List of politicians, lawyers, and civil servants educated at Jesus College, Oxford

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The crest of Jesus College above the entrance on Ship Street

Jesus College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. The college was founded in 1571 by Queen Elizabeth I at the request of Hugh Price, a Welsh clergyman, who was Treasurer of St David's Cathedral in Pembrokeshire. The college still has strong links with Wales, and about 15% of students are Welsh.[1] There are 340 undergraduates and 190 students carrying out postgraduate studies.[2] Women have been admitted since 1974, when the college was one of the first five men's colleges to become co-educational.[3] Old members of Jesus College are sometimes known as "Jesubites".[4]

Harold Wilson studied at Jesus College from 1934 to 1937, and was later the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during two periods (from October 1964 to June 1970, and from March 1974 to April 1976). More than 30 other Members of Parliament (MPs) have been educated at the college, from Sir John Salusbury who was elected as MP for Denbighshire in 1601 to Theresa Villiers who was elected as MP for Chipping Barnet in 2005. Sir Leoline Jenkins, who became a Fellow and later the Principal of the college, was Secretary of State for the Northern Department from 1680 to 1681 and Secretary of State for the Southern Department from 1681 to 1685. Sir William Williams served as Speaker of the House of Commons from 1680 to 1685 and as Solicitor General for England and Wales from 1687 to 1689. Evan Cotton was MP for Finsbury East before holding the position of President of the Bengal Legislative Council from 1922 to 1925. Several Welsh politicians have been educated at the college, some representing constituencies in Wales (such as Sir John Wogan, representing Pembrokeshire at various times between 1614 and 1644) and others working outside Parliament, such as D. J. Williams, a co-founder of the Welsh nationalist party Plaid Cymru.

Other students at the college have subsequently held political offices in other countries. Norman Washington Manley was Chief Minister of Jamaica from 1955 to 1962. P. T. Rajan was Chief Minister of Madras Presidency between April and August 1936. Heather Wilson was the first Old Member of the college to sit in the United States House of Representatives, where she represented New Mexico's 1st congressional district from 1998 to 2009. The Australian politician Neal Blewett was a member of the Australian House of Representatives from 1977 to 1994, a Government Minister from 1983 to 1994 and High Commissioner to the UK from 1994 to 1998. Pixley ka Isaka Seme, who studied for a BCL between 1906 and 1909, was one of the founder members of the African National Congress.

Several prominent judges and lawyers were educated at the college. Viscount Sankey, who was Lord Chancellor from 1929 to 1935, studied for a BA in History and BCL between 1885 and 1891. Lord du Parcq was appointed as a Lord of Appeal in Ordinary in 1946. Sir Richard Richards became Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer in 1817. The Scottish MP and lawyer Lord Murray was appointed a Senator of the College of Justice in 1979. The solicitor Sir David Lewis was Lord Mayor of the City of London from 2007 to 2008. Other lawyers who studied at the college include James Chadwin QC, who defended the Yorkshire Ripper, and Sir Arthur James, who prosecuted the Great Train Robbers and later became a judge of the Court of Appeal. Academic lawyers include J Duncan M Derrett, Professor of Oriental Laws in the University of London from 1965 to 1982, and Alfred Hazel, Reader in English Law at All Souls College, Oxford.

Alumni[edit]

Abbreviations used in the following tables
  • M – Year of matriculation at Jesus College (a dash indicates that the individual did not matriculate at the college)
  • G – Year of graduation / conclusion of study at Jesus College (a dash indicates that the individual graduated from another college)
  • DNG – Did not graduate: left the college without taking a degree
  •  ? – Year unknown; an approximate year is used for table-sorting purposes.
  • (F/P) after name – later became a Fellow or Principal of Jesus College, and included on the list of Principals and Fellows
  • (HF) after name – later became an Honorary Fellow of Jesus College, and included on the list of Honorary Fellows
Degree abbreviations

The subject studied and the degree classification are included, where known. Until the early 19th century, undergraduates read for a Bachelor of Arts degree that included study of Latin and Greek texts, mathematics, geometry, philosophy and theology. Individual subjects at undergraduate level were only introduced later: for example, Mathematics (1805), Natural Science (1850), Jurisprudence (1851, although it had been available before this to students who obtained special permission), Modern History (1851) and Theology (1871). Geography and Modern Languages were introduced in the 20th century. Music had been available as a specialist subject before these changes; medicine was studied as a post-graduate subject.[5]

Politicians from England and Wales[edit]

Thomas Johnes, British MP
Harold Wilson, Former British Labour Prime Minister
Name M G Degree Notes Ref
Aubrey, 2ndSir John Aubrey, 2nd Baronet 1668 DNG MP for Brackley (1698–1700) ref name=FA/>
Aubrey, 3rdSir John Aubrey, 3rd Baronet 1698 DNG MP for Cardiff (1706–10) [6]
Bulkeley, 7th Viscount Bulkeley, ThomasThomas Bulkeley, 7th Viscount Bulkeley 1769 1773 MA (1773), DCL (1810) MP for Anglesey (1774–84), who donated the copy of Guido Reni's St Michael subduing the Devil hanging in the college chapel [7][8]
Cotton, EvanSir Evan Cotton 1887 1892 BA Modern History (2nd, 1891), BA Jurisprudence (2nd, 1892) (2nd in Classics Honour Mods, 1889) Liberal MP for Finsbury East (1918), President of the Bengal Legislative Council (1922–25) [9][10][11]
Daniel, J. E.J. E. Daniel 1919 1925 BA Literae Humaniores (1st, 1923), BA Theology (1st, 1925) Welsh theologian and chairman of Plaid Cymru (1939–43) [12][13]
Davey, EdwardEdward Davey 1985 1988 BA PPE (1st) President of the Jesus College JCR, who became Liberal Democrat MP for Kingston and Surbiton (1997 to date); appointed Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change in 2012 [14][15][16]
Davies, GeraintGeraint Davies 1978 1982 BA PPE President of the Jesus College JCR, who became Labour MP for Croydon Central (1997–2005) [15][17][18]
Douglas-Mann, BruceBruce Douglas-Mann 1948 1951 BA PPE (2nd) Labour MP for Kensington North (1970–74) and Mitcham and Morden (1974–82); joined the SDP, but lost his seat at the by-election following his change of party [19][20][21]
Edwards, FrancisSir Francis Edwards, 1st Baronet 1872 1875 Pass degree Liberal MP for Radnorshire (1892–95, 1900 – January 1910 and December 1910 – 1918) [22][23]
Foxwist, WilliamWilliam Foxwist 1628 DNG Welsh judge who was MP for Caernarfon (1647–48), Anglesey (1654–55), Swansea (1659) and St Albans (1660) [24]
Garnier, EdwardEdward Garnier QC 1971 1974 BA Modern History (3rd) Conservative MP for Harborough (1992 to date), Solicitor General (2010–12) [15][25][26]
Glynne, WilliamSir William Glynne, 1st Baronet 1654 1656 BA MP for Caernarfon in the Third Protectorate Parliament [6][27]
Grist, IanIan Grist 1957 1960 BA Modern History (2nd) Labour MP for Cardiff North (1974–83), then MP for Cardiff Central (1983–92) [19][21][28]
Jenkins, LeolineLeoline Jenkins (F/P) 1641 DNG Studies interrupted by the English Civil War, but awarded DCL in 1661; a lawyer and diplomat who served as Secretary of State (1680–84) [29][30]
Johnes, ThomasThomas Johnes 1766? 1766? ? MP for Cardigan, Radnorshire and Cardiganshire in succession between 1775 and 1816; Lord Lieutenant of Cardiganshire (1800–16) [31][32]
Littleton, ThomasSir Thomas Littleton, 2nd Baronet 1638 DNG MP for Wenlock in the Short and Long Parliaments (1661–79), then MP for East Grinstead (1679) and Yarmouth (1681) [6][33]
Lloyd, CharlesSir Charles Lloyd, 1st Baronet 1679 DNG MP for Cardigan boroughs (1698–1701), High Sheriff of Cardiganshire (1690) and High Sheriff of Carmarthenshire (1716) [6][34]
Lloyd, HerbertSir Herbert Lloyd, 1st Baronet 1738 DNG MP for Cardigan boroughs (1761–68) [7][35]
Meyrick, JohnJohn Meyrick 1692? 1695? ? MP for Pembroke (1702–08) and Cardigan (1710–12); later a judge in Anglesey [36]
McIntosh, AndrewAndrew McIntosh, Baron McIntosh of Haringey 1951 1954 BA PPE (2nd) Former leader of the Labour Group on the Greater London Council; Deputy Government Chief Whip (1997–2003) [17][19][37]
Mostyn, RogerSir Roger Mostyn, 3rd Baronet 1690 DNG MP who represented Flintshire, Flint and Cheshire between 1701 and 1734 [38]
Perrot, JamesSir James Perrot 1586 DNG Welsh writer, who was MP for Haverfordwest in the reigns of Elizabeth I, James I and Charles I [6][39]
Philipps, JamesJames Philipps 1610 1613? ? High Sheriff of Cardiganshire in 1649; MP representing Cardiganshire, Pembrokeshire and Cardigan Boroughs between 1653 and 1661. [40]
Price, WilliamWilliam Price 1707 DNG High Sheriff of Merionethshire and High Sheriff of Caernarvonshire [6][41]
Rowlands, William BowenWilliam Bowen Rowlands 1854 1859 BA Liberal MP for Cardiganshire (1886–95) [7]
Salusbury, JohnSir John Salusbury 1581 DNG MP for Denbighshire in 1601, who also wrote sonnets and love lyrics [42]
Salusbury, ThomasSir Thomas Salusbury, 2nd Baronet 1642 DCL MP for Denbighshire in the Short Parliament of 1640; awarded an honorary DCL by King Charles I during the English Civil War [6][43]
Segal, SamuelSamuel Segal, Baron Segal (HF) 1919 1923 BA Physiology (2nd) Labour MP for Preston (1945–50) and Deputy Speaker of the House of Lords (1973–82) [12][21][44]
Thomas, PeterPeter Thomas, Baron Thomas of Gwydir (HF) 1938 1946 BA Jurisprudence Studies interrupted by World War II, when he served in the RAF and was a prisoner of war; then Conservative MP for Conwy (1951–66) and Hendon South (1970–87), and Secretary of State for Wales (1970–74) [17][45][46]
Tinn, JamesJames Tinn 1955 1958 BA PPE (3rd) Labour MP for Cleveland (1964–74) and for Redcar (1974–87) [19][21][47]
Vaughan, 1st Earl of Carbery, JohnJohn Vaughan, 1st Earl of Carbery 1592 DNG Comptroller to the household of Prince Charles (later King Charles I) and MP for Carmarthenshire; brother of William Vaughan, who also attended the college [6][48]
Villiers, TheresaTheresa Villiers 1990 1991 BCL Conservative MEP for London (1999–2005), MP for Chipping Barnet (2005 to date), Minister of State for Transport (2010–12) and Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (2012 onwards) [16][17][49]
White, JohnJohn White 1607 DNG High Sheriff of Pembrokeshire, MP for Southwark (1640–45) [6][50]
Williams, Alan WynneAlan Wynne Williams 1963 1969 BA Chemistry (1st), DPhil Labour MP for Carmarthen (1987–97) and Carmarthen East and Dinefwr (1997–2001) [17][51][52]
Williams, CharlesSir Charles Williams 1610 DNG MP for Monmouthshire 1620–21 and 1640–41 [6]
Williams, DavidD. J. Williams 1916 1918 BA English (4th) Welsh nationalist and writer, who was one of the founders of Plaid Cymru in 1925; his thesis was "The nature of literary creation" [12][53][54]
Williams, HughHugh Williams 1712 DNG MP for Anglesey (1725–34), grandson of Sir William Williams [6]
Williams, WilliamSir William Williams 1650 DNG MP for Chester (1670–85), Speaker of the House of Commons (1680–85) and Solicitor General (1687–89); grandfather of Hugh Williams [6][55]
Williams-Wynn, WilliamSir Watkin Williams-Wynn, 3rd Baronet 1710 DNG Welsh politician and prominent Jacobite who was said to have had "a record of idleness and extravagance" at College; awarded an honorary DCL in 1732 and presented a 10 imperial gallons (45 L) punch bowl to College to commemorate this [56][57]
Wilson, HaroldHarold Wilson (HF) 1934 1937 BA PPE (1st) Awarded pre-entry scholarship to read Modern History but changed degree subject; twice served as British Prime Minister (October 1964 – June 1970 and March 1974 – April 1976) [58][59][60][61]
Wogan, JohnSir John Wogan 1607 DNG MP for Pembrokeshire in the 17th century [6][62]
Wogan, LewisLewis Wogan 1663 DNG High Sheriff of Pembrokeshire (1672) [6][62]
Wynne, WilliamWilliam Wynne 1820 DNG MP for Merioneth (1852–65), High Sheriff of Merionethshire (1867) [7][63]

Politicians in other countries[edit]

Name M G Degree Notes Ref
Athulathmudali, LalithLalith Athulathmudali 1955 1960 BA Jurisprudence (2nd, 1958), BCL (2nd, 1960) President of the Oxford Union (1958); a Sri Lankan politician, who was killed by the Tamil Tigers in 1993 [19][64][65]
Blewett, NealNeal Blewett (HF) 1957 1959 BA PPE (2nd) Member of the Australian House of Representatives (1977–94), Government Minister (1983–94), High Commissioner to the UK (1994–98) [19][66]
Clearihue, JosephJoseph Clearihue 1911 1914 BA Jurisprudence (2nd, 1913), BCL (3rd, 1914) Canadian Rhodes scholar, who later became a member of the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia and a county court judge; also chairman of the council of Victoria College, British Columbia (which became the University of Victoria under his leadership) [12][67][68]
Jayatilaka, Don BaronDon Baron Jayatilaka 1910 1912 BA Jurisprudence (3rd) Ceylonese statesman (vice-chairman of the Board of Ministers, Leader of the State Council, and Minister for Home Affairs) [12][69]
Le Sueur, TerryTerry Le Sueur 1960? 1963 BA Physics (3rd) Chief Minister of Jersey 2008–11 [19][70][71][72]
Lloyd, ThomasThomas Lloyd 1658 1661 Law and medicine Politician in the province of Pennsylvania [73]
Manley, NormanNorman Manley (HF) 1914 1921 BA Jurisprudence, BCL (2nd) A Rhodes scholar whose studies were interrupted by World War I; Chief Minister of Jamaica (1955–62) [12][74][75]
Rajan, P. T.P. T. Rajan 1912 1915 BA Modern History (4th) Chief Minister of Madras Presidency (April – August 1936) [12][76][77][78][79]
Rushworth, HaroldHarold Rushworth 1898? 1901? BA Jurisprudence Emigrated to New Zealand in 1923, becoming an MP for the Country Party in 1928 [80]
Seme, Pixley ka IsakaPixley ka Isaka Seme 1906 1909 BCL Founder member of the African National Congress [81]
Wilson, HeatherHeather Wilson 1982 1985 MPhil (1984), DPhil in International Relations (1985) Republican member of the US House of Representatives, representing New Mexico's 1st congressional district (June 1998 – January 2009); the first Jesus Old Member elected to the House [82][83]

Judges[edit]

Name M G Degree Notes Ref
Amissah, AustinAustin Amissah 1951 1954 BA Jurisprudence (2nd) Ghanaian lawyer, judge and academic [19][76][84]
Blake-Reed, JohnSir John Blake-Reed (HF) 1901 1905 BA Literae Humaniores (3rd) British judge in various courts in Palestine, Cairo and Alexandria (1919–49) [12][21][76]
Du ParcqHerbert du Parcq, Baron du Parcq (HF) 1904 1905 BCL British judge, appointed a Lord of Appeal in Ordinary in 1946 [85]
Evans, WilliamWilliam Evans 1873 BA Literae Humaniores (1872, 3rd), BA Jurisprudence (4th, 1873) Matriculated as a non-collegiate student in 1868, transferring to Jesus College in 1869; a barrister and legal author, then a county court judge assigned to mid-Wales, who died whilst sitting at Oswestry County Court [7][11][86]
James, ArthurSir Arthur James (HF) 1934 1938 BA Jurisprudence (1st, 1937), BCL (1st, 1938) Barrister (who prosecuted the Great Train Robbers) then a judge of the High Court and Court of Appeal [21][76][87][88]
Lloyd-Jones, VincentSir Vincent Lloyd-Jones (HF) 1921 1924 BA English (2nd, 1923), BA Jurisprudence (3rd, 1924) High Court Judge (1960–72) [21]
Long, MichaelMichael Long 1947? 1949 BA Jurisprudence (3rd) Director of Public Prosecutions for Belize (1980–81), Resident Judge of the Sovereign Base Areas of Cyprus (1981–85) [89]
Murray, RonaldRonald Murray, Lord Murray (HF) 1947 1949 ? MP for Edinburgh Leith (1970–79), Lord Advocate (1974–79), appointed a Senator of the College of Justice in 1979 [90][91]
Poole, DavidSir David Poole (HF) 1957 1961 BA Literae Humaniores (2nd) Barrister, then a High Court judge [19][92][93]
Powell, JohnSir John Powell 1650 1653 BA Judge of the Court of Common Pleas and of the Court of King's Bench, who presided over the trial of the Seven Bishops in 1688 [94]
Richards, RichardSir Richard Richards 1771 Transferred to Wadham College and then The Queen's College; an MP (briefly) who became Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer [95]
Sankey, JohnJohn Sankey, 1st Viscount Sankey (HF) 1885 1891 BA Modern History (2nd, 1889), BCL (3rd) Lord Chancellor (1929–35), also High Steward of Oxford University [96][97][98]
Seys-Llewellyn, JohnJohn Seys-Llewellyn 1931 1934 BA French and German (2nd) Barrister (who participated in the prosecution of the Nuremberg Trials); later a County Court judge [87][99]

Other lawyers[edit]

Name M G Degree Notes Ref
Chadwin QC, JamesJames Chadwin QC 1951 1954? ? Barrister, who defended the Yorkshire Ripper [100][101]
Clark, CharlesCharles Clark 1954 1957 BA Jurisprudence (3rd) Lawyer and publisher, who was an expert on copyright [19][100][102]
Derrett, J Duncan MJ Duncan M Derrett 1940 1947 BA Modern History Professor of Oriental Laws in the University of London (1965–82) [17][76]
Evans, David WilliamSir David William Evans 1885 1888 ? Welsh solicitor who was director and legal advisor of the King Edward VII National Memorial Association for the Prevention and Treatment of Tuberculosis, and knighted for public services to Wales; previously won his "Blue" in rugby (1887 and 1888) and played as a Welsh rugby union international, winning six caps (1889–91) [10][103]
Hayward QC, SidneySidney Hayward QC 1919 1922 BA Jurisprudence (2nd) (1st class in Mods in Mathematics) Barrister and writer on housing and planning law [21][104]
Hazel, AlfredAlfred Hazel (F/P) 1888 1894 BA Literae Humaniores (2nd, 1892), BA Jurisprudence (1st, 1893), BCL (2nd) All Souls Reader in English Law, Liberal MP for West Bromwich (1906 – January 1910) [21][105]
Lewis, DavidSir David Lewis (HF) 1966 1969 BA Jurisprudence Former senior partner of Norton Rose, Lord Mayor of London (2007–2008) [106][107]
Reynolds, LlywarchLlywarch Reynolds 1868 1875 BA Welsh solicitor and Celtic scholar; many of the antiquarian manuscripts he collected are now held by the National Library of Wales [108]
Williams, JohnJohn Williams 1773 Transferred to Wadham College and graduated from there; serjeant-at-law and legal writer [109]
Wynne, EdwardEdward Wynne (F) 1698 1702 BA (1702), MA (1705) BCL and DCL (1711) Advocate at Doctors' Commons, chancellor of the Diocese of Hereford and an Anglesey landowner [110]
Wynne, EdwardEdward Wynne 1753 DNG Barrister and legal writer; son of the lawyer William Wynne [7][111]
Wynne, WilliamWilliam Wynne 1709 1712 BA Serjeant-at-law and author of The Life of Sir Leoline Jenkins (1724); the son of Owen Wynne and father of the barrister Edward Wynne [112]

Civil servants and diplomats[edit]

Name M G Degree Notes Ref
Atkinson, FrederickSir Frederick Atkinson (HF) 1938 1947 BA PPE Chief Economic Adviser to HM Treasury (1977–79) [17][76][87]
Daniel, GoronwySir Goronwy Daniel (HF) 1937 1940 DPhil Permanent Under-Secretary of the Welsh Office (1964–69), Principal of University of Wales, Aberystwyth (1969–79) [113]
Davies, ErylEryl Davies 1940 1942 BA English Chief Inspector of Schools for Wales (1972–82) [76][87][114]
De Soyza, GunasenaGunasena de Soyza 1923 1926 BA Literae Humaniores (2nd) High Commissioner for Ceylon in Britain (1960–61) [12][115]
Jenkins, Walter St DavidSir Walter Jenkins 1893 1897 BA Director of Naval Contracts at the Admiralty (1919–36) [21][116]
Jones, PhilipSir Philip Jones (HF) 1949 1953 BA Literae Humaniores Civil servant who was later chairman of Total Oil Marine (1990–98) and chairman of the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales (1996–2000) [117][118]
Lush, ArchibaldSir Archibald Lush 1917? 1920? ? Chief Inspector of Schools for Monmouthshire (1944–64), awarded a knighthood for social services to Wales [119]
Roberts, DavidSir David Roberts 1946? 1947? BA Diplomat who served as Ambassador to Syria, High Commissioner to Sierra Leone, Ambassador to the United Arab Emirates and Ambassador to Lebanon [21]
Phillips, Thomas WilliamsSir Thomas Williams Phillips (HF) 1902 1906 BA Literae Humaniores (1st) Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Labour (1935–44) and Chairman of the War Damage Commission (1949–59) [120][121]
Rowlands, ArchbaldSir Archibald Rowlands 1917? 1920? BA Modern Languages Permanent Secretary to the Ministry of Aircraft Production during the Second World War [122][123]
Thomas, Ben BowenSir Ben Bowen Thomas (HF) 1920 1923? BA Modern History Permanent Secretary to the Welsh Department of the Department of Education (1945–63), President of University College of Wales, Aberystwyth (1964–75) [124][125]
Vaughan, EdgarSir Edgar Vaughan (HF) 1925 1929 BA Modern History (1st, 1928), BA PPE (1st, 1929) Ambassador to Colombia (1964–66) [21][61]
Wynne, OwenOwen Wynne 1668 1672 BA Secretary to Sir Leoline Jenkins when he was Secretary of State, and for his successors; described as "an early example of the permanent civil servant." [126]

References[edit]

Notes
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  7. ^ a b c d e f Foster, 1715–1886, sub nom.
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Bibliography

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