List of recorded icebergs by area

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This is a list of icebergs by total area.

Iceberg Maximum surface (km²) Maximum length (km) Maximum width (km) Year recorded Picture Reference
B-15 11,007 295 37 2000
Iceberg B-15A drifting toward the Drygalski Ice Tongue prior to the collision, 2 January 2005 (NASA)
[1][2]
A-38 6,900 144 48 1998
The split of the A38-B iceberg is recorded in this series of images. The iceberg was originally part of the massive A-38 iceberg, which broke from the Ronne Ice Shelf in Antarctica
[3]
B-15A 6,400 2002
A-68 5,800 175 50 2017
Calving crack in the Larsen C ice shelf
[2][4][5]
C-19 5,500 200 32 2002
Iceberg C-19 breaking off from the Ross Ice Shelf, 11 May 2002, image:DMSP.
[6]
B-9 5,390 154 35 1987
Iceberg B-9B colliding with the Mertz Glacier Tongue calving the Mertz iceberg, 20 February 2010
B-31 660 39 22 2013 [7]
D-16 310 28 15 2006
Petermann Ice Island (2010) 260 2010
B-44 256 2017
Radar imagery captured by the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-1 on September 23, 2017, showed an early view of the new iceberg.
[8][9]
B-17B 140 1999
NOAA satellite image of Iceberg B-17B, December 11, 2009.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Goering, Laurie (24 March 2000). "Mammoth Iceberg Is Born In Antarctic". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 18 February 2014.
  2. ^ a b "Massive iceberg breaks away from Antarctica". CNN. 2017-07-12. Retrieved 2017-07-13.
  3. ^ NASA (April 24, 2004). "The A38-B Iceberg Splits". Retrieved 24 April 2014.
  4. ^ "Giant iceberg splits from Antarctic". BBC. 12 July 2017.
  5. ^ "Eisberg aus Larsen-C-Schelfeis treibt in wärmere Gewässer". ZEIT ONLINE (in German). 2018-09-06. Retrieved 2018-09-07.
  6. ^ NASA (2003-10-01). "Huge Antarctic Iceberg Makes a BIG Splash on Sea Life". Retrieved 2018-09-07.
  7. ^ NASAEarthObservatory (2014-04-17). "Drifting with Ice Island B31". www.youtube.com. Retrieved 2018-09-07.
  8. ^ "B44 in der Westantarktis: Erneut großer Eisberg abgebrochen". SPIEGEL ONLINE (in German). Retrieved 2017-10-01.
  9. ^ NASA (2017-09-28). "The Quick Demise of B-44 : Image of the Day". Retrieved 2018-01-04.