Westborough, Guildford. 27 March 2012. Archived from the original on 23 May 2014. Retrieved 11 June 2014.
  183. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 405.
  184. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Mark, Ewhurst Road, Peaslake, Shere, Guildford  (Grade II) (1377822)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  185. ^ "Church Calendar". St Mary the Virgin, Shalford. 2014. Archived from the original on 1 June 2014. Retrieved 1 June 2014.
  186. ^ a b c d Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: Shalford". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 107–111. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  187. ^ a b Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: Pirbright". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 363–365. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  188. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Michael and All Angels, Church Lane, Pirbright, Guildford  (Grade II*) (1377714)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  189. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, pp. 416–417.
  190. ^ Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: Puttenham". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 52–58. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  191. ^ Historic England. "Church of St John the Baptist, The Street, Puttenham, Guildford  (Grade II*) (1029601)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  192. ^ a b c d e Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: Send with Ripley". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 365–370. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  193. ^ Historic England. "Church of Mary the Virgin, High Street (south side), Ripley, Guildford  (Grade II*) (1188603)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  194. ^ Chambers 1952, pp. 105–106.
  195. ^ a b Stell 2002, p. 327.
  196. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 62184; Name: Ebenezer Chapel; Address: Newark Road, Ripley; Denomination: Strict Baptists). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  197. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 69618; Name: St Mary's Rydes Hill Catholic Church; Address: Aldershot Road, Rydes Hill, Guildford; Denomination: Roman Catholics). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  198. ^ "No. 43370". The London Gazette. 30 June 1964. p. 5666.
  199. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, pp. 448–449.
  200. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 450.
  201. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Mary, Church Lane, Send, Guildford  (Grade II*) (1188756)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  202. ^ "St Mary's Send Church Room, Send Road". Church of St Mary the Virgin, Send. 2014. Archived from the original on 27 March 2014. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  203. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 74537; Name: Send Evangelical Church; Address: Broadmead Road, Send; Denomination: Evangelical Churches). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  204. ^ Cleal & Crippen 1908, p. 397.
  205. ^ "What kind of church is Send Evangelical Church?". Send Evangelical Church. 21 December 2012. Archived from the original on 10 August 2014. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  206. ^ "No. 24420". The London Gazette. 2 February 1877. p. 692.
  207. ^ "No. 45978". The London Gazette. 15 May 1973. p. 6110.
  208. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 451.
  209. ^ Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: Godalming". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 24–42. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  210. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 452.
  211. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Mary the Virgin, The Street, Shalford, Guildford  (Grade II) (1294444)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  212. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, pp. 455–457.
  213. ^ Historic England. "The Church of St James, The Square, Shere, Guildford  (Grade I) (1377794)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 10 August 2014.
  214. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 73454; Name: Harry Edwards Spiritual Healing Sanctuary; Address: Burrows Lea, Hook Lane, Shere; Denomination: Spiritualists). Retrieved 11 August 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  215. ^ "No. 46026". The London Gazette. 12 July 1973. p. 8086.
  216. ^ "Welcome to the Sanctuary!". Harry Edwards Healing Sanctuary. 2013. Archived from the original on 12 September 2014. Retrieved 12 September 2014.
  217. ^ "About Us". BLCH Ltd. 2010. Archived from the original on 12 September 2014. Retrieved 12 September 2014.
  218. ^ "About Emmanuel". Emmanuel Church. 2014. Archived from the original on 12 August 2014. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  219. ^ "Queen Elizabeth Park Community Centre, Stoughton, Guildford: New Life Baptist Church Community Facility Proposal" (PDF). New Life Baptist Church. 2010. Archived (PDF) from the original on 3 October 2014. Retrieved 3 October 2014.
  220. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 64438; Name: Methodist Church; Address: Stoughton Road, Guildford; Denomination: Methodist Church). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  221. ^ Ovey, Leslie (1995). "Chapel History". Stoughton Methodist Church. Archived from the original on 12 September 2014. Retrieved 12 September 2014.
  222. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 56507; Name: Manor Road Hall; Address: Manor Road, Stoughton, Guildford; Denomination: Unsectarian). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  223. ^ "Welcome to the Website of Manor Road Evangelical Church, Guildford". Manor Road Evangelical Church. 2014. Archived from the original on 12 September 2014. Retrieved 12 September 2014.
  224. ^ "No. 34258". The London Gazette. 21 February 1936. p. 1175.
  225. ^ "Sands: The Church of the Good Shepherd, Sands". A Church Near You website. Archbishops' Council. 2014. Archived from the original on 12 August 2014. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  226. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 491.
  227. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Paul, Poyle Road, Tongham, Guildford  (Grade II) (1189072)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  228. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 49180; Name: Evangelical Free Church; Address: Poyle Road, Tongham; Denomination: Christians Not Otherwise Designated). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  229. ^ "Welcome to the Frontpage". Tongham Christian Fellowship. 2010. Archived from the original on 3 October 2014. Retrieved 3 October 2014.
  230. ^ "No. 33477". The London Gazette. 15 March 1929. p. 1841.
  231. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 501.
  232. ^ Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: Wanborough". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 374–375. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  233. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Bartholomew, Westwood Lane, Wanborough, Guildford  (Grade I) (1287038)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  234. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, pp. 506–507.
  235. ^ Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: West Clandon". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 346–349. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  236. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Peter and St Paul, The Street, West Clandon, Guildford  (Grade II*) (1029360)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  237. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, pp. 511–512.
  238. ^ a b Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: West Horsley". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 353–357. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  239. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Mary the Virgin, Epsom Road, West Horsley, Guildford  (Grade I) (1377828)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  240. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 22892; Name: Methodist Chapel; Address: The Street, West Horsley; Denomination: Methodist Church). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  241. ^ "A Short History of West Horsley Chapel". West Horsley Methodist Church. 2014. Archived from the original on 3 October 2014. Retrieved 3 October 2014.
  242. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 54962; Name: Westborough United Reformed Church; Address: Southway Avenue, Guildford; Denomination: United Reformed Church). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  243. ^ "Who We Are". Westborough URC. 2014. Archived from the original on 3 October 2014. Retrieved 3 October 2014.
  244. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 529.
  245. ^ Malden, H. E. (ed) (1911). "A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Parishes: Wisley". Victoria County History of Surrey. British History Online. pp. 378–381. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  246. ^ "Wood Street: St Alban, Wood Street Village". A Church Near You website. Archbishops' Council. 2014. Archived from the original on 3 October 2014. Retrieved 3 October 2014.
  247. ^ "Welcome to Worplesdon Parish". Worplesdon PCC. 2009. Archived from the original on 3 October 2014. Retrieved 3 October 2014.
  248. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Mary the Virgin, Worplesdon Road, Worplesdon, Guildford  (Grade I) (1377735)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  249. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 1; Name: Perry Hill United Reformed Church; Address: Perry Hill, Worplesdon; Denomination: United Reformed Church). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  250. ^ Cleal & Crippen 1908, pp. 426–428.
  251. ^ Stell 2002, p. 328.
  252. ^ Historic England. "The Old Parish Church of St Peter and St Paul, New Road, Albury Park, Albury, Guildford  (Grade I) (1294958)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 June 2014.
  253. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, pp. 91–92.
  254. ^ Historic England. "Catholic Apostolic Church and Chapterhouse, Albury Park, Albury, Guildford  (Grade II*) (1029568)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 June 2014.
  255. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 92.
  256. ^ Stell 2002, pp. 315–318.
  257. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 270.
  258. ^ Historic England. "Chapel of St Catherine, Old Portsmouth Road, Artington, Guildford  (Grade I) (1377750)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 June 2014.
  259. ^ "No. 58853". The London Gazette. 15 October 2008. p. 15784.
  260. ^ "Ash Vale Methodist Church". Ash and District Local History Museum Society. 2014. Archived from the original on 21 May 2013. Retrieved 1 June 2014.
  261. ^ "Chapel: Home Page". Chapel, Ash Vale. 2014. Archived from the original on 21 May 2013. Retrieved 1 June 2014.
  262. ^ "No. 24952". The London Gazette. 18 March 1881. p. 1261.
  263. ^ "Former Mission Hall – Woking Road, Guildford, Surrey GU1 – UNDER OFFER". D1 Space Ltd. 20 January 2013. Archived from the original on 1 June 2014. Retrieved 1 June 2014.
  264. ^ (Map). 1:2500. Cartography by Ordnance Survey. www.old-maps.co.uk (Historical Map Archive). 1914 http://www.old-maps.co.uk/maptiles/t101151_501198_151404.png. Retrieved 1 June 2014. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  265. ^ (Map). 1:2500. Cartography by Ordnance Survey. www.old-maps.co.uk (Historical Map Archive). 1935 http://www.old-maps.co.uk/maptiles/t100737_501198_151404.png. Retrieved 1 June 2014. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  266. ^ Cleal & Crippen 1908, p. 399.
  267. ^ Chambers 1952, p. 25.
  268. ^ "No. 19565". The London Gazette. 1 December 1837. p. 3191.
  269. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 70426; Name: Guildford Methodist Church; Address: Corner of Woodbridge Road and Wharf Road, Guildford; Denomination: Methodist Church). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  270. ^ "No. 43932". The London Gazette. 22 March 1966. p. 3259.
  271. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 23882; Name: Ward Street Chapel; Address: Ward Street, Guildford; Denomination: Unitarians). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  272. ^ Historic England. "Former Chapel at North-West End of Ward Street (now Cyrenian House), Ward Street (west side), Guildford, Guildford  (Grade II) (1293964)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 June 2014.
  273. ^ Hague & Hague 1986, p. 96.
  274. ^ Cleal & Crippen 1908, p. 419.
  275. ^ "Congregational Chapel at Willey Green". Normandy Historians. 2014. Archived from the original on 14 March 2014. Retrieved 2 June 2014.
  276. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1971, p. 389.
  277. ^ Cleal & Crippen 1908, p. 393.
  278. ^ "No. 50842". The London Gazette. 24 February 1987. p. 2489.
  279. ^ Stell 2002, p. 326.
  280. ^ Cleal & Crippen 1908, pp. 428–429.
  281. ^ Stockwell 1909, pp. 177–180.
  282. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 50857; Name: Methodist Chapel; Address: Ripley; Denomination: Methodist Church). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  283. ^ "Ripley Methodist Church". National Register of Archives: abstract of record GB/NNAF/C185367 (Ripley Methodist Church – 1977–2004: Church council minutes, records related to upkeep and closure of the church. The National Archives. Archived from the original on 22 May 2013. Retrieved 11 August 2014.
  284. ^ "Send, Surrey". Roman Catholic Diocese of Arundel and Brighton website. DABNet. 2007. Archived from the original on 13 October 2007. Retrieved 4 June 2014.
  285. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 59102; Name: St William Roman Catholic Church; Address: Mays Corner, Send; Denomination: Roman Catholics). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  286. ^ "No. 35219". The London Gazette. 15 July 1941. p. 4078.
  287. ^ "No. 59966". The London Gazette. 14 November 2011. p. 21747.
  288. ^ a b "Shalford" (PDF). ORBIT: Newsletter and Quarterly Plan of the Guildford Circuit. Guildford Methodist Circuit. June 2012. pp. 12–13. Archived (PDF) from the original on 4 June 2014. Retrieved 4 June 2014.
  289. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 34935; Name: Methodist Church; Address: Shalford; Denomination: Methodist Church). Retrieved 30 May 2014. (Archived version of list from April 2010)
  290. ^ "Shalford Methodist Church". Guildford Methodist Circuit. 2009–2014. Archived from the original on 3 October 2014. Retrieved 3 October 2014.
  291. ^ "No. 61511". The London Gazette. 26 February 2016. p. 4220.
  292. ^ "East Lane: St Mary, West Horsley". A Church Near You website. Archbishops' Council. 2014. Archived from the original on 3 October 2014. Retrieved 3 October 2014.
  293. ^ "Find us". St Mary's West Horsley. 2014. Archived from the original on 3 October 2014. Retrieved 3 October 2014.

Bibliography[edit]