List of public art in Whitehall

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This is a list of public art in Whitehall, a district in the City of Westminster, London.

Whitehall is at the centre of the highest concentration of memorials in the City of Westminster, in which 47% of the total number of such works in the borough are located.[1] It includes the eponymous street of Whitehall and Horse Guards Parade, both important ceremonial spaces, and Horse Guards Road, which forms its western boundary with St James's Park. The area's monuments are mainly military in character, foremost among them being the Cenotaph, which is the focal point of the national Remembrance Sunday commemorations held each year.[2]

Image Title / subject Location and
coordinates
Date Artist / designer Architect / other Type Designation Notes
Banqueting House - bust of King Charles I.jpg Bust of Charles I Banqueting House 1800 c. 1800 Anon. Bust Grade I One of three busts of Charles I found in a builder's yard in Fulham by Hedley Hope-Nicholson, Secretary of the Society of King Charles the Martyr, in 1945.[3] Installed here in 1950.[4] The plaque below is inscribed HIS MAJESTY KING CHARLES I/ PASSED THROUGH THIS HALL AND/ OUT OF A WINDOW NEARLY OVER/ THIS TABLET TO THE SCAFFOLD/ IN WHITEHALL WHERE HE WAS/ BEHEADED ON 20TH JANUARY 1649.
Cádiz Memorial, London.jpg
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Memorial to the Siege of Cádiz Horse Guards Road

51°30′15″N 0°07′38″W / 51.5042°N 0.1273°W / 51.5042; -0.1273
1814 (base) Robert Shipster N/A Memorial Grade II Unveiled 12 August 1816.[5] A French mortar from the siege, presented by Spain in thanks for Wellington's lifting of the siege. The mortar is mounted on a figure of the mythological monster Geryon and (at the back) his two-headed dog Orthrus.[6] The support was made by the Carriage Department of the Royal Arsenal to Shipster's design.[7]
Red Lion, Parliament St, London (3rd floor details).jpg Bust of Charles Dickens The Red Lion, Parliament Street 1900 Anon. Architectural sculpture Grade II [8]
Duke of Cambridge statue Whitehall.jpg
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Statue of Prince George, Duke of Cambridge Whitehall, opposite the Old War Office Building

51°30′19″N 0°07′36″W / 51.5052°N 0.1266°W / 51.5052; -0.1266
1907 Adrian Jones John Belcher Equestrian statue Grade II Unveiled 15 June 1907.[9] Jones was appointed a Member of the Royal Victorian Order for this work.[10] In 2012 the sword was broken off by a man who had stripped naked and mounted the statue in what was described as a "psychotic episode".[11]
King Charles Street closed entry - panoramio.jpg
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Archway King Charles Street 1908 Paul Raphael Montford and William Silver Frith John Brydon and Henry Tanner Grade II* [12]
Statue of the Duke of Devonshire in Whitehall (cropped).jpg
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Statue of Spencer Cavendish, 8th Duke of Devonshire Junction of Horse Guards Avenue and Whitehall

51°30′17″N 0°07′34″W / 51.5048°N 0.1262°W / 51.5048; -0.1262
1909–1910 Herbert Hampton Howard Ince Statue Grade II Unveiled 14 February 1911. The statue of the Duke in his Garter robes stands on a pedestal of Darley Dale stone. Edward VII, as a close friend of the Duke, took a personal interest in the memorial, asking Hampton to bring the modello to Buckingham Palace for his inspection.[13]
Statue of Robert Clive, King Charles Street, London.jpg
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Statue of Robert Clive, 1st Baron Clive King Charles Street, facing Horse Guards Road

51°30′08″N 0°07′45″W / 51.5023°N 0.1292°W / 51.5023; -0.1292
1912 John Tweed George Somers Clarke Statue Grade II Erected 1912 in the gardens of Gwydyr House; moved to present site in 1916. The statue was the brainchild of Lord Curzon, who felt that Clive had been insufficiently honoured for his role in establishing the British Empire in India. A marble version was also created for erection in Calcutta.[14]
S F-E-CAMERON LONDON CENOTAPH.JPG
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Cenotaph Whitehall

51°30′10″N 0°07′34″W / 51.5027°N 0.1261°W / 51.5027; -0.1261
1920 Francis Derwent Wood Edwin Lutyens Memorial Grade I Unveiled 11 November (Armistice Day) 1920 by George V. Lutyens's temporary cenotaph in wood and plaster, designed and built in two weeks in July 1919, proved so popular that this permanent version of the same design was erected the following year. It commemorates the dead of both world wars.[15]
Statue of Viscount Wolseley, London.jpg
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Statue of Garnet Wolseley, 1st Viscount Wolseley Horse Guards Road

51°30′18″N 0°07′39″W / 51.505°N 0.1275°W / 51.505; -0.1275
1920 William Goscombe John Richard Allison Equestrian statue Grade II Unveiled 25 June 1920 by the Duke of Connaught. Goscombe John was awarded this commission on the strength of his equestrian bronze of Lord Tredegar in Cathays Park, Cardiff. Trafalgar Square was initially considered as the location for this statue. It was stored for safekeeping at Berkhamsted Castle, Hertfordshire, between 1941 and 1949.[16]
Statue of the Earl Roberts, London.jpg
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Statue of Frederick Roberts, 1st Earl Roberts Horse Guards Road

51°30′16″N 0°07′39″W / 51.5045°N 0.1274°W / 51.5045; -0.1274
1924 Henry Poole after Harry Bates Richard Allison Equestrian statue Grade II Unveiled 30 May 1924 by the Duke of Connaught.[17] A scaled-down replica of Bates's 30-foot high bronze of Lord Roberts, erected in Calcutta in 1896. Another, earlier replica by Poole is in Kelvingrove Park, Glasgow.[18]
Earth and Water Statues on MoD Main Building in London MOD 45152995.jpg
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Earth and Water Horse Guards Avenue, outside Ministry of Defence Main Building 1924 Charles Wheeler Vincent Harris Grade II [19]
London, UK (August 2014) - 147.JPG
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Royal Naval Division War Memorial Horse Guards Road

51°30′19″N 0°07′44″W / 51.5054°N 0.129°W / 51.5054; -0.129
1925 Eric Broadbent and F. J. Wilcoxson Edwin Lutyens Fountain with obelisk Grade II* Unveiled 25 April 1925 by Winston Churchill.[20] Inscribed with words from the poem "1914. III. The Dead" by Rupert Brooke, who served in the RND.[21] Put into storage 1939, re-erected outside the Old Royal Naval College at Greenwich in 1959, and returned to its original site in 2003.[20]
Statue of the Earl Kitchener, London - closeup.jpg
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Statue of Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener Horse Guards Road

51°30′14″N 0°07′41″W / 51.5039°N 0.128°W / 51.5039; -0.128
1926 John Tweed N/A Statue Grade II Unveiled 9 June 1926 by the Prince of Wales (the future Edward VIII).[22] Set against a stone screen abutting the garden wall of 10 Downing Street.[23] A larger national memorial to Kitchener, the tomb designed by William Reid Dick, had been erected in St Paul's Cathedral the previous year.[22]
Guards Division War Memorial.jpg
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Guards Division War Memorial Horse Guards Parade

51°30′16″N 0°07′46″W / 51.5045°N 0.1295°W / 51.5045; -0.1295
1926 Gilbert Ledward H. Chalton Bradshaw Memorial with sculpture Grade I Unveiled 16 October 1926. The bronze figures represent five individual soldiers from the Grenadier, Coldstream, Scots, Irish and Welsh Guards; they were cast from captured German guns. After it sustained bomb damage in the Blitz, Ledward asked that some of the "honourable scars of war" be left on the memorial.[24]
Earl Haig Memorial, Whitehall, London.jpg
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Statue of Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig Whitehall

51°30′15″N 0°07′35″W / 51.5043°N 0.1263°W / 51.5043; -0.1263
1937 Alfred Frank Hardiman Stephen Rowland Pierce Equestrian statue Grade II* Unveiled 10 November 1937. The statue aroused great controversy, comparable even with the reaction to Epstein's early works. The depiction of the horse was deemed to be unnatural; Country Life noted that its legs were in the position for urinating.[25]
London 074 Dept of Energy 3 Whitehall Place (9185416307).jpg Agriculture and Sea and Fisheries 3 Whitehall Place 1952 c. 1952 James Woodford C. E. Mee Architectural sculpture Grade II* [26]
Bernard Montgomery Statue, Whitehall, London.jpg
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Statue of Bernard Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein Whitehall, outside the Ministry of Defence

51°30′12″N 0°07′33″W / 51.5034°N 0.1258°W / 51.5034; -0.1258
1980 Oscar Nemon N/A Statue N/A Unveiled 6 June 1980 by the Queen Mother. The texture of the lower parts of the statue was achieved by mixing old plaster from the studio floor with fresh plaster at the modelling stage. Another cast stands in Brussels,[27] at a traffic intersection called Montgomery Square.
Statue of Lord Mountbatten (29378962570) (cropped).jpg
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Statue of Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma Mountbatten Green, off Horse Guards Road

51°30′13″N 0°07′43″W / 51.5036°N 0.1287°W / 51.5036; -0.1287
1983 Franta Belsky Charles Pollard (Lettering by David Kindersley) Statue N/A Unveiled 2 November 1983 by Elizabeth II. The statue stands on a pedestal at the centre of a low stepped pyramid, a scheme much reduced in ambition from Belsky's competition-winning design which included fountains representing the four seas. The financial constraints and "a very restrictive brief" resulted in a finished work which dissatisfied the sculptor.[28]
Field Marshal The Viscount Slim.jpg
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Statue of William Slim, 1st Viscount Slim Whitehall, outside the Ministry of Defence

51°30′14″N 0°07′33″W / 51.5038°N 0.1259°W / 51.5038; -0.1259
1990 Ivor Roberts-Jones David Kindersley (lettering) Statue N/A Unveiled 28 April 1990 by Elizabeth II. Roberts-Jones had fought in the Burma Campaign of World War II, in which Slim was a commander.[29]
Statue of Lord Alanbrooke (8281927746).jpg
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Statue of Alan Brooke, 1st Viscount Alanbrooke Whitehall, outside the Ministry of Defence

51°30′13″N 0°07′33″W / 51.5036°N 0.1258°W / 51.5036; -0.1258
1993 Ivor Roberts-Jones David Kindersley (lettering) Statue N/A Unveiled 25 May 1993 by Elizabeth II. For the installation of this, the last of the statues of Field Marshals on what was formerly called Raleigh Green, the area was re-configured by the landscape architects RMJM and the statue of Sir Walter Raleigh removed to Greenwich.[30]
Gurkha Soldier Monument, London - April 2008.jpg
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Memorial to the Brigade of Gurkhas Horse Guards Avenue

51°30′18″N 0°07′30″W / 51.5051°N 0.125°W / 51.5051; -0.125
1997 Philip Jackson after Richard Reginald Goulden Cecil Denny Highton Statue N/A Unveiled 3 December 1997 by Elizabeth II. Modelled on a 1924 sculpture by Goulden in the Foreign Office. The Hong Kong Handover transferred the Gurkhas' headquarters to the United Kingdom, which until that point had no memorial to the brigade.[31]
Royal Tank Regiment Memorial, Whitehall Place, London.jpg
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Royal Tank Regiment Memorial Whitehall Court

51°30′22″N 0°07′28″W / 51.5061°N 0.1244°W / 51.5061; -0.1244
2000 Vivien Mallock after George Henry Paulin Christopher Rainsford for HOK International Sculptural group N/A Unveiled 13 June 2000 by Elizabeth II. The group depicts the five-man crew of a World War II-era Comet tank; it is an enlarged version of Paulin's statuette of 1953 in the Tank Museum, Bovington, Dorset. Mallock's husband had been an officer in the RTR in the 1960s.[32]
UK-2014-London-Monument to the Women of World War II (1).jpg
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Monument to the Women of World War II Whitehall

51°30′13″N 0°07′34″W / 51.5035°N 0.1262°W / 51.5035; -0.1262
2005 John W. Mills Giles Quarme Plinth with reliefs N/A Unveiled 9 July 2005 by Elizabeth II. Around the plinth are reliefs of servicewomen's clothing and protective costumes, appearing as if they have been hung up at the end of a working day.[33]
Bali bombing memorial in London, Horse Guard Road.JPG
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Memorial to the 2002 Bali bombings Horse Guards Road, rear of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office

51°30′09″N 0°07′47″W / 51.5024°N 0.1296°W / 51.5024; -0.1296
2006 Martin Cook Gary Breeze Memorial N/A Unveiled 12 October 2006, the fourth anniversary of the bombings, by the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall. The memorial consists of a granite globe carved with 202 doves—one for each individual killed in the bombings—and a wall inscribed with their names.[34]

Foreign and Commonwealth Office[edit]

Image Title / subject Location and
coordinates
Date Artist / designer Architect / other Type Designation Notes
America Whitehall.jpg America Whitehall façade (spandrel on first storey) Henry Hugh Armstead Relief [35]
Australasia Whitehall.jpg Australasia Whitehall façade (spandrel on first storey) Henry Hugh Armstead Relief [36]
Africa Whitehall.jpg Africa Whitehall façade (spandrel on first storey) Henry Hugh Armstead Relief [37]
Asia Whitehall.jpg Asia Whitehall façade (spandrel on first storey) Henry Hugh Armstead Relief [38]
Europe Whitehall.jpg Europe Whitehall façade (spandrel on first storey) Henry Hugh Armstead Relief [39]
Captain James Cook Whitehall façade (roundel in lunette on second storey) Henry Hugh Armstead or John Birnie Philip Relief
Sir John Franklin Whitehall façade (roundel in lunette on second storey) Henry Hugh Armstead or John Birnie Philip Relief
William Wilberforce Whitehall façade (roundel in lunette on second storey) Henry Hugh Armstead or John Birnie Philip Relief
David Livingstone Whitehall façade (roundel in lunette on second storey) Henry Hugh Armstead or John Birnie Philip Relief
Sir Francis Drake Whitehall façade (roundel in lunette on second storey) Henry Hugh Armstead or John Birnie Philip Relief
Elizabeth I Whitehall façade (roundel in lunette on second storey) Henry Hugh Armstead or John Birnie Philip Relief
Alfred the Great Whitehall façade (roundel in lunette on second storey) Henry Hugh Armstead or John Birnie Philip Relief
Edward the Confessor, an Angel and Christianity Whitehall façade (roundel in lunette and surrounding spandrels on second storey) Henry Hugh Armstead or John Birnie Philip Relief
Æthelbert statue.JPG Æthelberht of Wessex Whitehall façade (roundel in lunette on second storey) Henry Hugh Armstead or John Birnie Philip Relief
Adam Smith Whitehall façade (roundel in lunette on second storey) Henry Hugh Armstead or John Birnie Philip Relief
Sinclair Whitehall façade (roundel in lunette on second storey) Henry Hugh Armstead or John Birnie Philip Relief
Sir Francis Bacon Whitehall façade (roundel in lunette on second storey) Henry Hugh Armstead or John Birnie Philip Relief
Sir Joshua Reynolds Whitehall façade (roundel in lunette on second storey) Henry Hugh Armstead or John Birnie Philip Relief
The Foreign Office - Downing Street Entrance - geograph.org.uk - 1186804.jpg Edward Grey, 1st Viscount Grey of Fallodon North façade 1937 William Reid Dick Edwin Lutyens Relief [40]

Old War Office Building[edit]

Image Title / subject Location and
coordinates
Date Artist / designer Architect / other Type Designation Notes
Old War Office, Whitehall, London 02.jpg Sorrow of Peace and Winged Messenger of Peace Whitehall façade Alfred Drury William Young and Clyde Young [41]
Horrors of War and Dignity of War Whitehall façade Alfred Drury William Young and Clyde Young [41]
Truth and Justice Whitehall Place façade Alfred Drury William Young and Clyde Young [41]
Victory and Fame Horse Guards Avenue façade Alfred Drury William Young and Clyde Young [41]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Westminster City Council, p. 10
  2. ^ Memorials, The Royal British Legion, archived from the original on 31 January 2014, retrieved 8 February 2014 
  3. ^ Matthews 2012, p. 20.
  4. ^ Kershman 2013, p. 39.
  5. ^ Hughson 1817, pp. 224–6
  6. ^ Catalogue Twenty Four (PDF), Lymington: Alastor Rare Books, 2013, p. 4, archived from the original (PDF) on 8 February 2015 
  7. ^ Bradley & Pevsner 2003, p. 256
  8. ^ Kershman 2013, p. 46.
  9. ^ Ward-Jackson 2011, p. 413
  10. ^ Crellin, Sarah (2004), "Jones, Adrian (1845–1938)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, retrieved 6 January 2013, (Subscription required (help)) 
  11. ^ "Naked man who climbed statue of Duke of Cambridge had 'psychotic episode'", The Telegraph, 26 November 2012, retrieved 6 January 2013 
  12. ^ Bradley & Pevsner 2003, p. 270.
  13. ^ Blackwood 1989, p. 212
  14. ^ Ward-Jackson 2011, pp. 108–11
  15. ^ The Cenotaph, Veterans UK, archived from the original on 5 August 2014, retrieved 23 January 2015 
  16. ^ Ward-Jackson 2011, pp. 67–8
  17. ^ Ward-Jackson 2011, pp. 68–70
  18. ^ "Bates, Harry (1850–1899), Sculptor", Your Archives, The National Archives, archived from the original on 4 December 2011 
  19. ^ WHEELER, SIR CHARLES Archived 2011-10-06 at Archive.is Accessed 23 August 2010
  20. ^ a b Historic England. "Royal Naval Division War Memorial (1392454)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 19 December 2015. 
  21. ^ "Royal Naval Division Memorial", Your Archives, The National Archives, retrieved 12 September 2011 
  22. ^ a b Ward-Jackson 2011, pp. 72–4
  23. ^ Historic England. "Statue of Lord Kitchener (1231295)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 November 2013. 
  24. ^ "Ledward, Gilbert (1888–1960) Sculptor", Your Archives, The National Archives, retrieved 1 January 2010 
  25. ^ Watkins, Nicholas (2008), A Kick in the Teeth. The equestrian monument to 'Field Marshal Earl Haig, Commander-in-Chief of the British Armies in France 1915–1918' by Alfred Hardiman (PDF), Henry Moore Institute, archived from the original (PDF) on 31 March 2012, retrieved 14 October 2011 
  26. ^ "James Arthur Woodford RA, OBE", Mapping the Practice and Profession of Sculpture in Briatin & Ireland 1851–1951 
  27. ^ Ward-Jackson 2011, pp. 423–5
  28. ^ Ward-Jackson 2011, pp. 77–9
  29. ^ Ward-Jackson 2011, pp. 425–6
  30. ^ Ward-Jackson 2011, pp. 426–8
  31. ^ Ward-Jackson 2011, pp. 66–7
  32. ^ Ward-Jackson 2011, pp. 430–2
  33. ^ Ward-Jackson 2011, p. 428
  34. ^ Ward-Jackson 2011, pp. 79–80
  35. ^ Banerjee, Jacqueline (12 August 2011), "America by Henry Hugh Armstead (1828–1905)", The Victorian Web, retrieved 14 April 2013 
  36. ^ Banerjee, Jacqueline (6 June 2011), "Australasia by Henry Hugh Armstead", The Victorian Web, retrieved 14 April 2013 
  37. ^ Banerjee, Jacqueline (6 June 2011), "Africa by Henry Hugh Armstead", The Victorian Web, retrieved 14 April 2013 
  38. ^ Banerjee, Jacqueline (December 1999), "Asia by Henry Hugh Armstead", The Victorian Web, retrieved 14 April 2013 
  39. ^ Banerjee, Jacqueline (6 June 2011), "Asia by Henry Hugh Armstead", The Victorian Web, retrieved 14 April 2013 
  40. ^ Bradley & Pevsner 2003, p. 266 and Smith 2015, passim
  41. ^ a b c d Bradley & Pevsner 2003, p. 239.

Bibliography[edit]