List of red-flagged Formula One races

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A man in a white overall, standing behind a blue placard with the letters RBS in white. He is waving a red flag.
A red flag is shown to indicate an unscheduled stop to a race, usually for safety reasons.

Formula One, abbreviated to F1, is the highest class of open-wheeled auto racing defined by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA), motorsport's world governing body.[1] The "formula" in the name refers to a set of rules to which all participants and vehicles must conform. The F1 World Championship season consists of a series of races, known as Grands Prix, usually held on purpose-built circuits, and in a few cases on closed city streets. The results of each race are combined to determine two annual championships, one for drivers and one for constructors.

A red flag is shown when there has been an accident or the track conditions are poor enough to warrant the race being stopped. The flags are displayed by the marshals at various points around the circuit.[2] A Global Positioning System (GPS) marshalling system was introduced in 2007. It involves a display of flag signals in the driver's cockpit, which alerts them to the accident.[3] Following a red flag being shown, the exit of the pit lane is closed and cars must proceed to the starting grid slowly, without overtaking. From 2005, a ten-minute warning is given before the race is resumed behind the safety car, which leads the field for a lap before it returns to the pit lane.[4] Previously, the race was restarted in race order from the penultimate lap before the red flag was shown.[5] If a race is unable to be resumed, "the results will be taken at the end of the penultimate lap before the lap during which the signal to suspend the race was given".[6] If 75 per cent of the race distance has not been completed and the race cannot be resumed, half points are awarded. No points are awarded if the race cannot be restarted and less than two laps have been completed.[7]

Since the first World Championship Grand Prix in 1950, red flags have been shown in sixty-six races. Twenty-six were restarted on the first lap. Thirteen races, nine stopped because of rain and four due to accidents involving drivers, were not restarted. Five races were stopped due to incidents that resulted in fatalities: The 1975 Spanish Grand Prix was stopped on lap twenty-nine and not restarted after Rolf Stommelen's car crashed into a spectator area, killing five people.[8] The 1978 Italian Grand Prix was red-flagged after a massive crash at the start that claimed the life of Ronnie Peterson. The 1982 Canadian Grand Prix was halted on the first lap after Riccardo Paletti was killed when his car collided with the back of Didier Pironi's Ferrari.[9] The 1994 San Marino Grand Prix was red-flagged on lap five following the fatal accident of Ayrton Senna, in which his car crashed into a wall at the Tamburello curve.[10] The 2014 Japanese Grand Prix was red-flagged for a second time following a serious collision between Jules Bianchi and a recovery vehicle which would ultimately prove to be fatal.[11]

Red-flagged races[edit]

Key
N Indicates the race was not restarted
Y Indicates the race was restarted over the original distance
R Indicates the race was resumed with the originally scheduled distance completed
S Indicates the race was restarted over a shortened distance
  • The "Lap" column identifies the lap on which the race was stopped.
  • The "R" column indicates whether or not the race was restarted:
Formula One World Championship races that have been red-flagged
Race Lap R Winner Red flag prompting incident Failed to make the restart [F] Ref.
1950 Indianapolis 500 138 N Parsons, JohnnieJohnnie Parsons Rain.
1971 Canadian Grand Prix 64 N Stewart, JackieJackie Stewart Rain. [12]
1973 British Grand Prix 2 Y Revson, PeterPeter Revson Accident involving Jody Scheckter, Jean-Pierre Beltoise, George Follmer, Mike Hailwood, Carlos Pace, Jochen Mass, Jackie Oliver, Roger Williamson and Andrea de Adamich. Jody Scheckter, Jean-Pierre Beltoise, George Follmer, Mike Hailwood, Carlos Pace, Jochen Mass, Jackie Oliver, Roger Williamson and Andrea de Adamich (crash) Graham McRae (throttle) and David Purley (spun off). [13]
1974 Brazilian Grand Prix 32 N Fittipaldi, EmersonEmerson Fittipaldi Rain. [14]
1975 Spanish Grand Prix 29 N Mass, JochenJochen Mass Accident of Rolf Stommelen which killed five spectators. Half points were awarded.[A] [15]
1975 British Grand Prix 56 N Fittipaldi, EmersonEmerson Fittipaldi Rain. Crashes in the rain involving 7 drivers Wilson Fittipaldi, Jochen Mass, John Watson, Carlos Pace, Jody Scheckter, James Hunt and Mark Donohue. [16]
1975 Austrian Grand Prix 29 N Brambilla, VittorioVittorio Brambilla Rain. Half points were awarded.[A] [17]
1976 British Grand Prix 1 Y Lauda, NikiNiki Lauda Accident at the start involving Clay Regazzoni, James Hunt, Jacques Laffite and Niki Lauda. None although Clay Regazzoni and Jacques Laffite illegally used their spare cars at the restart, and were subsequently disqualified. [18]
1976 German Grand Prix 2 Y Hunt, JamesJames Hunt Accident involving Niki Lauda, Brett Lunger Harald Ertl. Niki Lauda, Brett Lunger and Harald Ertl (crashed), Chris Amon (withdrawn), Hans-Joachim Stuck (clutch) and Jacques Laffite (gearbox) [19]
1978 Austrian Grand Prix 7 Y Peterson, RonnieRonnie Peterson Rain. Mario Andretti, Jody Scheckter, Nelson Piquet, Hector Rebaque, Harald Ertl, Riccardo Patrese, Alan Jones and James Hunt. [20]
1978 Italian Grand Prix 1 S Lauda, NikiNiki Lauda Accident involving Ronnie Peterson, Riccardo Patrese, James Hunt, Vittorio Brambilla, Hans-Joachim Stuck, Patrick Depailler, Didier Pironi, Derek Daly, Clay Regazzoni and Brett Lunger. The race was shortened to 40 laps from the scheduled 52 due to the starting lights failing. Ronnie Peterson, Vittorio Brambilla, Hans-Joachim Stuck, Didier Pironi and Brett Lunger. [21]
1979 Argentine Grand Prix 1 Y Laffite, JacquesJacques Laffite A huge crash involved Jody Scheckter, Arturo Merzario, Didier Pironi, Nelson Piquet, John Watson, Patrick Tambay and Mario Andretti. Jody Scheckter, Arturo Merzario, Didier Pironi, Nelson Piquet and Patrick Tambay. [22][23]
1979 South African Grand Prix 2 Y Villeneuve, GillesGilles Villeneuve Rain. [24]
1980 Canadian Grand Prix 1 Y Jones, AlanAlan Jones Accident involving Jean-Pierre Jarier, Derek Daly, Emerson Fittipaldi, Keke Rosberg, Mario Andretti, Gilles Villeneuve and Jochen Mass. Derek Daly (crashed) and Mike Thackwell (lending his car to Jean-Pierre Jarier after Jarier crashed his car before the restart). [25]
1981 Belgian Grand Prix 2 R Reutemann, CarlosCarlos Reutemann A crash at the start involved Riccardo Patrese and teammate Siegfried Stohr injuring Patrese's mechanic. Riccardo Patrese and Siegfried Stohr [26]
54 N Rain. [26]
1981 French Grand Prix 58 R Prost, AlainAlain Prost Rain. The race was decided by combining the time from the first 58 laps with the time from the restarted 22. [27]
1982 Canadian Grand Prix 1 Y Piquet, NelsonNelson Piquet A crash at the start when Didier Pironi stalled his car, Riccardo Paletti suffered a fatal accident when he went into the back of Pironi's car. Geoff Lees, Raul Boesel and Eliseo Salazar crashed Riccardo Paletti (fatal accident), Geoff Lees (crashed) and Jean-Pierre Jarier (withdrawn after teammate Paletti died). [28]
1982 Detroit Grand Prix 6 S Watson, JohnJohn Watson A crash involved Roberto Guerrero and Riccardo Patrese. [29]
1984 Monaco Grand Prix 31 N Prost, AlainAlain Prost Rain. Half points were awarded.[A] [30]
1984 Detroit Grand Prix 1 Y Piquet, NelsonNelson Piquet Accident at the start involving Nelson Piquet, Ayrton Senna, Michele Alboreto and Marc Surer Marc Surer [31]
1984 British Grand Prix 11 S Lauda, NikiNiki Lauda Accident of Jonathan Palmer. The race was restarted for 60 laps, rather than the original 64. [32]
1984 Austrian Grand Prix 1 Y Lauda, NikiNiki Lauda Improper start procedure. [33]
1985 Austrian Grand Prix 1 Y Prost, AlainAlain Prost Accident at the start involving Teo Fabi, Elio de Angelis, Michele Alboreto and Gerhard Berger. Piercarlo Ghinzani [34]
1986 British Grand Prix 1 Y Mansell, NigelNigel Mansell It started off when Nigel Mansell having a driveshaft failure at the start then an accident involving a number of cars which included Thierry Boutsen, Jacques Laffite, Christian Danner, Piercarlo Ghinzani, Allen Berg and Jonathan Palmer. Jacques Laffite, Christian Danner, Piercarlo Ghinzani and Allen Berg. [35]
1987 Belgian Grand Prix 2 Y Prost, AlainAlain Prost Accident involving Jonathan Palmer and Philippe Streiff. Jonathan Palmer [36]
1987 Austrian Grand Prix 1 Y Mansell, NigelNigel Mansell The first race start ended quickly after Martin Brundle crashed, then Jonathan Palmer, Philippe Streiff and Piercarlo Ghinzani collided. [37]
The second race start ended quickly after Nigel Mansell crawled away with clutch problems and then Eddie Cheever and Riccardo Patrese collided and half the grid, including Stefan Johansson, Alex Caffi, Ivan Capelli, Pascal Fabre, Philippe Alliot, Martin Brundle and Christian Danner were involved in the ensuing pile-up. Philippe Streiff [37]
1987 Portuguese Grand Prix 2 Y Prost, AlainAlain Prost A multi-car collision on the opening lap. Nelson Piquet and Michele Alboreto collided at the start. Derek Warwick, Satoru Nakajima, Martin Brundle, Christian Danner, Philippe Alliot, René Arnoux and Adrián Campos were all involved in the ensuing accident. Christian Danner [38]
1987 Mexican Grand Prix 30 S Mansell, NigelNigel Mansell Accident of Derek Warwick. The race was decided by combining the time from the first 30 laps with the time from the restarted 33. [39]
1988 Portuguese Grand Prix 1 Y Prost, AlainAlain Prost The first start was aborted when Andrea de Cesaris stalled on the grid. [40]
The second start was aborted after Derek Warwick stalled his and was hit by Andrea de Cesaris, with Luis Pérez-Sala and Satoru Nakajima. [40]
1989 San Marino Grand Prix 4 S Senna, AyrtonAyrton Senna Accident of Gerhard Berger. The race was shortened from 61 to 58 laps, and was decided by combining the time from the first 3 laps with the time from the restarted 55. Gerhard Berger [41]
1989 Mexican Grand Prix 2 Y Senna, AyrtonAyrton Senna Accident involving a number of cars. [42]
1989 French Grand Prix 1 Y Prost, AlainAlain Prost This race is most famous for the multiple collision involving Nigel Mansell, Maurício Gugelmin, Thierry Boutsen, René Arnoux and Jonathan Palmer [43]
1989 Australian Grand Prix 2 Y Boutsen, ThierryThierry Boutsen accident involving JJ Lehto. Nicola Larini, Alain Prost [44]
1990 Monaco Grand Prix 1 Y Senna, AyrtonAyrton Senna Accident involving Gerhard Berger and Alain Prost. [45]
1990 Belgian Grand Prix 1 Y Senna, AyrtonAyrton Senna A crash at the start involved Martin Donnelly and Nigel Mansell. Aguri Suzuki crashes as well. Aguri Suzuki [46]
Accident involving Paolo Barilla, resulting in a damaged guardrail. Paolo Barilla [46]
1990 Italian Grand Prix 2 Y Senna, AyrtonAyrton Senna Accident of Derek Warwick. [47]
1990 Portuguese Grand Prix 61 N Mansell, NigelNigel Mansell Accident involving Aguri Suzuki and Alex Caffi. [48]
1991 Australian Grand Prix 14 N Senna, AyrtonAyrton Senna Rain. Half points were awarded.[A] [49]
1992 French Grand Prix 18 S Mansell, NigelNigel Mansell Rain. The race was decided by combining the time from the first 18 laps with the time from the restarted 51. [50]
1994 San Marino Grand Prix 7 S Schumacher, MichaelMichael Schumacher Fatal accident of Ayrton Senna. The restart procedure deleted the original lap six, and so the race was decided by combining the time of the first 5 laps with the time from the restarted 53. Ayrton Senna (fatal accident), Érik Comas (withdrew) [51]
1994 Italian Grand Prix 1 Y Hill, DamonDamon Hill Accident involving a number of cars. [52]
1994 Japanese Grand Prix 15 S Hill, DamonDamon Hill Rain and accident of Martin Brundle. The race was restarted with race leader Michael Schumacher behind the safety car. It was decided by combining the time from the first 13 laps with the time of the restarted 37. Martin Brundle [53]
1995 Argentine Grand Prix 1 Y Hill, DamonDamon Hill Accident involving Jean Alesi, Mika Salo, Luca Badoer, Olivier Panis, Pierluigi Martini, Johnny Herbert, Rubens Barrichello and Ukyo Katayama. Luca Badoer [54]
1995 Monaco Grand Prix 1 Y Schumacher, MichaelMichael Schumacher Accident involving Jean Alesi, Gerhard Berger and David Coulthard. Domenico Schiattarella, Jos Verstappen [55]
1995 Italian Grand Prix 1 Y Herbert, JohnnyJohnny Herbert Accident involving Max Papis, Jean-Christophe Boullion, Andrea Montermini, Pedro Diniz and Roberto Moreno. Andrea Montermini and Roberto Moreno. [56]
1995 Portuguese Grand Prix 1 Y Coulthard, DavidDavid Coulthard Accident involving Ukyo Katayama, Luca Badoer, Pedro Diniz and Roberto Moreno. Ukyo Katayama (crash, injured himself) and Max Papis (gearbox) [57]
1996 Australian Grand Prix 1 Y Hill, DamonDamon Hill Accident of Martin Brundle. Johnny Herbert [58]
1997 Brazilian Grand Prix 1 Y Villeneuve, JacquesJacques Villeneuve Accident involving Giancarlo Fisichella & stalled car of Rubens Barrichello at the start. [59]
1997 Canadian Grand Prix 56 N Schumacher, MichaelMichael Schumacher Accident of Olivier Panis.[D] [60]
1998 Canadian Grand Prix 1 Y Schumacher, MichaelMichael Schumacher Accident involving Jean Alesi, Johnny Herbert, Jarno Trulli and Alexander Wurz. [61]
1998 French Grand Prix 1 S Schumacher, MichaelMichael Schumacher Jos Verstappen stalled his car at the start.[E] [62]
1998 Belgian Grand Prix 1 Y Hill, DamonDamon Hill Massive accident involving David Coulthard, Jos Verstappen, Eddie Irvine, Alexander Wurz, Rubens Barrichello, Johnny Herbert, Olivier Panis, Jarno Trulli, Mika Salo, Pedro Diniz, Toranosuke Takagi, Ricardo Rosset and Shinji Nakano. Rubens Barrichello, Riccardo Rosset, Mika Salo and Olivier Panis. [63]
1999 British Grand Prix 1 Y Coulthard, DavidDavid Coulthard Jacques Villeneuve and Alex Zanardi stalled their cars at the start. Michael Schumacher crashed after the red flag was shown. Michael Schumacher (broken leg) [64]
2000 Monaco Grand Prix 1 Y Coulthard, DavidDavid Coulthard Initially shown due to a technical fault in the FIA computer. Accident involving Pedro de la Rosa and Jenson Button after the red flag was shown. Pedro de la Rosa [65]
2001 German Grand Prix 2 Y Schumacher, RalfRalf Schumacher Debris on the track after accident involving Luciano Burti & Michael Schumacher. [66]
2001 Belgian Grand Prix 5 S[B] Schumacher, MichaelMichael Schumacher Accident involving Luciano Burti & Eddie Irvine.[D] Luciano Burti (crash, injured himself) and Eddie Irvine (crash). [67]
2003 Brazilian Grand Prix 56 N Fisichella, GiancarloGiancarlo Fisichella Accidents of drivers Mark Webber and Fernando Alonso.[D] [68]
2007 European Grand Prix 5 R Alonso, FernandoFernando Alonso Torrential rain & accidents involving drivers Jenson Button, Nico Rosberg, Adrian Sutil, Lewis Hamilton, Scott Speed and Vitantonio Liuzzi.[D] Jenson Button, Nico Rosberg, Adrian Sutil, Scott Speed and Vitantonio Liuzzi. [69]
2009 Malaysian Grand Prix 33 N Button, JensonJenson Button Torrential rain and accidents of Sébastien Buemi, Sebastian Vettel and Giancarlo Fisichella. Half points were awarded.[A][D] [70]
2010 Korean Grand Prix 3 R Alonso, FernandoFernando Alonso Rain.[D] [71]
2011 Monaco Grand Prix 72 R[C] Vettel, SebastianSebastian Vettel Accident involving Adrian Sutil, Lewis Hamilton, Jaime Alguersuari and Vitaly Petrov. Jaime Alguersuari and Vitaly Petrov [72]
2011 Canadian Grand Prix 25 R Button, JensonJenson Button Rain.[D] [73]
2012 Malaysian Grand Prix 9 R Alonso, FernandoFernando Alonso Rain.[D] [74]
2013 Monaco Grand Prix 46 R Rosberg, NicoNico Rosberg Accident involving Pastor Maldonado and Max Chilton, resulting in a damaged barrier blocking the track. Pastor Maldonado [75]
2014 British Grand Prix 1 R Hamilton, LewisLewis Hamilton Accident involving Kimi Räikkönen, Felipe Massa and Kamui Kobayashi, resulting in a damaged guardrail. Kimi Räikkönen and Felipe Massa [76]
2014 Japanese Grand Prix 2 R Hamilton, LewisLewis Hamilton Torrential rain as a consequence of Typhoon Phanfone.[D] [77]
46 N Fatal accident of Jules Bianchi.[D] [77]

Notes[edit]

A. a b c d e Half points are awarded when a race cannot be restarted and less than 75 per cent of the race distance has been completed.[7]

B. a From the 2000 season, races stopped after two laps but before three-quarters race distance had been completed would be restarted with the cars lining up on the grid in the order they were at the end of the penultimate lap before the lap during which the red flag was shown. Only the race order and number of laps completed was taken into account for the new race, time differences between the cars were voided. The distance of the new race was the number of laps remaining from the original races, less three laps.[78][79]

C. a This was the first Grand Prix to be resumed despite 75% of the race distance having been completed, due to a 2005 regulation change that saw the terms "stopping" and "restarting" a race replaced with "suspending" and "resuming". Under the new regulations, regardless of distance completed, all races would be resumed behind the safety car with the cars in the order they were at the time of the red flag, once it was safe to do so. Only in the event that it was not possible to resume the race (including the four hour rule) would a result be declared from the penultimate lap before the lap during which the red flag was shown.[80]

D. a b c d e f g h i Race was stopped behind the safety car.

E. a When Jos Verstappen stalled his car on the grid, Race Director Charlie Whiting attempted to abort the start, a procedure that is carried out when a car is stalled before the lights go out. However, the lights went out before he had the chance to do so, and as a result the lights afterwards displayed the standard 5 red lights and 3 amber lights. The race was immediately stopped, but the red flag was not displayed until the cars came to the start/finish line. As is the case when a start is aborted, the race was shortened by one lap as the cars were not refuelled, but Verstappen was allowed to regain his original grid position in 15th.

F. a Drivers who had already retired are not listed, only those who failed to make the restart as a direct result of the red flag incident.

References[edit]

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External links[edit]