List of retired Pacific typhoon names

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Typhoon Maemi near peak intensity

This is a list of all Pacific typhoons that have had their names retired by the Japan Meteorological Agency. A total of 26 typhoon names have been retired since the start of official tropical cyclone naming in the western North Pacific Ocean in 2000. Tropical cyclone names are retired by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in a meeting in January or February. Those typhoons that have their names retired tend to be exceptionally destructive storms. Several names were removed or altered naming list for various reasons other than retirement. Collectively, retired typhoons have caused over $68 billion in damage (2015 USD), as well as over 12,000 deaths.

General information[edit]

In 2000, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) began naming tropical cyclones from a list of 140 names, submitted by 14 countries. Previously, the JMA labeled storms with numbers, but not names. The JMA has been the official warning agency of the western Pacific Ocean since 1981, though other organizations have also tracked typhoons. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) unofficially named tropical cyclones from 1947 to 1999.[1] During this time period, there were several pre-determined tropical cyclone lists, in which many names were removed and replaced with others.[2] The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) names tropical cyclones using a separate list, which is adjusted periodically.[3]

Several names were removed from the list. In 2002, the name Hanuman was replaced prior to being used, due to objection by the India Meteorological Department for reason of religion.[4] Additionally, the name Kodo was replaced in 2002 without being used.[5]The following year, Koni was replaced by Goni, after an apparent misspelling was made. In 2004, the names Yanyan and Tingting were removed at the request of the Hong Kong Observatory.[5][6] A total of nine names on the list had their spellings changed.[5] In February 2014, the name Sonamu was removed at the request from Malaysia due to causing unprecedented panic by the similar pronunciation to tsunami. [7] In February 2015 the name Jongdari was chosen as replacement for Sonamu. In the 46th session of the Typhoon Committee, it was noted the name Vicente appears on both the tropical cyclone name lists for the Western North Pacific and Eastern North Pacific. In response to this duplication the name Lan was chosen as replacement for Vicente on the Western North Pacific name list to avoid potential confusion.

Background[edit]

List of retired typhoons[edit]

Listed by damage[edit]

Damage from Typhoon Pongsona in Guam

This lists all retired Pacific typhoons by their total damages (in 2015 USD). Typhoon names are generally retired for one of two reasons, either because they were particularly damaging or particularly deadly. Some data may be incomplete and account for damages in only one location while the storm affected several areas. Calculation of modern-day damage amounts is done using the Consumer Price Index.[8]

Name Season Damage
Unadjusted USD 2015 USD
Vamei 2001 $3.6 million $4.79 million[9]
Chataan 2002 $660 million $865 million[10]
Rusa 2002 $4.2 billion $5.51 billion[11]
Pongsona 2002 $730 million $957 million[12][13]
Imbudo 2003 $383 million $491 million[14][15]
Maemi 2003 $4.8 billion $6.15 billion[11]
Sudal 2004 $14 million $17.5 million[16]
Rananim 2004 $2.44 billion $3.05 billion[17]
Matsa 2005 $2.23 billion $2.69 billion[18]
Nabi 2005 $972 million $1.17 billion[18]
Longwang 2005 $970.5 million $1.17 billion[19]
Chanchu 2006 $879 million $1.03 billion[20]
Bilis 2006 $4.4 billion $5.15 billion[21]
Saomai 2006 $2.5 billion $2.92 billion[22]
Xangsane 2006 $750 million $877 million[23][24]
Durian 2006 $530 million $620 million[25][26]
Ketsana 2009 $1.09 billion $1.2 billion[27]
Parma 2009 $617 million $678 million

Listed by deaths[edit]

Typhoon Haiyan caused over 2,600 deaths in Tacloban, Philippines

This lists retired Pacific typhoons by the number of deaths they caused. Typhoons names are generally retired for one of two reasons, either because they were particularly damaging or particularly deadly. Most storms cause fatalities not by their high winds but rather through flooding—either storm surge or inland flooding due to rainfall. Storm surge has the highest potential for deaths. With modern forecasting, warning, and evacuations, storm surge deaths can be nearly eliminated; however, the potential is still very high for catastrophe in places where warning systems are not in place or if warnings are ignored. Inland flooding, by contrast, is unpredictable because it depends heavily on the system's interaction with the terrain and with other nearby weather systems.

Name Season Deaths
Sudal 2004 None[16]
Pongsona 2002 1 indirect[12]
Matsa 2005 29 total[18][28]
Nabi 2005 32 total[18]
Longwang 2005 148 total[29][30]
Rananim 2004 188 total[31]
Chanchu 2006 268 total[32]
Xangsane 2006 312 total[24][33][34]
Bopha 2012 1,146 total
Washi 2011 1,268 total [1]

Pre—2000s[edit]

Name Dates Classification Wind speeds Pressure Primary areas affected Deaths Damages References
Lucille May 25 – June 4, 1960 Tropical storm 85 km/h (50 mph) 985 hPa (29.09 inHg) Philippines 300–500 $2 million [35][36][37][38][39]
Ophelia November 21 – December 6, 1960 Category 4 super typhoon 250 km/h (155 mph) 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) Caroline Islands 2 Unknown [40][41]
Karen November 7 – 17, 1962 Category 5 super typhoon 295 km/h (185 mph) 894 hPa (26.40 inHg) Guam 11 $250 million [42]
Bess October 8 – 14, 1974 Category 1 typhoon 120 km/h (75 mph) 977 hPa (28.85 inHg) Philippines, China, Vietnam 32 $9.2 million [40][43][44]
Bess July 21 – August 3, 1982 Category 5 super typhoon 260 km/h (160 mph) 900 hPa (26.58 inHg) Japan 95 $2.32 billion [45]
Ike August 26 – September 6, 1984 Category 4 typhoon 230 km/h (145 mph) 950 hPa (28.05 inHg) Guam, Philippines, China 1,142 $1 billion
Roy January 7 – 19, 1988 Category 4 typhoon 215 km/h (135 mph) 940 hPa (27.76 inHg) Micronesia, Philippines 2 $28.5 million
Mike November 5 – 18, 1990 Category 5 super typhoon 280 km/h (175 mph) 915 hPa (27.02 inHg) Micronesia, Philippines, China 748 $220 million
Mireille September 13 – 27, 1991 Category 4 super typhoon 240 km/h (150 mph) 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) Mariana Islands, Japan, South Korea 66 $10 billion
Thelma November 1 – 8, 1991 Tropical storm 85 km/h (50 mph) 992 hPa (29.29 inHg) Philippines, Vietnam 5,081–8,145 $26.7 million [46][47][48][49]
Omar August 20 – September 6, 1992 Category 4 super typhoon 240 km/h (150 mph) 920 hPa (27.17 inHg) Mariana Islands, Guam, Taiwan, China 2 $457 million
11 Names Reference for retired names.[nb 1] 7481 $14.3 billion

2000s[edit]

Name Dates Classification Wind speeds Pressure Primary areas affected Deaths Damages References
Vamei December 26, 2001 –
January 1, 2002
Tropical storm 85 km/h (50 mph) 1006 hPa (29.71 inHg) Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia 5 $3.6 million [nb 2][9]
Chataan June 27 – July 13, 2002 Typhoon 175 km/h (110 mph) 930 hPa (27.46 inHg) Chuuk, Guam, Japan 54 $660 million [50][51]
Rusa August 22 – September 4, 2002 Typhoon 150 km/h (90 mph) 950 hPa (28.05 inHg) Japan, Taiwan, Korean Peninsula 238 $4.2 billion [11]
Pongsona December 2 – 12, 2002 Typhoon 165 km/h (105 mph) 940 hPa (27.76 inHg) Mariana Islands 1 $730 million
Yanyan January 11 – 21, 2003 Tropical storm 65 km/h (40 mph) 1000 hPa (29.53 inHg) Mariana Islands None None
Imbudo July 15 – 25, 2003 Typhoon 165 km/h (105 mph) 935 hPa (27.61 inHg) Philippines, China 64 $340 million [52]
Maemi September 4 – 16, 2003 Typhoon 195 km/h (120 mph) 910 hPa (26.87 inHg) Korean Peninsula 117 $4.1 billion [11]
Sudal April 2 – 18, 2004 Typhoon 165 km/h (105 mph) 940 hPa (27.76 inHg) Yap, Guam None $14 million
Tingting June 24 – July 4, 2004 Typhoon 150 km/h (90 mph) 955 hPa (28.20 inHg) Mariana Islands, Japan 12 $23.7 million
Rananim August 6 – 15, 2004 Typhoon 150 km/h (90 mph) 950 hPa (28.05 inHg) China, Japan 169 $2.44 billion
Matsa July 30 – August 9, 2005 Typhoon 150 km/h (90 mph) 950 hPa (28.05 inHg) China, Taiwan 29 $2.23 billion
Nabi August 29 – September 9, 2005 Typhoon 175 km/h (110 mph) 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) Mariana Islands, Japan, South Korea 32 $535 million
Longwang September 25 – October 3, 2005 Typhoon 175 km/h (110 mph) 930 hPa (27.46 inHg) Taiwan, China 149 $971 million [53][54][55][56]
Chanchu May 8 – 19, 2006 Typhoon 175 km/h (110 mph) 930 hPa (27.46 inHg) Philippines, Taiwan, China, Vietnam 268 $478 million
Bilis July 8 – 16, 2006 Severe tropical storm 110 km/h (70 mph) 970 hPa (28.64 inHg) Philippines, Taiwan, China 859 $4.4 billion [57][58]
Saomai August 4 – 11, 2006 Typhoon 195 km/h (120 mph) 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) Mariana Islands, Taiwan, China 458 $2.5 billion [21]
Xangsane September 25 – October 2, 2006 Typhoon 155 km/h (100 mph) 925 hPa (27.76 inHg) Philippines, Vietnam, Thailand 312 $750 million
Durian November 25 – December 7, 2006 Typhoon 195 km/h (120 mph) 915 hPa (27.02 inHg) Philippines, Vietnam, Thailand >1,500 >$400 million [59][60]
Morakot August 2 – 12, 2009 Typhoon 140 km/h (85 mph) 945 hPa (27.90 inHg) Taiwan, China, Korean Peninsula 789 $6.2 billion
Ketsana September 23 – 30, 2009 Typhoon 130 km/h (80 mph) 960 hPa (28.35 inHg) Philippines, Vietnam, Laos
Cambodia, Thailand
710 $1.09 billion
Parma September 27 – October 14, 2009 Typhoon 185 km/h (115 mph) 930 hPa (27.46 inHg) Philippines, China, Vietnam 500 $617 million
Names References:[nb 1][nb 3][nb 4][nb 5][nb 6]

2010s[edit]

Name Dates Classification Wind speeds Pressure Primary areas affected Deaths Damages References
Fanapi September 14 – 21, 2010 Typhoon 175 km/h (110 mph) 930 hPa (27.46 inHg) Taiwan, China 105 $987 million [64]
Washi December 13 – 19, 2011 Severe tropical storm 95 km/h (60 mph) 992 hPa (29.29 inHg) Micronesia, Palau, Philippines 1,268 $48.4 million [65][66]
Bopha November 25 – December 9, 2012 Typhoon 185 km/h (115 mph) 930 hPa (27.46 inHg) Micronesia, Philippines 1,146 $1.04 billion
Sonamu January 1 – 10, 2013 Severe tropical storm 95 km/h (60 mph) 990 hPa (29.23 inHg) Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia 2 Minimal [67][68]
Utor August 8 – 18, 2013 Typhoon 195 km/h (120 mph) 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) Philippines, China 97 $2.6 billion [69][70][71]
Fitow September 29 – October 7, 2013 Typhoon 140 km/h (85 mph) 960 hPa (28.35 inHg) China, Taiwan, Japan 12 $10.4 billion [69]
Haiyan November 3 – 11, 2013 Typhoon 230 km/h (145 mph) 895 hPa (26.43 inHg) Palau, Philippines, Vietnam, China 6,340 $2.86 billion [72][69][73]
Rammasun July 9 – 20, 2014 Typhoon 165 km/h (105 mph) 935 hPa (27.61 inHg) Philippines, China, Vietnam 195 $7.13 billion [74][75][76]
8 Names References:[nb 1][nb 3][nb 4][nb 5][nb 6]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Reference for the retired names between 1947 and 2010.[40]
  2. ^ The name Vamei was retired because it was the first tropical cyclone recorded near the equator.[40]
  3. ^ a b Reference for dates, season, wind speeds and pressure between 2000 and 2014 [61]
  4. ^ a b Reference for the retired names between 2000 and 2015.[5]
  5. ^ a b Reference for the retired names between 2000 and 2013.[62]
  6. ^ a b Reference for the retired names between 1947 and 2013.[63]

References[edit]

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  76. ^ Typhoon Rammasun kills 27 in Vietnam

External links[edit]